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Old 04-24-2019, 11:05 AM
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Explain the Eurovision Song Competition to me


I just stumbled upon a Eurovision Song Competition video and was kinda hooked. Since I knew nothing about it, it has been fun watching old performances and looking up the history and rules.

I don't quite understand what is actually being judged. Is it the song itself, independent of the performer, performance, and production or are all of those things given a certain amount of weight in determining who is the winner?

Do countries ever get a famous pop star or "ringer" to sing their song? I would imagine having Adele, Beyonce, or at the very least your country's most popular or respected performer singing your country's song would give you a boost as compared to an unknown or little known performer.

Do people take this competition as seriously as the crowd reaction and YouTube comments make it seem?

Last edited by Mesquite-oh; 04-24-2019 at 11:10 AM.
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Old 04-24-2019, 11:20 AM
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Is it the song itself, independent of the performer, performance, and production or are all of those things given a certain amount of weight in determining who is the winner?
The voting, and indeed the whole competition, is enormously political. This is a pretty good article on the topic - it's an interesting and informative read:

https://www.politico.eu/article/13-t...got-political/
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Old 04-24-2019, 11:30 AM
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The one time I watched it (1977), the British entry ("Rock Bottom") was sung by pop star Lyndsey Paul. The Irish voted against it, and the French entry won. It got a week or so of air time and then pretty much disappeared without a trace.
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Old 04-24-2019, 11:32 AM
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UK has sometimes used established singers or groups as their entry. Examples include Cliff Richard, Sandie Shaw, Lulu, The Shadows.
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Old 04-24-2019, 11:38 AM
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The Eurovision Song Contest is enormous fun and is taken somewhat seriously to not at all seriously by the various participants and viewers. The voting is done partly by a panel of judges and partly by viewers as measured by phone calls in each country; you're not allowed to vote for your own country and you'll find that the votes break down by either regional loyalty or genuine enthusiasm for a particular performance. I've lived in Europe for just under 23 years now and it's one of my very favorite things ever.

The last time Sweden hosted, their terrific hosts put together a formula for a winning entry, which is also enormous fun: Love Love Peace Peace
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Old 04-24-2019, 11:40 AM
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In the 70s and 80s, it used to be one of the highlights of the year, the sort of event that everyone watched and talked about at school/work the following Monday.

Yes, the music was mostly awful, but it was fun ! And there was always the "cultural alibi" : you got to discover some obscure country's history and sights in the introductory vignettes. Plus, the songs were still sung in a wide variety of native languages, allowing us to hear those exotic Finnish, Croatian or Greek phonemes.
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Old 04-24-2019, 11:58 AM
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It's become political, it wasn't always. It's become crap, it wasn't always. It's become funny, it wasn't always.

In the 60s to the 80s, the UK used to submit songs from successful bands. Bucks Fizz (not sure of the US knows of these) and a few others, Brotherhood of Man, Lulu, Sandy Shaw, Dana. Other countries too, Abba, Celion Dion. UK winners and runners up would often have quite successful careers off the back of wins. During the 80's the UK's popular music declined into a myre of Stock Aitken and Waterman songs, and those bled out into the competitions entries. They lost heavily a lot of times during that period, with a disconnect between what was good, and what was popular (because SAW churned out hits for children, which were bad). Some other countries did take it seriously, and it was a chance for their foreign language hits to make it internationally.

The relentless losses of the UK, meant it became much more an object of fun, and it was often through the UK where the rest of the world got its coverage. I think at this time the members expanded, with the addition of eastern europe into the mix, and diluted the pool much more. Non EU countries are now in there, such as Turkey and Russia and non European, but European like, such as Israel too. Even niche almost rogue states such as Belarus enters.

At some point in the 90s Ireland had a lot of success, winning three of them in a row, and the downside of which is that you had to host the next one. It was costing them a fortune. My Lovely Horse, and episode of Father Ted is their version of Ireland trying to throw the competition because they kept winning it. This just added to the fun of it.

The more musically global countries, UK and Ireland, sort of stopped putting too much effort into selecting their winners for a while. Then they got bored of that and started competitions which inevitably got really bad bands entered. They tried real successful bands a few times too. Bonnie Tyler was the 2013 UK entry. However, that was too late, because it had become political.

