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  #51  
Old 05-11-2019, 11:54 PM
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Out of curiosity, is there any difference between the terms "full English" and "fry up"? I spent several months living and working in the UK, and the terms seem synonymous to me, but perhaps I am missing a cultural nuance. At any rate, I've had more than my share of "full breakfasts" when I lived and worked in a Scottish kitchen. I was 20 at the time, so my body could take it, but for approximately the first 30 days working at that kitchen, I had a full breakfast (plus kippers; included black pudding) every single day. I do miss a good fry-up. I mean, no reason I can't do it here, but I have to properly source the ingredients to duplicate the experience.
"Fry up" pretty much covers it. There was an episode of You Are What You Eat where the subject's wife deep-fried an egg for him in at least an inch of vegetable oil. I had never seen such a thing before!

The guy on Made in Spain did the same thing the other day, using olive oil. So I guess it's not all that uncommon.
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  #52  
Old 05-12-2019, 09:17 AM
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And there it was... the quickly-scrawled sign in a cafe window: Big English Breakfast • All day • With coffee • Come in!

The plate was piled seven inches high with eggs, huge sausages, grilled tomahtos, baked beans and chips, and within minutes I was totally revived. I have never felt that huge of a change (both physically and psychologically) that quickly.
But... but finish the story! Did you get a room or not?
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"Fry up" pretty much covers it. There was an episode of You Are What You Eat where the subject's wife deep-fried an egg for him in at least an inch of vegetable oil. I had never seen such a thing before!
Quiet you. Don't be giving the state fair people any ideas.
"Get'cher deep-fried egg sannich here!"

Like a Monte Christo without the ham.
  #53  
Old 05-12-2019, 09:29 AM
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"Fry up" pretty much covers it. There was an episode of You Are What You Eat where the subject's wife deep-fried an egg for him in at least an inch of vegetable oil. I had never seen such a thing before!

The guy on Made in Spain did the same thing the other day, using olive oil. So I guess it's not all that uncommon.
José Andrés? That's weird, I've seen him fry an egg and he did it with a normal amount of oil, which is nowhere near "an inch of olive oil" (what wasn't normal was the purty envelope he made, but that's why he's a fancy chef and I'm not).
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  #54  
Old 05-12-2019, 09:36 AM
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José Andrés? That's weird, I've seen him fry an egg and he did it with a normal amount of oil, which is nowhere near "an inch of olive oil" (what wasn't normal was the purty envelope he made, but that's why he's a fancy chef and I'm not).
Here apparently is a version of his fried egg. I don't think it's actually Jose Andres frying it up. Here's an Instagram version with him frying it up himself. Either way, both are much more than the typical amounts of oil, at least used here in the US.

Here's Jacques Pepin doing it with even more oil. Jose seems to prefer tipping the pan to make sure the egg is covered/mostly covered in oil, while Jacques just has a high oil level in the pan and doesn't bother with the tilting and basting. It's almost the same idea as an oil-basted egg, it looks like, but it looks like there's about two to three times as much oil as I would use for oil-basting.

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  #55  
Old 05-12-2019, 10:15 AM
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In the UK a breakfast featuring a load of fried sausages, bacon, eggs, mushrooms and baked beans would generally be referred to as a "full English", whereas a lighter breakfast, such as croissants would be "continental" Does this nomenclature exist outside the UK? Would a Frenchman describe such a plate of stodge as an "English breakfast?"
I had a "full English" breakfast at a hotel in Detroit. It was as described above plus black pudding.

I had never heard the term before. I enjoyed it very much.


mmm
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Old 05-12-2019, 10:23 AM
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It's not a regular thing for most British people either, to be honest. A weekend hangover cure for many, I suspect. People with physically demanding jobs tend to pre-load at breakfast though.
I assume you mean the "full" breakfast? What I meant is that over here even simply an egg is an extravaganza.
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Old 05-12-2019, 10:56 AM
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Here apparently is a version of his fried egg. I don't think it's actually Jose Andres frying it up. Here's an Instagram version with him frying it up himself. Either way, both are much more than the typical amounts of oil, at least used here in the US.

