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Old 08-16-2019, 06:18 AM
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Fictional crazy currencies?


Prompted by the current "Explain English Money to Me" thread in GQ. With weird / complicated / illogical foreign monetary systems, in contrast with one's own country's eminently sensible and understandable ditto, having long been a subject for comment and humour; I have been trying to think of instances in published fiction, of this device / trope / call it what you will -- and to my surprise, not come up with much.

I'd thought of Dennis Wheatley's war-cum-spying-cum-swashbuckling novels featuring Roger Brook, his Napoleonic-era James Bond equivalent; particularly the first in the series, in which a very young Roger is living by his wits, alone in France shortly before the Revolution. I seemed to recall in this book, the French currency set-up at that time being portrayed as hyper-complex and crazy, giving our hero some trouble: looking back at the book showed that my memory was at fault -- in fact there is in the narrative early in the book, a quick guide to French money circa 1783. This shows it as no more strange than its British counterpart at the time; even if strange in a different sort of way. Essentially, 24 livres aka francs, make one louis; the livre / franc is divided into a certain number of sous, and there are a couple of other coins worth a different number of livres / francs, than 24. (Googling the "real thing" in France at the time, shows that Wheatley was actually simplifying -- in real life the system, if the word is applicable, in France then: looks like a demented foreign currency dreamed up by a not-very-subtle satirist.)

On the Harry Potter scene, J.K. Rowling makes the wizards' currency markedly different from non-wizarding ones, and numerically eccentric: 29 copper knuts make one silver sickle; 17 sickles make one golden galleon. All in metal coins, of course -- wizards have a penchant for the old-fashioned, and don't "do" simple-and-systematic-and-convenient: that sort of crap is for Muggles.

I'd be interested to know whether any fellow-posters can furnish further examples in fiction -- would tend, one reckons, to be on the light / humorous side -- of strange and mind-bending foreign currencies, thought up for comic effect.
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Old 08-16-2019, 06:24 AM
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Triganic Pu
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The Triganic Pu is a unit of galactic currency, with an exchange rate of eight Ningis to one Pu. This is simple enough, but, since a Ningi is a triangular rubber coin six thousand eight hundred miles along each side, no one has ever collected enough to own one Pu.
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Old 08-16-2019, 06:27 AM
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The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy describes the ningi, a unit of currency where 8 ningis make one pu. A ningi is trangular coin, made of rubber, and each side is six thousand and eight hundred miles long.

Edit: ffs running coach!

Last edited by Baron Greenback; 08-16-2019 at 06:28 AM.
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Old 08-16-2019, 07:20 AM
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From a previous life...
The Book of Mormon goes through a long explaination of their monetary system. As I remember it, the system had money worth 1, 2, 4, 8 and so forth.
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Old 08-16-2019, 07:49 AM
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The currency used in East Orange, New Jersey.
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Old 08-16-2019, 08:01 AM
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As an aside, the Harry Potter wizard money system isn't as crazy as it first looks. Since they deal entirely in metal coins anyway, it's reasonable to suppose that they used to be on a pure specie system, where coins were just standardized ingots of the precious metals, and the values of the different metals fluctuated against each other. At some point in the probably recent past, the Ministry of Magic decided that constantly-changing exchange rates were too much of a headache, and officially froze the exchange rates at the values they happened to have right at that moment. And at that moment, it happened that silver was worth 29 times as much as copper, and gold was worth 17 times as much as silver.
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Old 08-16-2019, 08:36 AM
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As an aside, the Harry Potter wizard money system isn't as crazy as it first looks. Since they deal entirely in metal coins anyway, it's reasonable to suppose that they used to be on a pure specie system, where coins were just standardized ingots of the precious metals, and the values of the different metals fluctuated against each other. At some point in the probably recent past, the Ministry of Magic decided that constantly-changing exchange rates were too much of a headache, and officially froze the exchange rates at the values they happened to have right at that moment. And at that moment, it happened that silver was worth 29 times as much as copper, and gold was worth 17 times as much as silver.
That's still stupid. Just change the size of the coins to make them reasonable multiples.

The coins in John Wick don't make sense either. One cocktail = 1 coin, dispose of a body = 1 coin, flight to Europe = 1 coin.

