Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #451  
Old 03-28-2019, 08:51 PM
Sterling Archer is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,074
I once read a book as a kid that I have no idea what it was called. It was about a boy (and I think a friend and a girl were other main characters) who would find these little metal cubes and when he’d activate them by squeezing, they would give special powers. In the early part of the book, they gave telekinesis or allowed him to read minds, but later in the book he would actually go into people’s minds in a virtual simulation and could alter memories, resolve traumas, discover secrets, stuff like that, kinda like Inception. At the end, he finds the final cube which allows him to go into a new space (his own mind? The afterlife? Not sure) where he meets his long dead father who reveals he has been guiding him to these cubes and powers all along.

It was super weird but reading as a kid it was really engrossing.
  #452  
Old 03-28-2019, 09:45 PM
The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 16,365
Could’ve been Christopher, or Christopher and his Magic Powers.
  #453  
Old 03-29-2019, 10:45 PM
eschereal's Avatar
eschereal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Frogstar World B
Posts: 16,121
I recall reading one short story where the protagonist wanted to assassinate the tyrant but could not figure out how to get it done right, and at last he settled on using a laser to blind the tyrant while he is giving a speech, because how can a nation respect and follow a man who cannot see.

In a similar vein, a protagonist visits a planet where the natives take and subject him to a sequence of tortures that each grow more horrific than the last, and after his body is a total wreck, they elevate him to the pinnacle of leadership, because he now has nothing to gain or lose by acting rashly. (I want to say that it was in It Came from Schenectady, but my copy has gone out of hand and I cannot easily find a list of titles.)
  #454  
Old 03-29-2019, 11:01 PM
The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 16,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
In a similar vein, a protagonist visits a planet where the natives take and subject him to a sequence of tortures that each grow more horrific than the last, and after his body is a total wreck, they elevate him to the pinnacle of leadership, because he now has nothing to gain or lose by acting rashly. (I want to say that it was in It Came from Schenectady, but my copy has gone out of hand and I cannot easily find a list of titles.)
On The Uses Of Torture, by Piers Anthony.
  #455  
Old 03-30-2019, 07:29 AM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
I recall reading one short story where the protagonist wanted to assassinate the tyrant but could not figure out how to get it done right, and at last he settled on using a laser to blind the tyrant while he is giving a speech, because how can a nation respect and follow a man who cannot see.
The Light of Darkness by Clarke I think
  #456  
Old 03-30-2019, 12:37 PM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Other Waldo Pepper View Post
On The Uses Of Torture, by Piers Anthony.
Agreed. The story can be found in the collection "Anthonology" from 1985 - about the same time that "It Came from Schenectady" was published.
  #457  
Old 03-30-2019, 01:49 PM
Elendil's Heir is online now
SDSAB
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: my Herkimer Battle Jitney
Posts: 82,857
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
I recall reading one short story where the protagonist wanted to assassinate the tyrant but could not figure out how to get it done right, and at last he settled on using a laser to blind the tyrant while he is giving a speech, because how can a nation respect and follow a man who cannot see....
William Safire wrote a pretty good political novel, Full Disclosure, about a President blinded in an accident who has to fend off political foes and prove that he can actually still lead the country.
  #458  
Old 03-30-2019, 02:00 PM
eschereal's Avatar
eschereal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Frogstar World B
Posts: 16,121
Thanks, guys.
  #459  
Old 03-30-2019, 03:28 PM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy L View Post
The Light of Darkness by Clarke I think
Confirmed https://thebrickinthesky.wordpress.c...short-stories/
  #460  
Old 03-30-2019, 04:21 PM
eschereal's Avatar
eschereal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Frogstar World B
Posts: 16,121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy L View Post
Oh, man, The Nine Billion Names of God collection had one story that was so well written I had to show it to my HS English teacher to prove to him that there was good SF. It was called
SPOILER:
Death and the Senator
  #461  
Old 03-30-2019, 08:14 PM
frobozz is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Great Underground Empire
Posts: 172
Okay, my turn.
I read every post so far and this one has not been brought up before.

I have only the vaguest recollection of a story that was probably more fantasy than SF. It was a children’s or young adult book, which I would have read in the early 90’s, although I don’t know how old it was at the time.

