Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-13-2018, 07:36 PM
dstarfire dstarfire is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Tacoma, WA; USA
Posts: 1,450
Why no more 'ONLY oldies' stations?

I remember growing up there were lots of radio stations that targetting my parents generation by playing ONLY stuff from the 50's-70's years ago (at the time). However, every radio station in my area that (that includes older pop in their playlists) is always some variation of 'hits of the 80's, 90's, and today'.

Is my generation (and all the later ones, presumably) more accepting of new music than the previous one? Was there a major shift in music styles in the 70's and 80's? or is there a more prosaic explanation?

Note: I'm ignoring online radio stations here, simply because it's so cheap and easy to create virtual radio stations or playlists.
__________________
Dion Starfire, grammar atheist.
  #2  
Old 06-13-2018, 08:07 PM
DavidwithanR DavidwithanR is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 3,996
Because advertisers don't want to advertise to only old folks. They don't spend enough.
  #3  
Old 06-13-2018, 08:25 PM
Snowboarder Bo's Avatar
Snowboarder Bo Snowboarder Bo is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 24,229
Plus that demographic keeps dying off, necessitating constant updates to the range of material aired.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 06-13-2018 at 08:26 PM.
  #4  
Old 06-13-2018, 08:30 PM
DavidwithanR DavidwithanR is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 3,996
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
Plus that demographic keeps dying off, necessitating constant updates to the range of material aired.
Need for constant updates doesn't seem to bother other types of stations, does it? Maybe I'm missing something important.
  #5  
Old 06-13-2018, 08:31 PM
GaryM's Avatar
GaryM GaryM is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: St. Louis, MO 50mi. West
Posts: 4,923
Does Sirius/XM 50's on 5 channel count? I don't listen to them exclusively, but they primarily play 50's music.
__________________
GaryM
  #6  
Old 06-13-2018, 08:32 PM
kayT kayT is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Austin
Posts: 4,920
There are a number of oldies stations on Sirius. 50s, 60s, 70s, etc. Classic Vinyl. Those are the ones I notice. Also an Elvis channel, a Jimmy Buffet channel, Beatles, and I don't know who else.

Last edited by kayT; 06-13-2018 at 08:33 PM.
  #7  
Old 06-13-2018, 08:49 PM
Exapno Mapcase Exapno Mapcase is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NY but not NYC
Posts: 30,583
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayT View Post
There are a number of oldies stations on Sirius. 50s, 60s, 70s, etc. Classic Vinyl. Those are the ones I notice. Also an Elvis channel, a Jimmy Buffet channel, Beatles, and I don't know who else.
And none of them have advertising.

However, for the OP it's certainly place-dependent. My city has an oldies station. I assume that lots of other cities do as well.
  #8  
Old 06-13-2018, 09:14 PM
FoieGrasIsEvil's Avatar
FoieGrasIsEvil FoieGrasIsEvil is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Land of Cheese Coneys
Posts: 17,659
Also consider the definition of "oldies", "classic rock", etc changes as we age. Upon hearing Guns And Roses on a Classic Rock Station a few years ago. I was reminded of how old I am.
  #9  
Old 06-13-2018, 09:17 PM
Telemark's Avatar
Telemark Telemark is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Again, Titletown
Posts: 21,648
We have a few Classic Rock stations, that play music from the 60s, 70s, and 80s mostly, with some from the 50s thrown in for good measure. Classic Rock is the new Oldies.
  #10  
Old 06-13-2018, 10:04 PM
nightshadea nightshadea is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: a condo in hell 10th lvl
Posts: 3,852
all CBS radio stations were robo oldies stations a few years ago …..but yeah the 60s hard rock and 70s music are grandpas music now


I mean the first ramones album is almost 50...……… 80s and 90s are getting old enough to play on k-earth 101 (supposedly the original oldies station )
  #11  
Old 06-13-2018, 10:33 PM
doreen doreen is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Woodhaven,Queens, NY
Posts: 5,802
Quote:
Originally Posted by dstarfire View Post
I remember growing up there were lots of radio stations that targetting my parents generation by playing ONLY stuff from the 50's-70's years ago (at the time). However, every radio station in my area that (that includes older pop in their playlists) is always some variation of 'hits of the 80's, 90's, and today'.

