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Old 10-13-2019, 05:50 PM
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The Museum of Bad Design - your favorite exhibits.


Here at the Museum of Bad Design we celebrate all manner of bad design - industrial design, website design, process design, coding kludges, more...

This museum defines "bad design" as "form which inhibits function" (allowing that different valid interpretations may exist). You can see an easily understandable example of Bad Design in the entrance way, a display dedicated to car touchscreens which show the message "do not use while driving" only after you shift to "Drive" and start the car in a forward direction.

Come here, to one of my favorite exhibits, the fluorescent light bulb and ballast. Here is how I imagine this one got created...

"Boss, I have an idea!"

"What is it, son, tell me!"

"I have a great idea for a light bulb. It will take the world by storm!"

"Go on..."

"It will use fluorescent gas. But the genius of my design? It will be a thin glass tube where, to replace it, you have to grab it with both hands and apply enough rotational torque to (un)install it, which is EXACTLY what you don't want to do with thin glass tubes! And we can make these things long enough so that, at times, it takes two people doing this in unison! And the fixtures? So damned ugly they will become symbolic of both Corporate and Communist oppression!"

"That's a bold statement. Tell me more. Convince me."

"So, the connector will be these two little metal pins on each end of the light, see? And what you do is you... push this through this cheap piece of easily-snapped molded plastic... and then rotate it like... this! Dammit! Something is catching it somewhere. Anyway... look closer."

"I don't see anything."

"Exactly! Do you turn this glass tube one way... or the other? Instructions are for sissies, boss. One way leads to a removed bulb, the other may lead to broken glass as too much torque is applied by frustrated homeowners."

"Wow. Forcing homeowners and secretaries to hold thin glass tubes in their hands, applying equal torque to spin the thing just to plug it in an ugly fixture?

"And you don't even want to take the forty more minutes required to figure out a better solution, one which won't result in busted bulbs, bizarre ceiling lighting attachments, crap-assed connectors, and a bulb-changing system with a non-zero probability of getting shards of glass everywhere whenever it needs changing?

"I mean...

"Shit, this is why I hired you, man! I knew you had talent!" :claps on back:

"Boss, thanks!"

"Hey, got another design issue for you... do you know what a 'remote control' for a 'VCR' is?"

"Er, no."

"Perfect! You're leading the team!"

All right, so tell us about your favorite Exhibits in the Museum of Bad Design.

Last edited by JohnT; 10-13-2019 at 05:54 PM.
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Old 10-13-2019, 06:38 PM
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At one time in my career I designed and maintained IVR (phone menu) systems, so the one which required me to enter my 11-digit account number and 6-digit PIN before it told me that the office was closed sticks in my craw.

Then there's the (maybe) apocryphal IRS menu: "If you are using a rotary phone, press 1."

Last edited by OttoDaFe; 10-13-2019 at 06:39 PM. Reason: Pudgy digits
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Old 10-13-2019, 06:42 PM
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Curators are still struggling with the decision as to whether IVR issues are software or process fuckeries. However, our IVR wing is quite extensive.
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Old 10-13-2019, 06:51 PM
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OMG, I’m glad it’s just not me with the fluorescent tubes. Literally last weekend my replacements for the garage fixture arrived and of course I instantly shattered the one trying to install it! Back to no light, but now shards of glass to pick out of the concrete.
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Old 10-13-2019, 06:56 PM
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"Error 43-01"
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Old 10-13-2019, 07:03 PM
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Any touch screen interface installed in a moving vehicle.
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Old 10-13-2019, 07:08 PM
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Might be worth doing a YouTube search for the stand-up routine on “The George Foreman Grill”.

Lots of things are badly designed. Forks with flexible tines. The wood burning set I got for Christmas one year (they still make those)? Much computer software, especially medical programs from the 1980s, still in use thirty years later in some places. Light bulbs are up there, though.
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Old 10-13-2019, 08:14 PM
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I had this lovely vintage mid-century modern light fixture. To change the bulb you had to unscrew the thing holding the bottom cover, install the new lights, and then screw the thing holding the bottom fixture back on. Only...the screws were on the inside. To get it back on you could tape the screw into one place and then twirl the fixture...okay that didn't work. Get a long pair of pliers to hold the screw...nope, there's not enough room and it has to bend, and pliers don't really bend that way. Maybe tongs? Nope, they don't bend either and they're not quite long enough anyway. Maybe some duct tape? Somewhere? Finally got it, don't remember how, and put out word: Do not use this lamp, it's too hard to replace the damn bulbs.