Here's Jacques Pepin doing it with even more oil. Jose seems to prefer tipping the pan to make sure the egg is covered/mostly covered in oil, while Jacques just has a high oil level in the pan and doesn't bother with the tilting and basting. It's almost the same idea as an oil-basted egg, it looks like, but it looks like there's about two to three times as much oil as I would use for oil-basting.
Yep, that's it. The woman in YAWYE used a spatula to press down on the egg and keep it immersed in the oil.
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Old 05-12-2019, 11:39 AM
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I'm familiar with the term. Chicago is pretty Irish (see Chirish) and it should be trivially easy to find a place for a full Irish in a lot of neighborhoods. Full English might require travel more than a few miles but I'd think it would be easy enough to find.
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Old 05-12-2019, 11:57 AM
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I assume you mean the "full" breakfast? What I meant is that over here even simply an egg is an extravaganza.
Yes, well. In some countries the working population requires a modest calorific intake and some rehydration in order to effectively carry out proper jobs.

Other countries, where the main sources of employment are painting your face white and pretending to walk against an invisible wind, or writing interminably dull novels about tiny cakes, not so much.
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Old 05-12-2019, 05:29 PM
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It sure was convenient when traveling in unfamiliar parts. We could load up at breakfast time, maybe have a little brown bread to tide us over during the day (seriously, that Irish brown bread was amazing), and be fine until evening, so we only had to find one restaurant a day instead of two.

And a full <British Isles> breakfast is mostly a fry-up, but not every fry-up is a full <British Isles> breakfast. A fry-up is any meal consisting of eggs and unspecified other ingredients, in unspecified quantities, all fried. It could be eggs, sausage links, ham, bacon, black pudding, and potato hash all fried together (which still lacks beans, tomato, and/or mushrooms, brown bread, white toast, and tea to make a full breakfast), or it could be a single egg scrambled up with a little potato and nothing else.

Do the French ever eat an omelet for breakfast, or is that strictly a dinner food?
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Old 05-12-2019, 10:03 PM
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From reading Pomaine and other famous French food writers, I would say that an omelette is a French luncheon dish. It’s certainly too spare for a proper dinner. Maybe a post-theater or post-coital supper.
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  #62  
Old 05-13-2019, 01:06 AM
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Yep, that's it. The woman in YAWYE used a spatula to press down on the egg and keep it immersed in the oil.
My God, please don't tell me those things just after breakfast, I might throw up. That's not a huevo frito, that's a complete imbecile of a so-called cook.
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Old 05-13-2019, 03:50 AM
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Yes, well. In some countries the working population requires a modest calorific intake and some rehydration in order to effectively carry out proper jobs.

Other countries, where the main sources of employment are painting your face white and pretending to walk against an invisible wind, or writing interminably dull novels about tiny cakes, not so much.
I love French breakfasts, Proust and madeleines (but not mimes) and I laughed out loud.

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  #64  
Old 05-13-2019, 06:31 AM
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Yep, that's it. The woman in YAWYE used a spatula to press down on the egg and keep it immersed in the oil.
There's also an oil-heavy approach you might be interested in that is used in Southeast Asian cooking (and I assume beyond.) They're actually quite good, but yield a bit of a different final-looking result than Pepin's method. See here (should cue up, but at 1:02 if it doesn't. Or here's another example. It does yield quite a delicious fried egg with crispy edges and great textural contrast, but probably an egg you don't want to eat every day.
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Old 05-13-2019, 06:38 AM
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Hmm, maybe if i use more oil when i fry eggs they won't stick.
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Old 05-13-2019, 07:32 AM
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I've been to a fair number of Irish pubs in the US; IME, "Irish Breakfast" is common, but I've not seen "full English" or "English Breakfast" at any of them. YMMV, of course.
You wouldn't - whether a full breakfast is termed English, Irish (or Welsh or Scottish) is much less about the component ingredients* and much more about the location in which the breakfast is being served. Therefore Irish pub = Irish breakfast, Welsh B&B = Welsh breakfast, Edinburgh cafe = Scottish breakfast, etc.

*There are trivial differences that add local flavour, for example in the type of white or black pudding that is served, or the type of sausage, but the main components of egg, bacon, mushrooms, sausage, beans and tomatoes are pretty consistent.

