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Old 05-03-2019, 07:58 PM
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The "I'm sure I didn't invent this, but dang it's good" thread


Fussing around with some ground pork about a week ago, I fried it up, then added diced garlic and diced ginger, a splash of soy and a good dollop of Sambal Olek chili sauce. Let it sizzle for a minute, and dayum! Whether used with spaghetti noodles or added to an omelet, it's outstanding. If you have an idea as to a dish that this resembles, I'm all ears, but for now I'm claiming ownership.

If you are also a culinary genius and have invented something earthshaking, let us know!
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Old 05-03-2019, 08:10 PM
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That sounds like a variation to this: Thai Pork Omelet

A dish that I ate almost every day for breakfast when I was there. You sending deliveries out?
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Old 05-03-2019, 08:15 PM
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Sounds like a carnivore’s version of Ma Po tofu, which is usually 20 percent ground pork to 80 percent tofu, then served over udon or egg noodles. With lotsa extra hot pepper.

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/f...po-tofu-103565
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Old 05-03-2019, 08:37 PM
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I sometimes cobble together several recipes to get a result I want. My son wanted macaroni and cheese with ground beef, for example. You can find dozens of recipes for Beefaroni-style casseroles on the internet, with lots of tomatoes, but nothing really for just mac n’ cheese flavored with beef.

Because I wanted a custardy base, I beat an egg with a half cup each of sour cream and cottage cheese, adding just enough whole milk to make it runny. Stir in a cup each of shredded sharp cheddar and pepper jack.

My local Whole Foods sells a bulk pasta that is a short tube about one and a half inches long...smaller that ziti but longer than elbow. Perfect. I cook a quarter pound of that al dente.

A quarter pound of ground beef in the skillet with a few tablespoons each of chopped onion and Italian frying pepper. When the veg is soft and the meat is browned, add a minced garlic clove. Plenty of S&P and a good teaspoon of dried oregano.

Stir the meat and pasta into the custard thoroughly, then pour into a buttered baking dish. Sprinkle another cup of shredded cheddar/jack over the surface. Bake in a 400 oven until it’s bubbly and the surface cheese has turned golden and appetizing. Let rest for at least ten minutes before digging in. Feeds two big appetites, or one with leftovers for lunch.
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Old 05-03-2019, 08:49 PM
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Lightly rinse a couple cups of kimchi, chop it into pieces 1/2 - 1", fry in a hot saute pan with a little oil until browned some on all the pieces. Push to one side of the pan, lower the heat to medium, and add some eggs (if you need more oil for the eggs add it). Cook eggs over easy-ish. Empty the kimchi onto a plate, place the eggs on top. Eat all together. Optional: sprinkle furikake seasoning on top.
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Old 05-03-2019, 08:57 PM
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Speaking of which....and I might be the first person ever to do this...

Take cottage cheese out of the fridge. Put several spoonfuls in a shallow bowl.

Take kimchi out of the fridge. Put a couple spoonfuls over the cottage cheese, making sure to get plenty of the peppery marinade.

Eat with chopsticks.

Weirdly satisfyingly.
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Old 05-03-2019, 09:01 PM
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Clearly, I need to try harder.
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Old 05-03-2019, 09:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Speaking of which....and I might be the first person ever to do this...

Take cottage cheese out of the fridge. Put several spoonfuls in a shallow bowl.

Take kimchi out of the fridge. Put a couple spoonfuls over the cottage cheese, making sure to get plenty of the peppery marinade.

Eat with chopsticks.

Weirdly satisfyingly.
Gotta try it. And I think you might be right about being the first!
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Old 05-03-2019, 10:10 PM
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Clearly, I need to try harder.
As do I. Mine involves a Ritz cracker.
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Old 05-03-2019, 10:11 PM
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I think this is a variation on Chicken Cordon Bleu, but since I never bothered to learn how to stuff a chicken breast, it isn't that, exactly, and I call it Chicken à la Lin.

Take a medium-sized Vidalia onion (deskinned, wise guys) and about a quarter pound or so of a smokey ham and whizz it through a food processor until so finely chopped it's almost but not quite paste. The mix should be about half and half onion and ham. Drop it into a saucepan with red wine on a low heat and sweat it until the onions are soft. Set aside. (Use a sweet white onion if Vidalias aren't in season.)

Take 4 chicken breasts and turn them plump side down. Cut down the midline until you're about halfway through the breast and then shove the meat from the cut to each side so you have a bit of a hollow.