Neither case really matters since the point of both Harry Potter and John Wick isn't orthogonal to having a logical universe, but still.
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Old 08-16-2019, 09:17 AM
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Warning: I only saw Cowboy Bebop on US TV, I haven't read the manga or anime et al. Within that caveat, woolongs really annoyed me. Bigest problem: three decimal places -- 10.000. So what is that tenth of a woolong worth? Not much, a pizza costs 7000 woolongs [ref: https://cowboybebop.fandom.com/wiki/Woolong] Then they just arbitrarily switch the decimal/units separator -- comma and period. Just so our heros go for the 50,000 woolong bounty (fifty thousand) only to discover, woops, we meant 50.000 woolog bounty (fifty woolong, zero tenths, zero pennies, zero 1/10's of a penny.) Really government, you thought you had to make it that clear?
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Old 08-16-2019, 09:27 AM
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If you change the size of coins, then what do you do about all the old coins still in circulation?

And doesn't John Wick use ordinary real-world money like dollars and euros?

EDIT: Arkcon, are you sure you're interpreting that correctly? If a pizza is seven thousand woolongs, then the bounty they thought they were getting was just over seven pizzas' worth. It seems more likely that the cost of the pizza was seven woolongs, and the decimal point there was just understood.

Last edited by Chronos; 08-16-2019 at 09:31 AM.
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Old 08-16-2019, 09:29 AM
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Old 08-16-2019, 09:50 AM
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And doesn't John Wick use ordinary real-world money like dollars and euros?
Real-world money certainly exists in John Wick's world, it's what "normal" people use, and the bounties all seem to be in normal real-world currencies, but face-to-face monetary interactions in his weird assassin's demimonde seem to exclusively involve the gold coins which Snarky_Kong references. And, as Snarky_Kong indicates, the rate seems to be one coin for...pretty much anything. Maybe there are subtle denomination markers we don't see, but it sure seems like one cocktail is 1 Coin, disposing of a body is 1 Coin, emergency medical services is 1 Coin, etc.
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Old 08-16-2019, 11:10 AM
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...the rate seems to be one coin for...pretty much anything. Maybe there are subtle denomination markers we don't see, but it sure seems like one cocktail is 1 Coin, disposing of a body is 1 Coin, emergency medical services is 1 Coin, etc.
I wish I understood anything at all about economics, because it seems like such a system could actually work. You have 5 coins, you can get five services. Out of coins, no services. You do one service to earn one coin. You end up with finite resources to acquire finite services so there is a kind of balance--nobody can just hoard coins unless they are actually providing services. I wonder if this sort of system could be incorporated into a RPG to see how it plays out over time.
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Old 08-16-2019, 11:44 AM
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But not all services are equally easy to provide. If I can get one Coin for serving someone a drink, or one Coin for flying them across the Atlantic, then why would I ever choose to be a pilot when I can earn so much more for so little effort as a bartender?
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Old 08-16-2019, 11:49 AM
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That reminds me of the post-apocalyptic society in season 2 of Future Man. Everything there did cost one coin. A ratkebob? One coin. A house? One coin.
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Old 08-16-2019, 12:05 PM
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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine had "gold pressed latinum", used by the Ferengi and other non-Federation worlds. It came in slips, strips, and bars, implying some sort of three tiered system like old British money, although I don't think they ever established the values of each tier in relation to the others. But really the "crazy" part was that in one episode it was reviled that the Ferengi consider gold basically worthless, and the valuable part was the liquid latinum contained therein.
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Old 08-16-2019, 12:18 PM
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But not all services are equally easy to provide. If I can get one Coin for serving someone a drink, or one Coin for flying them across the Atlantic, then why would I ever choose to be a pilot when I can earn so much more for so little effort as a bartender?
Well, it's not just any bartender. It's a bartender specifically working for the secret assassin world. I figure it's more of a job you get recruited for than apply (please no spoilers for John Wick 3).
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Old 08-16-2019, 12:27 PM
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From a previous life...
The Book of Mormon goes through a long explaination of their monetary system. As I remember it, the system had money worth 1, 2, 4, 8 and so forth.
Book of Mormon:
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Originally Posted by Alma chapter 11
4 Now these are the names of the different pieces of their gold, and of their silver, according to their value. And the names are given by the Nephites, for they did not reckon after the manner of the Jews who were at Jerusalem; neither did they measure after the manner of the Jews; but they altered their reckoning and their measure, according to the minds and the circumstances of the people, in every generation, until the reign of the judges, they having been established by king Mosiah.
5 Now the reckoning is thus—a senine of gold, a seon of gold, a shum of gold, and a limnah of gold.
6 A senum of silver, an amnor of silver, an ezrom of silver, and an onti of silver.
7 A senum of silver was equal to a senine of gold, and either for a measure of barley, and also for a measure of every kind of grain.
8 Now the amount of a seon of gold was twice the value of a senine.
9 And a shum of gold was twice the value of a seon.
10 And a limnah of gold was the value of them all.
11 And an amnor of silver was as great as two senums.
12 And an ezrom of silver was as great as four senums.
13 And an onti was as great as them all.
14 Now this is the value of the lesser numbers of their reckoning—
15 A shiblon is half of a senum; therefore, a shiblon for half a measure of barley.
16 And a shiblum is a half of a shiblon.
17 And a leah is the half of a shiblum.
18 Now this is their number, according to their reckoning.
19 Now an antion of gold is equal to three shiblons.
All this was allegedly engraved on plates of gold by an ancient warrior/historian who carried those plates across the American continents because 19th century Americans really needed to know the details of Nephite currency.
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Old 08-16-2019, 12:35 PM
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Well, it's not just any bartender. It's a bartender specifically working for the secret assassin world. I figure it's more of a job you get recruited for than apply (please no spoilers for John Wick 3).
Like the joke about what a hooker is paid to do, I imagine a John Wick-world bartender isn't being paid a coin to serve a drink, he/she is being paid a coin to keep silent about what they see & hear in the bar.
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Old 08-16-2019, 12:36 PM
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But not all services are equally easy to provide. If I can get one Coin for serving someone a drink, or one Coin for flying them across the Atlantic, then why would I ever choose to be a pilot when I can earn so much more for so little effort as a bartender?
"Do what you love and you'll never work a day in your life." You do what you love, and if anyone wants what you do you get a coin good for...anything, provided by someone who loves doing what you're paying them for. Seems like a good system actually. Dunno how it buys groceries or deals with the day to day minutiae of life.
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Old 08-16-2019, 12:38 PM
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In Robert Heinlein's Citizen of the Galaxy, one of the cultures had a currency whose smallest denomination was the "minim".