That was the first place I put those spiral compact fluorescent bulbs when they came out. We could use our light again! It lasted till we moved. Let the next homeowner deal with it. Yeah, the one who was so impressed that this great mid-century fixture was STILL THERE.

Like this (scroll down a bit)
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Old 10-13-2019, 08:43 PM
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I nominate the battery installation of the Dodge Journey.

I was at my friends' place, when they needed to boost it. We opened the hood. The battery terminals were there, yes, but there was no battery! The terminals were connected to thick cables that led somewhere down inside the car.

We connected the jumper cables and boosted the car. But where was the battery? I dug out the manual. After a bit of searching, all was revealed. To access the battery on a Dodge Journey, you must:
1. Park the car.
2. Turn the front wheels hard to one side*, as far as they will go.
3. Go into the wheel well. Behind the wheel, you will find an access panel in the wall of the wheel well.
4. Open this panel. The battery is within.

This isn't as bad as the (possibly mythical) car where you had to lift out the engine to change the spark plugs, but still...

*I don't remember which side to turn the wheels to.
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Old 10-13-2019, 08:48 PM
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We had a slide scanner at work used to make computer images of old projector slides. It used a pea-sized incandescent bulb to illuminate the slide for scanning.

Eventually the bulb burned out. It's then when we discovered it was soldered into place and could not be replaced. Instead of having to replace a 50-cent bulb, you had to replace the entire $100 device.
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Old 10-13-2019, 09:38 PM
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Eventually the bulb burned out. It's then when we discovered it was soldered into place and could not be replaced. Instead of having to replace a 50-cent bulb, you had to replace the entire $100 device.
Bad design for sure, but a soldering iron costs less than $100 (ok, not that much less for a good one, but indispensable if you have to tinker with electronics)
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Old 10-13-2019, 09:39 PM
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In user interface design :

- Too much skeuomorphism : From Microsoft Bob to 76 Synthesizer, taking a real-life object and trying to extend the imitation/metaphor a bit too far.

The reaction to skeuomorphism led to minimalist design, which yields:

- Flat design with poor affordance. Modern applications (Web, mobile or desktop) have rectangles for text input and rectangles as buttons, and text output that may be clickable or not, and some objects (text or graphics) that are supposed to be dragged around, and the user is supposed to figure out what's what by reading the text or guessing which colour means what.

- Low-contrast text. Some sites show everything in shy shades of grey, making it all look like a yogurt commercial. Is this little bit of text grayed out (disabled), or just not selected yet, or am I just seeing it from a weird angle that makes it seem paler than the rest? The only way to find out is to try pressing/clicking on it. And who cares about those without 20/20 eyesight on perfect screens? See Contrast Rebellion.

Last edited by Heracles; 10-13-2019 at 09:40 PM.
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Old 10-13-2019, 09:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Hilarity N. Suze View Post
I had this lovely vintage mid-century modern light fixture. To change the bulb you had to unscrew the thing holding the bottom cover, install the new lights, and then screw the thing holding the bottom fixture back on. Only...the screws were on the inside. To get it back on you could tape the screw into one place and then twirl the fixture...okay that didn't work. Get a long pair of pliers to hold the screw...nope, there's not enough room and it has to bend, and pliers don't really bend that way. Maybe tongs? Nope, they don't bend either and they're not quite long enough anyway. Maybe some duct tape? Somewhere? Finally got it, don't remember how, and put out word: Do not use this lamp, it's too hard to replace the damn bulbs.

That was the first place I put those spiral compact fluorescent bulbs when they came out. We could use our light again! It lasted till we moved. Let the next homeowner deal with it. Yeah, the one who was so impressed that this great mid-century fixture was STILL THERE.

