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  #51  
Old 11-02-2005, 11:18 AM
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Ah, and the song Coalhouse Demands from Ragtime (an angry and threatening song when Coalhouse becomes a vigilante) uses the multiple characters singing the same song at different temps and pitches device to absolutely wonderful effect. "Somewhere in the city there's a madman waiting..."
  #52  
Old 11-02-2005, 03:46 PM
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An example of counterpoint from The Music Man: Pick a Little / Good Night Ladies.

Meredith Willson seemed to enjoy musical parlor tricks like that -- like the fact that "Good Night, My Someone" is the same melody as "76 Trombones". My kinda guy.
  #53  
Old 11-02-2005, 05:05 PM
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Another example of this sort of thing - the Astaire & Rogers film Swing Time has a great score, including "A Fine Romance" and "The Way You Look Tonight" by Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields. Lovely songs, but quite different, or so you might think while watching the film. But right at the end Fred and Ginger sing both songs simultaneously and they somehow match with Bach-like precision! Clever stuff.
  #54  
Old 11-02-2005, 09:02 PM
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Wow, jsc1953, you mentioned The Music Man and you didn't mention Lida Rose / Sweet and Low?

Gotta love that barbershop sound, mmm mmm good.
  #55  
Old 11-02-2005, 09:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Fish
Wow, jsc1953, you mentioned The Music Man and you didn't mention Lida Rose / Sweet and Low?

Gotta love that barbershop sound, mmm mmm good.
I knew there was another example. thanks.
  #56  
Old 11-03-2005, 12:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Yumblie
I just find songs where two different sets of lyrics are sung at once to follow along with.
  #57  
Old 11-03-2005, 03:41 PM
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In posting to the thread on "most depressing rock song ever," I realized Cat Steven's "Father & Son" is a perfect example of this type of songwriting.
  #58  
Old 11-03-2005, 04:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonius Block
Scarborough Fair is traditional, and Paul Simon wrote the counterpoint "Canticle".

Lyrics here.
I never paid attention to the background lyrics. That's awesome! Thanks!
  #59  
Old 11-03-2005, 06:40 PM
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I had a long post about how Malacandra is right, and various fascinating Gilbert and Sullivan observations, but the hamsters ate it. Fine.

I knew it was the Chancellor, anyway.
  #60  
Old 11-04-2005, 12:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walloon
Um, there should be a difficult in that sentence somewhere. Yeah...

I just find songs where two different sets of lyrics are sung at once difficult to follow along with.
  #61  
Old 11-04-2005, 04:04 AM
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I'm surprised that none of the people mentioning Gilbert and Sullivan have mentioned the pattersongs as well. They are all about euphonious confusion for the audience. Usually three different characters are singing three different songs which may or may not share the same rhyme scheme to an insanely fast pasted musical accompanyment. I find them great fun, even if all I get out of any first encounter with one is a phrase here or there. And I believe they're very different from the first act finales that the other posters mentioning G&S have been talking about, since the finales usually make sure that the audience gets one 'clear' listen at every part to the piece.
  #62  
Old 01-22-2011, 12:37 PM
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My favorite example of the is the "Lover's Quartet" from Co-ed Prison Sluts. Although it is heightened by Fluffy tearing the luncheon meat intestines out of the "hamster" while Hamster Man sings "The dog has wasted my hamster now, the agony's wasted my heart." Sigh. God, I miss that show.

Jack
It's BAAAACK. I just found this thread.....6 years later. Co-Ed Prison Sluts is at the Annoyance Theater @4830 N. Broadway, a little North of the Green Mill every Friday and Saturday night at 10:01pm. My dog Roxie has been playing the role of "Fluffy" for the past year. She's very good and gets paid in lunch meat.

Last edited by Miss Creant; 01-22-2011 at 12:39 PM.
  #63  
Old 01-22-2011, 03:17 PM
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So, I was getting all excited as I started to read this thread, and was figuring out what to touch on, when I got to my own post from 5 years ago . . . wow, so informative!

