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Old 04-30-2019, 06:27 PM
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Khadaji's Whatcha Reading Thread--May 2019 edition


Well here we are, May at last. 2019 is one-third of the way to 2020...... I have discovered the way to be a book hoarder without anyone else being the wiser, even the unfortunates living in your house. (My husband insists that we will die buried under piles of books ....) Buy a tablet and sign up for free e-book newsletters! My poor tablet...

Anyway currently I am reading:

Follow him Home by P.W.Davies a MMM romance with a hitman, a lawyer, and a doctor... and the occasional bar

The Smuggler's Gambit by Sara Whitford, it's a little hit and miss being a YA, but an okay read.

In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson, while I adore Larsen and his writing style, the subject matter, Germany just after Hitler became chancellor, is a difficult subject to read. Horrible behavior is easier to deal with when its a millenium old. And Martha Dodd is an awful person...


**************************************************************************************************** *************************************************************************************

Khadaji was one of the earlier members of SDMB, and he was well-known as a kindly person who always had something encouraging to say, particularly in the self improvement threads. He was also a voracious, omnivorous reader, who started these threads way back in the Stone Age of 2005. Consequently when he suddenly and quite unexpectantly passed away, January of 2013 we decided to rename this thread in his honor and to keep his memory, if not his ghost, alive.

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Old 04-30-2019, 06:29 PM
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In rememberance of months gone away
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Old 05-01-2019, 01:58 PM
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Just over halfway through an audiobook of Robert B. Parker's 1981 novel A Savage Place, and digging it. Spenser is hired by a beautiful TV news reporter in LA to guard her and help with her investigation into labor racketeering in the film biz.

Forgot to post in last month's thread this passage from Dashiell Hammett's 1929 noir novel Red Harvest: "'I'd have given the big umpchay [Pig Latin for "chump"] twice for that straight dope,' Reno grumbled."
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Old 05-02-2019, 03:35 PM
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Finished Dawn, by Octavia Butler. It really didn't interest me, which was a disappointment as I've read an enjoyed another of her books previously.

Now I'm reading Stars In My Pocket Like Grains Of Sand, by Samuel R. Delaney.
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Old 05-03-2019, 11:38 AM
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I read and adored Fooling Houdini: Magicians, Mentalists, Math Geeks, and the Hidden Powers of the Mind. Also read a couple other books that weren't that good and don't feel like they're worth mentioning here. Re-read a childhood favorite on audio book, Chasing Redbird, which I am surprised to like at least as much now, as an awful, as I did as a child. All the themes about belonging and grief and becoming the person you want to be are still relevant in my thirties.

I'm 278 pages into The Clockmaker's Daughter, which means I'm still less than halfway through since Kate Morton novels are always long. I'm enjoying it a lot so far, the storyline hasn't picked up that much but her writing is just beautiful!
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Old 05-03-2019, 01:15 PM
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Just over halfway through an audiobook of Robert B. Parker's 1981 novel A Savage Place, and digging it. Spenser is hired by a beautiful TV news reporter in LA to guard her and help with her investigation into labor racketeering in the film biz....
Finished it. A somewhat farfetched conclusion, but a good read.

Just started the next book in Patrick O'Brian's masterful series of Napoleonic naval adventures, The Fortune of War. Capt. John "Lucky Jack" Aubrey has just reported to an admiral in the Dutch East Indies and been subjected, among other things, to an entertainingly fierce anti-American tirade.
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Old 05-03-2019, 08:38 PM
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Two-thirds of the way through Munich, by Robert Harris.
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Old 05-03-2019, 08:51 PM
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The Library of America edition of Edmund Wilson’s literary essays and reviews from the 1920s and ‘30s.