In the middle ages, usury was forbidden. Christian and Muslim merchants were not allowed to ask for interest on a loan. So you would see contracts which said something like, "On the first of January, I will give you xxxx Scottish pounds. At the end of February, you will give me yyyy Dutch guilders." The religious authorities could not really punish you for that. But if you look up the prices of the metals, and the exchange rates of the currencies, you find that the merchants were paying exactly the same interest rates that they would have paid to an infidel moneylender.
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Old 08-16-2019, 12:40 PM
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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine had "gold pressed latinum", used by the Ferengi and other non-Federation worlds. It came in slips, strips, and bars, implying some sort of three tiered system like old British money, although I don't think they ever established the values of each tier in relation to the others.
They did, in fact...the episode Body Parts establishes it as 100 slips to a strip and 20 strips to a bar. There are larger denominations, such as the brick, that aren't established, but those are the three standard ones.

Quote:
But really the "crazy" part was that in one episode it was reviled that the Ferengi consider gold basically worthless, and the valuable part was the liquid latinum contained therein.
Why this is makes perfect sense within the context of the Star Trek universe - gold can be replicated, latinum, for some handwavy reason, can't.

This does create a bit of a continuity clash with the Ferengi's first appearance, where they try to use the fact that the Federation uses gold for utilitarian purposes, rather than as objects of value, as proof that they're insane...but we generally try to avoid thinking about that episode, anyway.
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Old 08-16-2019, 12:45 PM
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The old French currency was, in principle, no different from the duodecimal Carolingian currency used in England: one livre (pound) = 20 sous (shillings); one shilling = 12 deniers. Nothing too crazy about gold louis d'or worth 10 pounds or silver coins worth various (5, 10, 15, 30, ...) round numbers of shillings.