With the newer states entering the competition, they often had their old enemies and new friends to vote with. They voted in blocks. It became a place to show their countries opinions on the behaviour of others, usually the UK. Often getting really low scores and even getting 0 points in 2003.

Inside Europe, the people I've known in some places use it as a great fun celebration of cheesy music. In the UK it is either ignored, an object of fun, or another bitter faded glory for someone to care about.

If you really want to realise how the UK thinks, I really have no doubt that at least a million people voted to leave the Eurovision song contest in 2016...
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Old 04-24-2019, 12:25 PM
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Can't argue with Smid's analyis.

I would add that there used to be quite a few acts that entered the competition at various times in their careers.

Winners such as Lulu, Abba, Celine Dion, and Katrina and the Waves are well known internationally but there were also some other notable performances such as Julio Iglesias, Nana Mouskouri, Cliff Richards, Olivia-Newton John, t.a.T.u, Engelbert Humperdinck, Bonnie Tyler, Blue, Justin Hawkins...
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Old 04-24-2019, 12:37 PM
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I was surprised when Dervish won. I love them, and thought their brand of Irish trad wasn’t necessarily translatable to a huge audience.
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Old 04-24-2019, 12:47 PM
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In the 60's through most of the eighties it was a competition for real. Pure unadulterated kitsch, but also completely straight-faced.

From the 90's onward people pretty much caught up on the joke and it's nowadays campy on purpose.
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Old 04-24-2019, 01:43 PM
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In the 60s to the 80s, the UK used to submit songs from successful bands. Bucks Fizz ...{}.... Dana.

...........another bitter faded glory for someone to care about.
Nitpick - Dana is Irish and represented Ireland, of course, not the UK.

But the bitter faded glory line is a spot-on beaut.

j
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Old 04-24-2019, 02:04 PM
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In the 60s to the 80s, the UK used to submit songs from successful bands. Bucks Fizz
Bucks Fizz were put together purely to compete in Eurovision.
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Old 04-24-2019, 02:06 PM
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Nitpick - Dana is Irish and represented Ireland, of course, not the UK.

But the bitter faded glory line is a spot-on beaut.

j
Other nitpick - Bucks Fizz was formed for the purpose of entering Eurovision - they weren't a successful band before that.

Having first encountered Eurovision in 80's Britain as "that cheesy fun thing that nobody takes seriously" I find it hilarious that Australia is now a) in it at all, b) selecting legit pop stars like Jessica Mauboy and Guy Sebastian to represent us. I don't think any performer in the UK who cared about their reputation would be seen dead - though it's possible I may be out of date
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Old 04-24-2019, 02:20 PM
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Non EU countries are now in there, such as Turkey and Russia and non European, but European like, such as Israel too. Even niche almost rogue states such as Belarus enters.
The competition is run by the European Broadcasting Union, which isn't an EU institution. It is comprised of public broadcasters from many countries, including those from North Africa, the former Soviet Union and the near Middle East. There's associate members from all over the world.
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Old 04-24-2019, 02:28 PM
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I suppose we should also add that much of the entertainment of the UK telecast comes from the sarcastic commentary provided for many years by Terry Wogan; and since his death, by Graham Norton. Indeed, without the disrespectfully funny commentary, I doubt that many would watch.

Though to give GN his due, he does fairly frequently seem genuinely charmed by what he sees.

j
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Old 04-24-2019, 02:39 PM
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It all started because the major public broadcasters in the European Broadcasting Union wanted ways to demonstrate what they could do now they had established interconnectivity between all their different technical TV standards, as well as dealing with the difficulties of transmission over long distances. It was only a handful of years since the BBC had managed the first live broadcast across the Channel.

There was politics from the start - in those days, the major record companies had a lot to do with putting their singers and songwriters forward in the national competitions, and the French record companies therefore had not only France, but also Monaco, Luxembourg, Belgium every other year, Switzerland every third or fourth year (until recently, entries had to be in one of the country's official languages).

And the five biggest contributors to the EBU get an automatic spot in the final (which explains why Australia is in - they pay in).

Today's big stadium style shows more or less started with Ireland and their Riverdance interval show. The idea that hosting the show (the privilege of the previous year's winner) was a way to get your country/city on the map wasn't much heard of until about then (it became a bit of a joke that Ireland's successive wins were beginning to be such a burden for RTE that they were looking for a stinker so as to be sure to lose).

