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  #51  
Old 11-27-2011, 12:22 AM
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Stewart Sandwiches


I worked for Stewart for many years. I started as a maintenance man repairing the infra red ovens. I then started helping on sandwich routes then finally got my own route. After a few years, I was promoted to a supervisors position and joined the management training program. I was named the temporary manager of the Miami sales center, then promoted to manage the Baton Rouge sales center. All of this from 1971-1979.
What happened to Stewarts? Well like many stories this one has many vilians. The growth of a fast food restaurant on every corner, smaller local companies with lower overhead, but most importantly the FDA found listeria in the production plant in Norfolk VA. Bankruptcy followed and the lawyers tore up everything.
  #52  
Old 11-27-2011, 01:36 AM
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Why then, is it, that I saw Stewart sandwiches just a week or so ago at an Ohio Gas Station?
  #53  
Old 11-27-2011, 08:40 AM
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Why then, is it, that I saw Stewart sandwiches just a week or so ago at an Ohio Gas Station?
Well, you don't want to let that old stock go to waste do you?
  #54  
Old 04-28-2012, 03:19 PM
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stewart sandwiches


during my grade school time grades 1 thru 8, these became the greatest thing on earth. poor Mark Lentz eatting a cold Whopper, while most other kids had the hot dog, first 2 bites on either end were hot, the rest, stone cold. Mrs, Bruss and Ms. Russell didn't know how to work that new fangled oven well. Hamburger were also taste treats, but the best of all, the O'Boy. The crunchy bun with the cheese melted so well, it dripped out the bottom of the sandwhich.
  #55  
Old 04-30-2012, 09:06 AM
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I think there is a strong business case to bring back Stewart Sandwiches, looking at this thread there seems to be a high demand for these tasty sandwiches. I hope that when I start the New Stewart sandwich company all of you are there to support me.
Coming to a catholic school near you.......... The New Stewart Sandwich Company
  #56  
Old 04-30-2012, 09:18 AM
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Great-now we can explore : "who makes those amazing hot dogs that rotate endlessly on those shiny bars"?
Quote: (Apu, from "The Simpsons"):"you are the only one who eats those hotdogs, Homer".
  #57  
Old 04-30-2012, 10:01 AM
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Cotto salami, bologna american cheese on a toasted sub bun
  #58  
Old 08-04-2012, 11:38 AM
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"The" Machine....


I recently acquired one of this beautiful stainless steel encased heater....and it still works! Amazing! Has some minor rust on outside but otherwise door and elevator works unbelievably great...

If anyones still interested, I will be more than happy to post a few pictures of it.
  #59  
Old 12-12-2012, 10:58 AM
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Yummy Memories


I recall as a kid we used to by these sandwiches and my Dad would wrap them (still in the cellophane) in Tinfoil and toss them on the intake manifold of our pickup truck as we were pulling the Camper up the North Shore of Minnesota. When we got to our favorite resting place, Dad would pop the hood and we would all have a wonderful hot sandwich!

30 or more years ago, I worked at E.A. Sween (now known as DeliExpress) who bought the Minnesota Stewart Sandwiches franchise.

They used to have a freezer in the employee cafeteria filled with frozen food that was too close to expiration to ship out and it was FREE to the employees.
Man me and my room mate lived on Burritos, Pizzas, Heroes for a year.
  #60  
Old 12-12-2012, 12:05 PM
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Chuckwagons, mmmmmmmmmmmmmm!

From 1960 to '67, my dad used to take my brother and me to Flying Cloud Airport outside the Twin Cities on weekends; we would hang around all day and occasionally bum rides in light airplanes from the flight instructors. I'll never forget the Stewart Sandwiches they used to sell there, or the toaster oven they had to be heated up in. Those hot dogs with the charred edges on the buns---superb! Just the kind of thing a kid growing up would devour all day when far from home.
  #61  
Old 12-12-2012, 12:09 PM
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Come to think of it, didn't Roger Awsomb occasionally have a Stewart Sandwich on WTCN's "Lunch with Casey" back in the '60s? (Anyone who grew up then in Minneapolis or St Paul will know what I'm talking about.)
  #62  
Old 01-02-2013, 05:46 PM
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Stewart Driver