What I remember:
The protagonist is in an alternate universe or reality, whose analogue in our world is a junk yard.
The junk yard is surrounded by a metal fence, which in the other world is an impassible ocean of metal.
The plot involved the protagonist needing to reach the center of the world. There was an enemy of some sort who wanted to reach the center before he did. I recall the enemy being an animal of some sort, such as a rat.
The protagonist had a mysterious box that he didn’t know how to open. When he reaches the center of the world, he understands that the box opens in threes.

There have been some very impressive answers in this thread already, so I’m hopeful someone will recognize this.
keeping my fingers crossed....
  #462  
Old 03-30-2019, 10:29 PM
Morgyn is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: In the time stream
Posts: 5,551
Senor Beef started a thread about the movie Sunshine, and his synopsis of it reminded me of a story I read decades ago but I have, of course, forgotten both name and author. Pretty sure it was a short story, though.

In the story, the sun is no longer giving enough heat and light to keep the Earth warm, and everyone lives underground. Scientists have come up with a means to relight it that requires the delivery of a device to the sun. The mission succeeds, but only after the ship carrying the material needed to reignite the sun falls into the sun along with the device, I think because either the heat or the gravity was too much for the ship. Oddly, the crew members had expected to get back to Earth.

The last line was something like a woman on Earth looking up to the sky to see the sun starting to brighten, and remembering the last thing one of the crew members, her lover (?) saying to her, "I will return to you, in the sun." That line has stuck with me all these years, so I'm wondering if anyone else recognizes it? I would have read this late 70s to mid 80s, so Alex Garland, writer of the movie Sunshine, is very definitely not the writer.
  #463  
Old 03-30-2019, 11:18 PM
The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 16,365
The line is “I will come back to you in the sunlight”: Clark Ashton Smith, Phoenix.
  #464  
Old 03-31-2019, 12:55 AM
Morgyn is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: In the time stream
Posts: 5,551
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Other Waldo Pepper View Post
The line is “I will come back to you in the sunlight”: Clark Ashton Smith, Phoenix.
God damn, I love this board.

I'm seriously considering just PMing you and Peter Morris when I have a question like this. You two are bloody amazing.
  #465  
Old 03-31-2019, 04:25 PM
markn+ is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: unknown; Speed: exactly 0
Posts: 2,249
I remember a story whose name escapes me, where the protagonist was an engineer working on a rocket in his country's first space program. As the story progresses, we gradually discover that in this story's world, electricity has never been discovered. The setting seems rather modern, with cities and rockets, etc. but all the technology is based on mechanical or chemical processes, with nothing electric. In the course of the story, I believe there's a young maverick scientist who discovers or nearly discovers electricity, but is ridiculed by his superiors.

Last edited by markn+; 03-31-2019 at 04:25 PM.
  #466  
Old 03-31-2019, 04:31 PM
The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 16,365
Sounds like “Not In The Literature”, by Christopher Anvil.
  #467  
Old 03-31-2019, 05:41 PM
markn+ is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: unknown; Speed: exactly 0
Posts: 2,249
That's it! Thanks.
  #468  
Old 03-31-2019, 06:49 PM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Other Waldo Pepper View Post
Sounds like “Not In The Literature”, by Christopher Anvil.
I should read more Christopher Anvil - I've liked the stories and novels of his that I've read, but I know there are more out there.
  #469  
Old 03-31-2019, 11:26 PM
ChrisM is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
The title I'm looking for is set in the contemporary 1960s. There are tunnel networks under cities, with entrances in basements. There are bad guys called elves living in the tunnels. The protagonist enters the tunnels to rescue a woman. An hallucinogenic fungus grows in the tunnels that the elves eat. I recall someone reading tea leaves.
I'm pretty sure this is "The Shadow People" by Margaret St. Clair.
  #470  
Old 04-25-2019, 09:56 PM
Sleel is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Japan
Posts: 2,818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Bill View Post
Don't know if that's the one. I also remember it was one of his stories set in Africa, with I believe a Maasai protagonist.

