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Old 03-10-2020, 02:55 PM
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Tips for tomato pasta sauce


Iím zeroing in on a basic recipe for tomato pasta sauce, and Iíd like some input: opinions, suggestions, preferences, etc.

Plenty for two people:
Medium can (400g) of crushed tomatoes
3 tablespoons tomato concentrate
1 tablespoon sugar
1 medium onion
1 medium Cubanelle (Italian frying) pepper
half red bell pepper
1 stalk of celery
1 clove garlic
1 frozen hamburger patty (75% beef 25% pork, not too thick)
Fresh basil, dried oregano, salt, olive oil

Chop all vegetables and sautť in olive oil, starting with onion and garlic with a little salt. Add crushed tomatoes and enough water to fill half the can, sugar, concentrate, spices and frozen patty. Cover and stir occasionally (break up patty) for two or three hours until good and thick.

Thereís little or no browning happening. Would that be an improvement? The frozen patty is just for my convenience. Would it make much difference to brown it fresh from the butcherís?

Other recipes call for wine, black pepper, carrot, Worcestershire sauce, clove, chili flakes, bay leaves, parsley...
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Old 03-10-2020, 03:24 PM
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Red wine.
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Old 03-10-2020, 03:53 PM
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A few drops of balsamic vinegar helps to bring out/intensify the tomato flavor.

j
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Old 03-10-2020, 04:07 PM
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Ditch the celery, add wine. Also, use both tomato paste and tomato sauce in addition to diced tomatoes. I would use fresh ground pork and brown it in olive oil. The frozen patty may be okay, but definitely break it up and brown it. Take it out and saute the veg in the fat (add a bit more, if necessary). Then add the tomato paste and cook until the oil is absorbed and the paste has turned a darker red. Then add the meat back in and the other tomato products. If you're using fresh herbs, add them at the end. Otherwise, add dry herbs at the same time you add the tomato paste. Simmer all of it for about an hour. Garnish with fresh cut basil. For dried herbs, use oregano, thyme, rosemary and parsley.

Last edited by Chefguy; 03-10-2020 at 04:09 PM.
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Old 03-10-2020, 04:15 PM
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For simplicity and deliciousness, very little beats Marcella Hazan's three ingredient sauce. 2 cups tomatoes (about a 28-ounce can, 800 g), 5 tablespoons butter, half an onion (literally, just cut in half, no further dicing). Cook for 45 minutes occasoinally while smashing down tomatoes as they break down. Remove onion, taste for salt (add as much as necessary), serve over pasta.

So you definitely want to start with good quality tomatoes. Most of my basic Italian tomato sauces are no more than about four ingredients or so. Another standard one for me is tomatoes, olive oil, garlic, dash of dried oregano.

Now, if I'm doing a meat sauce, then, yeah, I'll add a batutto of onions, carrots, celery and often parsley and layer flavors from there (wine, milk if I'm doing a bolognese, possibly chicken livers, pancetta, etc). But for a simple tomato sauce, I just want the focus on tomatoes, with one herb as an accent, and either onions or garlic (not both when I'm keeping it simple) and serve with pasta with generous grating of your preferred salty cheese (like percorino romano, grana padano, parmigianno-reggiano, etc.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 03-10-2020 at 04:16 PM.
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Old 03-10-2020, 04:52 PM
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Thereís little or no browning happening. Would that be an improvement?
I would think so. Add the beef in before you add the tomatoes and water. Let it cook and brown up. Then add the liquid and deglaze the fond.
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Old 03-10-2020, 05:02 PM
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I would think so. Add the beef in before you add the tomatoes and water. Let it cook and brown up. Then add the liquid and deglaze the fond.
Well, it depends on what you're going for. In a classic bolognese, you generally don't want browning. You want the meat to cook gently and have it remain soft and tender. Typically, you cook the raw red out of the meat and then once it's changed color, you add milk, cook it down, then add wine, cook it down, and then continue with the rest of the recipe.