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Originally Posted by Rtmjohnson View Post
I worked for Stewart for many years. I started as a maintenance man repairing the infra red ovens. I then started helping on sandwich routes then finally got my own route. After a few years, I was promoted to a supervisors position and joined the management training program. I was named the temporary manager of the Miami sales center, then promoted to manage the Baton Rouge sales center. All of this from 1971-1979.
What happened to Stewarts? Well like many stories this one has many vilians. The growth of a fast food restaurant on every corner, smaller local companies with lower overhead, but most importantly the FDA found listeria in the production plant in Norfolk VA. Bankruptcy followed and the lawyers tore up everything.
I actually drove for Stewart Sandwiches between about 1978 & 1980. I loved their cheeseburgers and subs. Sometimes I would eat the sub cold or heat it in the oven you described. MMMMM.....MMMMMMMMMMM..........MMM!!!! LOL! Wish they were around today. Landshire couldn't hold a candle to them.
  #63  
Old 01-26-2013, 03:26 AM
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I've wished for years I could have another Cattleman's Special. It was a beef patty with a pat of butter and little onion pieces on top of the bun. It may be the same as someone has already mentioned, though by another name. He mentioned butter and onion, but not that the onion was on top of the bun. In the 70's, our HS had open campus at lunch to leave school if we wanted. We went to one of the local drug stores and had Stewart Sandwiches and cherry cokes. Also loved the Torpedo's and hotdogs. The place was called Romigs Drug Store. They had a counter with the swivel seats, and also the booths with a jukebox selection at every booth. A throwback from the 50's, I guess. Maybe even further back. My friends still talk about the sandwiches accasionally. They were good, at least back then they seemed to be. Thank you all for adding to the memories.
  #64  
Old 01-26-2013, 07:09 AM
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Oh, wow do I remember Stewart Hot Sandwiches! There was a neighborhood grocery a block and a half from from my house that had a pinball room in the back. I guess I was bout 12-15 when we we all were hanging there. They had Stewart Sandwiches and they seemed to keep us alive thru those days! The Cattleman's Special was the best by far. Thats the one that had the beef patty on an onion roll, some diced onions on it and a big fat pat of butter that just greased up the whole thing! You just couldn't wait for that timer bell to ring! Mmm mmm.
  #65  
Old 01-26-2013, 07:33 AM
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And somebody better get a lawyer now that I know how my uncle was killed in that cranberry bog years ago.
He ate a sandwich he found in a bog? What did he expect?
  #66  
Old 05-06-2013, 04:31 PM
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Stewart Sandwich Answer


I noticed your post...My father was the managing partner for Stewart Sandwich franchise in the Pacific NW starting in the early 50s. I worked there off & on through my high school & college years in the Late 60s & early 70s. At one time were producing up to 150,000 sandwiches per day.

The sandwiches were great...heated & toasted with an infrared light inside a sheet metal enclosure...Sort of like an easy bake oven on steroids. Hence the full name of the company was Stewart Infrared Sandwiches. They had a Quiznos type crunchy texture & flavor...Keep in mind this was 20 years before Subway & Quiznos was even an idea. McDonalds was still in it's infancy.

The cellophane wrappers were a great invention not unlike what we use today to wrap food for reheating in a microwave. The trick to not burning the cellophane was to make sure the sandwich was not frozen when it was put in the infrared oven. It was all about timing....because the cellophane would burn.... It was better to slice open the wrapper for a toastier sandwich.

We used imported cheeses and quality meats from companies like Armour and others. We were the #1 bread customer to local bakeries. When the microwave was invented in the late 60s..there was pressure to provide small microwaves to our customers. This really took a toll on the quality control of our product...microwaves turn meat & bread into rubber & cheese into liquid. People didn't know how to use them yet.

In the late 80s, we disenfranchised from the Stewart name...the name was changed to Scotty's Sandwiches. Stewart Sandwich Corp provided little more than a name. Each franchise was responsible for their own product lines and quality control. Our NW franchise another whole line of deli style cold sandwiches in the 1970s.

Even after my fatherís death in the early 90s... I continued to represent the family & attend corporate meetings until about 2000. With the continued consumer choices & competition in fast food and lack of quality control in ingredients and preparation we began to see drastic drop in market share. Many of our convenience store customers began to produce their own sandwiches. One chain called "Plaid Pantry" even cut a deal with Subway to set-up in-house with them. We sold the company in 2000 to a food distributor in Eastern, Oregon. Some franchises lasted a little longer in other parts of the country....but they all eventually met the same outcome.