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Old 05-13-2019, 08:13 AM
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I admit that I may not have been paying that much attention when I was still living in the US (I am not and never have been a "Breakfast Time" breakfast foods eater, but I do enjoy an omlette or Full English Breakfast for dinner a couple of times per year) but at least here in Poland, the Irish Pubs specifically advertise "English Breakfast" much more commonly than they do "Irish Breakfast".

Maybe it's a translation thing or perhaps, in Krakow, where every weekend thousands of English university kids (and plenty of older retired "kids" in their 60's and 70's as well) fly over here for the dirt-cheap food & drink, while actual Irish tourists are not nearly as common and so they think it is better marketing?

(The Irish Pubs I know here are seemingly always owned and staffed by Poles, not ex-pat Irish)
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Old 05-13-2019, 04:04 PM
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I think of it as a regular breakfast plus beans and non-breakfast sausage. I've not really seen it around here, but I've seen it on TV, where it is presented as being internarional/multicultural. In other words, "why not try this variation on breakfast?"

Oh, and breakfast sausage is an uncased brown sweet sausage in either patty or link form that goes great with maple syrup. But, honestly, Google would probably tell you better than my description. I'd say it's the sausage you get at McDonald's, but I'm not sure that's the same internationally. I'm pretty sure you don't get our biscuits...
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Old 05-13-2019, 04:10 PM
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From reading Pomaine and other famous French food writers, I would say that an omelette is a French luncheon dish. It’s certainly too spare for a proper dinner. Maybe a post-theater or post-coital supper.
I was under the impression that French lunches were bigger than their dinners. Like it was such a big deal that businesses would shut down for 2 hours or more.

Granted, this is a memory from my grade school French teacher, so maybe it's out of date. (I remember petit dejeuner and dejeuner, but not supper.)
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Old 05-13-2019, 04:11 PM
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In the US, "breakfast sausage" usually means sausage (usually pork) that's been heavily flavored with sage. The most common form, in my experience, is cased links, but uncased patties are not uncommon.
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Old 05-13-2019, 04:13 PM
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Why would it? It’s an English term.

Does “green chile cheeseburger” get used outside of New Mexico?
I don't know, but it seems pretty obvious what it is, but I wouldn't have one for breakfast.

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Does “a double order of stuffies and a coffee cabinet” GT used outside of Rhode Island?
As opposed to this, where only one word makes sense in the context of food
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Old 05-13-2019, 08:03 PM
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I was under the impression that French lunches were bigger than their dinners. Like it was such a big deal that businesses would shut down for 2 hours or more.

Granted, this is a memory from my grade school French teacher, so maybe it's out of date. (I remember petit dejeuner and dejeuner, but not supper.)
Nah, French lunch is lunch. Dinner is dinner, meaning if you’re lucky, an appetizer, plat, and dessert of fruit, cheese, or a sweet. And plenty of wine.

Big midday meals are a rural thing, if you’re out threshing the barley or mowing the alfalfa all day. But in Paris or Lyons or Marseilles, it’s the above.
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Old 05-13-2019, 09:03 PM
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Hmm, maybe if i use more oil when i fry eggs they won't stick.
Use a non-stick pan. Seriously, it won't stick at all to a decent non-stick that hasn't been scratched up. I usually put a quick spritz of cooking spray on it anyway, just to make sure, but you definitely don't need more oil if you don't want to use more oil for the different results it gives. And even with a shit ton of oil on a regular (i.e. not non-stick) pan, you can still get the egg to stick to the pan. OK, maybe not if you have enough oil so the egg never touches the bottom of the pan, but if you look at the second Asian street-fried egg video I linked to, you can see that he's got to dig in there with his wok spatula to get it to release.

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Old 05-14-2019, 06:54 AM
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In my experience, the "full English/Scottish/Irish" breakfasts are all very similar, basically the same thing differing only with the selection of a local processed meat, the style of fried potatoes, and maybe the preferred brand of beans being different.

In and around NYC I've noticed "Full Irish" breakfasts listed in some diners or (Irish) pubs that are open for breakfast, but I haven't seen a "Full English" breakfast listed in the US. (I have seen it in Asia.)

The diner that I go to most often near me that lists the Full Irish breakfast specifies "Batchelor beans", which I thought was a typo, but eventually learned was the brand of canned beans (i.e., not the Heinz one but "Batchelor's", I guess it is more popular in or more associated with Ireland?).

