Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-19-2020, 10:21 PM
Leaper is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: In my own little world...
Posts: 12,764

So just how powerful and moneyed is the cruise ship lobby?


I hear that they’re one of the industries clamoring for a bailout, and the idea that they could get it strikes me as absurd. Do they have more money and influence than I think?
  #2  
Old 03-20-2020, 07:48 AM
Telemark's Avatar
Telemark is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Just outside of Titletown
Posts: 23,739
https://www.statista.com/topics/1004/cruise-industry/
Quote:
The global cruise industry generated an estimated revenue of 39.6 billion U.S. dollars in 2015, a figure which has grown by around 15 billion U.S. dollars over the last half decade. The industry made significant recovery after revenue fell below 25 billion U.S. dollars during the 2009 global recession. The passenger capacity of the global cruise market reached 466 thousand in 2016 and capacity was expected to continue to grow to reach 521 thousand by 2018.
So, fairly big and growing.
  #3  
Old 03-21-2020, 10:40 PM
Bookkeeper's Avatar
Bookkeeper is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Ottawa, Canuckistan
Posts: 2,864
I think they should be bailed out for all losses for business of their US-flagged vessels.
  #4  
Old 03-22-2020, 01:20 PM
Tilt-A-Whirl is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 49
I agree with Bookkeeper. We need to support all American flagged cruise ships. All one of them. That being the Pride of America (built mostly in Germany, owned by Norwegian Cruise Lines, which is domiciled in Bermuda).

Yeah, I was surprised when Pence was so vigorous in his support for the cruise lines a couple of weeks ago, I wonder where that came from.
  #5  
Old 03-22-2020, 02:55 PM
Euphonious Polemic is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 12,838
As others have indicated, cruise ship lines should be bailed out by the countries where they are registered. Seems straightforward.


Liberia, Panama, Bahamas.... this is where the cruise ship corporations should go looking for money.
  #6  
Old 03-22-2020, 07:42 PM
racer72 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Auburn, WA
Posts: 6,530
Blame the US government for the cruise ships being foreign registered. Most of the bigger cruise lines are U.S. owned. Why should they be treated any different form any other U.S. company has most of it's interests in foreign manufacturing or other foreign interests.
  #7  
Old 03-23-2020, 02:14 AM
Themenin is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Le Marais
Posts: 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
https://www.statista.com/topics/1004/cruise-industry/


The global cruise industry generated an estimated revenue of 39.6 billion U.S. dollars in 2015, a figure which has grown by around 15 billion U.S. dollars over the last half decade. The industry made significant recovery after revenue fell below 25 billion U.S. dollars during the 2009 global recession. The passenger capacity of the global cruise market reached 466 thousand in 2016 and capacity was expected to continue to grow to reach 521 thousand by 2018.
Eyeballing it that looks like USD 100,000 per passenger per year average. They definitely need baling(sic) out !
  #8  
Old 03-23-2020, 11:03 AM
FollowMeDown is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Philadelphia, Pa, USA
Posts: 47
So how much do they pay in taxes? Don't they largely take Americans to foreign places to spend their money? and aren't most of their workers Non-Americans? Besides, I don't understand bailing out an industry that is completely unnecessary in the first place.
  #9  
Old 03-24-2020, 04:53 AM
Paul in Qatar is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Dammam, Saudi Arabia
Posts: 13,276
It is hard to see what harm would come from allowing the present firms to go bankrupt and then passing the business to a number of successor companies.
__________________
800-237-5055
Shrine Hospitals for Children (North America)
Never any fee
Do you know a child in need?
  #10  
Old 03-24-2020, 09:03 AM
RickJay is offline
Charter Jays Fan
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Oakville, Canada
Posts: 42,550
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul in Qatar View Post
It is hard to see what harm would come from allowing the present firms to go bankrupt and then passing the business to a number of successor companies.
Exactly. The cruise ships themselves won't be scuttled. After the existing companies die, new investors will buy their penny stock, or will purchase the ships themselves, hire many of the same staff, and life will go on. Companies that did not save money for a rainy day will go belly up and companies with cash will replace them, which is how capitalism should work.
__________________
Providing useless posts since 1999!
  #11  
Old 03-25-2020, 12:41 PM
Velocity is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 16,892
Is the cruise industry even worth saving? The airlines, at least, are practical and valuable - they ferry people to destinations, deliver mail and cargo, etc. A cruise industry is for mere pleasure only. Not that pleasure is worthless, but they aren't worth many billions of taxpayer dollars better spent elsewhere.
  #12  
Old 03-25-2020, 01:56 PM
Bijou Drains is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 11,123
I believe that the vast majority of crew on these ships are not American citizens as well.
  #13  
Old 03-25-2020, 02:02 PM
FairyChatMom's Avatar
FairyChatMom is online now
I'm nice, dammit!
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Southern Merrylande
Posts: 43,033
American crew members are a tiny minority on the cruise ships I've sailed on.

Much as I love cruising, I don't think the industry deserves a bailout. No business is guaranteed profitability, and if this plague hurts them, they need to figure out how to deal with it or go away. Life's rough.
  #14  
Old 03-26-2020, 10:23 AM
MikeF is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,718
Quote:
Originally Posted by racer72 View Post
Blame the US government for the cruise ships being foreign registered. Most of the bigger cruise lines are U.S. owned. Why should they be treated any different form any other U.S. company has most of it's interests in foreign manufacturing or other foreign interests.
Exactly. If a company moves it domicile (if that's the correct term) and/or flags its ships to another country to avoid paying taxes and regulations, they should zero tax money to save them, cruise line or otherwise.
  #15  
Old 03-26-2020, 10:33 AM
control-z is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 13,151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocity View Post
Is the cruise industry even worth saving? The airlines, at least, are practical and valuable - they ferry people to destinations, deliver mail and cargo, etc. A cruise industry is for mere pleasure only. Not that pleasure is worthless, but they aren't worth many billions of taxpayer dollars better spent elsewhere.
Not only that, but coop up a couple thousand people in close quarters for a few days, dump them out at a port to interact with the locals for a few hours, repeat. Perfect way to spread disease. I think all mass tourism is going to be questionable for a while.
  #16  
Old 03-26-2020, 10:36 AM
TinaMoris is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Location: Orlando
Posts: 4
As for me, cruise ship lines should be bailed out by the countries where they are registered. It seems straightforward.
  #17  
Old 03-26-2020, 10:45 AM
Machine Elf is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Challenger Deep
Posts: 12,716
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickJay View Post
Exactly. The cruise ships themselves won't be scuttled. After the existing companies die, new investors will buy their penny stock, or will purchase the ships themselves, hire many of the same staff, and life will go on. Companies that did not save money for a rainy day will go belly up and companies with cash will replace them, which is how capitalism should work.
Wouldn't this be true for literally any business sector? For example, the airline or hotel industry?
  #18  
Old 03-26-2020, 11:07 AM
turner is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Machine Elf View Post
Wouldn't this be true for literally any business sector? For example, the airline or hotel industry?
Exactly, it makes the assumption that there is no expertise involved in the overall management of the industry. You have ship operations, maintenance, major industrial facilities, and every aspect of the hospitality industry (hotel, food service, entertainment). Additionally, you have to deal with the complex regulatory environment associated with each of these aspects. To think that any schmuck off the street can just pick up and start over is pretty unrealistic.
  #19  
Old 03-26-2020, 11:39 AM
Tatterdemalion is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 809
I think a cruise industry bail out should be strictly means tested. The bail out should be exactly proportional to how deep the water is in the hold.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:37 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2019 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017