Thank you for you interest...responding to you has brought back some great memories.. If you or anyone else has questions...I would be happy to respond directly... My e-mail is

TomTVA@aol.com

Regards,
Tom Trullinger
  #67  
Old 05-06-2013, 04:44 PM
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Anyone else get a warm fuzzy feeling whenever this topic gets bumped back up?
  #68  
Old 05-06-2013, 05:42 PM
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Imagine if they had these things today-the cellophane probably outgassed a ton of chemicals into the sandwich-probably not too good for you!
The precursor of Zik-Zak Burger Paks... the ones where the plastic rubs off on the meat and doubles the nutritional value!
  #69  
Old 05-06-2013, 10:06 PM
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Thank you Tom, that was great!
  #70  
Old 05-07-2013, 09:40 AM
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They had a sandwich which was (inexplicably) named a "Poor-Boy"*. It was kind of a submarine sandwich on very soft hoagie bun (think of a hoagie bun, but with the texture of a hot-dog bun). It had salami, bologna, ham and (I think) two types of cheese.

I was addicted to those things. The name may have been weird but....damn...it was delicous. And whatever type of cheese(s) it was, they were wonderful.

*IIRC, Po'Boys are fried seafood (oysters traditionally) on a hot-dog bun type thing

Last edited by Fenris; 05-07-2013 at 09:42 AM.
  #71  
Old 05-07-2013, 07:05 PM
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They had a sandwich which was (inexplicably) named a "Poor-Boy"*. It was kind of a submarine sandwich on very soft hoagie bun (think of a hoagie bun, but with the texture of a hot-dog bun). It had salami, bologna, ham and (I think) two types of cheese.

*IIRC, Po'Boys are fried seafood (oysters traditionally) on a hot-dog bun type thing
"Poor Boy" is another regional name for what we called "Submarine" sandwiches in Minnesota. In other parts of the US, they're known as "Grinders," "Torpedoes," "Hoagies," and Lord knows what else.

"Po' Boys" such as you describe I've never heard of outside Louisiana.

Last edited by terentii; 05-07-2013 at 07:09 PM.
  #72  
Old 05-07-2013, 07:12 PM
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They were originally working-class "all-in-one" lunchpail sandwiches, hence the name "Poor Boy."
  #73  
Old 05-08-2013, 12:49 PM
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I did not know that! I'd only heard of the fried seafood inna bun version. Thanks for the info!

Regardless, though, Stewart's were unbelievably good for some reason.
  #74  
Old 06-05-2013, 01:57 PM
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guest


To me the best sandwich was the Torpedo. Chuckwagon was a close second. I used to eat these when I was in high school. Do they have any of these sandwiches anywhere to purchase? Any help would really be appreciated!

Last edited by BBREF13; 06-05-2013 at 01:58 PM. Reason: drop the guest
  #75  
Old 07-01-2013, 08:53 PM
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Stewart Sandwiches


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Originally Posted by ralph124c View Post
When I was a young kid, my uncle owned a bar-he had a line of pre-made sandwiches that were supplied by a company named "Stewart". These sandwiches were made to be heated up, in a special electric oven-I think it was like a toaster oven. The weird thing was, these sandwiches were packed in cellophane wrappers-i never figured out how the wrappers didn't burn.
My uncle recalls that they were not gourmet fare, but people seemed to like them.
I googled and came up with nothing-I'm sure the company is long gone. anyway, they had hamburgers-so somebody had thought of fast food, a long time ago.
The Stewart family lived on Lake Geneva, Wisconsin and ran the business in an office behind their home. They sold the company to Campbell Soup in the early 70s. If anyone knows Collis Stewart, Jr., I'd appreciate a message.
  #76  
Old 07-01-2013, 08:55 PM
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Stewart Sandwiches were cooked in infrared machines. The infrared didn't melt the plastic, but it sure ran up the electric bill. Today's infrared cookers are based on this original technology that dates back to the 50s.
  #77  
Old 07-01-2013, 08:57 PM
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I actually drove for Stewart Sandwiches between about 1978 & 1980. I loved their cheeseburgers and subs. Sometimes I would eat the sub cold or heat it in the oven you described. MMMMM.....MMMMMMMMMMM..........MMM!!!! LOL! Wish they were around today. Landshire couldn't hold a candle to them.
The Stewart family sold the company to Campbell Soup in the early 70s and for the most part retired. The oldest son, Collie Stewart maintained a couple of the commissaries in Arizona and somewhere else, may still be managing them.
  #78  
Old 07-21-2013, 07:20 AM
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Indianapolis Stewart sandwiches