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Old 04-24-2019, 04:36 PM
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Today's big stadium style shows more or less started with Ireland and their Riverdance interval show. The idea that hosting the show (the privilege of the previous year's winner) was a way to get your country/city on the map wasn't much heard of until about then (it became a bit of a joke that Ireland's successive wins were beginning to be such a burden for RTE that they were looking for a stinker so as to be sure to lose).
The list of host cities is kinda funny for Ireland; there's this list of big cities like Stockholm, Amsterdam, Dublin, Paris, Birmingham and... Millstreet, Ireland. Population 1500. A tiny rural village with pretty much two streets and a horseracing arena.

It didn't quite get put on the map.
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Old 04-24-2019, 06:01 PM
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In the 70s and 80s, it used to be one of the highlights of the year, the sort of event that everyone watched and talked about at school/work the following Monday.

Yes, the music was mostly awful, but it was fun !
The only Eurovision Song Competition I saw was in the '80s, when I was a student in the UK. I remember the British entry, grownups dressed up as schoolchildren singing in faux Cockney: "It's 'Orrible Being in Love When You're Eight and a 'Arf" ('arf was rhymed with scarf).
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Old 04-24-2019, 06:14 PM
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The only Eurovision Song Competition I saw was in the '80s, when I was a student in the UK. I remember the British entry, grownups dressed up as schoolchildren singing in faux Cockney: "It's 'Orrible Being in Love When You're Eight and a 'Arf" ('arf was rhymed with scarf).
That was actual kids doing a song for an actual kids Saturday morning TV show:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkyWE2jy0Go <- this is evidence only, don't watch because it is really terrible.
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Old 04-24-2019, 06:27 PM
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Bucks Fizz were put together purely to compete in Eurovision.
I wasn't aware of that, I think I was about ten when they became famous.

However, they did have a number of very successful hits afterwards which were not Eurovision entries and were one of the more successful bands of that time.

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Old 04-24-2019, 06:29 PM
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The competition is run by the European Broadcasting Union, which isn't an EU institution. It is comprised of public broadcasters from many countries, including those from North Africa, the former Soviet Union and the near Middle East. There's associate members from all over the world.
When I was still living full-time in Moscow, I had a girlfriend who was in graduate school. I made the mistake of visiting her in her cramped dorm suite one night when the Eurovision song contest was on. It seemed interminably long with all the new nations that were represented (at least double the length of the 1977 contest). My girlfriend had a half dozen female roommates from all over the former Soviet Union, and they were rooting loudly for their respective countries. There was no way you could have torn them away from the TV set.
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Old 04-24-2019, 06:36 PM
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I wasn't aware of that, I think I was about ten when they became famous.

However, they did have a number of very successful hits afterwards which were not Eurovision entries and were one of the more successful bands of that time.
I know that early in the '70s, ABBA and The Brotherhood of Man really made the charts after competing in Eurovision. What other notable groups did the same?
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Old 04-24-2019, 09:34 PM
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I watched it in a gay bar last year in the UK. The atmosphere inside the pub was amazing. Israel didn’t deserve to win at all, the Czech Republic stole the show.
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Old 04-25-2019, 12:04 AM
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Can't argue with Smid's analyis.

I would add that there used to be quite a few acts that entered the competition at various times in their careers.

Winners such as Lulu, Abba, Celine Dion, and Katrina and the Waves are well known internationally but there were also some other notable performances such as Julio Iglesias, Nana Mouskouri, Cliff Richards, Olivia-Newton John, t.a.T.u, Engelbert Humperdinck, Bonnie Tyler, Blue, Justin Hawkins...
I thought Celine Dion was Canadish.
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Old 04-25-2019, 01:06 AM
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I thought Celine Dion was Canadish.
The Swiss brought her in as a ringer.

(To be fair, this was in 1988, before anyone had heard of her outside the Francosphere).
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Old 04-25-2019, 01:31 AM
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<...>

And the five biggest contributors to the EBU get an automatic spot in the final (which explains why Australia is in - they pay in).

<...>
Actually, no. Australia was invited for the 60th anniversary of the contest because, for some strange reason, the contest has become extremely popular there; people stay up at really outrageous hours to watch it in numbers.

It was going to be a one-off, but on that contest the Australian representative did surprisingly well (5th overall). So the invitation was renewed for the next contest...