Is my generation (and all the later ones, presumably) more accepting of new music than the previous one? Was there a major shift in music styles in the 70's and 80's? or is there a more prosaic explanation?
I think it's actually the reverse- that younger generations are more accepting of older music than previous generations were. My son and his friends listen to music that goes as far back as at least 1970, 20 years before he was born. I don't know any of my contemporaries who regularly listen to music that was popular 20 years before we were born - they might like a few songs or a particular singer from that time, but they wouldn't listen to a radio station that played only '40s music.
  #12  
Old 06-13-2018, 10:37 PM
River Hippie River Hippie is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: N.E. Indiana, USA
Posts: 5,223
In my market there are two "oldies" stations. One plays "classic rock" from 1970s to mid eighties, the other plays "new rock" from mid eighties to mid 2000s. Rare to hear anything new on either. That's just the two that I'm aware of, maybe there are others playing other stuff but that's what I listen to when my local NPR station goes to jazz.
  #13  
Old 06-13-2018, 10:41 PM
RealityChuck's Avatar
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Schenectady, NY, USA
Posts: 41,804
Quote:
Originally Posted by doreen View Post
I think it's actually the reverse- that younger generations are more accepting of older music than previous generations were. My son and his friends listen to music that goes as far back as at least 1970, 20 years before he was born. I don't know any of my contemporaries who regularly listen to music that was popular 20 years before we were born - they might like a few songs or a particular singer from that time, but they wouldn't listen to a radio station that played only '40s music.
This is a valid point. The Beatles are still popular with young people today; it's the equivalent of young people listening to "Alexander's Ragtime Band" on old wax cylinders in the 60s.*

*Yes, some people liked that music even then, but it was not on the radio.
__________________
"If a person saying he was something was all there was to it, this country'd be full of rich men and good-looking women. Too bad it isn't that easy.... In short, when someone else says you're a writer, that's when you're a writer... not before."
Purveyor of fine science fiction since 1982.
  #14  
Old 06-14-2018, 12:37 AM
scabpicker's Avatar
scabpicker scabpicker is offline
Soy un pinche idiota
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Funkytown (Fort Worth)
Posts: 4,402
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
This is a valid point. The Beatles are still popular with young people today; it's the equivalent of young people listening to "Alexander's Ragtime Band" on old wax cylinders in the 60s.*

*Yes, some people liked that music even then, but it was not on the radio.
Well, the funny thing about that is, even the Beatles aren't on the radio as much as they once were. I live in a fairly large radio market, and the last "Oldies" station on FM (meaning 50's-early/mid 60's rock n' roll) changed formats at least 10 years ago. You can hear that kind of stuff on the radio still, but it's on specialty shows from stations that have varied formats. I'm honestly more likely to hear Howlin' Wolf on my drive into work than pre-Revolver Beatles at this point. Even 70's classic rock is getting pretty thin on the vine.

Yes, I listen to what my brother refers to as "poor people radio", terrestrial signals. I figure that's what being asked about. My commute is an hour each way, and I spin the dial randomly often. Even in my area, there's not much market for programming that old. Oldies is limited to the late 60's at this point, and the stations trying to limit their format to retro hip-hop are starting to pop up. Time marches on.
  #15  
Old 06-14-2018, 05:48 AM
cochrane cochrane is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: The Nekkid Pueblo
Posts: 20,924
Quote:
Originally Posted by FoieGrasIsEvil View Post
Also consider the definition of "oldies", "classic rock", etc changes as we age. Upon hearing Guns And Roses on a Classic Rock Station a few years ago. I was reminded of how old I am.
Our local classic rock station seems to run heavily on Def Leppard.
  #16  
Old 06-14-2018, 06:29 AM
F. U. Shakespeare F. U. Shakespeare is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Baltimore or less
Posts: 4,000
I would guess that another factor is that unlike oldies, new artists' music is being pushed by record companies with payola promotional considerations.
  #17  
Old 06-14-2018, 10:17 AM
Tired and Cranky Tired and Cranky is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 1,213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
We have a few Classic Rock stations, that play music from the 60s, 70s, and 80s mostly, with some from the 50s thrown in for good measure. Classic Rock is the new Oldies.
Quote:
Originally Posted by River Hippie View Post
In my market there are two "oldies" stations. One plays "classic rock" from 1970s to mid eighties, the other plays "new rock" from mid eighties to mid 2000s. Rare to hear anything new on either. That's just the two that I'm aware of, maybe there are others playing other stuff but that's what I listen to when my local NPR station goes to jazz.
I think these are the answers. "Oldies" isn't music X number of years old; it is pop music from the '50s and '60s. People don't want to advertise to that demographic anymore so I'm guessing those stations are dying out along with their audience. The replacement formats are "classic rock." That label doesn't turn off people who think of "oldies" stations as belonging to a generation older than them.