Now, that's not the only way to do it. Many cooks do brown their meat for a bolognese. The browning will add a roasted flavor to the sauce, and the texture of the meat will have a "tighter" texture than that of a non-browned bolognese. (But I may be digressing here, as bolognese really isn't a tomato sauce so much as a meat sauce that happens to have tomato in it.)
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Old 03-10-2020, 05:06 PM
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Iím zeroing in on a basic recipe for tomato pasta sauce, and Iíd like some input: opinions, suggestions, preferences, etc.
What makes for a good basic sauce is such an individual matter that opinions really become meaningless. Experiment, do what works for you, mangia!. I really only offer one bit of advice and only because it works well for me. If it's not for you, tell me to eat another cannoli and stop talking.

There really is no substitute for good tomatoes and long cooking times. Everything else is negotiable. When I want pasta and red sauce, I don't want to wait 2+ hours for a properly made from scratch sauce. As a result, I tend to make huge batches (10 quarts or more) so that I can portion and freeze most of it. I make 3-4 batches a year, 4-6 hours invested per batch and put out a plate of pasta anytime I want in about 15 minutes.

If you have the freezer space, you might want to give this a shot. For ME, the convenience and quick meal prep make the freezer space a worthy investment.

BTW, I love fennel bulb in my sauce.
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Old 03-10-2020, 05:19 PM
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There really is no substitute for good tomatoes and long cooking times.
I would agree with #1. That's the most important thing. Unless your tomatoes are in season and you know you can source good quality fresh tomatoes, use a good brand of canned tomato. San Marzano is the gold standard, but there is so much "San Marzano style" out there you have to know what you're buying. You might have to look out for DOP certification on your can. I actually likely some American brands of tomatoes and go for them. (6-in-1/Escalon brand ground tomatoes are my favorite for sauces. 7/11 Ground tomatoes are also very good.)

For #2, well, it depends what you're going for. I personally like a lot of fresh tomato sauces that are only cooked for maybe 20 minutes at most. Arrabiata, for instance, if I'm using ground tomatoes or a passata, I just cook it long enough for it to be cooked through and very slightly thickened. Maybe 10 minutes. These have a very different flavor than long-cooked sauces. They're fruitier and "livelier" to me than long cooked sauces, which have a more mellow, but perhaps deeper(?) flavor.
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Old 03-10-2020, 05:43 PM
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And that's a fair point pulykamell. As always, the perfect way to cook anything is the way in which the cook and his/her loved ones enjoy it. I like my sauce cooked for quite long time so the flavors mellow but I do end up losing that bright tomato freshness. My sauce is very rich, usually meatless, chunky and with a lots of different vegetables to enhance the texture and appearance.

Truthfully, when I have really good, fresh tomatoes, the idea of using them in a cooked red sauce just seems wrong for me. When I want to bring out and exploit that flavor, I would sooner make a nice caprese salad or bruschetta. That's just me and if I'm wrong, so be it.

I have used honest and for true San Marzano tomatoes and yes they are better. But, for my money, they are not sufficiently superior to justify their increased cost. That's assuming I can even find them in my rural location.
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Last edited by Alpha Twit; 03-10-2020 at 05:44 PM.
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Old 03-10-2020, 06:14 PM
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One of my favorite simple recipes:

2-3 pounds tomatoes, chopped
7 oz. pancetta or bacon, sliced in 1/4" julienne strips
1 onion, sliced thin
1/4 cup olive oil
salt
1/4 cup fresh basil
grated pecorino
pepper

Heat the oil and cook the onion and bacon for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the tomatoes and a bit of salt, cover and simmer for about an hour. At the end of cooking, add a good pinch of ground pepper and the basil leaves. Serve over pasta and top with peccorino.
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Old 03-10-2020, 06:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
One of my favorite simple recipes:

2-3 pounds tomatoes, chopped
7 oz. pancetta or bacon, sliced in 1/4" julienne strips
1 onion, sliced thin
1/4 cup olive oil
salt
1/4 cup fresh basil
grated pecorino
pepper

Heat the oil and cook the onion and bacon for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the tomatoes and a bit of salt, cover and simmer for about an hour. At the end of cooking, add a good pinch of ground pepper and the basil leaves. Serve over pasta and top with peccorino.
Oh yeah, that's very nice. Kind of a riff on sugo all'amatriciana.