Like this (scroll down a bit)
I compliment you on your good taste in leaving the fixture behind and also the devious evil you exhibit in that act has its charm as well. The lights shown in your link were imho ugly as hell one and all.

My poor design submission, the alcoves for my washer and dryer. Yes, this bit of architectural genius is that there is a cabinet above each appliance. The appliances are placed flanking the door to the garage from the kitchen, with that wall on one side and a short wall on the other side leaving an alcove just wide enough to fit the machine. Now the washer isn't too difficult to hook up to the water and drain and power, those are all up high enough to reach. The dryer, on the otherhand, requires a bit of stretching and limbering up as it has to be moved close enough for the vent duct to be connected yet leave enough room for a largish/medium sized adult to fit behind it to hook the duct up because drier vents are at the bottom of the machine, thus not accessible by merely reaching over the top. It takes some small ability of a contortionist to crawl over the machine and then hunker down and hook every thing up and crawl back out without bruising breaking impaling something.
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Old 10-13-2019, 10:14 PM
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Curators are still struggling with the decision as to whether IVR issues are software or process fuckeries. However, our IVR wing is quite extensive.
All of the above, but I think brain-dead/tone-deaf design is the main culprit. A few of the rules I learned, but seem to be lost on a depressing number of designers:
  • Put the most commonly used options first.
  • Get the caller where they wanted to go — or if you can't, say so — as soon as possible.
  • Use destination/option ("For sales, press 1" rather than "Press 1 for sales") since a surprising number of callers will forget the option by the time they've digested the destination.
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This isn't as bad as the (possibly mythical) car where you had to lift out the engine to change the spark plugs, but still...

The 1976 or thereabouts Chevy Monza, which was basically a "sportified" Vega and offered a V8 (which didn't really fit in the engine compartment) as an option. I happened across a technical bulletin on the subject, and while it was "only" one plug, changing it required not only jacking the engine off its mountings, but also using a special wrench with several swivel joints.
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Old 10-13-2019, 10:23 PM
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Windows 8. Do I even need to explain this one? It may not have been as bug-ridden or crash-prone as previous versions but it was still very disappointing as a new release because the interface was just so awful, awful, awful.
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Old 10-13-2019, 10:33 PM
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While not about design per se, this seems to me to be relevant to the topic:
If builders built buildings the way programmers write programs, the first woodpecker to come along would destroy civilization.
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Old 10-13-2019, 11:20 PM
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Seats in (most all) cars. Specifically the gap between them and center console. Especially now that phones are skinny and slick.
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Old 10-14-2019, 12:38 AM
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The Ferdinand/Elefant. Let's take an engine that wasn't good enough for the Tiger and use for an even heavier vehicle! What could go wrong?

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This isn't as bad as the (possibly mythical) car where you had to lift out the engine to change the spark plugs, but still...
There are a few tanks require the engine to be taken out to do some routine maintenance.
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Old 10-14-2019, 01:02 AM
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The most maddening thing at the moment is bluetooth "autoplay" on Apple devices. Whenever your phone connects to your car, or whenever a hands-free phone call ends, it automatically finds and starts playing whatever audio you were last listening to. And this feature cannot be disabled. People have been complaining about if for years, but Apple won't put a setting in to allow you to disable it. It think it will take somebody to sue them for the distraction causing an accident when music starts blasting uncommanded just as you're reversing out of a tight parking space.

Last edited by Riemann; 10-14-2019 at 01:04 AM.
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Old 10-14-2019, 01:48 AM
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A place to have fun,while wondering at the genius of the human race. Wi
With visual evidence:
Www.reddit.com/r/crappydesign
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Old 10-14-2019, 02:03 AM
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I used win 1/2.0 in a computer exhibit....talk about slow and fugly....

If ms hadn't switched to the pretty pictures with that mouse(i remember when mice were optional and a salesman told me not to bother cause it wasn't used for anything ) doohickey I think we'd be using ms-dos 10
  #22  
Old 10-14-2019, 02:44 AM
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My contribution is a process one.