...in which Australia almost won (ended up being 2nd overall; won the jury votes and only lost because the phone-in votes favoured the Ukrainian entry en masse; perhaps as a “fuck you” to Russia).

After that, Australia became an “associate member” of the EBU (European Broadcast Union), thus enabling it to take part in the contest if it so wished. It has been decided that, if Australia ever wins the contest, it will designate a European country where the following year’s contest would be held.

The “big five” that get a straight pass to the finals because they are the biggest contributors to the EBU budget are the UK, Germany, France, Spain and Italy.
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Old 04-25-2019, 02:32 AM
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I stand corrected.

My understanding of the popularity of the thing in Australia is that it was broadcast on their SBS, which focusses on multicultural offerings and attracts viewers from or with an interest in the many countries of origin of more recent immigrants, so presumably a lot of people from different European countries watch for some sort of contact with "home". And then again, maybe it's got something to do with the followers of ABBA, who (to judge by the movie Muriel's Wedding, at least) seem particularly strong in Australia.

Of course it's all too bloated now: oh for the days when there were at most 12 performances in the final, and no-one was supposed to have seen or heard them before. All the excitement then was whether the connections would hold to the different national announcers reporting their results, or whether the hapless presenter would be shouting "Can you hear me, Oslo?" again. These days, they could at least do some elimination rounds with videos to cut it down a bit.
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Old 04-25-2019, 02:43 AM
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...thanks to this thread I have watched this three times now. I don't know whether to laugh or cry.

"Making Your Mind UP!"
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Old 04-25-2019, 02:53 AM
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I don't think anyone's yet mentioned that Elton John (with Kiki Dee) was once the UK entry with 'don't go breaking my heart' - he was a huge star at the time, and came second.

These days, no successful singer or band in the UK would be seen dead on the show, so we tend to enter complete unknowns or faded stars (Englebert Humberdink, looking at you).

It's super political in its voting, which basically means the big western countries barely stand a chance any more, but it's fabulously kitsch and the gays just love it. Eurovision fancy dress parties are common place.

Audiences do love the crazy and the subversive - Austria won recently with a bearded drag Queen.

Some countries take is super seriously - I was in Moscow for it one year, and couldn't believe how seriously they took it. Everyone watched in complete silence, like they were at the opera.

For the UK, it's an opportunity to poke fun at bad euro muzak and have a laugh.

Of course, it's probably most famous for launching Abba's career, after they won with 'Waterloo'.

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Old 04-25-2019, 04:36 AM
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...thanks to this thread I have watched this three times now. I don't know whether to laugh or cry.

"Making Your Mind UP!"
That bit where they rip the skirts off (and underneath there are ... more skirts!!) was cutting-edge risque by eighties standards

I had their album. I'm not ashamed to admit it (well, only a little bit). What can I say, I was thirteen...
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Old 04-25-2019, 06:19 AM
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That was actual kids doing a song for an actual kids Saturday morning TV show:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkyWE2jy0Go <- this is evidence only, don't watch because it is really terrible.
Yikes! But that does look similar to what I saw. I remembered them as being older, but it was more than 30 years ago.
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Old 04-25-2019, 06:50 AM
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I suppose we should also add that much of the entertainment of the UK telecast comes from the sarcastic commentary provided for many years by Terry Wogan; and since his death, by Graham Norton. Indeed, without the disrespectfully funny commentary, I doubt that many would watch.

Though to give GN his due, he does fairly frequently seem genuinely charmed by what he sees.

j
I was going to say this about Wogan. His smirking style did the competition no favours in being taken at all seriously in the UK.

The New Seekers (formed by one of the original Seekers) came 2nd in 1972; they had had a couple of huge hits beforehand but lost, partly because the UK gave maximum points to Luxemburg, the eventual winner!
Even then it was a big show; Edinburgh hosted it because the previous winners, Monaco, couldn't mount it themselves.

Wikipedia on the 1972 event
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Old 04-25-2019, 07:44 AM
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I don't think anyone's yet mentioned that Elton John (with Kiki Dee) was once the UK entry with 'don't go breaking my heart' - he was a huge star at the time, and came second.
Cite?