This winter I did a performance of One Day More from Les Miserables, which is another example of the OP, and I think is pretty much the exact song that South Park parodies in the movie.
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Old 01-23-2011, 04:36 AM
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So, I was getting all excited as I started to read this thread, and was figuring out what to touch on, when I got to my own post from 5 years ago . . . wow, so informative!
Yeah - I was reading the thread and was surprised people mentioned a song from BTVS, but not My Eyes from Dr. Horrible's Sing Along Blog. Then I got to the end of the thread and realized DHSAB wasn't created yet when the thread started.

Last edited by Waenara; 01-23-2011 at 04:36 AM.
  #65  
Old 01-23-2011, 07:25 AM
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'Oh, Happy We' from Candide is a fabulous example. Candide and Cunegonde are singing about how well they agree, except they sing it in canon so that their phrases are a quarter note out from one another.
  #66  
Old 01-23-2011, 05:11 PM
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How about "Sumer is icumen in"? They don't play it on the radio any more, though.
  #67  
Old 01-24-2011, 09:24 AM
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Does this count??? Great cover of Life on Mars...but even better what they do with it...
[URL="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nW0ACEOEq6w"]
  #68  
Old 01-24-2011, 09:49 AM
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That's why opera is important, Baron... because it's realer than any play! A dramatic poet would have to put all these thoughts down one after another just to represent this second of time. The composer can put them all down at once - and still make us hear each one of them. Astonishing device: a vocal quartet! I tell you, I want to write a finale lasting half an hour! A quartet becoming a quintet becoming a sextet becoming a septet, an octet, a nonet, on and on, wider and wider - all sounds multiplying and rising together - and the together creating a sound entirely new!

I bet you that’s how God hears the world. Millions of sounds ascending at once and mixing in His ear to become unending music, unimaginable to us. That’s our job. That's our job! To combine the inner minds of him and him and her and her, the thoughts of chambermaids and court composers... and turn the audience into God.
- Peter Shaffer, from Amadeus

Last edited by storyteller0910; 01-24-2011 at 09:49 AM.
  #69  
Old 01-24-2011, 10:08 AM
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I like the "We Can Do It" and "I Wanna Be a Producer" blends in The Producers.

And I like the technique in general because if your leads are both talking about why it will/won't work, it gets very tough to understand them. But if they sing, it's quite easy to pick apart the differing motivations.
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Old 01-24-2011, 12:03 PM
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Make Up Your Mind/Catch Me I'm Falling from Next to Normal calls it an "overlap"
  #71  
Old 01-24-2011, 12:42 PM
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How about "Sumer is icumen in"? They don't play it on the radio any more, though.
That's because it's got itself on the banned list. People have been singing "coo coo" rather too lewdly.
  #72  
Old 01-24-2011, 12:56 PM
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Make Up Your Mind/Catch Me I'm Falling from Next to Normal calls it an "overlap"
They're not calling it an "overlap". They're saying "These words are overlapping each other". That's not the same thing. As mentioned on the first page of the thread, it's called "counterpoint".
  #73  
Old 01-24-2011, 03:30 PM
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I also love when they do this in musical.

I have to second my favorite example Confrontation from Les Miserables.

Does the intro song to Parade count? When Old Red Hills blends with the weird chorus part in the background...do you know what I'm talking about?

Lead:
The rushing of the Chattahoochie
The rustling in the wind
And Mama in the kitchen singin'
And me and Lila swinging in a trees

TOWNSPEOPLE:
The tall pines and the red clay
The blue skies and the dogwood trees
A man can grow his cotton
And his crops

Now in this case, the parts clash a little but I think they are very effective in conveying a tone.

Last edited by Aeris; 01-24-2011 at 03:30 PM.
  #74  
Old 08-06-2016, 04:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Punkyova View Post
But I think the best one in Gilbert and Sullivan is the Act I finale from Iolanthe....
Quote:
Originally Posted by anyrose View Post
My personal favorite G&S is Patience. There are at least two numbers in act one and one in act two that do that
Another G&S example I just remembered: "I Am So Proud" from The Mikado:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dVLS6FazQ4
http://lyrics.wikia.com/wiki/Gilbert...:I_Am_So_Proud
  #75  
Old 08-06-2016, 05:18 PM
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...and I'm thinking that Yes did it as well (Siberian Khatru, perhaps?)
Yes mainly sang regular harmonies but definitely used counterpoint occasionally. Best example I can think of right now is "Hearts", and I think also "Starship Trooper" -- there's definitely others.