Last edited by pulykamell; 03-10-2020 at 06:33 PM.
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Old 03-10-2020, 07:43 PM
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So you definitely want to start with good quality tomatoes. Most of my basic Italian tomato sauces are no more than about four ingredients or so. Another standard one for me is tomatoes, olive oil, garlic, dash of dried oregano.
Pretty much this. I use fire-roasted crushed tomatoes, usually, and will switch between oregano, basil and sage depending on season, what I am going to pair it with, etc.
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Old 03-10-2020, 08:59 PM
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I'll third (fourth?) the oregano recommendation. I really like the flavor in my tomato sauce.
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Old 03-10-2020, 09:21 PM
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A hot Italian sausage or two. Browned & sliced or removed from casing & cooked with hamburger (which I have replaced with a diced chicken breast)
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Old 03-11-2020, 03:34 AM
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Lots of great advice and ideas. You guys have kicked up my game by a gear if not a whole level! Molto generoso, grazie.

Chefguy: I thought celery was used a lot in Italian cooking? This is about the only time I use it, and I do so only because I thought it was customary in Italian cooking. Thanks for that recipe; I’ll be making it that way next time.

Pulykamell: The butter sounds intriguing, as does the milk for bolgnese. I had no idea and will be looking into that. What about processing the vegetables with a blender or food mill? It that something anyone does when preparing these sauces?

Alpha Twit: Fennel sounds like a very good idea for a vegetable-based sauce. I like fennel a lot (not sure why, either; it just agrees with me), although I only use it in stewed white beans at present.

Thanks again to everyone who participated!
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Old 03-11-2020, 04:55 AM
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I'd fry the onion pepper and celery first at a moderate heat to get a bit of decent caramelisation.

I'd set that aside and then brown the meat in batches at a high heat and set that aside.

Veggies back in (don't clean the pan first) and add the garlic and any dry herbs. Personally I'd add a pinch of dried chilli and a little nutmeg at this point too. Give that a few minutes on a low heat and then add some balsamic and stir round to deglaze. Only then add the tomatoes and sugar. I'd also add a little milk for simmering liquid and then set on a low heat for perhaps an hour.
Then season and add fresh herbs 5 minutes before the end.
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Old 03-11-2020, 05:42 AM
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I'm more like a mustard dressing but you can also do without tomato

Last edited by ForsythLucas42; 03-11-2020 at 05:43 AM.
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Old 03-11-2020, 06:49 AM
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Pulykamell: The butter sounds intriguing, as does the milk for bolgnese. I had no idea and will be looking into that. What about processing the vegetables with a blender or food mill? It that something anyone does when preparing these sauces?
Milk is standard in bolognese. This is the recipe I use for bolognese, from the Simili sisters of Bologna. You could also look at Marcella Hazan's recipe, which is similar. (Marcella Hazan is to Italian cooking in the US what Julia Child was to French. Her cookbook "Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking" is required for anyone interested in Italian cuisine.)

I have seen some recipes that call for processesing the vegetables for a bolognese in a food processor first, like this Bon Appetit recipe.

Do note that as I said above, a bolognese is not a tomato meat sauce so much as meat cooked down with tomatoes. The final product is like a thick sloppy joe in consistency, not like a jar of Ragu or Prego in consistency (these are all American references, but I believe the OP is familiar with them.)