My father, Stanley Puckett, owned the Indianapolis franchise, and my grandfather, Glenn Puckett, sold many of the franchises. I worked as the office manager, as did my sister before me. The shop used to be on 10th street across from the zoo and then he moved it to Raymond across from Tupperware. I used to go to the conventions and tours in Norfolk, Virginia. It was a Huge business. We really got a huge jump supplying to Indianapolis public schools. The sandwiches WERE amazing and so very simple. The ladies in the back just slapped lunchmeat on the buns and the machine carried them down the line. The worst job was boxing them a dozen to a box because of the nasty paper cuts!
  #79  
Old 08-21-2013, 06:50 PM
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Stewart Sandwiches Collectible Clock


Hey all,

I'm a picker and I recently came across a Stewart Sandwiches Collectible clock. I listed it on eBay, and I wanted to share the link with you all because you all seem to remember these sandwiches so fondly!

Here's the link http://www.ebay.com/itm/Stewart-Sand...item2c71caae18

If the link doesn't work for some reason, just go to ebay and search for Stewart Sandwiches Clock.

It's been fun reading through this thread! I love learning the history behind the items I pick, and you all have helped me know more about this company than I otherwise would have! For some reason when you search Stewart Sandwiches, most of the information that kicks back is about Martha Stewart's sandwiches!
  #80  
Old 08-21-2013, 06:53 PM
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Spam reported. (Bluemoondecor)
  #81  
Old 08-21-2013, 06:59 PM
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why spam?


Why was that spam? I thought people would enjoy seeing something that they obviously enjoy. Sorry if i offended.
  #82  
Old 08-21-2013, 07:05 PM
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It's your E-Bay store. Looks like you're trying to sell.
The only place allowed here for that is the Marketplace forum. Buy a membership and you can post there.
  #83  
Old 08-21-2013, 07:29 PM
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It is cool you found the clock, and nice that you found this message board. We'd probably be happy to help you find out more info on items that you pick, but technically it is against the rules to post links to items you have for sale.

Please don't let this scare you away... stay awhile... read some threads, share the expertise you have in your picking adventures... just don't post links to items for sale, unless you pay the membership fee and post in the marketplace.
  #84  
Old 12-15-2013, 09:06 AM
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I was there too. I was a line mech. in the East kitchen beside The Patty Plant that I believe you talked about .I thought the food was good too! Do you remember any of the other folks? My name is Steve.
  #85  
Old 03-18-2014, 12:45 PM
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The Stewart family lived on Lake Geneva, Wisconsin and ran the business in an office behind their home. They sold the company to Campbell Soup in the early 70s. If anyone knows Collis Stewart, Jr., I'd appreciate a message.
Sold to Stewart Sandwiches International out of Norfolk, not Campbell Soup. Company moved from Harvard, Ill to the barn converted to offices behind what was known as Ten Acre Lodge purchased in 1964.
  #86  
Old 03-18-2014, 12:48 PM
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Anyone else get a warm fuzzy feeling whenever this topic gets bumped back up?
I was going to post this when I realized that I had probably already done so.
  #87  
Old 07-22-2014, 12:36 AM
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Remembering Stewart's Sandwiches


From early 1970 to mid 1971 I was stationed at McConnell AFB, in Wichita, Ks. I worked at the PMEL facility, and the chow hall was a fare hike. Our lab chief saw that there was a need for our small group to have a decent meal at lunch time, and not have to trek across the base, to get something decent to eat. In short order we had a Stewart's Infra - Red oven in our break room, with a stock of sandwiches in the fridge. We paid by the honor system, in order to keep the privilege. I can't say as I ever had a favorite, because I loved all of the sandwiches the delivery guy brought. So, I rarely walked to the chow hall after the sandwiches became part of our lunchtime routine. The Infra-Red oven made the sandwich buns crispy/toasty, on the outside, with the meat and cheese hot and melted, and oh so delicious. Microwaved food that came later just couldn't match what that oven did.
My wife has often said that "With Jim, it's all about the food, where, when, and how good it was." In this case that is so true, because I do remember, very fondly those Stewart Sandwiches. In 1971, I received orders for Andersen AFB, on the island of Guam. There were no Stewart's sandwiches on Guam, or at least I never found one there. I really think they should bring Stewart sandwiches back. They would surely be a hit.
  #88  
Old 07-25-2014, 12:45 PM
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The Fascinating Stewart Sander


I always admired the creative genius of Stewart Infrareds. Whom else would have possessed the synergy not to call it a Cheezeburger, but rather the attention-demanding "Hamburger Sandwich with Cheeze"? Brilliant!

Who remembers the rival hot sanders named Ouslers?
  #89  
Old 07-27-2014, 12:41 AM
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Aww, one of my favorite zombies!