I haven't heard of "new rock" as a category but River Hippie's description makes sense to appeal to somewhat younger consumers who are already recognize that "classic rock" appeals to people at least half a generation older than they are.

I don't know what the next old people's music format will be called but I will bet that it won't be called either "classic rock" or "new rock."
  #18  
Old 06-14-2018, 11:15 AM
Shodan Shodan is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Milky Way Galaxy
Posts: 37,898
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tired and Cranky View Post
I don't know what the next old people's music format will be called but I will bet that it won't be called either "classic rock" or "new rock."
It will be called "Real Music - Not that Racket You Listen To, Dammit!'

Regards,
Shodan
  #19  
Old 06-14-2018, 11:31 AM
DCnDC's Avatar
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: The Dueling Grounds
Posts: 11,310
Quote:
Originally Posted by FoieGrasIsEvil View Post
Also consider the definition of "oldies", "classic rock", etc changes as we age. Upon hearing Guns And Roses on a Classic Rock Station a few years ago. I was reminded of how old I am.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cochrane View Post
Our local classic rock station seems to run heavily on Def Leppard.
I grew up in the 80s. I remember "Classic rock" stations were playing stuff from up to the late 70s which were so different stylistically from then-contemporary music, i.e. New Wave, post-punk, synth-pop, etc. that it seemed like it was from an era long, long ago, even though it may have been brand new just a few years back.
  #20  
Old 06-14-2018, 11:36 AM
bump bump is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 16,216
We've got what amount to three different FM oldies stations in D/FW. Four at one point even.

We have:
  • The oldies station - they advertise as 60s, 70s and 80s music.
  • The "Jack" station- they say they play whatever they want, but in practice, it's heavily slanted toward the 1980s-1990s top 40 hits, including some grunge.
  • The classic rock station- 1960s through early 1990s for the most part; I've heard 1991's "November Rain" by GnR on there a time or two, but most of their playlist is the usual Lynyrd Skynyrd, 38 Special, Molly Hatchet, Queen, The Who, Beatles, etc... They do play some 80s stuff like GnR and Def Leppard, but probably at half the rate that they play the 70s and early 80s stuff. They also occasionally play some grunge stuff from the 1990s as well.

The 1970s seem to be a underrepresented time period, except for the classic rock station, which seems to be mostly centered in about 1978, I think.

Last edited by bump; 06-14-2018 at 11:37 AM.
  #21  
Old 06-14-2018, 01:14 PM
drad dog's Avatar
drad dog drad dog is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5,764
The easy listening station around here is now a regional operation which plays really old stuff: Big Crosby, Patti Page, and moving ahead stuff from the 50s and 60s that is mellower. I never listened to it much as a younger person. But right now it is a great thing to listen to.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WJIB
  #22  
Old 06-14-2018, 03:17 PM
dstarfire dstarfire is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Tacoma, WA; USA
Posts: 1,450
My point is that, today, the stations that play the modern version of oldies (stuff 30-40 years old) also play current hits. I don't recall hearing any current (at the time) hits when it was the 50's-60's stations that were the oldies (i.e. targeted at people 30-50).
__________________
Dion Starfire, grammar atheist.
  #23  
Old 06-14-2018, 03:24 PM
cochrane cochrane is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: The Nekkid Pueblo
Posts: 20,924
Quote:
Originally Posted by bump View Post
[*]The classic rock station- 1960s through early 1990s for the most part; I've heard 1991's "November Rain" by GnR on there a time or two, but most of their playlist is the usual Lynyrd Skynyrd, 38 Special, Molly Hatchet, Queen, The Who, Beatles, etc... They do play some 80s stuff like GnR and Def Leppard, but probably at half the rate that they play the 70s and early 80s stuff. They also occasionally play some grunge stuff from the 1990s as well.
That sounds like the station I mentioned. They'll play classic Beatles and Stones, stuff like you mentioned, along with some Eagles, Tom Petty, and Van Halen, and maybe some Nirvana, Stone Temple Pilots, and Pearl Jam.
  #24  
Old 06-14-2018, 03:38 PM
Tapiotar Tapiotar is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1,492
In South Florida, over the air, there is an oldies station that plays tunes from the 50's - some 70's, a pretty big variety, and there's a classic rock station. There's also a lounge lizard kind of station, that plays Vegas Sinatra kind of stuff, which could be counted as oldies, I guess. Does a Spanish mariachi band station count as oldies? As opposed to modern Spanish language pop?