AFAIK, before they were famous, Elton John and Bernie Taupin submitted "I Can't Go On Living Without You" to be considered for the UK pre-selection for the Eurovision contest but placed second the Lulu's "Boom Bang A Bang" which was the 1969 Eurovision winner.
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Old 04-25-2019, 07:53 AM
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Lulu came first equal, as part of a 4-way tie with France, Spain, the Netherlands & the UK all scoring the same number of points.
The rules were changed to provide for a tie-break after this.
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Old 04-25-2019, 08:12 AM
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I don't quite understand what is actually being judged. Is it the song itself, independent of the performer, performance, and production or are all of those things given a certain amount of weight in determining who is the winner?
Officially, the song itself, but when the vote is open to everyone in each country, who knows what motivates them?

When everyone sang in the official language of their country, inevitably there was a bias towards songs in a shared or widely understood language (mostly French in those days, but Germany/Austria, Greece/Cyprus and UK/Ireland often gave each other high points).As the thing grew, and particularly once the post-Communist countries came in, neighbours voted for each other (Baltics, Yugoslavs and so on). But once almost everyone was singing in pseudo-English, the big production number had a vogue (remember the suggestive Polish milkmaids a few years ago?) but it didn't always work - a couple of years ago, a Portuguese hipster with a throwback of a wistful ballad came through on the rails.

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Do countries ever get a famous pop star or "ringer" to sing their song? I would imagine having Adele, Beyonce, or at the very least your country's most popular or respected performer singing your country's song would give you a boost as compared to an unknown or little known performer.
When it was record companies pushing their own products, it often was singers well-known in at least their own country. Nowadays, every country has different ways of doing it. This year, I have the impression the BBC left it all to a work experience intern to organise, but that's just me. A few years ago, Russia got Patricia Kaas to sing their entry, obviously banking on her international recognition, but it didn't work.

Once you factor in all the variables, including the number of different votes each country can cast (across half a dozen different entries), the final result is entirely unpredictable.
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Old 04-25-2019, 08:24 AM
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I thought Celine Dion was Canadish.
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The Swiss brought her in as a ringer.

(To be fair, this was in 1988, before anyone had heard of her outside the Francosphere).

Yep, the only requirement is that it is an original song. The performer and songwriter(s) can be from any country. The rules even allow for countries outside of Europe to enter the competition.

Due to her massive popularity in Quebec, Celine Dion was known throughout Canada as a teen star in the 80s but sadly, her appearance and not being able to speak english hindered her career. She could not compete with the looks and popularity of other acts, particularly Rene and Nathalie Simard.

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Old 04-25-2019, 09:56 AM
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Yep, the only requirement is that it is an original song. The performer and songwriter(s) can be from any country. The rules even allow for countries outside of Europe to enter the competition.
The key factor is the European Broadcasting Union, the organisation of the major public broadcasters, rather than any entirely politico-governmental requirement (though no doubt that varies from country to country, depending on how independent their public broadcaster(s) actually are.

As for "ringers", even before Céline Dion, the Swiss had been represented by Esther Ofarim from Israel. (I gather she's on presenting duty this year, since Israel is hosting - that's another occasional tradition, with a host country's past representatives making an appearance even if, decades later, they now look like a fish out of water).
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Old 04-25-2019, 01:35 PM
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I don't quite understand what is actually being judged. Is it the song itself, independent of the performer, performance, and production or are all of those things given a certain amount of weight in determining who is the winner?
Originally it was supposed to be the song and you had one performer, or a duo, with the same orchestra for each song. Allowing up to six performers on stage was introduced in 1973. Originally songs were also judged by a small jury, not by public approval.

Today? Whatever they people who want to phone in feel is relevant. For the juries ... well the rules don't actually say what criteria they are to use just that:
Quote:
When voting Jury Members shall use all their professional skill and experience without favouring any Contestant on the account of their nationality, gender or likeliness.
A good introduction to what a mess the contest is is reading the rule changes chronologically:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rules_...hanges_by_year

Quote:
Do countries ever get a famous pop star or "ringer" to sing their song? I would imagine having Adele, Beyonce, or at the very least your country's most popular or respected performer singing your country's song would give you a boost as compared to an unknown or little known performer.
It might give you a boost to win, but what's in it for you as a performer? Being a Eurovision winner isn't all that significant to a "famous pop star", and being a Eurovision _loser_ might be embarrassing.