Definitely not Seven Views of Olduvai Gorge, however, as I recently read that.
Into the Out Of by Alan Dean Foster.
__________________
Deja fu: the feeling that somehow, somewhere, you've been kicked in the head like this before.
  #471  
Old 04-25-2019, 10:05 PM
AHunter3 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: NY (Manhattan) NY USA
Posts: 20,202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morgyn View Post
Thank you, Peter Morris, for identifying both The Galactic Rejects and The Ghosts for me. I found both inexpensively on Amazon and spent a pleasant evening revisiting both.

Alas for me, The Ghost of Dibble Hollow, while available, costs far more than I'm willing to spend, but thank you anyway, TheOtherWaldoPepper. I'm still amazed you were able to identify it, given that I had only a vague memory of plot points and most were wrong!
It's on my bookshelf along with other favorites from my elementary-school reading days
  #472  
Old 04-26-2019, 12:16 PM
thorny locust is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 247
OK, here's a couple I'd like to identify -- the first because I'd like to re-read it, the second because I really would not like to re-read it but every once in a while I think of it and when I do it bugs me.

1) Longish short story or possibly a novella; I think maybe about fifteen or twenty years old? Researcher -- I think a linguist -- trips over an isolated group of people who don't categorize people into male and female. Researcher says something like (not direct quotes) 'don't you notice that some people have penises and flat chests and other people have vulvae and large breasts?' and is answered in effect 'of course some people have penises and some people have vulvae. But some people with penises have larger breasts than some people with vulvae and why would we categorize people by that anyway?' Researcher then goes hunting for other unusual gender categorizations or lack of, and comes across a pair of twins with a twin language, which has terms for a lot of, I think several dozen, genders.

Note that I read this significantly before I started seeing common reports of people identifying as anything other than male or female.

2) Quite a short story, and I think considerably older. Small boy is sick in bed. He complains that his foot -- I think it was his foot -- isn't part of him any longer, but has been taken over by something awful, and begs to have it amputated. Family tries to soothe him, tells him he just has a fever and is hallucinating, of course it's his own foot. He then starts saying that the something awful is moving up his leg, taking over more and more of him. Family continues in the same attitude. The awful thing continues on upwards. Child, or rather something now looking like the child, wakes up, has developed some sort of destructive power, destroys something in the room I don't remember what, and then goes off to kill the parents.
  #473  
Old 04-26-2019, 12:26 PM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
The second one is by Bradbury. Stand by...

"Fever Dream" https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feve...m_(short_story)

I saw a picture book version of this once, with the infected parts of the kid being phosphorescent!

Last edited by Andy L; 04-26-2019 at 12:31 PM.
  #474  
Old 04-26-2019, 12:33 PM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
Corrected link https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feve..._(short_story)

PS: At the end of the story the kid deliberately infects his pet bird with the disease and resolves to shake hands with lots of people, starting with his family.

Last edited by Andy L; 04-26-2019 at 12:34 PM.
  #475  
Old 04-26-2019, 04:16 PM
thorny locust is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 247
Yup, that's it, Andy L. I remembered a lot of details wrong, but that's certainly the one I was remembering.

-- not sure I might not have been around fifteen myself when I read it; it's certainly old enough. Scared the hell out of me, that's for sure.

Thanks!

Last edited by thorny locust; 04-26-2019 at 04:17 PM.
  #476  
Old 04-26-2019, 05:19 PM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
Yup, that's it, Andy L. I remembered a lot of details wrong, but that's certainly the one I was remembering.

-- not sure I might not have been around fifteen myself when I read it; it's certainly old enough. Scared the hell out of me, that's for sure.

Thanks!
Glad to help. The "glow in the dark" edition https://www.amazon.com/Fever-Dream-N.../dp/0312572859 is extra creepy.
  #477  
Old 04-26-2019, 05:23 PM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post

1) Longish short story or possibly a novella; I think maybe about fifteen or twenty years old? Researcher -- I think a linguist -- trips over an isolated group of people who don't categorize people into male and female. Researcher says something like (not direct quotes) 'don't you notice that some people have penises and flat chests and other people have vulvae and large breasts?' and is answered in effect 'of course some people have penises and some people have vulvae. But some people with penises have larger breasts than some people with vulvae and why would we categorize people by that anyway?' Researcher then goes hunting for other unusual gender categorizations or lack of, and comes across a pair of twins with a twin language, which has terms for a lot of, I think several dozen, genders.