And, yes, celery is used commonly in Italian cooking--it forms part of a vegetable base called either battuto or soffritto that is used much like mirepoix in French cooking or "the holy trinity" in Creole cooking. I typically use it for meat sauces, but it can be used on its own in a tomato sauce, too. (Marcella Hazan has a recipe for a simple tomato sauce which starts with tomatoes and then the finely diced celery, onions, and carrots are cooked crudo in the sauce, that is, they are thrown in raw and not fried or softened first.)
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Old 03-11-2020, 07:02 AM
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ETA: Looking at Hazan's "Essentials of Classit Italian Cooking," the very first chapter called "Fundamentals: Where Flavor Starts" begins with a section on battuto, sofrtito, and insaporie.
It does state that at one time the standard ingredients were lard, parsley, and onion, but now often include garlic, celery, or carrot, depending on the dish, and with olive oil substituted often these days for the lard.

So whether your battuto contains celery will be a manner of local or family tradition and/or personal taste. Pretty much all the current online sources I can find do at least celery, carrot, and onion in their battuto, with some also calling for garlic, leeks, and/or parsley.
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Old 03-11-2020, 08:54 AM
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I live in Italian with an Italian. Not a great moment to be living there, though great for cooking!

Anyway, I have nothing much to add except "less is more"and I'd second or third or whatever the good tomato motion.
Also, most Italians in most situation use garlic or onions, but not both. They are thought to clash. I don't agree with that in every possible situation, but for a simple sauce I would do one or the other, in my case garlic. And most Italians will slice the garlic and let it infuse in the heating oil and then take it out. But I leave it in or eat it, it's healthy!
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Old 03-11-2020, 09:56 AM
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I think I'd be careful with the cubanelle and bell peppers; those can overwhelm a sauce if you're not judicious with the quantity.

I'd also save the salt until the end, and something I've learned is that it's often good to taste the sauce at the end, and if it seems to be missing something, that something is often brightness/acidity, and adding lemon juice or in this case, red wine vinegar will often perk the sauce up. It doesn't take much though- I'd add by the 1/8 teaspoon (or less) until I had it right.
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Old 03-11-2020, 11:30 AM
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Every time I make red pasta sauce my recipe is a little different because I like to "experiment" with whatever I have on hand. I do like to mash a couple anchovies and use add them to my sauce. Like many others I like some oregano; dried is fine, but we have a few different varieties growing so I'll hadd some of that along with fresh basil.
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Old 03-11-2020, 12:40 PM
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Thanks to everyone for all the ideas. Very generous. Now I have knowledge to learn about traditional approaches and inspiration to try my own ideas.

Hereís your reward. Iíve known about this recipe for a while and tried it today for the first time with outstanding results.

Chicken in pepitoria (almond) sauce:

In a large non-stick pan, brown chicken and set aside. In same pan, sautť onion and garlic. Meanwhile (beforehand is better), boil eggs and, in a small skillet over very low heat, toast almonds without any oil or anything. Remove from skillet and set aside. With the skillet off the heat, add a little saffron to toast it, too, and set it aside. Now add some olive oil to the skillet, toast a slice of ďFrenchĒ bread (hard, dried-out bread works best) on both sides and set aside. Peel eggs and set aside yolks. With a blender, whizz up the almonds, the saffron, the bread, the yolks and a little white wine, and pour the mixture into the pan with the onion and garlic. Mix and add chicken. You can swish a little water around in the blender to get all the mixture out, but bear in mind that when cooking starts you want just enough sauce to cook the chicken for about half an hour (see below) on low heat, so be careful not to end up with too much liquid. Obviously, chicken broth is better than water, but I just used water and half a chicken bouillon cube. About cooking time, I cooked a drumstick and a thigh uncovered over low heat for 10 minutes on each side, and a whole chicken will take longer, maybe 35 to 40 minutes. Before serving, chop parsley and the hard-boiled egg whites and sprinkle over each plate.

Do it right: Disconnect the phone, sop up the sauce with your favorite crusty white bread, and pass out on the couch for an hour or two.