The crazy Douglas Adams currency is an obvious parody of the very real stone money. In real life, one does not need to physically "collect" the stones, which are too large to move, since everybody agrees on who owns what stone at any given time.
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Old 08-16-2019, 12:46 PM
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Like the joke about what a hooker is paid to do, I imagine a John Wick-world bartender isn't being paid a coin to serve a drink, he/she is being paid a coin to keep silent about what they see & hear in the bar.
No business on Continental grounds.
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Old 08-16-2019, 01:17 PM
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The crazy Douglas Adams currency is an obvious parody of the very real stone money. In real life, one does not need to physically "collect" the stones, which are too large to move, since everybody agrees on who owns what stone at any given time.
Bit like the gold ingots stored in a few very secure vaults in New York, London etc
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Old 08-16-2019, 01:19 PM
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Fredric Brown, in his short-short story "Letter from a Phoenix", recounts that the long-lived hero once lived a city where fish scales were the medium of exchange. He didn't elaborate.
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Old 08-16-2019, 01:33 PM
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There was some terrible book I read where in the future utopia all hard currency was abolished and "money" was basically a series of IOU notes, the "basic" note was "This note promises that I will give you 1 hour of labor as you see fit", the idea being if I bought a sandwich from a vendor I'd give him that note and sometime in the future he could call upon me to work for him for an hour to make up for it, that or you could give him something that was the equivalent of one hour of labor to make.

I have no idea how the system would work in anything more complex than a basic hunter/gatherer society. Maybe because it was a utopia everyone had a lot of free time on their hands so it meant you have to get rid of it somehow?
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Old 08-16-2019, 01:49 PM
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That island (Yap or Wa'ab) is famous for its crazy currency, which goes well beyond giant stone discs. There are also: strips of cloth wrapped in betel-nut sheaths; necklaces of shells imported from other islands, two to four feet long; large shells from New Guinea, Palau, and Ponape tied on a coconut rope (this currency is commonly used for marriage money as well as buying canoes, bananas, and fish traps); and balls made of ground turmeric mixed with water. And US $.

The value is determined by how much trouble it was to make or obtain the money. For example, the first batch of ninety shell necklaces brought in by a man named Angumang are the most valuable, and the stone money imported on a large scale by an Irish-American entrepreneur are worth less than the ancient ones.

Figuring out exchange rates and conversion factors in your head is left as an exercise.
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Old 08-16-2019, 01:58 PM
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There was some terrible book I read where in the future utopia all hard currency was abolished and "money" was basically a series of IOU notes, the "basic" note was "This note promises that I will give you 1 hour of labor as you see fit", the idea being if I bought a sandwich from a vendor I'd give him that note and sometime in the future he could call upon me to work for him for an hour to make up for it, that or you could give him something that was the equivalent of one hour of labor to make.

I have no idea how the system would work in anything more complex than a basic hunter/gatherer society. Maybe because it was a utopia everyone had a lot of free time on their hands so it meant you have to get rid of it somehow?
Sounds like the author didn't quite grasp the concept of a communist utopia: there is no "money", notes, barter, specie, or otherwise. You are entitled to a sandwich by the fact that you are hungry. It also doesn't make sense since not all labor takes equal skill or care, even comparing tasks that take equal amounts of time.
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Old 08-16-2019, 03:17 PM
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Alastair Reynolds' Revenger space opera has "quoins" which are physical objects used as money, created by aliens.
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Old 08-16-2019, 03:37 PM
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Maybe the Ferengi didn't have replicators at the time they first met the Federation?

Asuka, if you're allowed to substitute other items worth an equivalent value, then when someone calls in an IOU on me, I could just give them an IOU from another person. Which means that it's just back to being plain old money, with the only difference being that all forms of work are valued at the same hourly rate.
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Old 08-16-2019, 03:40 PM
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Alastair Reynolds' Revenger space opera has "quoins" which are physical objects used as money, created by aliens.
In what way are they different from the physical objects used as money on contemporary Earth?
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Old 08-16-2019, 03:50 PM
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...that all forms of work are valued at the same hourly rate.
That reminds me of the short film, The Price of Life. The fictional crazy currency was, literally, time: children are injected with nanobots that kill them after an allotted time span of however many years. If you want to pay for something, you literally give over hours, days, weeks of your life. The foolish manage to piss their time away in a few decades, while clever capitalists are effectively immortal, living centuries or millennia since "you can't take it with you" does not apply.
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Old 08-16-2019, 03:57 PM
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Straying a bit from the topic of currencies here, but having the ability to replicate nearly any object destroys the value of pretty much everything, doesn't it? Or at least if objects have value at all it would be based on how much energy they take to replicate, not how rare or difficult to obtain they are in nature. A filet mignon is probably no more difficult to replicate than a hamburger -- it's all the same proteins and fats after all, so they're now worth the same amount. So if the Enterprise crew can dine on filet mignon and lobster every day if they wish, it ceases to be in any way special. Does the concept of a fancy meal, or luxury goods of any type, even exist in the Federation?