I dunno how this is organised where all you guys are, but round here, once a year in spring when Daylight Saving comes on (and we all lose an hour of sleep), the State Government has decided that this is the absolute best time for the second term of school to commence. Because clearly, you'd hate for the shift to occur in the middle of the holidays, when there are legions of under-eighteens who won't care because they don't have to get up for anything - we need to make the two events coincide just to make it extra challenging.

Term dates and DST-change dates shift around from year to year - but the pairing together always happens.

Likewise at the other side of the year, it's crucial to make sure that the clocks change back - giving you your extra hour - on the first day of school holidays, when you don't get any good out of it.

There's some busy bee in the Education Department making sure this works right every year...
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Old 10-14-2019, 02:49 AM
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A place to have fun,while wondering at the genius of the human race. Wi
With visual evidence:
Www.reddit.com/r/crappydesign
Not the least amusing thing in that thread is the way ads for the new (?) GoT game are laced imperceptibly through the 'crappy design' posts. That may not have been the positive advertising they were looking for!
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Old 10-14-2019, 03:45 AM
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Busses on my local route used to have a small receptacle by the exit door which was just the perfect thing to put your used bus ticket into when leaving the bus. They even painted "Used Tickets" on it as a hint to passengers. Strangely though, it never got used. Perhaps if they had placed it where the opened door didn't completely block access to it ?
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Old 10-14-2019, 10:02 AM
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The fast food kiosks that are increasingly popular...

One in four times the thing is out of paper, so I don't get a receipt--no proof I ever paid, no way to know my number when it is called. That's flaky hardware and inattentiveness of the staff, but not necessarily bad design.

However...when it works correctly, I still have to go to the counter to ask for my cup even though I paid at the kiosk--a design flaw in their system. This is bad design.
What is the advantage to the customer if by design they still have to spend five minutes trying to get the attention of any random worker who passes close to the register?
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Old 10-14-2019, 10:21 AM
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I nominate... the ubiquitous optical disc, and all of its variants (CD, CD-ROM, DVD, Blu-ray, etc.).

The surface of the disc contains microscopic pits & lands to represent digital data. It is completely exposed and extremely vulnerable to damage via scratches and even fingerprints. Stupid, stupid, stupid! The disc should be contained in an integrated protective casing, similar to how a 3.5" floppy is designed.

Last edited by Crafter_Man; 10-14-2019 at 10:22 AM.
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Old 10-14-2019, 11:10 AM
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Sometime in 1987, a man was hired at McDonald's, so he could earn some $ while working for his business degree in Podunk U.

He was a good employee, dedicated, came in to work on time, really, the perfect candidate for advancement through the McDonald's system. So he did.

Tragically, however, this man was put in charge of employee training and development. And he, over the next 30 years, trained tens of thousands of people... many of whom went to have successful careers in other fast food restaurants than McD's... to put the slippery change ON TOP of the bills and receipt to drive-through customers.

This exhibit... of a woman looking over her car window at the 2 quarters and 3 pennies that just rolled off her hand... is a testament to his ingenuity. Not did he just come up with a bad way to do something that people had been doing successfully since 1974, he then put himself into position where his bad process could spread over the industry! Zero cost and millions lost!

Last edited by JohnT; 10-14-2019 at 11:14 AM.
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Old 10-14-2019, 11:22 AM
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[/LIST]The 1976 or thereabouts Chevy Monza, which was basically a "sportified" Vega and offered a V8 (which didn't really fit in the engine compartment) as an option. I happened across a technical bulletin on the subject, and while it was "only" one plug, changing it required not only jacking the engine off its mountings, but also using a special wrench with several swivel joints.
In my youth I had an MG Midget. The spark-plugs needed to be changed very often, and one of them was almost impossible to reach. Every time I'd change the plugs, three would be replaced in 5 minutes, then I'd spend an hour on the fourth.

One time I wasn't in the mood to scrape up my knuckles, so I took the car to a mechanic to have the spark plugs changed. Fine. But the next time I changed them myself, I discovered the mechanic had not bothered changing the hard to reach plug. I had 3 Autolite and one filthy Champion.
  #29  
Old 10-14-2019, 11:42 AM
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I nominate... the ubiquitous optical disc, and all of its variants (CD, CD-ROM, DVD, Blu-ray, etc.).