Put the chicken breasts into a baking pan (I use Pyrex). Butter the breasts. Sprinkle chopped garlic (to taste; mine is set to LOTS), thyme, and lemon juice on the breasts. Put a slice of provolone cheese on top. Spoon the ham and onion mix on top. Put another slice of provolone cheese on top of that. Add chicken broth and red wine to the pan so that it's about ⅓ of the way up the sides of the breasts (about 2 parts broth to 1 part wine). If there's any ham and onion left, sprinkle the ham and onion on top of the top layer of cheese.

Put into a preheated oven at 350 for about 30 minutes or so (depends on the size of the breasts). When the cheese is browned and bubbly, take it out of the oven. Serve with rice. I like basmati rice that has turmeric in it, but it's up to you. Also I don't use the liquid that the chicken cooked in after the chicken finishes cooking.

Last edited by Morgyn; 05-03-2019 at 10:14 PM. Reason: clarification
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Old 05-03-2019, 10:31 PM
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I know it's common now. But I was mixing honey and mustard together before it went mainstream.
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Old 05-04-2019, 03:55 AM
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Soupa de fideo is made lots of ways, but I've never seen anyone make it with breakfast sausage like I do.
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Old 05-04-2019, 08:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manson1972 View Post
That sounds like a variation to this: Thai Pork Omelet

A dish that I ate almost every day for breakfast when I was there. You sending deliveries out?
I was going to say, it sounds like a pared-down variation of any of a number of Southeast Asian stir fries.
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Old 05-04-2019, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
I was going to say, it sounds like a pared-down variation of any of a number of Southeast Asian stir fries.
Yup, pretty much, as it turns out:

• 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
• 2 lb. ground pork, divided
• 1 2" piece fresh ginger, peeled, cut into thin matchsticks or finely chopped
• 8 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
• 2 Tbsp. sugar
• 2 Tbsp. tomato paste
• 2 sprigs basil, plus more for serving
• ⅓ cup hot chili paste (such as sambal oelek)
• ¼ cup soy sauce
• ¼ cup unsweetened rice vinegar
• 1½ lb. fresh ramen noodles or 16 oz. dried spaghetti
• Kosher salt
• 2 Tbsp. unsalted butter

RECIPE PREPARATION
• Heat oil in a large wide heavy pot over medium-high. Add half of pork to pot, breaking apart into 6–8 large chunks with a wooden spoon. Cook, undisturbed, until well browned underneath, about 5 minutes. Turn pieces and continue to cook, turning occasionally, until pork is browned on 2–3 sides, about 5 minutes longer. Add ginger, garlic, sugar, and remaining pork to pot and cook, breaking up pork into small clumps, until meat is nearly cooked through, about 5 minutes longer. Add tomato paste and 2 basil sprigs. Cook, stirring occasionally, until paste darkens, about 2 minutes. Add chili paste, soy sauce, vinegar, and 2 cups water. Bring to a simmer, reduce heat to low, and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until sauce is slightly thickened and flavors have melded, 30–45 minutes.
• Cook noodles in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until 1 minute short of al dente. Add to pot with sauce along with butter and a splash of pasta cooking liquid. Simmer, tossing occasionally, until sauce begins to cling to noodles, about 1 minute. Pluck out basil sprigs.
• Divide noodles among plates. Top with torn basil.

A truly excellent version, but almost too hot.
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:22 AM
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Recently, I had been thinking of how good a tiramisu is, with the espresso-soaked ladyfingers and all. It occurred to me that the humble vanilla wafer banana pudding is a southern American version of a tiramisu, and that English spongecake trifle is also in the same family.

After thinking about various flavor profiles, I combined elements from each of these and came up with Banana Coffee Rum Coconut pudding. It's slices of sponge cake dipped into rum-flavored espresso, layered in a deep dish with sliced banana and homemade pastry cream which has been flavored with coconut extract.

It's so astoundingly good that I'd enter it into any dessert contest, if such a thing existed around here.

But someone must have come up with it before, I'm sure.
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Old 05-05-2019, 05:23 PM
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That sounds delicious, and I don't even like coffee. Also, you never know. After all, chocolate chip cookies were new, once, and their ingredients had been around for a long time before they were put together like that.
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Old 05-05-2019, 05:41 PM
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That sounds delicious, and I don't even like coffee. Also, you never know. After all, chocolate chip cookies were new, once, and their ingredients had been around for a long time before they were put together like that.
If you make baked beans, add a tablespoon of instant coffee to them.
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:22 PM
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If you make baked beans, add a tablespoon of instant coffee to them.
I'm guessing putting freeze dried beans in your coffee is less successful.
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
Fussing around with some ground pork about a week ago, I fried it up, then added diced garlic and diced ginger, a splash of soy and a good dollop of Sambal Olek chili sauce. Let it sizzle for a minute, and dayum! Whether used with spaghetti noodles or added to an omelet, it's outstanding. If you have an idea as to a dish that this resembles, I'm all ears, but for now I'm claiming ownership.