Last edited by jerez; 03-11-2020 at 12:42 PM.
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Old 03-11-2020, 02:15 PM
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Certainly some interesting ideas. It's necesssary to cook a longer time if you are using canned tomatoes, because of the citric acid they add to it. Fresh tomatoes don't require it, but then it's a rare thing to find a decent fresh tomato around here, except for the ones I grow myself. Your typical Italian chef won't use suger. They use stuff like sweet peppers and or basil for sweetness. I'm not talking about American Italians. Most always have a great, basic, sauce, and build their bolo's or whatever off of that.

My tip for you is to brown tomato paste in the oil a bit, and try tomato powder and water for paste. 3 to 1 ratio.
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Old 03-11-2020, 02:44 PM
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Ugh. Way too much. For a simple marinara, sautť four minced cloves of garlic in two tablespoons of good extra virgin olive oil. When they take on color, add salt, pepper, a few dashes of crushed red pepper, then add a 28 oz can of crushed tomato, preferably San Marzano. Simmer for a bit, then add a handful each of chopped basil and parsley. Cook until done.
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Old 03-11-2020, 02:47 PM
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Ugh. Way too much. For a simple marinara, sautť four minced cloves of garlic in two tablespoons of good extra virgin olive oil. When they take on color, add salt, pepper, a few dashes of crushed red pepper, then add a 28 oz can of crushed tomato, preferably San Marzano. Simmer for a bit, then add a handful each of chopped basil and parsley. Cook until done.
Your recipe is my recipe, except I use home canned tomatoes and forego the parsley. Exquisite.
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Old 03-11-2020, 03:46 PM
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Lots of great advice and ideas. You guys have kicked up my game by a gear if not a whole level! Molto generoso, grazie.

Chefguy: I thought celery was used a lot in Italian cooking? This is about the only time I use it, and I do so only because I thought it was customary in Italian cooking. Thanks for that recipe; Iíll be making it that way next time.
It may be; it's just my preference not to use it. My mother (who was definitely NOT Italian) always put it in her spaghetti sauce, but then she put pretty much everything in her kitchen sink sauce, including olives and a ton of rosemary that we picked out of our teeth for hours after. I don't think celery adds much in this instance, but am a fan of it in other dishes, especially Creole/Cajun dishes, and in salads.
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Old 03-11-2020, 05:42 PM
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Your recipe is my recipe, except I use home canned tomatoes and forego the parsley. Exquisite.
Good man! Mail me a few jars of your home tomatoes, willya?

I never used parsley either, until I read Henry Hillís Wiseguy Cookbook, where I learned itís a regular Sicilian-American thing. He was...persuasive. And it does add a nice brightness.
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Old 03-11-2020, 06:30 PM
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Good man! Mail me a few jars of your home tomatoes, willya?

I never used parsley either, until I read Henry Hillís Wiseguy Cookbook, where I learned itís a regular Sicilian-American thing. He was...persuasive. And it does add a nice brightness.
Yeah, I'm a fairly recent convert to fresh parsley in soups and tomato sauces. I include it in my Italian meatballs, also.
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Old 03-11-2020, 06:44 PM
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Good man! Mail me a few jars of your home tomatoes, willya?

I never used parsley either, until I read Henry Hillís Wiseguy Cookbook, where I learned itís a regular Sicilian-American thing. He was...persuasive. And it does add a nice brightness.
Good woman. But darn, I'm nearly out of home canned for the season... I'm even having to self-ration till next September. Maybe next year.

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Yeah, I'm a fairly recent convert to fresh parsley in soups and tomato sauces. I include it in my Italian meatballs, also.
Don't get me wrong, I love fresh Italian parsley in lots of tomato sauces I make. Happily, it self-sows in my garden each year. I just don't prefer it in this particular concoction. May have to revisit, however, on the recommendations of two such illustrious Doper chefs!
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Old 03-11-2020, 06:58 PM
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Yeah, I'm a fairly recent convert to fresh parsley in soups and tomato sauces. I include it in my Italian meatballs, also.
Yup, meatballs get the same basil/parsley treatment, along with minced onion.