Note that I read this significantly before I started seeing common reports of people identifying as anything other than male or female.
This sounds familiar to me too. Maybe Le Guin?
  #478  
Old 04-26-2019, 05:42 PM
Mr. Bill is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleel View Post
Into the Out Of by Alan Dean Foster.
You got it. I even recognize some of the characters names in the link.

Man, I could have sworn that was a Mike Resnick story.

I bow to your superior knowledge.
  #479  
Old 04-26-2019, 11:10 PM
El DeLuxo is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Over here
Posts: 815
Oh, I think I've got a really obscure one for you!

Mind you, I'm not trying to play stump-the-expert here, I really would like to find this tale and read it again.

The story was published in the late 1970s or early 1980s, I think; I read it in an anthology whose title I don't recall.

PREMISE: Space travelers from Earth visit a planet where the intelligent local entities are some kind of bipedal vegetables or plants, with language and a culture and like that..

Said locals have a tradition of hanging up their children and stretching their bodies out as the kids become adolescents. This rite of passage horrifies the do-gooders among the Earth visitors, who see it as child abuse. Another faction of the traveller group argues for a "Prime Directive" of sorts: Don't interfere with the indigenous culture!

A local kid named Spet or Splet or something similar befriends the Earthlings; the well meaning don't-stretch-your-kids faction starts working with Splet-or-Spet's family, trying to convince them to break tradition by not subjecting their boy Spet-or-Splet to the ritual.

It has an ending which is either very sad indeed or happy in a weird way, depending on the reader's interpretation.

I read this story like ten, fifteen years ago and it has somewhat stuck with me -- but obviously not completely, or even sufficiently. If you could supply me with the title, and the author's name, and maybe even what magazine or anthology it was published in, I'd really appreciate it. Thank you in advance.
  #480  
Old 04-27-2019, 05:18 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 16,365
UNHUMAN SACRIFICE, Katherine MacLean. Published in Astounding Science Fiction (March, 1958), reprinted in Damon Knight's anthology A Century of Science Fiction.
  #481  
Old 04-27-2019, 07:45 AM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Other Waldo Pepper View Post
Excellent!
  #482  
Old 04-27-2019, 09:40 AM
thorny locust is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy L View Post
This sounds familiar to me too. Maybe Le Guin?
I'm pretty sure it's not LeGuin; I think I'd have remembered it as LeGuin if it were.

(It's true that I've been sure of things before that turned out not to be so --)
  #483  
Old 04-28-2019, 01:21 AM
El DeLuxo is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Over here
Posts: 815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy L View Post
Excellent!
Yeah, that's it! Thank both of you guys.
  #484  
Old 04-28-2019, 03:07 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 16,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammos1 View Post
I first asked about this short story 15 years ago on this board. I read it in the 1980s in an anthology. (NB it is not On by Adam Roberts, nor is it Clarke's The Wall of Darkness).

The story concerns a tribe who live on a vertical cliff face of seemingly infinite height. Despite this precarious situation they have lived on the face for generations and have a developed society, language etc.

One day, one of them looks over his shoulder and sees in the distance another cliff face that wasn't there before.

Over the next few days, it becomes apparent that the second cliff face is getting closer and closer. The tribe has to decide what to do: some choose suicide and let go off the cliff, while the others debate the relative merits of going up or going down...
Could be THE PEOPLE ON THE PRECIPICE, by Ian Watson.
  #485  
Old 04-28-2019, 03:12 AM
Asuka is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 1,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Other Waldo Pepper View Post
Could be Ian Slater’s USA VS MILITIA book series.
Thanks for this! The cover is exactly how I remember it.


Another one.

Sci-Fi short story I read in a short story collection that was published in the 90's. About 50-70 pages long.