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Old 08-16-2019, 04:03 PM
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The ingredients are effectively free (I assume basic food and similar low atomic number materials do not require much energy in this fictional universe), but the creative skill of the chef isn't. Or you can take your chances with the AI chef.
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Old 08-16-2019, 04:12 PM
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Alastair Reynolds' Revenger space opera has "quoins" which are physical objects used as money, created by aliens.
And they get more interesting in the second book.
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Old 08-16-2019, 04:26 PM
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There was some terrible book I read where in the future utopia all hard currency was abolished and "money" was basically a series of IOU notes, the "basic" note was "This note promises that I will give you 1 hour of labor as you see fit", the idea being if I bought a sandwich from a vendor I'd give him that note and sometime in the future he could call upon me to work for him for an hour to make up for it, that or you could give him something that was the equivalent of one hour of labor to make.

I have no idea how the system would work in anything more complex than a basic hunter/gatherer society. Maybe because it was a utopia everyone had a lot of free time on their hands so it meant you have to get rid of it somehow?
Sounds like Eric Frank Russell's novel The Great Explosion, which is based on his novella "And Then There Were None."
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Old 08-16-2019, 04:27 PM
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In the comic book Bone, eggs were used as currency in the valley.

James Blish's Cities in Flight series has an economic system based upon germanium.
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Old 08-16-2019, 04:32 PM
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no one mentions the system in advanced dungeons and dragons..... espically 1st edition? im on a tablet but you can look it up ......
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Old 08-16-2019, 04:53 PM
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In Terry Pratchett & Steven Baxter's Long Earth series there is an agricultural village far to the "West" where they've abandoned money and instead use a system of favors, as in, "You'll owe me a favor." It's a small community so presumably they can all remember who is owed how much, and also know what kind of effort is required for the "favors".


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Straying a bit from the topic of currencies here, but having the ability to replicate nearly any object destroys the value of pretty much everything, doesn't it? Or at least if objects have value at all it would be based on how much energy they take to replicate, not how rare or difficult to obtain they are in nature. A filet mignon is probably no more difficult to replicate than a hamburger -- it's all the same proteins and fats after all, so they're now worth the same amount. So if the Enterprise crew can dine on filet mignon and lobster every day if they wish, it ceases to be in any way special. Does the concept of a fancy meal, or luxury goods of any type, even exist in the Federation?
Continuing the hijack, such technology should also make it possible to make food look and taste however you want it, but have different nutritional values. You could, if you want to, have a completely healthy diet while only eating chocolate.
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Old 08-16-2019, 05:28 PM
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In Terry Pratchett & Steven Baxter's Long Earth series there is an agricultural village far to the "West" where they've abandoned money and instead use a system of favors, as in, "You'll owe me a favor." It's a small community so presumably they can all remember who is owed how much, and also know what kind of effort is required for the "favors".
From what I understand, that's exactly what the gold coins in John Wick are supposed to represent - favors. That's why they can be used to pay for anything.

I mean, favors are what the criminal economy is supposedly based on, at last in the movies. When Bonasera went to Don Corleone and asked him to deal with the boys who put his daughter in the hospital, the Don didn't say, "OK, you owe me one (1) fixed-up body of one dead son, to be determined later"; instead, he told him, basically, that he owned him a favor. If the Godfather had existed in the John Wick universe, the undertaker would have given the Don a gold coin.
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Old 08-16-2019, 05:59 PM
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Sounds like Eric Frank Russell's novel The Great Explosion, which is based on his novella "And Then There Were None."
And Then There Were None is the story I was trying to remember. If I recall correctly, the supposedly money-less economy was based on an informal trading of "obs" ("obligations"). I do something for you, you owe me an ob. Then when you do something for me, the ob is paid off. When I first read this as a kid, it seemed like an interesting idea, until I started thinking about the logistics of keeping track of obs, and then realized that "ob" is just another word for "money".

Last edited by markn+; 08-16-2019 at 06:02 PM.
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Old 08-16-2019, 07:58 PM
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Sure, even in replicator-world, an expertly-prepared steak tastes better than a Whopper. But that expert chef can make one perfect steak, and then replicate it for everyone. So it still works out to the same almost-zero marginal cost.

Some Star Trek characters still cook anyway, but that's because they enjoy cooking, and there's a bit of snob appeal to non-replicated food.
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Old 08-16-2019, 08:21 PM
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I understand the Quran also describes a fixed exchange ratio for gold & silver. It does not match modern values, so would be ripe for some exploitation, if you found someone foolish enough to do the deal.
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Old 08-17-2019, 01:46 AM
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Some superb stuff here -- thanks, all.