The onion goes in the meatballs, the garlic goes in the sauce. I donít know why it works, but it do.
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Old 03-11-2020, 07:06 PM
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Good woman. But darn, I'm nearly out of home canned for the season... I'm even having to self-ration till next September. Maybe next year.
Don't get me wrong, I love fresh Italian parsley in lots of tomato sauces I make. Happily, it self-sows in my garden each year. I just don't prefer it in this particular concoction. May have to revisit, however, on the recommendations of two such illustrious Doper chefs!
Iím a BOY, Iím a BOY, though my Ma wonít admit it! Iím a BOY, Iím a BOY, but if I say I am Iíll git it.

Do try a lollop of parsley next time, and report back.

Also, I ainít no CHEF. A chef is a fucking executive, who doesnít get his fancy little pink hands in the bloody dripping offal and the hot soup stock. Iím a working man... a COOK, damn it!
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Old 03-11-2020, 07:12 PM
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Aspenglow: Oh, hell, I just realized you meant YOU were a woman. Apologies.

Now I respect you more than ever — always enjoy your posts — seeing you’re not another one of the nattering Y chromosomes that infest this place.
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Old 03-11-2020, 07:21 PM
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Iím a BOY, Iím a BOY, though my Ma wonít admit it! Iím a BOY, Iím a BOY, but if I say I am Iíll git it.

Do try a lollop of parsley next time, and report back.

Also, I ainít no CHEF. A chef is a fucking executive, who doesnít get his fancy little pink hands in the bloody dripping offal and the hot soup stock. Iím a working man... a COOK, damn it!
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Aspenglow: Oh, hell, I just realized you meant YOU were a woman. Apologies.

Now I respect you more than ever ó always enjoy your posts ó seeing youíre not another one of the nattering Y chromosomes that infest this place.
LOL, you are making me laugh hard, and that is something I truly appreciate these days!

I did actually debate the nomenclature of 'cook' v. 'chef,' but I didn't wish to take any professional training Chefguy has for granted. Though I have the feeling he wouldn't feel awful about offal.

I will try some parsley next time and I will report back.
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Old 03-11-2020, 07:51 PM
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Any canned, bottled, or fresh pasta sauce with a dash of instant coffee will taste as if simmered all day.
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Old 03-11-2020, 09:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Ugh. Way too much. For a simple marinara, sauté four minced cloves of garlic in two tablespoons of good extra virgin olive oil. When they take on color, add salt, pepper, a few dashes of crushed red pepper, then add a 28 oz can of crushed tomato, preferably San Marzano. Simmer for a bit, then add a handful each of chopped basil and parsley. Cook until done.
This is exactly how the marinara sauce at the Calabrian ristorante I worked at was made. It was lighter on the basil and heavier on the parsley, but that was as much for cost as flavor.
  #38  
Old 03-11-2020, 10:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Good man! Mail me a few jars of your home tomatoes, willya?

I never used parsley either, until I read Henry Hill’s Wiseguy Cookbook, where I learned it’s a regular Sicilian-American thing. He was...persuasive. And it does add a nice brightness.
It's certainly not just Sicilian-American. Marcella Hazan describes it thusly:

"It is the fundamental herb of Italian cooking. It is found nearly everywhere, and there are comparatively few sauces for pasta, few soups, and a few meat dishes that don't begin by sauteing chopped parsley with other ingredients. On many occasions, it is added again, raw, sprinkled over a finished dish that, without the fresh parsley fragrance hovering over it, might seem incomplete." For example, I love to finish penne all'arrabiata with parsley. I used to use basil, but I think parsley does work better with the chili heat (and I came across it maybe twenty or so years ago researching the dish for one reason or another.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 03-11-2020 at 10:19 PM.
  #39  
Old 03-12-2020, 04:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Aspenglow View Post
...the recommendations of two such illustrious Doper chefs!
Hmm, more than two, Iím thinking.