Most of the time, as I've driven across the country, I can pick up an oldies or classic rock radio station.

The sad part is all the ads for Viagra or Viagra substitutes, and for getting checked for Hep C. The soundtrack of youthful non-stop sex and rebellion has now become the soundtrack of impotent old age.
  #25  
Old 06-14-2018, 03:48 PM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: America's Wing
Posts: 28,948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tapiotar View Post
Does a Spanish mariachi band station count as oldies?
I was wondering the same thing about native American drum music, which I caught on several public radio stations out West last month (which I listened to for a song or two because hey, better than country.) I don't know how popular that style of music is but I could tell the recordings were old because of the vinyl pops. I was wondering if today's youth think of it more like classical, or oldies, or think of it as current (that can obviously differ between youths and tribes.)
  #26  
Old 06-14-2018, 04:05 PM
Marvin the Martian Marvin the Martian is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Phoenix, AZ, USA
Posts: 1,051
Quote:
Originally Posted by dstarfire View Post
My point is that, today, the stations that play the modern version of oldies (stuff 30-40 years old) also play current hits. I don't recall hearing any current (at the time) hits when it was the 50's-60's stations that were the oldies (i.e. targeted at people 30-50).
The "classic rock" stations that I have listened to (both here in Phoenix and back in Philadelphia) never play current hits (unless by a "classic rock" artist). There are a few stations that play current music that seem to have a tendency to play old Dave Matthews and Red Hot Chili Peppers on occasion, but no other old stuff.
  #27  
Old 06-14-2018, 04:37 PM
Skywatcher's Avatar
Skywatcher Skywatcher is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Somewhere in the Potomac
Posts: 33,575
Kankakee's WVLI plays a little bit of everything from the Forties to the Nineties with vintage top 40 countdowns on Saturdays, starting at 4PM Eastern. I listen to their Internet feed while working.

Last edited by Skywatcher; 06-14-2018 at 04:39 PM.
  #28  
Old 06-14-2018, 04:53 PM
Skywatcher's Avatar
Skywatcher Skywatcher is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Somewhere in the Potomac
Posts: 33,575
Oh, and there's WARE up in Massachusetts. Their AM station plays some really obscure stuff from the Fifties & Sixties, at least they used to.