I used to think of Wilson as a smug Princeton prick because he mocked detective novels and HP Lovecraft’s fiction...but his takes on more highbrow stuff are actually pretty good. I’ll just skip the essays on pop lit and stick to the ones on Yeats, Woolf, Eliot, and Joyce.
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Old 05-04-2019, 10:19 AM
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I just finished The Overdue Life of Amy Byley, which I quite enjoyed. I just started A Curve in the Road. I love free Amazon Prime free books.
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Old 05-04-2019, 04:09 PM
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I've read a couple of books in the past week or so.

Nighttown is a "Junior Bender novel," part of a mystery series starring a crackerjack burglar protagonist. It was fine, and if I were more of a mystery lover, I might've loved it more. Reasonably clever, reasonably funny, but didn't blow me away.

The Light Brigade is Starship Troopers, if Starship Troopers instead of being a cryptofascist macho novel were a cryptosocialist feminist novel. It's trippy time travel with space marines, which is all pretty fun, but the speechifying about the evils of megacorporations and the joy of peaceful socialism wore on me after awhile--and I'm a pretty freakin socialist monkey myself. This is the kind of book I thought I'd like more than I did.

Next up: Revenant Gun, the third in a series that I've enjoyed immensely. When I finish it, I'll have read all the Hugo nominees for the year, and I dunno, earned a cookie or something.

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Old 05-06-2019, 07:43 AM
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Finished the Bobiverse series by Dennis E. Taylor. I really liked it. I think fans of the Martha Wells Murderbot series would also enjoy them; they were similar to me in that the science stuff didn't get in the way of the human plot. (Okay, the NOT-human plot).


Now I'm on to a murder mystery set in the Australian outback, The Lost Man by Jane Harper. I've read her other books and they've all been very solid.
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Old 05-06-2019, 08:28 AM
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I don't have any new books to read so last night I started a re-read of All Creatures Great and Small. According to the bookplate, I bought it in 1980 but I read it long before that. It's not as good as I remember. Forty years has made a difference.
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Old 05-06-2019, 09:27 AM
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I loved the Herriot books, but after reading a biography of Alf Wight (and becoming a more experienced reader), yeah, they aren't quite the same.
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Old 05-06-2019, 09:31 AM
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Well, I can confidently recommend NOT to read A Curve in the Road. What a shallow silly book. Don't waste your time.
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Old 05-06-2019, 10:03 AM
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I just finished Miss Pym Disposes, by Josephine Tey. It reminded me of Dorothy L. Sayers' Gaudy Night quite a bit, in that it's set at an English college for women, with a former student nostalgically reliving her younger days during a visit (while simultaneously solving a crime). But Tey doesn't try to tackle as many complex social and personal issues as Sayers did, and this book is the better for it.

Tey was a great writer, and it's a shame she wasn't able to write more books (she devoted much of her time to writing plays and died young).

Last edited by Rough Draft; 05-06-2019 at 10:04 AM. Reason: Clarity
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Old 05-06-2019, 12:56 PM
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I don't have any new books to read so last night I started a re-read of All Creatures Great and Small. According to the bookplate, I bought it in 1980 but I read it long before that. It's not as good as I remember. Forty years has made a difference.
Does he get an arm into a cow up to his shoulder at some point? It's just not Herriot if he doesn't get an arm into a cow up to his shoulder.
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Old 05-06-2019, 04:03 PM
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I think it's been a while since I've posted in one of these threads! February, March, and April were just insane at work; I didn't have as much time for reading as I would have liked. I vaguely remember posting about John Grisham's The Brethren in Jan/Feb...here's the list since then:
  • Lethal White by Robert Galbraith (aka J.K. Rowling) -- the 4th book in the Cormoran Strike series; I keep enjoying them
  • Long Road To Mercy by David Baldacci -- the 1st book in the Atlee Pine series; I wasn't blown away, but I'll probably read the next one
  • Blood Echo by Christopher Rice (Anne's son) -- the 2nd book in the Burning Girl series; I keep feeling like I shouldn't like these books, but I do
I'm currently reading Redemption by David Baldacci. It's the 5th book in the Amos Decker ("Memory Man") series, which I really enjoy.