The surface of the disc contains microscopic pits & lands to represent digital data. It is completely exposed and extremely vulnerable to damage via scratches and even fingerprints. Stupid, stupid, stupid! The disc should be contained in an integrated protective casing, similar to how a 3.5" floppy is designed.
And yet it outlasted the 3.5" floppy.

And vinyl records seem to be hanging in there somehow. You scratch them with a needle every time you use them.
  #30  
Old 10-14-2019, 11:57 AM
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I nominate... the ubiquitous optical disc, and all of its variants (CD, CD-ROM, DVD, Blu-ray, etc.).

The surface of the disc contains microscopic pits & lands to represent digital data. It is completely exposed and extremely vulnerable to damage via scratches and even fingerprints. Stupid, stupid, stupid! The disc should be contained in an integrated protective casing, similar to how a 3.5" floppy is designed.
I assume the "stupid, stupid..." is your editorial comment; the CD data surface is not "completely exposed" to damage. A modern CD/DVD, etc. is relatively impervious to fingerprints and minor scratches, due to (1) the optical characteristics (the data surface is not the physical outside surface, which is out of focus to the reading head) and (2) the multiple error correction schemes (Reed-Solomon Cross-Interleaved Coding, and others). While a protective casing is a good idea, the original CD design took into consideration these factors, and was able to minimize them to a significant degree.

...in contrast to a vinyl LP, subject to serious degradation from fingerprints, dust and scratches.
  #31  
Old 10-14-2019, 12:13 PM
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Seats in (most all) cars. Specifically the gap between them and center console. Especially now that phones are skinny and slick.
There was a team on Shark Tank that proposed a narrow cushion thing specifically designed to go between the car seat and center console just to prevent things like cell phones, car keys and whatever from dropping down and getting lost. (A couple of years ago, my mother dropped her keyfob down there and couldn't find it. So she drove to my brother's house, where he crawled around until he located it in the crevasse under the seat.)
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Old 10-14-2019, 12:19 PM
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Whoever devised the utility company's phone prompt system deserves honorable mention.

Press 5 if you wish to throw up your proverbial hands in despair at your apparent inability to select a button which will enable you to speak to a real human being....
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Old 10-14-2019, 12:27 PM
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I'd like to give a shout-out to the designers and developers of our corporate travel portal. Last time I had to book a flight it went something like this:

1. Enter your dates and departure and destination airports. Search for available flights.

2. Look through the search results and select your round trip.

3. Portal tells you that the flight you selected is invalid because the cost is over the corporate allowance.

4. Only then do you have access to another tab that shows which flights are actually within the allowance, and which are not. (Why not show that screen right off the bat?)

5. Select another round trip from the very limited group of flights that are within budget. (Usually with a 5:30 or 6 am departure time.)

6. Portal will not allow you to book the round trip. You have to go to a different tab and book each one-way flight separately. Meaning you have to jot down the flight # from the round-trip tab, then scroll through a huge list of flights on the one-way tab until you find your flight. Book it. Repeat as needed.

And don't even get me started on filling out the expense report online when you get back.
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Old 10-14-2019, 01:17 PM
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Front axle fork on the Jeep XJ needs a mention. It slides a locking collar over the two halves of the axle to lock it for 4-wheel drive (don't get me started on that mis-nomer). It's activated by a vacuum motor. On an off-road vehicle. Little plastic vacuum lines, down on the front axle.

I bought the Jeep used, and tore them off the first time I took the thing off-road.

So now its locked, permenantly, like it should be. Vacuum lines all shit-canned.
  #35  
Old 10-14-2019, 01:28 PM
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The most maddening thing at the moment is bluetooth "autoplay" on Apple devices. Whenever your phone connects to your car, or whenever a hands-free phone call ends, it automatically finds and starts playing whatever audio you were last listening to. And this feature cannot be disabled. People have been complaining about if for years, but Apple won't put a setting in to allow you to disable it. It think it will take somebody to sue them for the distraction causing an accident when music starts blasting uncommanded just as you're reversing out of a tight parking space.
This is a bad design, but I believe that this is a feature of the car, not of Apple, and it's not something Apple can easily fix.

