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  #101  
Old 12-21-2012, 10:50 AM
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boots = shitkickers
  #102  
Old 12-21-2012, 11:11 AM
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Pogey: to grab onto the bumper of a car with your hands, and "ski" along snow- and ice-covered streets.
  #103  
Old 12-21-2012, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by elmwood View Post
Pogey: to grab onto the bumper of a car with your hands, and "ski" along snow- and ice-covered streets.
Here in Ontario "pogey" is the nickname for EI (Employment Insurance) benefits. Formerly known as UNemployment insurance.

What you describe is "car surfing".

In high school when you got in trouble it was called getting "toasted". I remember writing in my diary that I got "toasted" by the vice-principal for being late.

We also said "mow" (rhymes with "cow") for pigging out on junk food.
  #104  
Old 12-21-2012, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by elmwood View Post
Pogey: to grab onto the bumper of a car with your hands, and "ski" along snow- and ice-covered streets.
We called that "bumper shining." "Pogey" is drawing unemployment insurance benefits, as in "Driving plow in the winter is great, summer's off drawing pogey."

Last edited by Nature's Call; 12-21-2012 at 01:17 PM. Reason: 12 minute ninja - whoa!
  #105  
Old 12-21-2012, 01:23 PM
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Skitching. Skateboarding + hitching.
  #106  
Old 12-21-2012, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by elmwood View Post
Pogey: to grab onto the bumper of a car with your hands, and "ski" along snow- and ice-covered streets.
This was "skitching" in my youth. And we did it hanging on to school buses.

Last edited by Delta-9; 12-21-2012 at 01:41 PM.
  #107  
Old 01-03-2013, 11:51 AM
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Besides the term used for getting stoned, a "bake" was a smack to the back of the neck.

A "thorpe" was a quick thump to someone's breastbone with the four fingers together from a semi-closed hand - the more wrist action, the better.

"Jim's coming to visit you today..."

"Jim who?"

"Jim <thwack!> Thorpe!"

"Indian burns" and "wet willies" are more universal....
  #108  
Old 01-03-2013, 12:01 PM
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Bogart - yep

Kife - yep

High-waters were too-short pants

Wicked - I still use that sometimes, and does Brockton-bred Husband. I haven't heard wicked-pissah in eons tho!
  #109  
Old 01-03-2013, 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Sternvogel View Post
We just called them "flood pants" or "floods" (West suburbs of Cleveland, OH, early to mid '70's).
Where I grew up (Vancouver, WA) it was "high-waters".

In junior high school (also in Vancouver) circa 1978-1981, we had this term,"zeke" (Zeke? zeek?) that meant something along the lines of "dumbass". I've no idea where it came from. My family had no TV after 1976, and we weren't moviegoers, so if it came from one of those sources I'd have missed it. It was a fairly short-lived term, though; for all I know it was just something invented by one of the cool kids and was confined to my school.
  #110  
Old 01-04-2013, 12:47 AM
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We used to call it "flooding" when your pants were too high.

But anyway, I heard some kid on the train today say something absurd, then followed it with psyche/sike. Apparently kids are still saying this. Nice! Then I though to myself, Oh My Fucking God, I'm just like those old people I used to know who would remark "Kids are still saying that?" when they'd hear us using ancient slang. This is the day my youth died, ladies and gentlemen. The day when I honestly --and not as a matter of expression-- was surprised by what the kids are doing.
  #111  
Old 01-06-2013, 05:11 AM
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Not a vocabulary term exactly, but a well-known phrase:

"That's what I thought!" In this case, used when two people are getting to the point of blows, and one of them backs off. The other would taunt him with this phrase.

Last edited by ekedolphin; 01-06-2013 at 05:11 AM.
  #112  
Old 06-15-2019, 01:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Ambivalid View Post
"Bogue"-as in not cool, bad, not right. "That's so bogue, dude. You promised me you wouldn't wear your Pumps today."
Omg, I literally just looked this up to use it because I wasn't sure how to spell it: When people use it around Michigan and the rare occasion in movies, it sounds more like they are saying "That's Bode". and I couldn't find it anywhere except these message boards! That is so crazy to me because it has been used so often around here when I was younger (90's).

It has to be derived from Bogus and just shortened to "Bogue". But, I still use this today. We also use/used:

Iggy= Ignorant
Whack= Lame
Weak/Weak Sauce= Pansy
Trippin= Crazy
Stained=Burned/Told off/Checked/Snap/Yeet

My nephew uses Yeet all of the time! It drives me crazy!
  #113  
Old 06-15-2019, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by ralph124c View Post
"Wicked Pissuh"-a term meaning great. Of South Boston origen, seems to have disappeared.
Yeah, I don't know if you would still here that one around here. When I first moved to Boston, about 50 years ago, I was very confused when someone would say they were "shitfaced,"* and someone else would say they were "bullshit."**

*Drunk
**Angry.
  #114  
Old 06-15-2019, 03:58 PM
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Hawaii pidgin English

Wop yo jaw! Wop Wop it! (while stroking the sides of your chin like you had a goatee) - See! Told you!