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I don't have any new books to read so last night I started a re-read of All Creatures Great and Small. According to the bookplate, I bought it in 1980 but I read it long before that. It's not as good as I remember. Forty years has made a difference.
One of my friends has a dog named Tricki-Woo.
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Old 05-06-2019, 09:32 PM
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I just finished Miss Pym Disposes, by Josephine Tey. It reminded me of Dorothy L. Sayers' Gaudy Night quite a bit, in that it's set at an English college for women, with a former student nostalgically reliving her younger days during a visit (while simultaneously solving a crime). But Tey doesn't try to tackle as many complex social and personal issues as Sayers did, and this book is the better for it.

Tey was a great writer, and it's a shame she wasn't able to write more books (she devoted much of her time to writing plays and died young).
I’ll have to try that! I recently read Gaudy Night, and I found it a bit disappointing.

Ruth Rendell always said that Tey’s The Franchise Affair was one of the great mysteries of all time, and I agree. Brat Farrar is also exceptional.
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Old 05-07-2019, 06:51 AM
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I've diverted from my original list because I picked up a copy of Bob Woodward's Fear: Trump in the White House. It's been heavily quoted from, so there aren't any bombshells that I haven't heard of, but this one quotation sums up what I've seen of the Trump residency. It's Trump talking to someone about dealing with women, but applies to pretty much everything Trump does (p. 175):

Quote:
You've got to deny, deny, deny and push back on these women. If you admit to anything and any culpability, then you're dead. ...You didn't come out guns blazing and just challenge them. You showed weakness. You've got to be strong. You've got to be aggressive. You've got to push back hard. You've got to deny anything that's said about you. Never admit.

I think a lot of people still haven't truly realized that this is what he is and how he operates. If you add that he will readily and without hesitation lie brazenly to perform the above, and maybe even believe the lie himself, you have his reaction to unwanted stimulus in a nutshell. You say he colluded with Russia, he NEVER colluded with Russia. His opponents are the ones guilty of that!
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Old 05-07-2019, 07:05 AM
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One of my friends has a dog named Tricki-Woo.
I hope he doesn't go flop-bott!
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Old 05-07-2019, 07:15 AM
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I hope he doesn't go flop-bott!
Or cracker dog! ACGaS opens with Herriot up to his shoulder in a cow.
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Old 05-07-2019, 10:07 AM
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...ACGaS opens with Herriot up to his shoulder in a cow.
Then all is right with the world.
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Old 05-07-2019, 10:40 AM
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I’ll have to try that! I recently read Gaudy Night, and I found it a bit disappointing.

Ruth Rendell always said that Tey’s The Franchise Affair was one of the great mysteries of all time, and I agree. Brat Farrar is also exceptional.
I appreciate that Gaudy Night is highly regarded, and it's certainly well-written, but it just wasn't for me. My problem was that Sayers had at least four big themes running through the book, and crime-solving certainly wasn't the most prominent. Also, I have never warmed up to Peter Wimsey as a character. He's just too perfect, and his relationship with Harriet Vane is really cringe-worthy.

Nice to hear Ruth Rendell's praise for Josephine Tey. I have great respect for both of them as writers. I've read most of Tey, and I'm really looking forward to reading The Franchise Affair next. So far Brat Farrar is my favorite.
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Old 05-07-2019, 11:36 AM
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I hope he doesn't go flop-bott!
LOL!

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Or cracker dog!
Every now and then my dog will get a sudden burst of energy, and do tight circles on the bed or repeatedly jump onto/down from something. Whenever that happens, I tell her she's gone crackerdog.
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Old 05-07-2019, 02:56 PM
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Finished Stars In My Pocket Like Grains Of Sand, by Samuel R. Delaney. It has two, maybe three good stories in it surrounded by 300+ pages of padding.

