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  #51  
Old 05-12-2019, 10:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuntman Mike View Post
The 1940s, 1950s, 60s, 70s, 80s, hell even the 90s... each decade had its own very distinguishable personality in terms of pop culture, music, fashion, technology, cars, etc.

The most recent two decades, though??? Not so much. By now the 2000s and 2010s should each have its own personality, but I just don't see it.
Of course you don't see it. You're in it. In time, the "personalities" of those decades will be quite apparent to you.

Of course, bear in mind those "personbalities" will be largely fiction and nonsense. The "distinguishable personality" of, say, the 1950s you claim to know about is a pop culture creation and a product of your own personal nostalgia and the weakness of your own memory, which do one that really does not accurately reflect what life was like for people living then.
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  #52  
Old 05-12-2019, 09:20 PM
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One thing distinctive of about the late 90s was the Monday Night War between WCW and WWF(now WWE). WCW became popular with with advent of the NWO angle. And WWF with advent of "Stone Cold" Steve Austin. Professional wrestling hit its all-time peak of popularity among the mainstream. It seemed I couldn't go out in public without seeing someone wearing either an NWO or "Austin 3:16" t shirt. So if you were going to 90s themed party wearing either of those would be appropriate.
  #53  
Old 05-13-2019, 02:44 AM
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Trends I have noticed in the 2010s:

Visible tattoos. No longer hidden on shoulders and backs, it's now very common to see full sleeve tattoos and even neck tattoos on regular people. They're not just for the back alley niche crowd anymore. Soon you'll see them on hosts of kid's TV shows.

YouTuber fame. Making your own content, bypassing traditional studio support, and still getting millions of views and sometimes millions of dollars. That aspect can't last in this form, so it will be distinctly part of this decade I think. But it's also such a huge variety of unusual niche content that is unfeasibly popular.

Social Media as a legitimate force. It's not just communication of memes, it's a source of news, and can make or break a career, or initiate a movement.

Bingeing TV shows. They're still events, just in a new format.

Podcasts. The new radio. A source not just for entertainment, but it's where the top comedians and character actors are coming from.

Fantasy TV series. They used to be barely 2% of a network's output, but now it's got to be at least 30% of some. The CW is almost entirely fantasy, sci-fi, or superhero right now. They may be comedy, drama, soap, or a combination of all three (as always) but they have to have some kind of demon, zombie, witch, or caped crusader in it somewhere.
  #54  
Old 05-14-2019, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Guinastasia View Post
If you ask me, it would be the 90s. It's probably a nostalgia thing, since those were my teen years, but I miss the music, the tv shows, and I'd also LOVE to go back and watch Mario Lemieux and Jaromir Jagr play in their prime once again.



Seriously? Someone mentioned the fall of the Berlin Wall, there was also the collapse of the Soviet Union. You cannot possibly tell me that wasn't a huge deal? Much, much bigger than Reagan, or the Challenger explosion, as tragic as the latter was.

Major revolutions in the middle east? The rise of the personal computer? The AIDS epidemic?

The advent of the internet. That was major, and pretty much changed life as we know it. (Yes, I'm aware that technically it existed long before that). The end of the Cold War. The first WTC bombing, Waco, the cease fire in Northern Ireland?

The Columbine massacre? The end of Apartheid? Seriously, dude.

You are right, I completely missed those. I knew there were some things I was missing. Consider this a lesson in perspective - it's easier to see the events that are part of history than those that are a part of your life. And it's easier to see trends after they've been processed through media perspectives.


To add to my history then:
1991 - Fall of the Berlin Wall/Soviet Union/End of the Cold war. I'm putting these together because the former was a very visible symbol of the latter, and the cold war ended when the Soviet Union did. I do remember wondering who was going to be the bad guy in all the future thriller/spy movies.
1993 - Waco Branch Davidian Siege
1993 - First WTC bombing.
1995 - Oklahoma City Bombing. Missing this may be a case of being too close to the event - my husband of the time worked in the Dallas Federal Building, and I worked a couple of blocks away from the Fort Worth Federal Building, and both of these had been targeted by the people who bombed the OKC Federal building (oddly, wiki lists a different motive for the bombing, but it happened two years to the day after the Branch Davidian Siege)
Early 90s - end of Apartheid
Mid 90s - End of "The Troubles" - Northern Ireland ceasefire.


Some of the other items, while they had cultural impact, were more of the slow burn - the rise of the use of personal computers, computer games, and the rise of the internet trickled into the public consciousness, rather than being a discrete event or a fairly short ranged event.