When a phone is connected to your car's bluetooth, the car is the one driving the interface. The car tells the phone to play or pause or whatever. When the phone gets a message from the car that says "play whatever", there's no real way for the phone to know that it's because the car is being dumb, and not because the driver of the car, say, pushed the play button on the controls. Apple can't fix the car's software sucking.
  #36  
Old 10-14-2019, 01:30 PM
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Whoever devised the utility company's phone prompt system deserves honorable mention.

Press 5 if you wish to throw up your proverbial hands in despair at your apparent inability to select a button which will enable you to speak to a real human being....
Arguably, this is the design working as intended. Phone trees are inhumane design (in the sense that they're not designed for human users' well-being), but they're doing exactly what they're designed to do: reduce the payroll of employees who answer the phone and talk to customers.

Last edited by iamthewalrus(:3=; 10-14-2019 at 01:30 PM.
  #37  
Old 10-14-2019, 01:36 PM
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We moved into a condo last summer and two of the appliances are driving us mad.

1. A stove whose oven controls are front mounted touch buttons. If you have something in the oven and something on a back burner and you lean to stir whatever is on the back burner, you are liable to turn off the oven. It has happened a number of times.

2. A fridge with several flaws. One it a retractible shelf that allows you to put a tall bottle on the shelf below. Unfortunately, it is all too prone to retract with the least push and spill everything on it onto the floor. If only it could be locked in the unretracted position. The second problem is that even with the fridge temp set to 43 (really too high), there are a couple places in back that are below freezing.
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Old 10-14-2019, 02:12 PM
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I've come across quite a few train platforms out in the sticks of Europe that are contextually impossible to tell which side of the platform you should be on to catch a particular direction of train. Panicked dash down the under stair to the opposite platform ensues...
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Old 10-14-2019, 04:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Hari Seldon View Post
We moved into a condo last summer and two of the appliances are driving us mad.

1. A stove whose oven controls are front mounted touch buttons. If you have something in the oven and something on a back burner and you lean to stir whatever is on the back burner, you are liable to turn off the oven. It has happened a number of times
My LG stove has an unfortunately common feature: the dials turn from off, to high, to low. That is, when you first turn the dial, the burner roars to life at high heat, which you immediately reduce...then when you go to turn it off you instinctively turn the flame lower and lower until...it hits the stop and an almost invisible flame remains.

My wife and I have left burners on multiple times because of this stupid design. To shut the valve, you must turn it in the hotter direction.

I imagine the reason is to have a big burst of gas for the auto ignition feature, but it still sucks.
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Old 10-14-2019, 04:31 PM
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Considering I've owned two of the damn things I can say with a certain pride --------- the 1958 Edsel.

Classically bad thinking can be a thing of future beauty.
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Old 10-14-2019, 04:59 PM
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A good phone-option tree will automatically lead 90+% of the callers to the information they were looking for, leaving only a small percentage that need to be handled by your downsized customer-service team. A bad one will still result in only 10% or less of your customers speaking to a human, but it will leave the other 90% out in the cold.
  #42  
Old 10-14-2019, 05:21 PM
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I assume the "stupid, stupid..." is your editorial comment; the CD data surface is not "completely exposed" to damage. A modern CD/DVD, etc. is relatively impervious to fingerprints and minor scratches, due to (1) the optical characteristics (the data surface is not the physical outside surface, which is out of focus to the reading head) and (2) the multiple error correction schemes (Reed-Solomon Cross-Interleaved Coding, and others). While a protective casing is a good idea, the original CD design took into consideration these factors, and was able to minimize them to a significant degree.