Now I'm reading Early Riser by Jasper Fforde, which I'm enjoying so far.
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Old 05-07-2019, 05:38 PM
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...Also, I have never warmed up to Peter Wimsey as a character. He's just too perfect, and his relationship with Harriet Vane is really cringe-worthy.
You and me both!

I finished reading a novel called Not of This Fold. Part of a mystery series about a woman named Linda Wallheim who is the wife of a Mormon bishop. She has a lot of issues with the church, and that part is very interesting; she’s a well developed character. She also does some really really dumb things in attempting to solve the crime. The mystery part is fairly forgettable, but as a novel it works well.
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Old 05-07-2019, 07:05 PM
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I appreciate that Gaudy Night is highly regarded, and it's certainly well-written, but it just wasn't for me. My problem was that Sayers had at least four big themes running through the book, and crime-solving certainly wasn't the most prominent. Also, I have never warmed up to Peter Wimsey as a character. He's just too perfect, and his relationship with Harriet Vane is really cringe-worthy.

Nice to hear Ruth Rendell's praise for Josephine Tey. I have great respect for both of them as writers. I've read most of Tey, and I'm really looking forward to reading The Franchise Affair next. So far Brat Farrar is my favorite.
I read most of the Wimsey novels during my teenage “classic mystery” bingeing years during the 70s, but I skipped the Harriet Vane books because, even as a callow youth, I could not picture Lord Peter as a romantic hero. Beginning last summer, I decided to go back and fill that gap.

Strong Poison had one of the cleverest murder plans ever. Bonus points for keeping Harriet in jail through most of the book.

Have His Carcase was less of a tour de force of criminology, but presented Harriet as a human and engaging personality. When she wore the flirty dress on the picnic and the big lug tried to kiss her, I was right there with Peter when he was ready to punch the lug’s nose. I would have held his coat, anyway.

Gaudy Night was, as Rough Draft said, off in all directions. I was mainly interested in the portrayal of weirdo female academics at Oxford in the mid-30s, and Sayers did that well, but Harriet kinda faded into the background and the mystery plot was uninvolving. Peter being away on the continent singlehandedly solving the forthcoming WWII was really irritating. Peter being fawned over by everyone at Oxford was worse. The pretentious Latin proposal and acceptance did not help.

Enjoy The Franchise Affair.. Warning: as in Gaudy Night, there is no murder.
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Old 05-07-2019, 08:04 PM
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Does he get an arm into a cow up to his shoulder at some point? It's just not Herriot if he doesn't get an arm into a cow up to his shoulder.
Repeatedly.

His description of trying to get a semen sample from a bull is classic. I still cannot read that story without putting the book down and burying my face in a pillow so I don't disturb the household with gales of laughter.

And the poor dog with mange. He tried for weeks to help her, and finally realized he couldn't.
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Old 05-08-2019, 10:20 AM
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Ruth Rendell always said that Tey’s The Franchise Affair was one of the great mysteries of all time, and I agree.
I have The Franchise Affair on request from my library.

Also, I had an interesting coincidence last night. I was reading Ruth Rendell's Harm Done, and in Chapter 5, Inspector Wexford specifically references The Franchise Affair as being similar to the case he's currently working. He also appears to spoil the plot, but I guess I'll just have to live with that.

Regarding Sayers and Peter Wimsey, I think I'll read Have His Carcase because I've heard good things about it. That will make four of her books under my belt; maybe I'll pass on the rest.

Another thought on Gaudy Night: The dog collar was the last straw for me!
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Old 05-08-2019, 01:02 PM
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Oh, god, I don’t remember the dog collar scene.

Please don’t tell me that Lord Peter made Harriet wear it for the marriage proposal.

Or vice versa.
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Old 05-08-2019, 04:56 PM
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Oh, god, I don’t remember the dog collar scene.

Please don’t tell me that Lord Peter made Harriet wear it for the marriage proposal.