I've traveled in England, Scotland, Wales, and the east coast of Ireland (Dublin to Belfast), and had this kind of meal at Heathrow and elsewhere, any time of day (a "fry-up" for lunch a few times, and almost once for dinner). And one time, I had a "full Scottish breakfast" which supplied fried haggis in addition to or instead of the black pudding.
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:05 AM
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I was familiar with a full English breakfast, but until reading this thread, I can't recall seeing the phrase "full Irish breakfast".

I've been to Ireland. Maybe i just forget.
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:18 AM
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Do the French ever eat an omelet for breakfast, or is that strictly a dinner food?

Nope, that's not done. The standart breakfast is coffee+buttered bread, possibly jam, period. Chocolate and nowadays often cereals for the kids. Maybe fruit juice. Not much deviation from this. No kind of hot dish (or cold dish, for that matter).
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:20 AM
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I've traveled in England, Scotland, Wales, and the east coast of Ireland (Dublin to Belfast), and had this kind of meal at Heathrow and elsewhere, any time of day (a "fry-up" for lunch a few times, and almost once for dinner). And one time, I had a "full Scottish breakfast" which supplied fried haggis in addition to or instead of the black pudding.
This is my favourite thing about a 'full Scottish' - I love the haggis, goes brilliantly with the beans.
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:27 AM
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Yes, well. In some countries the working population requires a modest calorific intake and some rehydration in order to effectively carry out proper jobs.
I've been raised in a very backward rural area, and the eating habbits of the old farmers were pretty different. Something typical for breakfast would have been buckwheat "galettes" and soup, with a healthy dose of wine in the soup. Cheese or cold cuts could be on the menu too.

My great-grandfather liked to have eggs for breakfast, but his wife was greedy and eggs could be sold. When he became ill and incapacited, she denied him eggs. One of his neighbors began to steal his eggs in the early morning and smuggle them to him past his wife.
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:48 AM
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I was under the impression that French lunches were bigger than their dinners. Like it was such a big deal that businesses would shut down for 2 hours or more.

Granted, this is a memory from my grade school French teacher, so maybe it's out of date. (I remember petit dejeuner and dejeuner, but not supper.)


It's a bit out of date, yes. Lunches have had a tendency to become lighter. And people working can't really have a 2 hours lunch. But a full seated meal, with starter, entree, and dessert is still normal.

And yes, shops used to shut down in the early afternoon. Not offices and such, though. My lunch break went from one hour to 45 minutes to now 30 minutes during my career.


When I was a kid in the countryside, and relatives were invited for lunch that was...basically an all day affair. The first guests will be there around 11, and there was the "aperitif" until everybody had showed up around 1 pm, at which point the lunch could start. With all the talking, the lunch would progress very slowly to the despair of kids like me. By the time the dessert was finished, it was 4 p.m. Time for the "digestif". Which would bring us to 5 pm and coffee time. A short break during which women would go clean the dishes, some more talking and it was time for the "apéritif" preceding dinner. Rinse and repeat. At about 10-11 pm, people would leave, half of them not having left the table the whole time.
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:56 AM
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...My great-grandfather liked to have eggs for breakfast, but his wife was greedy and eggs could be sold. When he became ill and incapacited, she denied him eggs. One of his neighbors began to steal his eggs in the early morning and smuggle them to him past his wife.
I'm curious about the household economics and dynamics that led to this. Were eggs her only source of money she had any control over? Or if they had shared access to other sources of income, what little luxury was she denied by her husband greedily consuming all the eggs?

That's just a strange, sad story.
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:56 AM
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When I was a kid in the countryside, and relatives were invited for lunch that was...basically an all day affair. The first guests will be there around 11, and there was the "aperitif" until everybody had showed up around 1 pm, at which point the lunch could start. With all the talking, the lunch would progress very slowly to the despair of kids like me. By the time the dessert was finished, it was 4 p.m. Time for the "digestif". Which would bring us to 5 pm and coffee time. A short break during which women would go clean the dishes, some more talking and it was time for the "apéritif" preceding dinner. Rinse and repeat. At about 10-11 pm, people would leave, half of them not having left the table the whole time.
Sounds like my perfect day!
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Old 05-14-2019, 09:28 AM
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I'm curious about the household economics and dynamics that led to this. Were eggs her only source of money she had any control over? Or if they had shared access to other sources of income, what little luxury was she denied by her husband greedily consuming all the eggs?