Quote:
Do people take this competition as seriously as the crowd reaction and YouTube comments make it seem?
It varies from country to to country and through time and between people. Personally I stopped paying attention completely two decades ago and have only watched when friends have arranged a ESC viewing party.
  #39  
Old 04-25-2019, 03:22 PM
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......As for "ringers", even before Céline Dion, the Swiss had been represented by Esther Ofarim from Israel........
Oooooh Goody - I've been looking for the opportunity to mention the story of France Gall, from - uh - France, who represented Luxembourg in the 1965 contest, and won with the song Poupée de cire, poupée de son, written by Serge Gainsbourg*. Teaming Gainsbourg with a pretty and naive 16 year old blond was never going to end well.

After her victory she recorded an album under Serge's guidance, which included the song Les Sucettes, which he wrote for her. Sucettes = lolipops - so it's a song about a young girl liking lolipops. Sucette comes from the verb Sucer, to suck. Yep, that's where we're heading. Double entendre warning.

This is the Wiki article on the song.

I'm not sure, these days, that you could call this video NSFW, but you may embarrass yourself by falling off your chair laughing.

Hijack over, and I will now return you to the original thread.

j

* - incidentally, Poupée de cire, poupée de son (Wax puppet, bran puppet; ie wax head and body stuffed with bran) can be translated another way, as Son also means Sound. So you could loosely translate it as Wax puppet, singing puppet. Given what followed, I'm happy to rule out coincidence. Serge all over - a genius but a bit of a bastard.
  #40  
Old 04-25-2019, 04:40 PM
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I'm not sure, these days, that you could call this video NSFW, but you may embarrass yourself by falling off your chair laughing.
God, how I miss the sixties!
__________________
Is it true the two greatest problems facing us today are Ignorance and Apathy?
  #41  
Old 04-26-2019, 12:59 AM
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* - incidentally, Poupée de cire, poupée de son (Wax puppet, bran puppet; ie wax head and body stuffed with bran) can be translated another way, as Son also means Sound. So you could loosely translate it as Wax puppet, singing puppet.
Given what followed, I'm happy to rule out coincidence. Serge all over - a genius but a bit of a bastard.
It's a interesting lead-in to another phenomenon: how one year's winner influences future entries. Two years later, the BBC's first ever win was, guess what, "Puppet on a String", and I well remember the writers explaining at the time how they'd studied the structures and component features of previous winners to come up with a winning formula.

So it was that after years of few or no points for wistful ballads about lonely herring-gutters, Norway won by jumping on the Boom-Banga-La-La bandwagon. You can still see some reflections of the previous year's perceived trend, but it doesn't really work now it's all so multifarious and unpredictable (God alone knows where last year's winner came from).

(PS: Gainsbourg - it wasn't long after that that came, if I may use the word, Je T'Aime Moi Non Plus with Jane Birkin - whom he at least married: though that would hardly have been a Eurovision contender!)
  #42  
Old 04-26-2019, 01:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Treppenwitz View Post
Oooooh Goody - I've been looking for the opportunity to mention the story of France Gall, from - uh - France, who represented Luxembourg in the 1965 contest, and won with the song Poupée de cire, poupée de son, written by Serge Gainsbourg*. Teaming Gainsbourg with a pretty and naive 16 year old blond was never going to end well.

After her victory she recorded an album under Serge's guidance, which included the song Les Sucettes, which he wrote for her. Sucettes = lolipops - so it's a song about a young girl liking lolipops. Sucette comes from the verb Sucer, to suck. Yep, that's where we're heading. Double entendre warning.

This is the Wiki article on the song.

I'm not sure, these days, that you could call this video NSFW, but you may embarrass yourself by falling off your chair laughing.