Or vice versa.
Ha! Actually, Lord Peter did make Harriet wear it, but as a deterrent to strangulation attempts (yes, I rolled my eyes too).
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Old 05-08-2019, 06:04 PM
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This is horribly embarrassing to admit, but I read that scene thinking “Huh, danger of strangling...wear a sturdy piece of leather around the neck...yeah, that’d work.”

I am such an innocent little lamb. And Sayers is one dirty old broad.
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Old 05-10-2019, 07:42 AM
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I finished The Lost Man. I enjoyed the journey very much, but when I had the answer to the mystery, I could see all the pieces fit together...but I didn't believe it in my heart. Anyway, still a good book although I can tell you I won't be marrying any Australian blokes anytime soon!


Today I read nearly all of The Test by Sylvain Neuvel. It's a very fast-paced novella about a man taking a citizenship test which is scored according to his actions in a simulation.
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Old 05-10-2019, 07:49 AM
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Finished Woodward's Fear: Trump in the White House, which seems oddly appropriate right now, and passed it on to my wife.

I've veered from my original intent, and am now reading the Isaac Asimov story collection The Bicentennial Man*, which I hadn't read when it first came out. Reading the second volume of his autobiography made me realize that I was missing a lot of his SF oeuvre by not reading this. I'll come back to the Hunley later.



*Besides, I've seen the movie, but not read the story. There are a couple of commercial movies supposedly adapted from his work, and a few indie and student films more closely adapted, but this film "feels' more like an Asimov story than any other one I've seen.
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Old 05-10-2019, 05:07 PM
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So this week... I got sick and that lead to a lot of reading. Since Monday, I've read:

Think of England by KJ Charles, a m/m romance/espionage/Victorian house party with blackmail, sabotage and lots of nookie.

The Magpie Lord by KJ Charles, Victorian magic and hijinks in a country estate with a rather unusual lord at the helm (m/m)

Remnant by KJ Charles & Jordan L Hawk ummmm more Victorian m/m magic and shenanigans, though this time, in part, in a museum...

Color of You by CS Poe, modern m/m story of a band director who moves to a small town and meets the love of his life. The story was a bit rushed and would have benefitted greatly from more time taken with the romance and the development of Merlin's relationship with his students. But still a sweet read.

Proper English by KJ Charles. More Victorian hijinks and murder in a country house but this time it's f/f

And I am currently blazing through the 7th Sandman Slim volume Killing Pretty. Stark needs to figure out who tried to kill Death. (Please tell me it was Terry Pratchett) (Kadrey aaaaalllllllmoooost lost me at the prior volume, but Death pulled me back in)

Also reading The Inventor by Emily Organ. More Victorian, but a murder in London and no sign of any romance...
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Old 05-11-2019, 02:18 AM
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Finished Munich, by Robert Harris. Intrigue behind the scenes of the infamous September 1938 Munich conference, which Prime Minister Chamberlain said meant "Peace in our time!" upon his return to London. It was good but not his best. I like that Hitler's supposed sexual relationship with his niece was touched on. Didn't Cecil have a column on that?

Next up is The Kremlin's Candidate, by Jason Matthews, the final installment of his Red Sparrow trilogy.
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Old 05-12-2019, 01:10 PM
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Finished Early Riser by Jasper Fforde. The plot wasn't the most original, but the world building was interesting. Overall, I enjoyed it.

Just started The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet by Becky Chambers.
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Old 05-13-2019, 07:16 AM
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Today I read nearly all of The Test by Sylvain Neuvel. It's a very fast-paced novella about a man taking a citizenship test which is scored according to his actions in a simulation.
Finished The Test. It was just okay, but it was such a quick read I don't feel the time was wasted. Nearly all the reviews over at Goodreads mention Black Mirror...I don't even know what that is.