That's just a strange, sad story.
So, you're presented with the story of a woman victimizing her husband, but rather than accepting it at face value, you have to scramble for alternate explanations where she would be the victim, because it doesn't fit your prefered narrative where women are victimized by men, right? This message board is really terrible from this point of view.

My great grandfather's wife, from all accounts (my own family and other locals who have known her), wasn't a nice person, and notoriously a penny pincher (and greediness was so widespread in this area that to be remembered as being abnormally greedy, especially by people of this generation, means a lot, believe me).

She put to work (rented out) the children of my grandfather's first marriage starting at age 6 (not her own children), hijacked the inheritance of their mother, treated them very badly (along with, later, their own children. When she found out that her husband had left his daughter and granddaughter stay in their home for a visit, she kicked both out, even though they had no other place to stay that night, and forbade her husband to let them stay in their house again).

She definitely didn't allow any luxury (not that they were wealthy people, so "luxury" would have been relative). When a relative offered shoes to my then teenage grandmother so that she could go dancing (people were normally wearing clogs, at the time) and she found out (my grandmother was hiding the shoes), she took them and sold them. Eggs weren't their only source of income, they were small farmers, having some cows, some potatoes fields, some wheat fields, etc...a bit of everything.

I've no reason to suppose that she denied my greatgrandfather eggs for any other reason than because she thought it was an extravagant expense and being bed-ridden, there was nothing he could do about it. That's most certainly how it was recounted by the neighbor, at least. Nothing of what I heard about them let me think that my great grandfather had much say in the running of the household, either.
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Old 05-14-2019, 11:02 AM
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Old 05-14-2019, 11:49 AM
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I was watching an old episode of Midsomer Murders a few weeks ago, and Inspector Barnaby was getting breakfast in the cafeteria (canteen?) at work. At least half his plate was beans. They looked disgusting. I never eat baked beans as-is heated up straight from the can. We've always doctored them with bacon, sauteed onions, mustard, brown sugar and Worcestershire sauce, then, slow baked them for an hour or more. Of course, Barnaby was called away before he could actually eat his breakfast.

Big breakfasts now in the US seem to be more of a weekend thing. I certainly rarely eat a big breakfast, and if I do eat one on the weekend, it's more likely a kind of brunch, and I'd only eat two meals that day.
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Old 05-14-2019, 12:00 PM
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So, you're presented with the story of a woman victimizing her husband, but rather than accepting it at face value, you have to scramble for alternate explanations where she would be the victim, because it doesn't fit your prefered narrative where women are victimized by men, right? This message board is really terrible from this point of view...
No, I don't think women are routinely victimized by men. And with the rest of the background you gave, it does sound like she was just a miserable miser. But the story, as you gave it, could very easily have been the story of a woman whose only income was the eggs. That was back in the days when a married woman didn't legally own anything, her husband did. And frankly, I find it hard to identify with a person so evil that she tried to avoid feeding her sick husband eggs unless the eggs are somehow extremely valuable to her. I was trying to guess why they would be so valuable.
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Old 05-14-2019, 12:01 PM
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I was watching an old episode of Midsomer Murders a few weeks ago, and Inspector Barnaby was getting breakfast in the cafeteria (canteen?) at work. At least half his plate was beans. They looked disgusting. I never eat baked beans as-is heated up straight from the can. We've always doctored them with bacon, sauteed onions, mustard, brown sugar and Worcestershire sauce, then, slow baked them for an hour or more. Of course, Barnaby was called away before he could actually eat his breakfast.