Make A - Make ass, embarassing

Sideburns and Buddha Blast - When someone got a hair cut and you could see their skin, you would flick your thumb upwards on the sideburns or give a glancing blow upwards to the back of the head for Buddha Blast.

Rat bite - I think this is more universal and still in use. When the barber (or more likely Mom or Dad) slips with the scissors and takes out a chunk of hair.
  #115  
Old 06-15-2019, 04:14 PM
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Originally Posted by DMark View Post
Small town in Illinois - in high school the term for a blow job was "moke".
In Hawaii, a 'moke' is a (usually large) urban Polynesian with an attitude. The female equivalent is 'tita' (who can be diminutive). You may get away with calling a female a tita as it can be used affectionately. A beloved local singer, Melveen Leed is known as "Da Tita". But never, ever call a guy a moke, even as a joke, unless you're really, really good friends with him!
  #116  
Old 06-15-2019, 04:47 PM
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In my early sixties junior high, the seventh graders were called Scrubs.

I'm sorta disappointed that Fetch never caught on.
  #117  
Old 06-15-2019, 05:11 PM
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In the 1970s a "hood" had these characteristics:

- white male
- 17 to 25 years old
- had long, straight hair
- wore a jean jacket
- drove a Trans-Am or something similar
- high school dropout
- sold drugs on the side
  #118  
Old 06-15-2019, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by WOOKINPANUB View Post
I see you list "Hollywood Riviera" as your location. For me, that in itself qualifies as a long forgotten term ( nobody but those who live/ lived there know the term, AFAIK, and I haven't lived there in 20+ years). Did you grow up there?
Oh, gosh, I lived there like 40 years ago!!! Nowhere near Hollywood.

I'm so old I remember when hodaddy indicated a non-surfer, and therefore a dweeb.
  #119  
Old 06-15-2019, 08:11 PM
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Face - oral sex
Dope light - dome light
Hock a loogie - spit phlegm with a high arc
  #120  
Old 06-15-2019, 08:57 PM
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Bubble gum light - The old fashioned rounded lights on top of police or fire cars
  #121  
Old 06-15-2019, 10:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Crafter_Man View Post
In the 1970s a "hood" had these characteristics:

- white male
- 17 to 25 years old
- had long, straight hair
- wore a jean jacket
- drove a Trans-Am or something similar
- high school dropout
- sold drugs on the side
Pretty much the same description in 1950's slang, Midwest Division. Quite similar to a Fonzie, but not in a nice way.
  #122  
Old 06-16-2019, 01:05 PM
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70's: Neat or neato =really great, cool
Cool beans = that's good
Hold the bus = wait a minute
Let one, cut the cheese = fart
Doy or No Doy = Duh
Doy Ralph = same as above, no idea where ralph came from
Spazz - be uncool, hyper.
2 for flinching - excuse to hit someone
Kipe

ETA: various groups of kids at school - Socs = rich kids Hoods = tough kids, drove hot rods, wore shitkickers, started fights Freaks/Heads = Druggies Geeks = nerds.

Last edited by Clarisse McClellan; 06-16-2019 at 01:07 PM. Reason: to add
  #123  
Old 06-16-2019, 09:06 PM
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65-67= 5th and 6th grade for me.
Boss was a good thing. That skateboard is really boss.

Jr Hi.
"Fish" = jerk or not cool
"Greasers" wore black leather jackets and generally came from just 1 of the 4/5 elementary schools that fed our Jr High.
"Psych" was good! It was short for psychedelic. Inna Gadda Da Vida was psych!
"Cool" made a comeback after I heard my buddy's older brother use it. The brother was home on leave from Vietnam and before he went into the army he had opened the FIRST head shop in our city. His joining the Army had something to do with selling Marine Dress Blue uniform jackets in his head shop (the age of Sergeant Pepper), a municipal judge, and a choice being offered.
"Plastic" was an insult among Mothers Of Invention fans.
"Fag it up" = what our older brothers would try during their draft physicals to get out of going to Vietnam.
  #124  
Old 06-16-2019, 10:53 PM
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"Cool" made a comeback after I heard my buddy's older brother use it...
No comeback needed.

I work with a bona fide Beat Poet who played bongos and recited haikus in Greenwich Village basement clubs back in the 50s. We had the same discussion we're having here, and he said "The cool thing about 'cool' is that it's always been cool, and still is. None of our other slang survived. Except cool."
  #125  
Old 06-17-2019, 11:07 AM
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This is more from college, but there was "Take a bag/take the bag" for losing badly.

From the Firesign Theater, of course.
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  #126  
Old 06-18-2019, 11:51 AM
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Not exactly from my childhood, but during my HS and college years a common expression was "to rag on somebody". Now it seems to have been mostly replaced by "to bag on somebody", which makes even less sense. How do you bag on people? Place small burlap sacks of something on top of their heads? Hang paper lunch bags around their necks?