There's a 2013 thread on the Dope, "Most complicated currency system ever?" (took me some time to remember and locate it).

boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=701724&highlight=Lhasa

That thread is essentially about real-world currencies; but it contains one splendidly nonsensical dialogue from what I take to be a work of fiction called "5,000 Fingers of Dr. T."-- runs approximately as follows:


A: How much are you being paid?

B: Two thousand pastoolas.

A: Two thousand what?

B: Two thousand pastoolas. [B's employer the villain] pays me in pastoolas.

A: What are pastoolas?

B: If you must know, the currency here is a little strange. First of all, in the small money come the drakmids. At the regular, normal rate of exchange, there are 59 drakmids to one silver zlobeck.

A: "Zlobeck"?

B: Three silver zlobecks make one golden krachmuk. A pastoola normally is, uh, 44,000 krachmuks. But these, they tell me, are not normal times...
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Old 08-17-2019, 06:29 AM
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That's still stupid. Just change the size of the coins to make them reasonable multiples.
So you would be happy to measure and weigh each coin you get in change, to make sure that the correct value is made?

The inconvenience of that is the reason why standard sized coins were invented.
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Old 08-17-2019, 11:23 AM
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In Wes Anderson's Grand Budapest Hotel, set in the fictional country of Zubrowka, the currency is the Klübeck. Not particularly crazy though.
  #47  
Old 08-17-2019, 02:55 PM
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I've mentioned the book here before, and Charles Stross a bunch of times, but the plot of Neptune's Brood revolves around the economics of a galactic economy with three different tiers of cryptocurrency: fast, medium, and slow. As well as insurance fraud---a principal player is the Crimson Permanent Assurance. The book is very funny in parts, but the economics aren't. (Or maybe they are: I get the feeling reading Stross that I'm missing most of the jokes.)

It's a strange enough, but interesting, setup that I thought still follows with the OP.
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Old 08-19-2019, 03:46 AM
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The short story Self Limiting begins with the line "There are no millionaires on Xanax", explaining how the currency of the planet Xanax is silvery-grey metal coins which are kept in "money pits" of a standardized size. A million coins won't fit in a normal money pit, so there are no millionaires. One greedy individual dug an oversized pit and started stealing from the pits of other Xanaxians, since he wanted to be the first millionaire. It didn't turn out well...

Quote:
He entered his dwelling, and leaning over the money pit, he gloated as he dropped the bag of coins into the hole that was waiting for it. Queed could hardly wait until it was night-time and he could take out all the coins and count them. He was now certainly a millionaire!

As the heavy bag of silvery-grey coins made of pure plutonium 239 dropped into the waiting hole, the money pit went critical and exploded . . .

There are no millionaires on Xanax.
That's one way to prevent the over-accumulation of wealth.
  #49  
Old 08-19-2019, 04:10 AM
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In Terry Pratchett & Steven Baxter's Long Earth series there is an agricultural village far to the "West" where they've abandoned money and instead use a system of favors, as in, "You'll owe me a favor." It's a small community so presumably they can all remember who is owed how much, and also know what kind of effort is required for the "favors".
"It is better to owe money than favors, because with money you know when you're done paying". "Money is paid with money; favors, you end up paying with favors and money." Paraphrasing a couple of sayings from my mother's side of the family; the paternal side of the family is perfectly happy to work on a favors basis so long as the other party can be trusted to not fiddle the accounting. The US economy is more heavily currency-based than the Spanish economy; favors are a perfectly common currency in many places, although one normally doesn't track them in little black books (or in little books of any other colors). Pratchett and Baxter were simply moving that money vs. favors scale to the favors extreme.

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That reminds me of the short film, The Price of Life. The fictional crazy currency was, literally, time: children are injected with nanobots that kill them after an allotted time span of however many years. If you want to pay for something, you literally give over hours, days, weeks of your life. The foolish manage to piss their time away in a few decades, while clever capitalists are effectively immortal, living centuries or millennia since "you can't take it with you" does not apply.
There's a long movie as well, but I can't recall its name. I'll try to find it.
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Last edited by Nava; 08-19-2019 at 04:12 AM.
  #50  
Old 08-19-2019, 04:57 AM
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There's a long movie as well, but I can't recall its name. I'll try to find it.
In Time, maybe? I haven't actually seen it.
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