Big breakfasts now in the US seem to be more of a weekend thing. I certainly rarely eat a big breakfast, and if I do eat one on the weekend, it's more likely a kind of brunch, and I'd only eat two meals that day.
I like baked beans from the can, and I don't like them when they've been ruined by nasty stuff like mustard or undercooked onions. I don't eat baked beans for breakfast in the US, but I've enjoyed them in the UK.
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Old 05-14-2019, 12:26 PM
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Here’s a place that has it in Chicago. Of course, this pub caters to football (soccer) fans and the time zone difference means that matches can start as early as 630 AM. The clientele features a lot of ex pats and Anglophiles such as myself.

https://www.theglobepub.com/food-drink/
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Old 05-14-2019, 12:44 PM
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It sure was convenient when traveling in unfamiliar parts. We could load up at breakfast time, maybe have a little brown bread to tide us over during the day (seriously, that Irish brown bread was amazing), and be fine until evening, so we only had to find one restaurant a day instead of two.
This is what I like about the "full" breakfast. It's not something I would eat under ordinary, daily circumstances, but when you're traveling or hiking or otherwise out all day, then it's great. You're good until tea-time.
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Old 05-14-2019, 02:16 PM
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No, I don't think women are routinely victimized by men. And with the rest of the background you gave, it does sound like she was just a miserable miser. But the story, as you gave it, could very easily have been the story of a woman whose only income was the eggs. That was back in the days when a married woman didn't legally own anything, her husband did. And frankly, I find it hard to identify with a person so evil that she tried to avoid feeding her sick husband eggs unless the eggs are somehow extremely valuable to her. I was trying to guess why they would be so valuable.
I answered the way I did because you didn't say something like "Could it be that the eggs were her only source of income? That while her husband was eating eggs, she had nothing?". You *asserted* that her husband was greedy. You didn't ask *if* he was depriving her of something, you asked me *what* she was denied by her greedy husband.

By the way, I realized one thing after writing my last post. I know very few anecdotes about my great grandparents, and for some of them nothing at all. She's the only one about whom I've heard many tales. Invariably about her nastiness or her greediness, and generally both. I guess the others would have some interesting stories to tell if they were brought back to life, but I guess there were on the overall rather unremarkable people. But her, she was remarkable, albeit in a bad way.


And : women back in the day did own property. They might not have been able to dispose of it freely, depending on the local laws, but they owned it.

A more uplifting story about this great grandfather, for a change, with this time a distinct lack of greediness. At this time he was a poor sharecropper (he and his second wife were both widowed at a young age, and the inheritances from all four families, along presumably with her penny pinching, were what allowed them to buy a farm later on). It was around 1900-1905. He had gone to some village at the fair that was taking place for the local saint's day to sell his produces. Soon after he left, he realized he had lost his wallet and all the money from the sales in it. So, he went back looking for it, in vain of course. The road going up to the village square was lined for the occasion with beggars hoping for some donation. He asked them if by chance they hadn't seen the wallet, and none of them had, of course. But when he began to lament, wondering about how he would feed his children, one of them told him "Ah! I see that you aren't much richer than me. Here's your wallet" and gave it back to him.
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Last edited by clairobscur; 05-14-2019 at 02:21 PM.
  #90  
Old 05-14-2019, 04:48 PM
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Yeah, I was being dramatic, that's a risky strategy. This time it failed, and I have egg on my face.