Last edited by Skywatcher; 06-14-2018 at 04:54 PM.
  #29  
Old 06-14-2018, 05:14 PM
bump bump is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 16,216
Quote:
Originally Posted by scabpicker View Post
Well, the funny thing about that is, even the Beatles aren't on the radio as much as they once were. I live in a fairly large radio market, and the last "Oldies" station on FM (meaning 50's-early/mid 60's rock n' roll) changed formats at least 10 years ago. You can hear that kind of stuff on the radio still, but it's on specialty shows from stations that have varied formats. I'm honestly more likely to hear Howlin' Wolf on my drive into work than pre-Revolver Beatles at this point. Even 70's classic rock is getting pretty thin on the vine.
If you live in Fort Worth, I assume you listen to 92.5? They kind of go on little jags of playing one band or another, but they still play a pretty large amount of Beatles, old Elton John, 38 special, etc.... They've only recently moved into playing stuff like GnR and some lighter stuff I wouldn't have even called rock- ISTR them playing some 80s pop band like Simple Minds a few weeks back. (maybe they are rock, but not in the 'classic' vein)
  #30  
Old 06-14-2018, 11:22 PM
dstarfire dstarfire is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Tacoma, WA; USA
Posts: 1,450
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clothes View Post
Where did oldies radio go? I can't say, but I do know that certain songs got played into the ground: "Blue Moon" by the Marcels, "Why Do Fools Fall in Love" by Frankie Lymon, "Get a Job", "Big Girls Don't Cry", "Runaround Sue" - all great songs the first time you hear them. But by only playing the top chartbusters, this format got stale pretty fast. Perhaps if they had broadened their scope - you can find college radio shows with titles like "Lost and Found" that make it pretty clear there was a lot more going on in the era than the 50,000th airing of "Love Me Tender" would have you believe.
Okay, that helps explain why oldies stations died out. I didn't keep track of them since I was doing current hits after I left home, so didn't notice them dying out.

Back to the original issue, it sounds like I need to clarify my language and lay out my assumptions.
  • As I understand it, most media tends to target people 30-50
  • When I was a kid this market favored "oldies" (50's-70's) so many radio stations played exclusively oldies.
  • People like the music, movies and other cultural bits that were common when they were in their teens
  • So, the 30-50 year old market would be targetted with music from the 80's through early 2000's
  • Following this pattern the most common radio stations would play music from 80's, 90's, and 00's
  • Almost all the radio stations I've encountered that play a mix of 80's, 90's, and 00's also include many mainstream current hits in their regular playlists.

I should also note here, that this isn't any sort of a complaint. This change is a strong blow against nostalgia and that 'the good old days' BS.
__________________
Dion Starfire, grammar atheist.

Last edited by dstarfire; 06-14-2018 at 11:23 PM.
  #31  
Old 06-15-2018, 12:12 AM
scabpicker's Avatar
scabpicker scabpicker is offline
Soy un pinche idiota
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Funkytown (Fort Worth)
Posts: 4,402
Quote:
Originally Posted by bump View Post
If you live in Fort Worth, I assume you listen to 92.5? They kind of go on little jags of playing one band or another, but they still play a pretty large amount of Beatles, old Elton John, 38 special, etc.... They've only recently moved into playing stuff like GnR and some lighter stuff I wouldn't have even called rock- ISTR them playing some 80s pop band like Simple Minds a few weeks back. (maybe they are rock, but not in the 'classic' vein)
Well, yes. But there's a point where The Beatles stops being oldies and begins being classic rock. 92.5 seems to think that's at Revolver, and I kind of agree. I haven't heard them play anything earlier than that unless it was on one of the Sunday morning programs devoted to the history of them. They've been playing stuff like GnR for around a decade now. They've been playing light rock from that era for even longer.

But, as dstarfire has clarified, they're looking for songs from the 80s-naughties, not the 50s/early 60s definition of oldies. In this case, 92.5 seems to qualify, even if they're about a decade and a half behind.

So, they're in the large markets, kind of?
  #32  
Old 06-15-2018, 02:16 AM
smithsb smithsb is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: mid-Pacific
Posts: 2,961
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shodan View Post
It will be called "Real Music - Not that Racket You Listen To, Dammit!'

Regards,
Shodan

I agree - get off my lawn! Don't lean on my Ford Torino!

I still have many of the old albums but I have to admit - there was a whole lotta drek "music" from the psychedelic/great folk scare era.
  #33  
Old 06-15-2018, 10:48 AM
Tired and Cranky Tired and Cranky is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 1,213
Quote:
Originally Posted by dstarfire View Post
Back to the original issue, it sounds like I need to clarify my language and lay out my assumptions.
  • As I understand it, most media tends to target people 30-50
  • When I was a kid this market favored "oldies" (50's-70's) so many radio stations played exclusively oldies.
  • People like the music, movies and other cultural bits that were common when they were in their teens
  • So, the 30-50 year old market would be targetted with music from the 80's through early 2000's
  • Following this pattern the most common radio stations would play music from 80's, 90's, and 00's
  • Almost all the radio stations I've encountered that play a mix of 80's, 90's, and 00's also include many mainstream current hits in their regular playlists.
I think I get what you are looking for now. You are asking why there are no radio formats that play only 20-40 year old music with no newer and contemporary music.