Hijack over, and I will now return you to the original thread.

j

* - incidentally, Poupée de cire, poupée de son (Wax puppet, bran puppet; ie wax head and body stuffed with bran) can be translated another way, as Son also means Sound. So you could loosely translate it as Wax puppet, singing puppet. Given what followed, I'm happy to rule out coincidence. Serge all over - a genius but a bit of a bastard.

the youtube comments say the girl didnt know what the song was actually about ......
  #43  
Old 04-26-2019, 04:53 AM
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After her victory she recorded an album under Serge's guidance, which included the song Les Sucettes, which he wrote for her. Sucettes = lolipops - so it's a song about a young girl liking lolipops. Sucette comes from the verb Sucer, to suck. Yep, that's where we're heading. Double entendre warning.
Way off topic, but not the only person pushing the envelope in that regard:

https://youtu.be/AxOXTeKIKsg

(And if I'm not mistaken that voiceover is Judi Dench)

Now, back to Eurovision. Here are the bookies' odds on this year's runners and riders:

https://eurovisionworld.com/odds/eurovision
  #44  
Old 04-26-2019, 04:57 AM
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Forgot to add, these are the actual songs this year:

https://eurovisionworld.com/eurovision/songs-videos
  #45  
Old 04-26-2019, 06:32 AM
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Hi, I'm Gyrate and I'm a huge Eurovision fan. Admittedly I enjoy it because the friends and relations and I (online or at home) spend the evening exchanging snarky comments about the acts, the presenters, the various country reps and the whole long kitschy evening, but still: it's great fun.

Which reminds me: I see Verka Serduchka will be performing as part of the interval show this year. BEST EUROVISION ACT EVER.

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Originally Posted by Alessan View Post
The Swiss brought her in as a ringer.

(To be fair, this was in 1988, before anyone had heard of her outside the Francosphere).
Likewise, Katrina Leskanich (of Katrina and the Waves) is American, but still represented the UK (and won) in 1997. There's a lot of this going on. Nobody seems too bothered by it really.

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I was going to say this about Wogan. His smirking style did the competition no favours in being taken at all seriously in the UK.
Wogan was great but by the end of his run Wogan wasn't even bothering to conceal his contempt for the event nor his increasing state of inebriation throughout the evenings. Norton is a much better host (although part of me would love to see Harry Hill host it one year, just for the commentary).
  #46  
Old 04-26-2019, 07:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickLondon View Post

(PS: Gainsbourg - it wasn't long after that that came, if I may use the word, Je T'Aime Moi Non Plus with Jane Birkin - whom he at least married: though that would hardly have been a Eurovision contender!)
Gainsbourg was a disgusting little turd who exploited women for his own perverted pleasure. He wallowed in how he could manipulate young girls through their innocence and naivety including his own 13 year-old daughter with the song "Lemon Incest". Warning the video is creepy and pervy.

He groomed France Gall from when she was 15-16 years old so she trusted him and his songs.

FTR, he and Birkin were never married.

Last edited by Sparky812; 04-26-2019 at 07:24 AM.
  #47  
Old 04-26-2019, 08:07 AM
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Gainsbourg .......groomed France Gall from when she was 15-16 years old so she trusted him and his songs.
So far as I am aware, he did not "groom" Gall in (what we could call these days) the normal sense/use of the word. He certainly exploited her naiveté and innocence in the cause of his own "art". He may have made her a laughing stock and probably did her harm, career-wise, but that's a different matter. As I noted above, Serge was a genius but a bit of a bastard.

j
  #48  
Old 04-26-2019, 08:09 AM
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Norton is a much better host (although part of me would love to see Harry Hill host it one year, just for the commentary).
Ooooooooh - please!

j
  #49  
Old 04-26-2019, 08:37 AM
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Time again to bring out one of my favorite comic novels, Clovenhoof and the Trump of Doom.

It is October, 2016 and only two events predicted by Nostradamus have yet to happen for the End of the World as We Know It to take place. One is the election of Donald J. Trump and the other Brexit. Clovenhoof, Satan condemned to a life in Birmingham, West Midlands, is dispatched to the US to stop the former and the Archangel Michael (ditto) is tasked with the latter. He decides that an entry in Eurovision with a song pleading the UK to remain is the best way so he gathers an... eclectic group of artists to write and perform it in the control room of the LHC (long story). For me, the funniest bit was several chickens who escape their cages (they couldn't find any doves) make it into the collider ring and are instantly accelerated on a sub-light but still very fast trip around the ring. They return a few minutes later defeathered and roasted by air friction.
  #50  
Old 04-26-2019, 08:49 AM
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For me, the funniest bit was several chickens who escape their cages (they couldn't find any doves) make it into the collider ring and are instantly accelerated on a sub-light but still very fast trip around the ring. They return a few minutes later defeathered and roasted by air friction.
Now you've done it. Molvania or someone is bound to put that in their stage act.
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