Anyhoo, onward. Today I started on The Invited by Jennifer McMahon. It's a haunted house novel by an author whose work I've always enjoyed, so I'm quite happy this Monday morning!
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Old 05-15-2019, 09:18 AM
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Old 05-15-2019, 09:20 AM
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...the next book in Patrick O'Brian's masterful series of Napoleonic naval adventures, The Fortune of War. Capt. John "Lucky Jack" Aubrey has just reported to an admiral in the Dutch East Indies and been subjected, among other things, to an entertainingly fierce anti-American tirade.
Just finished it. Pretty good, although Jack and his friend Dr. Maturin spend a big chunk of the novel as POWs in Boston.

Next up: Evan Thomas's John Paul Jones, a bio of the biggest Revolutionary War hero of the U.S. Navy. It's OK but not great so far.

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...I've veered from my original intent, and am now reading the Isaac Asimov story collection The Bicentennial Man... I've seen the movie, but not read the story. There are a couple of commercial movies supposedly adapted from his work, and a few indie and student films more closely adapted, but this film "feels' more like an Asimov story than any other one I've seen.
The story is far better than the movie IMHO.

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Finished Munich, by Robert Harris. Intrigue behind the scenes of the infamous September 1938 Munich conference, which Prime Minister Chamberlain said meant "Peace in our time!" upon his return to London. It was good but not his best. I like that Hitler's supposed sexual relationship with his niece was touched on. Didn't Cecil have a column on that?....
Not that I could find.
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Old 05-15-2019, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Dung Beetle View Post
Anyhoo, onward. Today I started on The Invited by Jennifer McMahon. It's a haunted house novel by an author whose work I've always enjoyed, so I'm quite happy this Monday morning!
Please report back with your review of this. I'm always looking for a good haunted house story!
  #42  
Old 05-16-2019, 04:05 PM
Dendarii Dame is offline
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Finished The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet by Becky Chambers, which I thought was excellent---one of the best books I've read this year.

Next up: The Prefect, by Alastair Reynolds.
  #43  
Old 05-17-2019, 10:51 PM
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I like that Hitler's supposed sexual relationship with his niece was touched on. Didn't Cecil have a column on that?
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Not that I could find.
I could not find it either, but I have a memory of it. Someone specifically asking about Hitler's supposed sexual relation with his murdered niece, and all the rumors afterward of his alleged involvement in the murder. That was before he came to power, and supposedly such an affair was thought to have been an embarrassment even for a Nazi. If I didn't read it from Cecil, then I don't know where it could have been.
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  #44  
Old 05-18-2019, 06:36 AM
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Next up: Revenant Gun, the third in a series that I've enjoyed immensely. When I finish it, I'll have read all the Hugo nominees for the year, and I dunno, earned a cookie or something.
Whew--finally finished this. I liked the others in the series better, but it was still pretty good. In addition to having a nonlinear plot, it had nonlinear characters, in a way that I can't explain without spoilers, but that made it pretty hard for me to follow in places. Still, good stuff.
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Finished The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet by Becky Chambers, which I thought was excellent---one of the best books I've read this year.
I love this book, and its third sequel (Record of a Spaceborn Few) is my favorite SF of the past few years. Chambers is amazing.
  #45  
Old 05-18-2019, 08:48 AM
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Have just finished Fall Out by Sara Paretsky -- the ?eighteenth? V.I. Warshawski mystery. Have read most if not all of the "Warshawskis". In the main I like the whole thing, and the characters -- V.I. particularly -- except that for me, some of the novels get too complicated to be easy to handle (and rightly or wrongly, I'm ready to expend only a limited amount of "skull sweat" on fiction read for entertainment) -- multiple plot threads, and a huge cast of characters: I can experience a good deal of puzzlement as to "who's this bod, and that one; how does this, that and the other, fit into the scheme of things?"

Fall Out -- while basically readable -- was for me, thus complication-bedevilled. It's her penultimate Warshawski novel to date; the most recent so far, Shell Game (which as it happened, I read before Fall Out) was a good deal more easily comprehensible.