I think you are mostly finding "adult hits" stations, which play adult contemporary, pop, and rock songs from the 1970s to today. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adult_hits)

You might also be finding "active rock" stations, which play rock songs from the mid-1970's to today (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Active_rock)

You don't seem interested in "classic rock" stations, which only play songs from the late-1960's to the late 1980's. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classic_rock). I think these are the true spiritual successors to yesterday's oldies stations.

I think the radio format that most closely matches what you are looking for is apparently called, in the U.S. at least, "mainstream rock," and which plays predominantly classic rock songs from the 1970s, 1980s and the 1990s. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mainstream_rock). This format doesn't seem to include music from the early 2000s, but at some point, the already fine distinction between "mainstream rock" and "active rock" would be almost entirely wiped away if mainstream rock started playing stuff from just a few years ago.
  #34  
Old 06-15-2018, 10:53 AM
bump bump is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 16,216
Quote:
Originally Posted by scabpicker View Post
Well, yes. But there's a point where The Beatles stops being oldies and begins being classic rock. 92.5 seems to think that's at Revolver, and I kind of agree. I haven't heard them play anything earlier than that unless it was on one of the Sunday morning programs devoted to the history of them. They've been playing stuff like GnR for around a decade now. They've been playing light rock from that era for even longer.

But, as dstarfire has clarified, they're looking for songs from the 80s-naughties, not the 50s/early 60s definition of oldies. In this case, 92.5 seems to qualify, even if they're about a decade and a half behind.

So, they're in the large markets, kind of?
True... stations are more.. blended than they used to be, even in the "Classic Rock" arena.

I sort of wonder if that's because radio music seems to have stagnated somewhat since grunge sort of faded away. I mean, you could play most pop songs from around the turn of the millenium today and they wouldn't be entirely out of place on top 40 radio and vice-versa. Which is not something you could say about 1988 and 1998 or 1978 and 1988.

So as a result, what's "current" music is perceived as a larger category than in years past where you had distinct categories on the radio of 50s music, 60s music, 70s music/disco, 80s music, grunge, and then... more or less what we have now. I couldn't tell you what would clearly separate say... Britney Spears or Ricky Martin from say... Rihanna or Katy Perry in terms of musical era, despite there being about a decade in between.

And as people age, this sort of recent 20 year stagnation has sort of compressed what is "old" into anything prior to about 1997, so radio stations are following suit. And it's why you don't see say... "90s" music as a separate callout; it's lumped in with the 70s and 80s, because the first 2/3 of the decade is "old', while the latter 3-4 years are where the stagnation began. Same with the oughties- there is no clearly defining characteristic versus pre-2000 or post-2010 radio music.
  #35  
Old 06-15-2018, 10:58 AM
Czarcasm's Avatar
Czarcasm Czarcasm is online now
Charter Member
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 58,354
Portland, OR has KISN 95.1 FM, real golden oldies with no modern music. It's my driving music of choice.
  #36  
Old 06-15-2018, 12:02 PM
ISiddiqui ISiddiqui is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Decatur, Georgia, USA
Posts: 6,409
I would argue that there are more than few people who grew up listening to music in the 80s and 90s tend to think of themselves as younger than they actually are, and therefore have seemingly existential crises when the music of their upbringing is now deemed "Oldies" or "Classic Rock" and therefore the blended 80s, 90s, 00s, and today makes them feel as if their music is more current than it actually is .
  #37  
Old 06-15-2018, 12:13 PM
RTFirefly RTFirefly is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Maryland
Posts: 37,286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tapiotar View Post
The sad part is all the ads for Viagra or Viagra substitutes, and for getting checked for Hep C. The soundtrack of youthful non-stop sex and rebellion has now become the soundtrack of impotent old age.
Time for the comeback tour of Gerry and the Pacemakers.
  #38  
Old 06-15-2018, 12:18 PM
RTFirefly RTFirefly is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Maryland
Posts: 37,286
When I was still occasionally listening to the DC-area classic rock station (up to maybe 3 years ago), they seemed to have just discovered Nirvana, along with a few other 1990s bands. Before maybe 7-8 years ago (guesstimating), they were strictly late 1960s through late 1980s.