My favorite example of counterpoint, at least in the rock music world, is from Duran Duran's best song ever, "New Religion" (starting at 2:15)
  #76  
Old 08-07-2016, 08:38 AM
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I know I'm far afield here, but is Meat Loaf's Paradise by the Dashboard Light an example?

"It was long ago and it was far away..."
"It never felt so good it never felt so right..."


mmm
  #77  
Old 08-09-2016, 01:57 AM
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Sampiro writes:

> One of my favorite moments from Miss Saigon is when Kim and Ellen are both singing
> over each other about Chris and their relationship with him.

A similar example is Susan Boyle and Elaine Page singing the song "I Know Him So Well" from Chess:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9o8PgJPUjfo

This is especially interesting because Elaine Page was the singer that Susan said on her appearance on Britain's Got Talent that she most admired.
  #78  
Old 08-09-2016, 10:23 AM
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My favorite example of this is the Beatles "I've got a feeling," at the end when Paul is singing "I've got a feeling" while John is singing "Everybody's had a good year ...."
  #79  
Old 08-09-2016, 10:34 AM
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I know and love all of the examples provided so far, and am just popping in to mention "Quartet (A Model of Decorum and Tranquility)" from Chess.
I was lucky enough to see the West End version back in 1987. Somebody - I want to say Tim Rice, but I remember reading in the liner notes from the CD that some lyrics in at least one song were modified without his permission (and I have a feeling that "over his objections" is more like it) - rewrote "Quartet" for the American version so that, expect for a brief moment at the end, nobody is singing over anybody else.
  #80  
Old 08-16-2016, 05:26 PM
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This is one of my favorite musical tunes also. A little different than the OP's point because it doesn't recombine previously separate parts; separate parts are woven together through the entire song.

However it is called Prima Donna. "Notes" immediately precedes it; they kind of run together.
Replacing obsolete link with this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMPdczoLW_c
  #81  
Old 08-18-2016, 02:13 PM
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Guess Who's "No Sugar Tonight/New Mother Nature"
  #82  
Old 08-18-2016, 02:19 PM
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The most thrilling moment in Xanadu was when Gene Kelly and Michael Beck are each envisioning their version of the perfect nightclub band then their two separate visions blend together- in song!





Okay, I just wanted to be the first person ever to write the phrase "The most thrilling moment in Xanadu".


(If this was one of those "Name Your Guilty Pleasures" Threads, I'd tell you just how much I really do love that scene!)
Same here...it's called "Dancin'." It always impressed me how seamlessly and harmoniously the two different styles fit together...very well-written.
  #83  
Old 03-21-2020, 09:20 PM
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Two other examples:

"All for the Best" from Godspell (starting at 1:41): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i9Snj9kXNyA

"Doll on a Music Box," which includes a reprise of "Truly Scrumptious," from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (at 3:42): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_l2ii_25tc
  #84  
Old 03-21-2020, 11:27 PM
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I love how this thread has turned into a mutual appreciation society for all things counterpoint. Take that, Wrong Person On The Internet!

Many of my favourites have been mentioned, but what about Please Hello form Sondheim's Pacific Overtures? The way that essentially devolves into a yelling match of the various ambassadors each singing to approriately regional music but still actually fitting together harmonically is about the most impressive thing I can think of
  #85  
Old 03-22-2020, 02:37 AM
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I haven't read all 15 years of this thread, but I think that "Skid Row" from Little Shop of Horrors does this towards the end, and I love it.

https://youtu.be/z0kSBiu1IGk
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  #86  
Old 03-22-2020, 07:35 AM
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The reason why everyone in a musical knows all the words to a song and can sing along with others is because the writers wrote it that way. Musicals, like classical opera, require complete suspension of disbelief.

The weirdest example of "everybody knowing the words" I can think of was in Pompeii, when the Greek chorus in the arena announced even unscheduled events with perfect timing. How the fuck would each member have known what to say?
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