Re the Sayers / Wimsey discussions upthread: I'm quite a fan of the Wimsey novels, but harbour a total detestation of Harriet Vane -- bloody professional misery-merchant: for me, the series went into a sharp decline when she showed up. OK, life has given her a hard time; but she wallows in it to the max... For the period of Murder Must Advertise, Peter is unsuccessfully courting Harriet, but she's out of the picture for the whole of the novel -- I was praying that the incognito Wimsey's interaction with his advertising-agency colleague, the tough-fibred and cynical Miss Meteyard, would lead to his concluding that he's on a hiding to nothing with the miserable HV biddy, and to his taking-up with Meteyard instead.

One gathers that romance-novel buffs have the highest of praise for Gaudy Night and Busman's Honeymoon. I'm no big fan of either book (have read each, once -- never again). Apart from the "Harriet factor" -- I see assorted faults in GN, as touched on by folk upthread; plus (at the risk of sounding like Harriet myself) I have not-too-happy personal issues with the university involved. And BH was, so far as I was concerned, utter "cornball" throughout.
  #46  
Old 05-18-2019, 02:57 PM
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Anyone read Liane Moriarty? I read The Husband's Secret and enjoyed it tremendously, and now I'm reading Big Little Lies and it's a fun ride too.
  #47  
Old 05-20-2019, 08:06 AM
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Please report back with your review of this. I'm always looking for a good haunted house story!
Happy to!

So, I finished The Invited. I think it would be a stretch to call this a haunted house story, since there is only a house-in-progress throughout the book. It's more of a haunted objects story, and although there are supernatural happenings, it had much more the feel of a murder mystery to me. A couple of problems: the characters moved much too quickly from skepticism to belief, and I figured out the mystery before the characters did. (That may have been the author's intent). Also, I think this book cried out for an epilogue. Most ends were tied up, but in my opinion, there could have been a little more to say about the restless spirits and the phenomena in the house. Overall, I enjoyed the book but I didn't find it chilling as I had hoped.


Next up, a thriller featuring a woman with locked-in syndrome, If She Wakes, by the awesome Michael Koryta.
  #48  
Old 05-20-2019, 10:40 AM
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Please report back with your review of this. I'm always looking for a good haunted house story!
If you don't mind some m/m sex, Restless Spirits by Jordan L Hawk is a good haunted house mystery. It has elements of Hell House and The Haunting of Hill House and moves along quite nicely.

Last edited by DZedNConfused; 05-20-2019 at 10:40 AM.
  #49  
Old 05-20-2019, 10:42 AM
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Currently plowing my way thru The Outlet by Andy Adams. It's a Western about a cattle drive. The problem is "It's a Western about a cattle drive" pretty much sums up the whole book so far. There isn't much of a central conflict. There is a bunch of stuff about some evil corrupt Easterners who are trying to rip off one of the cattle bosses, and they rip them off in return, but it's not much of a conflict and there is not much reason to care about it. Lots and lots of detail about the day-to-day of a cattle drive, which isn't bad, but it's hard to get emotionally involved in the difficulties of crossing rivers.

Also read Killing Jesus by Bill O'Reilly, which didn't present anything I didn't already know.

Also listened to some of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries, newly written ones called The Rediscovered Railway Mysteries which were frankly pretty bad. It is not a good sign when, three paragraphs into the story, you say
SPOILER:
it's radiation poisoning
and, sure enough...

Gotta get to the library - I need some audiobooks for a long drive this weekend.

Regards,
Shodan
  #50  
Old 05-20-2019, 10:46 AM
Elendil's Heir is offline
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...Next up, a thriller featuring a woman with locked-in syndrome, If She Wakes, by the awesome Michael Koryta.
John Scalzi's Lock In is a pretty good near-future sf novel about a pandemic that leaves one percent of the world's population "locked in," and how that changes society.
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