Aliens come to Earth and pose us a challenge. Beat them at their version of a board game and if we win we gain the knowledge of how to beat all diseases. Fail and they destroy the Earth. The board game is needlessly complex but a newspaper writer who's covering this somehow gains an understanding of it and becomes Earth's champion. He's sent to challenge the head alien and pretty much instantly loses once the game gets underway. However he's able to figure out the aliens simply want a fun challenge and don't care about the medium so he challenges them instead to a game of poker, which he beats them handily at every time. Intrigued they thank him for the fun and give us our prize and go off to another planet to challenge them to a high-stakes poker game.
  #486  
Old 04-28-2019, 10:12 PM
Horatio Hellpop is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Jeju-si, S. Korea
Posts: 9,507
Someone I don't know on Facebook gave this description:
Quote:
As I recall, Ray Bradbury wrote a story about a scientist who invented a device that could reveal any moment in the past. He happened to zero in on Abraham Lincoln—and witnessed Lincoln and his wife murdering somebody in the White House. Aside from this ghastly revelation, he realized his that wife wanted nothing more than to obsessively spend the rest of her life watching their dead son. He wound up destroying the machine.
I googled "Ray Bradbury Abraham Lincoln" and got only one hit, a story nothing like the one described above, called "Downwind from Gettysburg" from a TV show called Ray Bradbury Theatre, so Bradbury's authorship of this story is a little doubtful. Nevertheless, does anybody recognize it?
  #487  
Old 04-29-2019, 04:02 AM
Wendell Wagner is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Greenbelt, Maryland
Posts: 14,246
This sounds to me like a muddled version of a story by Isaac Asimov called "The Dead Past":

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dead_Past

In this story, a scientist realizes that if his wife gets hold of a time machine, she will spend all her time watching the life of their daughter, who died as a baby.
  #488  
Old 04-29-2019, 06:06 AM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
This sounds to me like a muddled version of a story by Isaac Asimov called "The Dead Past":

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dead_Past

In this story, a scientist realizes that if his wife gets hold of a time machine, she will spend all her time watching the life of their daughter, who died as a baby.
I agree.
  #489  
Old 04-29-2019, 06:12 AM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
This list of "Time-Viewer" stories https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_v...cience_fiction mentions "E for Effort" in which a time-viewer causes trouble when it reveals the hidden motives and actions of many heroes of history - which might be another part of the story mentioned in post 486
  #490  
Old 05-14-2019, 08:03 AM
Meurglys is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 2,333
An aquaintance thought I might know what story this was, but I'm drawing a blank.
____

...an an SF story in which humans are on an alien world, working with intelligent aliens who are like big cats (think panther) but which have tentacles (think multiple elephant trunks). The humans (privately) call the aliens "Octopussies".

Also on the world are animals who look like humans, referred to as "Yahoos"; two human sociologists attempt to raise two orphaned yahoo babies, believing that the yahoos are suppressed humans, and if raised as human children will grow to have human intellects, etc.
____

I don't have an approximate year, but the details seem specific enough that may not be necessary.
  #491  
Old 05-15-2019, 08:58 AM
Elendil's Heir is online now
SDSAB
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: my Herkimer Battle Jitney
Posts: 82,857
I'm trying to remember in which of John Scalzi's Old Man's War series of sf military/diplomatic books this chapter appears:

Colonial Defense Forces soldiers mount a commando raid on an alien capital city, capturing and purposefully sterilizing the child of the monarch, to force the monarch to marry someone more to the CDF's liking and have a child with him/her/it. They contact the monarch with the child still in their hands as a hostage and the monarch, although outraged and heartbroken, reluctantly agrees to do what they ask.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asuka View Post
...Aliens come to Earth and pose us a challenge. Beat them at their version of a board game and if we win we gain the knowledge of how to beat all diseases.... Intrigued they thank him for the fun and give us our prize and go off to another planet to challenge them to a high-stakes poker game.
Do they give us all that advanced medical knowledge before they go?
  #492  
Old 05-15-2019, 09:04 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 16,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meurglys View Post
An aquaintance thought I might know what story this was, but I'm drawing a blank.
____

...an an SF story in which humans are on an alien world, working with intelligent aliens who are like big cats (think panther) but which have tentacles (think multiple elephant trunks). The humans (privately) call the aliens "Octopussies".