I'm too young to have ever had the real things (b. 1981), but I thought of this exact thread a few months ago while on an airplane. Sun Country serves something along these lines for their 'hot lunch' options. I've no idea what brand they are, but they hand the things to you piping hot, still sealed in the bag. The buns are toasted and the plastic's gone slightly crispy, so they must be heating them via IR instead of in a microwave. Massively overpriced, but strangely like real food for something I bought at 35,000 feet.
  #90  
Old 02-09-2015, 05:46 PM
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Great memories!


I believe their slogan was "Best taste you ever toasted." My grandmother was the production manager in Milwaukee for years and years. My father used to make sandwiches at those long tables as well and then delivered sandwiches in the summer, usually to bars throughout Milwaukee. On Fridays they'd make 1200 hot dogs for the Milwaukee County Zoo. I shared this thread with him and he was very excited to read all the comments. Thank you all for sharing your memories.
  #91  
Old 02-09-2015, 06:38 PM
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Remember the "Established poster" thread we had recently? I'd like to add that you're established if you recall at least 3 resurrections of the Stewart Sandwich thread.

I have arrived!

Last edited by Sicks Ate; 02-09-2015 at 06:38 PM.
  #92  
Old 02-10-2015, 03:15 PM
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I remember these sandwiches from the caff at our local hospital. I volunteered there on weekends as a high schooler and the hot food line at the caff was always closed down by the time we had our breaks. But they had the Stewart's sammies. I loved the ham and cheese. At home we only got cold ham and cheese sammies, so getting them hot crispy on the outside and melty on the inside was a kind of nirvana. Ham and cheese sammie and an RC cola. Still sounds good.
  #93  
Old 02-10-2015, 03:22 PM
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Anyone else get a warm fuzzy feeling whenever this topic gets bumped back up?
Yep, still there.
  #94  
Old 05-07-2015, 09:13 AM
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Yep


My parents had NAPA auto stores. In 1963, when I was fourteen and working with a "worker's permit" Stewart Sandwich came in and put in a small refrigerator and a microwave oven in the store. The first I'd seen. At that time there were no fast food chains in the county. The refrigerator is still working at my office 5-7-2015; 52 years later.
  #95  
Old 05-07-2015, 09:52 AM
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Anyone else get a warm fuzzy feeling whenever this topic gets bumped back up?
I guess you had to be there (like Mrs. Wagner's Pies). Having never heard of them, it's always a surprise to me when someone new adds his/her new memory.
  #96  
Old 05-07-2015, 09:56 AM
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Remember the "Established poster" thread we had recently? I'd like to add that you're established if you recall at least 3 resurrections of the Stewart Sandwich thread.

I have arrived!
No no no no. You are now an established member. Or to be more precise an established reader.

To be an established POSTER you must have been an argumentative jerk during 3 resurrections of a thread.

Standard people. Standards.
  #97  
Old 05-07-2015, 06:54 PM
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My parents had NAPA auto stores. In 1963, when I was fourteen and working with a "worker's permit" Stewart Sandwich came in and put in a small refrigerator and a microwave oven in the store. The first I'd seen. At that time there were no fast food chains in the county. The refrigerator is still working at my office 5-7-2015; 52 years later.
So, if my math skills haven't totally disappeared, you're talking about 1963 or so. McDonalds had 500 units. Seems like a fast food chain.
  #98  
Old 05-07-2015, 07:00 PM
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I never heard of this brand but I'm reminded of something I used to love and really miss which I believe was called Magic Fries. No clue who made them but each fry was in it's own crisping sleeve and tasted so good.
  #99  
Old 05-07-2015, 08:57 PM
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So, if my math skills haven't totally disappeared, you're talking about 1963 or so. McDonalds had 500 units. Seems like a fast food chain.
Psst! I'm taking he didn't make a typo, and really meant there weren't any in his county. Heck, my home town (population @3000) didn't get one until the mid 1970s.

Last edited by Earl Snake-Hips Tucker; 05-07-2015 at 08:57 PM. Reason: Ha! Made a typo spelling 'typo!' Off all the ironies, that has to be one of the ironest!
  #100  
Old 05-07-2015, 10:39 PM
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Psst! I'm taking he didn't make a typo, and really meant there weren't any in his county. Heck, my home town (population @3000) didn't get one until the mid 1970s.
I'm pretty sure McDonald's didn't come to Minneapolis/St Paul until I was in Kindergarden (late 1960--early '61).
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