Wars in the middle east? Have been happening off and on for as long as I can remember.

So, what impact did these events have on pop culture? I note that the events I originally listed were from my childhood and teen years, plus those events I studied in American History from before my time. Guinastasia listed a number of events from her teenage years - a time period where I was getting away from pop culture. All I can observe from the added events is the reduction of worries about nuclear war and the switch from Russians as the bad guys to middle-easterners as the bad guys... a switch I'm not sure was an improvement
  #55  
Old 05-14-2019, 09:14 PM
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As one of the Board's resident Old Guys, I see definite differences between the 2000s and 2010s.

2000s
Immediate post-9/11 trauma and USA! USA!
Primitive texting
When will Hillary run?
Democrats run new faces, Republicans keep running the same old white guys.
Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera bein' nasty

2010s
We elected a black President! We got Bin Laden! So let's elect Donald Trump!
Ipod, Ipad and I-everything else and 24/7 streaming everywhere
When will Hillary stop running?
Democrats keep running the same old white guys, Republicans ran a brand-new type of candidate
Taylor Swift being wholesome with a little attitude.
  #56  
Old 05-15-2019, 10:15 AM
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2000s = "heartland" fashion! Buzz cuts, military / NASCAR insignia, country music, pickups / SUVs / Hummers, etc.
  #57  
Old 05-15-2019, 10:32 AM
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1990's: Soon we'll be living in the future we all imagined!
2000's: The future is here!
2010's: This doesn't seem like the future. There should be hoverboards and replicants.
  #58  
Old 05-15-2019, 04:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zyada View Post
You are right, I completely missed those. I knew there were some things I was missing. Consider this a lesson in perspective - it's easier to see the events that are part of history than those that are a part of your life. And it's easier to see trends after they've been processed through media perspectives.


To add to my history then:
1991 - Fall of the Berlin Wall/Soviet Union/End of the Cold war. I'm putting these together because the former was a very visible symbol of the latter, and the cold war ended when the Soviet Union did. I do remember wondering who was going to be the bad guy in all the future thriller/spy movies.
1993 - Waco Branch Davidian Siege
1993 - First WTC bombing.
1995 - Oklahoma City Bombing. Missing this may be a case of being too close to the event - my husband of the time worked in the Dallas Federal Building, and I worked a couple of blocks away from the Fort Worth Federal Building, and both of these had been targeted by the people who bombed the OKC Federal building (oddly, wiki lists a different motive for the bombing, but it happened two years to the day after the Branch Davidian Siege)
Early 90s - end of Apartheid
Mid 90s - End of "The Troubles" - Northern Ireland ceasefire.


Some of the other items, while they had cultural impact, were more of the slow burn - the rise of the use of personal computers, computer games, and the rise of the internet trickled into the public consciousness, rather than being a discrete event or a fairly short ranged event.

Wars in the middle east? Have been happening off and on for as long as I can remember.

So, what impact did these events have on pop culture? I note that the events I originally listed were from my childhood and teen years, plus those events I studied in American History from before my time. Guinastasia listed a number of events from her teenage years - a time period where I was getting away from pop culture. All I can observe from the added events is the reduction of worries about nuclear war and the switch from Russians as the bad guys to middle-easterners as the bad guys... a switch I'm not sure was an improvement
I would add the Rodney King beating and LA riot, along with the OJ chase and trial to your list of notable events for the 90s.

And how about the rise of ubiquitous yoga pants for a 2010s vs 2000s fashion difference.
  #59  
Old 05-15-2019, 04:54 PM
pulykamell is online now
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Here's another fashion thing I thought of: untucked dress shirts. To me, I don't really remember this being a very common thing before the 2000s. This NY Times style article claims 2004 was when it became big, but I didn't dare go out with an untucked dress shirt until the mid-2010s, and I'm actually back to my tucked-in ways for the most part. Here's an article from the Times from 2017 about the untucked shirts.

Also, since I mentioned David Cross before as looking quintessentially 90s in a stand-up act, I oddly came across this in my Youtube feed, and was looking at his outfit, and the only decade I can really place him in looking like that is the 2010s. Maybe, maybe the 2000s, but something about the whole look with the long but trimmed beard, the logo-less hat, the flannel, the dressy looking slacks, just screams a look that only looks right in this decade to me. It has elements of other eras, but not put together like that, and not "slick" looking like that.

Last edited by pulykamell; 05-15-2019 at 04:55 PM.
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