Parsleyís a very old and abundant ingredient the world over, as noted upthread. A lot of people use it when they boil artichoke hearts (tie stalks with leaves into a knot, remove after cooking), and Iíve heard that a parsley omellete is surprisingly delicious. It definitely has a flavor, but I havenít been able to notice it so far when I use it in cooked dishes such as these sauces. Maybe I need to try that omelette a few times to appreciate the flavor. For me, most of its value is the color it adds.

Thanks again to everyone whoís participated.
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Old 03-12-2020, 09:41 AM
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LOL, you are making me laugh hard, and that is something I truly appreciate these days!

I did actually debate the nomenclature of 'cook' v. 'chef,' but I didn't wish to take any professional training Chefguy has for granted. Though I have the feeling he wouldn't feel awful about offal.

I will try some parsley next time and I will report back.
I've mentioned in the past that I'm not a trained chef. I chose the username on a whim, as it's easier to use than Reallygoodhomecookguy. I have taken some professional grade classes in the past, but not been to a full-time culinary school, nor worked in a restaurant. I'd change the name, but is seems like too much trouble to bother with.
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Old 03-12-2020, 11:29 AM
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Re: parsley. Hell, I just put a handful into the big pot of dog food I’m cooking up. Give the little bastards a little more vitamin punch.
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  #42  
Old 03-12-2020, 11:44 PM
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PookehMacphillemey beat me to my point, using onion or garlic but not both makes a subtle but important difference in my mind. It adds a clarity to the sauce, a focus as it were.

It is noticeable in its absence especially when I make a soup or other braise with a mirepoix and garlic blend.
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Old 03-13-2020, 07:22 AM
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PookehMacphillemey beat me to my point, using onion or garlic but not both makes a subtle but important difference in my mind. It adds a clarity to the sauce, a focus as it were.
Yeah. While it's not a universal rule, the recipes I have for most Italian dishes are very much either onion or garlic not both. (Leafing through one of the cookbooks I bought in Italy, there's not a single recipe that has both in them.) I've never really deeply researched it, but I wonder if Sicilians or southern Italians are more likely to use both, which is why it became popular here in the US.
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Old 03-16-2020, 11:28 AM
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I've mentioned in the past that I'm not a trained chef. I chose the username on a whim, as it's easier to use than Reallygoodhomecookguy. I have taken some professional grade classes in the past, but not been to a full-time culinary school, nor worked in a restaurant. I'd change the name, but is seems like too much trouble to bother with.
I am a trained chef, and have been for 30 years, and when I'm in Italy, I work in a place with 3 Michelin Stars...but the aspect of my job I enjoyed the most is line-cooking during service, and the skill of which I am most proud. I'm a cook.
  #45  
Old 03-16-2020, 01:51 PM
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Sugar??
  #46  
Old 03-18-2020, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Yeah. While it's not a universal rule, the recipes I have for most Italian dishes are very much either onion or garlic not both. (Leafing through one of the cookbooks I bought in Italy, there's not a single recipe that has both in them.) I've never really deeply researched it, but I wonder if Sicilians or southern Italians are more likely to use both, which is why it became popular here in the US.
Garlic goes in the ďgravy,Ē minced onion goes in the meatballs. Of course, thatís Italian-American...but it works!
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  #47  
Old 03-18-2020, 10:53 AM
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Garlic goes in the ďgravy,Ē minced onion goes in the meatballs. Of course, thatís Italian-American...but it works!
Yeah, but I've also had plenty of Sunday gravies that have had both in the sauce/gravy. It certainly doesn't seem atypical to me.
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Old 03-18-2020, 02:08 PM
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Just backing you up at your post @43. Besides, that’s the way I make it. Onion in the sauce makes the sauce overly sweet, IMHO.
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