Not that the earlier version is any more rational in that regard.

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  #127  
Old 06-19-2019, 08:07 PM
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Fruit.

This was a universal pejorative used for anybody, anything or any situation you found distasteful, weird, unfair or in any way uncool.
"That shirt Joe is wearing is really fruit."
"Mrs. Smith gave us homework over the weekend. That's really fruit."

I believe it was originally used as a term for a homosexual, but we were only very marginally aware of homosexuality or what it even meant (early 60s). Anything and everything could be called "fruit."

I have not used this term or heard it used in over 50 years.

Last edited by jebert; 06-19-2019 at 08:09 PM.
  #128  
Old 06-19-2019, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Spectre of Pithecanthropus View Post
Not exactly from my childhood, but during my HS and college years a common expression was "to rag on somebody". Now it seems to have been mostly replaced by "to bag on somebody", which makes even less sense. How do you bag on people? Place small burlap sacks of something on top of their heads? Hang paper lunch bags around their necks?

Not that the earlier version is any more rational in that regard.

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I still use it. "Quit ragging on me." I never really understood "bag" either, but nor do I know the etymology of "ragging on someone"
  #129  
Old 06-19-2019, 08:48 PM
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If something was bad it didn't just "suck", it "sucked shit"

"How's that Robin Hood movie with Kevin Costner?"
"Sucks shit"

"Do you like your TRS-80?"
"Sucks shit"

"How was Simon & Simon last night?"
"Sucked shit"
  #130  
Old 07-06-2019, 07:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff View Post
65-67= 5th and 6th grade for me.
Boss was a good thing. That skateboard is really boss.
'Boss' goes WAY back. I've seen a shoe store ad from the 1890s that announces it's the "Boss Place" for shoes. At least it did in L.A., where the ad originated.

'Out of sight' is another one. A character in the novel McTeague (1899) says it frequently to mean excellent or fun.

I hope I didn't already say this here.



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Last edited by Spectre of Pithecanthropus; 07-06-2019 at 07:30 PM.
  #131  
Old 07-06-2019, 08:57 PM
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I'm not just saying this because this is one but ---------------
back in the late 60s after Night of the Living Dead came out anything "old news" or just flat-out tired became "living dead" or "zombie".

"Yeah -- I heard about Lencofsky and Zanotti breaking up; living dead."
"Steve's car is running but its seriously zombie".
  #132  
Old 07-06-2019, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Hazle Weatherfield View Post
"Face!" While spreading your palm in front of your face. It meant "burned," "gotcha'," etc.
LOL...I was coming here to post that one. Short for "In your face!".


"Gay wad" was a big one when I was in elementary school and jr high. It has obvious homophobic origins, but I'm not sure what the "wad" part meant.

"Clam" was a common one from high school, but it seemed local to my school. Basically it meant "shut the fuck up". The proper way to so it was to look straight at the speaker and get their attention, extend your arm, close your hand like a clam-shell clamping shut and quietly say "clam" like you are shushing them.


"Random" was a popular one when I was in college. Usually in the context of uninvited people at a party. But specifically people who look like they wouldn't be invited. Typical usage something like "We went to that party at the Beta house, but the only people there were a bunch of freshmen, a couple of girls from Alpha Gamma and some randoms.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff
"Psych" was good! It was short for psychedelic. Inna Gadda Da Vida was psych!
We had "psych" but it was used as a synonym for "just kidding, you idiot!". As in, "Sure I'll go out with you....psych!"

"Groady" (I think I spelled that correctly) meant "gross". Only girls really said that as it came from 80s Valley Girl speak IIRC.
  #133  
Old 07-07-2019, 06:44 AM
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Originally Posted by WOOKINPANUB View Post
I remember kipe. I may have to reintroduce that one.
Hell i still use it from time to time

Hummm gnarly, not really sure it had a defined er definition, hmmmmm meant cool awesome extraordinary unusual tough difficult etc.
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Last edited by DorkVader; 07-07-2019 at 06:47 AM.
  #134  
Old 07-07-2019, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by FairyChatMom View Post
The only one I can remember was sped - alluding to kids in the Special Ed classes. So if you wanted to tell a friend to stop acting like an idiot, you'd say "Don't be such a sped!" One of my sisters still says that - apart from her, I haven't heard anyone use the term in over 40 years...
That was never an issue in my middle and high school. You see, that town had a rivalry with the next town over, and the way to tell someone that they were being an idiot was named after an infamous, allegedly inbred (speculated due to some hereditary birth defects), family in that town.

So, if you were acting like an idiot people would either say you were "pulling a Hartford" or tell you "don't be such a Hartford."

Least you think it was only the kids who made fun of the Hartfords, there's actually a road in that rival town nicknamed Tippytoe lane and used by all the adults in both towns after their hereditary foot deformity.
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