That's a funny story about the beggar, though. I've heard a similar story about a thief returning money, but I feel like I've hijacked this thread enough. Some other time.
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Old 05-14-2019, 05:24 PM
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When I was a kid in the countryside, and relatives were invited for lunch that was...basically an all day affair. The first guests will be there around 11, and there was the "aperitif" until everybody had showed up around 1 pm, at which point the lunch could start. With all the talking, the lunch would progress very slowly to the despair of kids like me. By the time the dessert was finished, it was 4 p.m. Time for the "digestif". Which would bring us to 5 pm and coffee time. A short break during which women would go clean the dishes, some more talking and it was time for the "apéritif" preceding dinner. Rinse and repeat. At about 10-11 pm, people would leave, half of them not having left the table the whole time.
Something a lot like this is still done in the New Orleans area. Not all families do it, but some do -- including my own. The way you described that "coming over for lunch" day/evening is really familiar. Perhaps a cultural holdover from the city's French history?
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Old 05-14-2019, 06:08 PM
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I like baked beans from the can, and I don't like them when they've been ruined by nasty stuff like mustard or undercooked onions. I don't eat baked beans for breakfast in the US, but I've enjoyed them in the UK.
US baked beans are seasoned completely differently from UK baked beans. I won't eat the US version without serious modifications/additions, but your basic Heinz Beanz are an essential part of a full breakfast.
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Old 05-14-2019, 06:44 PM
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I go out with different people for breakfast about nine or ten times a week, and have done so for the past tree-fitty years, and I have NEVER seen "Full English" in the States. Also have NEVER* seen black sausage, tomahtos (grilled or fried), baked beans, or chips/french fries at breakfast.
No? I'm sorry to hear that. Here in NYC, it's easily available, at least on weekends. But it's known as the "Irish breakfast." And it will come with black and white pudding.
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Old 05-14-2019, 08:08 PM
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I think baked beans in tomato sauce are pretty much an English thing, although they are available all over the world. They are not spicy or especially sweet and the beans are specially bred to have virtually no taste of their own; 50,000 tonnes of navy beans are shipped annually to the UK from North America. There are many brands, but Heinz is probably the most popular; every day over one a half million cans of Heinz Baked Beans are consumed in the UK. That’s more than 540 million cans a year.
Ok you and everyone talking about the beans... How do the UK and US beans compare and contrast? I've seen pictures of the UK ones and they look almost like Boston baked beans. I haven't made them from scratch, but it seems like the ingredients are very similar. Is it ratios or technique? I love Boston baked beans but I could see if they were just slightly different that I would hate them so I'm curious if it's radically different or just a more coke/pepsi thing (in which they're brown sugar water but differing flavors, but close enough some people can't tell them apart).
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Old 05-14-2019, 08:18 PM
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Ok you and everyone talking about the beans... How do the UK and US beans compare and contrast? I've seen pictures of the UK ones and they look almost like Boston baked beans. I haven't made them from scratch, but it seems like the ingredients are very similar. Is it ratios or technique? I love Boston baked beans but I could see if they were just slightly different that I would hate them so I'm curious if it's radically different or just a more coke/pepsi thing (in which they're brown sugar water but differing flavors, but close enough some people can't tell them apart).

Beans baked in tomato sauce. Very similar if not the same as Boston baked beans. Except I believe Boston beans are also stewed with bacon and molasses, where the British version is in tomato sauce, possibly sweetened with brown sugar but not quite molasses in texture.
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Old 05-14-2019, 08:26 PM
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Think pork & beans without the pork. The first three ingredients in Heinz Beanz are beans (51%), tomatoes (34%), and water. The same list for Van Camp's Pork & Beans is Beans, water, tomato puree. There is no molasses in Heinz, and very little spicing. Van Camp's list onion powder as a distinct ingredient along with HFC. Heinz beans are vegetarian, whilst Van Camp's have been shown a picture of a pig somewhere during processing.
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Old 05-15-2019, 08:04 AM
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While most 'pork and beans' in the US may have a tomato-base sauce, there is at least one brand (termed New England style) with a molasses base. Make that two brands.
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Old 05-15-2019, 09:18 AM
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Interesting. I always thought Boston baked beans (and barbecue/pork & beans) always had a strong molasses and/or brown sugar component to them -- which is why I tend not to like them. I might have to give some of the other brands a try, but I suspect I still will end up only liking Heinz beans for eating out of the can.
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Old 05-15-2019, 10:57 AM
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English breakfast


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Originally Posted by Baron Greenback View Post
It's not a regular thing for most British people either, to be honest. A weekend hangover cure for many, I suspect. People with physically demanding jobs tend to pre-load at breakfast though.
Most people just eat cereals thee days. In other words, Corn Flakes. In England you usually only find a full English breakfast in a B&B or a hotel. Black pudding is for the north of England, not everybody likes it. In my experience you don't often get kippers.

As for English baked beans ... I hate them. Canteen food at its blandest. Why do people like the things?
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Old 05-15-2019, 12:09 PM
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Interesting. I always thought Boston baked beans (and barbecue/pork & beans) always had a strong molasses and/or brown sugar component to them -- which is why I tend not to like them. I might have to give some of the other brands a try, but I suspect I still will end up only liking Heinz beans for eating out of the can.
I like both B&M and Bush's. Heinz also makes a "Deep Browned" version of baked beans that is really good. Beware: It too has a brown sugar and/or molasses base.

Beans baked in maple syrup (a strictly Canadian thing, I think) are also good.

The tomato sauce in my beans "a la Britannique" is just watery, with almost no flavor. I have a Full English or Irish breakfast three or four times a year (it normally takes me two days to finish one), and I'll continue having them with one of the other kinds of beans.
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