It was a very white format, too: the only black artist they played, AFAICT, was Jimi Hendrix. Top 40 in the mid-1960s was way more integrated.
  #39  
Old 06-15-2018, 12:45 PM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: the extreme center
Posts: 30,469
But I wanna hear "Stairway to Heaven" and "Layla" a few thousand more times.
  #40  
Old 06-15-2018, 12:46 PM
Derleth Derleth is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Missoula, Montana, USA
Posts: 20,837
Quote:
Originally Posted by dstarfire View Post
I remember growing up there were lots of radio stations that targetting my parents generation by playing ONLY stuff from the 50's-70's years ago (at the time). However, every radio station in my area that (that includes older pop in their playlists) is always some variation of 'hits of the 80's, 90's, and today'.
This is due to location: You don't have any stations which focus on classic rock, but instead Adult Album Alternative (AAA) stations, which are broader and, therefore, can draw a larger audience. This is common in smaller markets, where you need a larger portion of the total potential audience to justify existing at all.

Quote:
Was there a major shift in music styles in the 70's and 80's?
Yes, but not one which will be reflected on AAA stations: Rap, punk, and disco all came into the mainstream in that era, but AAA stations studiously ignore this, focusing instead on the future development of guitar-oriented traditional rock music to the exclusion of all else, until punk was calmed down a bit and branded as New Wave for MTV. Why? AAA is straight White person radio, and, apparently, straight White people would rather hear Creedence Clearwater Revival than The Sugarhill Gang or Richard Hell and the Voidoids.

What else has happened was the death of Oldies stations, which were stations which focused on pre-Beatles rock and roll, instead of picking up the thread around the British Invasion and focusing on psychedelia, singer/songwriter, and Southern rock. Oldies stations played more pop-folk (Kingston Trio), doo-wop, and teen idol music like Bobby Vee, plus, of course, giants like Chuck Berry, Fats Domino, and Elvis. That music is largely gone from terrestrial radio for the simple fact the biggest demographic for it is too old and dead to bother with.
  #41  
Old 06-15-2018, 12:47 PM
Hermitian's Avatar
Hermitian Hermitian is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 2,173
dstarfire, for what it is worth, I understood your question from the first post. I did not respond because:

1. I didn't have an answer.
2. Trying to fix everyone else's misunderstanding sounded like a lot of work.

.

Last edited by Hermitian; 06-15-2018 at 12:48 PM.
  #42  
Old 06-15-2018, 01:35 PM
RTFirefly RTFirefly is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Maryland
Posts: 37,286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Derleth View Post
What else has happened was the death of Oldies stations, which were stations which focused on pre-Beatles rock and roll, instead of picking up the thread around the British Invasion and focusing on psychedelia, singer/songwriter, and Southern rock. Oldies stations played more pop-folk (Kingston Trio), doo-wop, and teen idol music like Bobby Vee, plus, of course, giants like Chuck Berry, Fats Domino, and Elvis.
During the late 1960s and much of the 1970s at least, that was a fair description. But once Album Rock became late 1960s and later, without the pop/bubblegum from the immediate post-British invasion era, at least IME the oldies stations picked that up. They'd be where you'd hear the Grass Roots or the Young Rascals. I think you're right that the pre-Beatles stuff still dominated the format, though.
Quote:
That music is largely gone from terrestrial radio for the simple fact the biggest demographic for it is too old and dead to bother with
Yeppers to this.
  #43  
Old 06-15-2018, 11:31 PM
scabpicker's Avatar
scabpicker scabpicker is offline
Soy un pinche idiota
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Funkytown (Fort Worth)
Posts: 4,402
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackmannii View Post
But I wanna hear "Stairway to Heaven" and "Layla" a few thousand more times.
If you're in a large market, you're in luck!

But folks who want to hear "Mellow Yellow" or "Greenback Dollar" are gonna depend on specialty shows, or satellite radio, or other delivery methods.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:49 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017