If you are also a culinary genius and have invented something earthshaking, let us know!
It reminds me of a filling I made for wontons one time, back when I took potlucks seriously (I didn’t use a hot sauce, though).
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Morgyn View Post
I think this is a variation on Chicken Cordon Bleu, but since I never bothered to learn how to stuff a chicken breast, it isn't that, exactly, and I call it Chicken à la Lin.

Take a medium-sized Vidalia onion (deskinned, wise guys) and about a quarter pound or so of a smokey ham and whizz it through a food processor until so finely chopped it's almost but not quite paste. The mix should be about half and half onion and ham. Drop it into a saucepan with red wine on a low heat and sweat it until the onions are soft. Set aside. (Use a sweet white onion if Vidalias aren't in season.)

Take 4 chicken breasts and turn them plump side down. Cut down the midline until you're about halfway through the breast and then shove the meat from the cut to each side so you have a bit of a hollow.

Put the chicken breasts into a baking pan (I use Pyrex). Butter the breasts. Sprinkle chopped garlic (to taste; mine is set to LOTS), thyme, and lemon juice on the breasts. Put a slice of provolone cheese on top. Spoon the ham and onion mix on top. Put another slice of provolone cheese on top of that. Add chicken broth and red wine to the pan so that it's about ⅓ of the way up the sides of the breasts (about 2 parts broth to 1 part wine). If there's any ham and onion left, sprinkle the ham and onion on top of the top layer of cheese.

Put into a preheated oven at 350 for about 30 minutes or so (depends on the size of the breasts). When the cheese is browned and bubbly, take it out of the oven. Serve with rice. I like basmati rice that has turmeric in it, but it's up to you. Also I don't use the liquid that the chicken cooked in after the chicken finishes cooking.
Sounds yummy, but what the hell is a MEDIUM Vidalia onion? I’ve only seen them in three sizes; jumbo, gigantic, and humongous.

Last edited by kaylasdad99; 05-05-2019 at 07:41 PM.
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:42 PM
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I've seen a lot of tofu in peanut sauces, but I'm the only person I know who makes Tofu Kale.

Directions:
-Either fry up a bunch of pressed cubed firm tofu, or else marinate it in a mixture of soy sauce, water, grated ginger, garlic, and chili flakes, and then saute it a bit.
-Using either the reserved marinade or else making the mix from scratch and without so much water, add a bunch of natural peanut butter.
-Pour the sauce over the tofu and cook it in the sauce until it's thick.
-Add a bunch of chopped kale and cook until tender.
-Serve over brown rice.

I normally make it without the chili flakes and add Sriracha at the table. Weirdly, this is my fourth-grader's absolute favorite meal, and everyone I've served it to loves it. It's a great comfort food.
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:50 PM
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If you make baked beans, add a tablespoon of instant coffee to them.
Alas for me, I not only don't like coffee, I also don't like baked beans.
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:52 PM
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Sounds yummy, but what the hell is a MEDIUM Vidalia onion? I’ve only seen them in three sizes; jumbo, gigantic, and humongous.
Half a jumbo, then? It's been a while since I made the dish, and even longer since I made it when Vidalia's were in season.
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:12 PM
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Top a steamy baked potato with a runny egg, plus butter, salt, pepper, and hot sauce to taste. Google tells me that this is called an Idaho sunrise. It's good.

Toss hot, drained spaghetti with butter, salt, pepper, red pepper flakes, maybe a dash of garlic powder, and top with a runny egg.