...in contrast to a vinyl LP, subject to serious degradation from fingerprints, dust and scratches.
CDs are an OK medium and have mostly stood the test of time, the real design flaw was the jewel case. You couldn't have designed that thing more brittle and fragile. EVERY fucking time you drop one of them, something breaks, first of course the laughable hinges on the lid. And the round thingy the CD is pressed onto breaks the first time you try to pick the CD out. A total failure in my book.
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Old 10-14-2019, 05:43 PM
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The Museum of Bad Design is hosting a special "Packaging Failures" exhibit from December 10th-February 22nd. Jewel cases are featured prominently in this exhibit as are the entire array of "theft-prevention" devices such as REALLY BIG PACKAGES to the JEWEL CASE OF IMPENETRABILITY to the LOOK UP PAGE 76, PARA 2, WORD 16 software instruction set, with a special display on the evolution of those devices which, to prevent you from stealing a $25 pair of jeans, put two small holes in those very same jeans.

I remember one PC baseball game back in the 1990s (Hardball, perhaps?), which had a wheel you would spin to find the right word. That one is in this exhibit too.

Last edited by JohnT; 10-14-2019 at 05:47 PM.
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Old 10-14-2019, 05:44 PM
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Originally Posted by minor7flat5 View Post
My LG stove has an unfortunately common feature: the dials turn from off, to high, to low. That is, when you first turn the dial, the burner roars to life at high heat, which you immediately reduce...then when you go to turn it off you instinctively turn the flame lower and lower until...it hits the stop and an almost invisible flame remains.

My wife and I have left burners on multiple times because of this stupid design. To shut the valve, you must turn it in the hotter direction.

I imagine the reason is to have a big burst of gas for the auto ignition feature, but it still sucks.
Every single gas stove I have ever encountered in my life has worked this way. If you can't remember "up means off", you probably should't be cooking.
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Old 10-14-2019, 06:38 PM
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I remember one PC baseball game back in the 1990s (Hardball, perhaps?), which had a wheel you would spin to find the right word. That one is in this exhibit too.
Bard's Tale III, Pool of Radiance and Secret of Monkey Island used those code wheels as well.
  #46  
Old 10-14-2019, 07:27 PM
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Every single gas stove I have ever encountered in my life has worked this way. If you can't remember "up means off", you probably should't be cooking.
Well, that's a bit harsh, don't you think?

Anyway, I still shouldn't be cooking, for other reasons.
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Old 10-14-2019, 09:30 PM
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I mentioned this in another thread:

Tried to pay a store credit card online.

One of the first pieces of information was what day did I want to pay. I put in that day's date.

On we went, four (approx) more screens with amount, bank account, couple of other things. Then I clicked "Pay Now," only to be told that I could not use today's date as it was too late in the day. There was no way to change it on that screen; I had to begin again. Ridiculous, I calls it.

I think admission tickets to this museum should be sold in this kind of way. After putting all the information in, tell them that they can't actually buy the ticket and send 'em back to the beginning. It might put a dent in attendance, but it would be a great hands-on exhibit, don't you think?
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Old 10-14-2019, 09:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnT View Post
The Museum of Bad Design is hosting a special "Packaging Failures" exhibit from December 10th-February 22nd. Jewel cases are featured prominently in this exhibit as are the entire array of "theft-prevention" devices such as REALLY BIG PACKAGES to the JEWEL CASE OF IMPENETRABILITY to the LOOK UP PAGE 76, PARA 2, WORD 16 software instruction set, with a special display on the evolution of those devices which, to prevent you from stealing a $25 pair of jeans, put two small holes in those very same jeans.
There are special tools for opening clamshells/blister packs. Guess what they're packaged in.
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Old 10-14-2019, 10:24 PM
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There's a model of teapot which for some reason is very popular with Spanish bars (cheap and sold by the same companies which sell everything else bars need is my guess). That thing pees every which way except through the spout.
  #50  
Old 10-14-2019, 10:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alessan View Post
Every single gas stove I have ever encountered in my life has worked this way. If you can't remember "up means off", you probably should't be cooking.
Not only that, but there is a clear "hard" stop once you get all the way up; also, the knobs normally need to be pushed in before you can turn them on, and go back to an "out" position when the stove is, well, out. So yeah, I'm with Alessan on this one: "user doesn't understand the basics" does not equal "bad design".
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