Also on the world are animals who look like humans, referred to as "Yahoos"; two human sociologists attempt to raise two orphaned yahoo babies, believing that the yahoos are suppressed humans, and if raised as human children will grow to have human intellects, etc.
____

I don't have an approximate year, but the details seem specific enough that may not be necessary.
Overproof?
  #493  
Old 05-15-2019, 10:22 AM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
I'm trying to remember in which of John Scalzi's Old Man's War series of sf military/diplomatic books this chapter appears:

Colonial Defense Forces soldiers mount a commando raid on an alien capital city, capturing and purposefully sterilizing the child of the monarch, to force the monarch to marry someone more to the CDF's liking and have a child with him/her/it. They contact the monarch with the child still in their hands as a hostage and the monarch, although outraged and heartbroken, reluctantly agrees to do what they ask.
Pretty sure this is "The Ghost Brigades"
  #494  
Old 05-15-2019, 10:24 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 16,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dale Sams View Post
I've mentioned this before, but i'll try again. Is probably a kids book of some kind but if so, surprisingly mature themes. From the 70's, what I remember:

Protagonist is a baseball player, has great eye/spatial coordination. War breaks out, his brother is presumed dead. The aliens have a single eye that emits a powerful laser. Holes in the hull are plugged by expanding balls shot from guns. Sort of what incapacitated Mr. Incredible.

The protagonist and an alien are on a moon together and stuff is moving around in slow motion because of the low gravity, but the human can tell the alien is going to be crushed because the protagonist has great baseball/spatial skills. He sacrifices himself to save the alien.

He wakes up in the hospital and sees his brother standing over him. The war is over, the guy saved the alien and it turns out the powerful lasers from the aliens are actually communication beams and the war started accidentally.
Sounds exactly like TRAPPED IN SPACE, by Jack Williamson.
  #495  
Old 05-15-2019, 04:56 PM
YamatoTwinkie is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,242
SF Short Story that's been bugging me for some reason. Read it mid-1990's in middle school as part of a SF story collection.

Premise is an astronaut on a long relativistic journey to explore a distant world ends up getting met upon landing by a human parade/party in his honor. During his voyage, technology had advanced so much that subsequent journeys were made in a fraction of a time, enough for a colony to be fully established for many years.

This isn't exactly a novel concept- tvtropes has a whole list of them under "lightspeed leapfrog" , but none of them seem to feature a party/parade for the arriving "explorer".
  #496  
Old 05-15-2019, 05:40 PM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
Quote:
Originally Posted by YamatoTwinkie View Post
SF Short Story that's been bugging me for some reason. Read it mid-1990's in middle school as part of a SF story collection.

Premise is an astronaut on a long relativistic journey to explore a distant world ends up getting met upon landing by a human parade/party in his honor. During his voyage, technology had advanced so much that subsequent journeys were made in a fraction of a time, enough for a colony to be fully established for many years.

This isn't exactly a novel concept- tvtropes has a whole list of them under "lightspeed leapfrog" , but none of them seem to feature a party/parade for the arriving "explorer".
I think this is Far Centaurus by Van Vogt.
Do you remember something about electron psychology?

Last edited by Andy L; 05-15-2019 at 05:41 PM.
  #497  
Old 05-15-2019, 07:49 PM
cochrane is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: The Nekkid Pueblo
Posts: 21,302
Oops. Wrong thread.

Last edited by cochrane; 05-15-2019 at 07:50 PM.
  #498  
Old 05-15-2019, 07:51 PM
Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 6,267
NM

Last edited by Andy L; 05-15-2019 at 07:51 PM.
  #499  
Old 05-16-2019, 07:24 AM
YamatoTwinkie is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,242
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy L View Post
I think this is Far Centaurus by Van Vogt.
Do you remember something about electron psychology?
I read the synopsis of Far Centaurus (it's one of the tropes under "lightspeed leapfrog"), but didn't see anything about a massive celebration/parade to greet the astronaut on landing.
  #500  
Old 05-16-2019, 07:38 AM
Meurglys is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 2,333
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Other Waldo Pepper View Post
Overproof?
Thanks for that; seems to be correct.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:37 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017