When you finish a jar of pickles, drop some sweet baby peppers into the juice and let them rest for a few days. You have invented pickled peppers! Do the same with baby carrots and cauliflower florets.
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:46 PM
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Alas for me, I not only don't like coffee, I also don't like baked beans.
I don't like the usual Boston style, either. I like mine with several types of beans, and with bacon and ground beef. It's soupier than the baked style, but has the same molasses, brown sugar, etc. The coffee gives it a smokey flavor.
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Old 05-05-2019, 09:42 PM
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When I make baked beans, I make MAINE baked beans. NO sugar. Large beans, like Maine Yellow Eye or Soldier. Molasses, onion, mustard, and salt pork.
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Old 05-05-2019, 10:58 PM
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I'd say the molasses is standing in for the "sugar" role, contributing the sweet note.
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Old 05-05-2019, 11:06 PM
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Pizza and Beer. I'm fucking claiming it. I don't care.
  #29  
Old 05-06-2019, 09:11 AM
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Soupa de fideo is made lots of ways, but I've never seen anyone make it with breakfast sausage like I do.
Mi mother calls that variation a la cazuela (in the crockpot, no actual crockpots are involved); we're sure that's not the official name, but it's what my family and everybody who's learned it from us call it. We normally use thick fideos for that one.
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Last edited by Nava; 05-06-2019 at 09:13 AM.
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Old 05-06-2019, 10:11 AM
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If mixed drinks are eligible for this thread, I want to document my invention of the bourbon slush right now!

(It's actually not very original, just a variation on bourbon and soda where all the ingredients except the club soda are chilled in the freezer and combined at the last minute, turning the soda into slush. VERY refreshing at the end of a hot summer day.)
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Old 05-06-2019, 03:58 PM
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When you finish a jar of pickles, drop some sweet baby peppers into the juice and let them rest for a few days. You have invented pickled peppers! Do the same with baby carrots and cauliflower florets.
I always save the brine in a pickle jar and use it to marinate the macaroni I use for macaroni salad. Actually flavoring the macaroni itself makes such a big deal in the final result. I make a very Hawaiian style mac salad, so it's relatively simple and needs a bit of punch.
  #32  
Old 05-06-2019, 04:08 PM
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I always save the brine in a pickle jar and use it to marinate the macaroni I use for macaroni salad. Actually flavoring the macaroni itself makes such a big deal in the final result. I make a very Hawaiian style mac salad, so it's relatively simple and needs a bit of punch.
I use cider vinegar for the purpose.
  #33  
Old 05-06-2019, 08:54 PM
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I'd say the molasses is standing in for the "sugar" role, contributing the sweet note.
True, but most southern New England baked bean recipes call for brown sugar in addition to molasses.

The hardy denizens Down East stick to the more subtle molasses and eschew the cloy of actual sugar. And bigger beans. Some even use dark red kidneys.
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Old 05-06-2019, 10:12 PM
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A weird drink I concocted:

1 oz Crown Royal Rye
1 oz Frangelico
1 oz Coca-Cola
3 Ice cubes

Add to whisky glass, stir.

Tastes like a Reese's Peanut Butter Cup

Awesome Spinach Dip:

Big ol' bundle of spinach
2 heads roasted garlic (cut top off whole garlic, wrap in tinfoil, drizzle olive oil to cover, bake @ 350 until golden brown and the house smells divine.)
medium onion
flour
oil/butter/margarine/whatever
Parmesan cheese. fresh is best, powdered works fine too.
Good squeeze of citrus
Few kajiggers of S&P
Finely dice onion, sautee in oil of your choosing until lightly caramelized.
Add garlic and spinach, sautee until spinach nicely wilted.

Make a thin roux, heat (oil of your choice) and add flour 2:1, whisk until silky, add Parmesan (same amount as flour.) Squeeze in citrus, whisk until silky.

ETA 2 parts oil to 1 part flour, 1 part Parmesan.

Add roux to spinach, season with S&P to taste, and blend/process/etc.

Grab pita chips/tortillia chips/saltines.

Thank me later.

Last edited by Drummond Bays; 05-06-2019 at 10:17 PM.
  #35  
Old 05-19-2019, 09:44 AM
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My son recently posted a photo on Facebook of a breakfast concoction he came up with. Hashbrown balls. Basically a ball of shredded potatoes with cheese inside. He didn't provide a recipe, but I'm assuming he must have mixed potatoes with flour and egg, folded them around some cheese and deep-fried them. I'll have to browbeat him into making them for me on my next visit.
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Old 05-19-2019, 11:09 AM
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I make an hor d'oeuvre that's sort of like a deconstructed, breadless reuben. I'm not saying no one has made it before me but I developed this recipe on my own.

Lay down some slightly overlapping slices of deli corned beef, Vienna Beef for special occasions. Add some slices of Swiss cheese (I use Lorraine) and spread a thin layer of thousand island dressing over. Squeeze a few spoonfuls of Franks sauerkraut dry using two nested cereal bowls and distribute evenly over the beef & cheese. Toast some caraway seeds in a dry skillet and sprinkle into the kraut. Roll and slice in one inch portions. Secure with a toothpick and allow to chill before serving.
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