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Old 05-11-2019, 09:27 PM
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Film whose edited versions you actually preferred


Space Is the Place - One of my favourite all-time movies is ruined in the uncut French version with some doc/nurse porn that totally detracts from the flick's awesomely insouciant dingbattery.

Another one on my stellar shelf is Man Bites Dog. I'll take the edited (US) version, thanks, which leaves out the scenes where a screaming child (at least in almost total darkness) is chased down and killed, and the rape scene that has the doc filmmaker Remy "ingeniously" (um, nah, not really) finagled into the action.

Probably a big ask*, but can anyone think of their own?

*ok - I promise never to use that annoying catchphrase ever again.
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Old 05-11-2019, 09:41 PM
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I prefer the voice over version of Blade Runner over the director's cut.



The report would be "routine retirement of a Replicant", which didn't make me feel any better about shooting a woman in the back.
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Old 05-12-2019, 12:51 AM
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The Director's Cut of Aliens has a few good bits but the longest section is the dull "Newt's parents find the eggs" sequence that is poorly paced and just sort of plods along. If I was showing it to someone for the first time, I'd definitely go with the theatrical version and if they ever care enough to see the other parts later, it'll be there for them.
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Old 05-12-2019, 03:42 AM
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The TV version of Ace Ventura which cuts the few sex scenes which aren't that funny, and instead adds in a bunch of new scenes that are both funny and actually important to the plot.
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Old 05-12-2019, 09:26 AM
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Not quite what you're looking for perhaps, but I nostalgically prefer the TV edit of Die Hard from my childhood. Yippee-ky-ay, Kimo Sabe (sp) is real to my mind, even if 'Motherfucker' might be the proper line.
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Old 05-12-2019, 11:33 AM
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Donnie Darko, of course. The DC helps explain a bit more about what's going on, but I find it to be "dumbed down" too much for my taste, with way too much foreshadowing. Plus, I like the original soundtrack better than the one in the DC.
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Old 05-12-2019, 11:35 AM
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Betty Blue.

The Director's Cut provided useful information, but it really bogged down the story. I prefer the theatrical release.
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Old 05-12-2019, 12:35 PM
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'The Warriors'.

The director's cut features comic frame caricatures to herald some scene changes. Mostly it's OK ( if a bit hokey ) but in one instance absolutely kills the suspense of a key scene.

When the gang scatters to escape the police inside the 96th street subway station, the first ones to exit to the street are in a panicky state. A member asks agitated-ly "Where are they!!??" ( as to the missing members ) and you see him quickly gaze to asses the situation. Just then the camera ( ostensibly his and other's gaze ) catch sight of the 'Baseball Furies', a greasepaint faced ghoulish looking gang wielding baseball bats; they're barely visible in the night surrounding the station exit. Truly terrifying and unexpected.

In the director's cut, before the camera cuts to show the Furies waiting for them, a comic slide that says "Holy shit, the Baseball Furies!" is shown first. Completely kills the suspense and surprise.
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Old 05-12-2019, 12:49 PM
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The theatrical release of Amadeus is much better than the director's cut, despite the brief nudity.
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Old 05-12-2019, 01:05 PM
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1776. The edited version is my favorite movie. The director's version includes long scenes that make the plot drag.
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Old 05-12-2019, 01:08 PM
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The theatrical release of Amadeus is much better than the director's cut, despite the brief nudity.
Absolutely!

I'd submit that Apocalypse Now falls into the same category.
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Old 05-12-2019, 01:37 PM
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I find it strange that people are referring to theatrical release versions as "edited." Whatever gets released in theaters is the real movie. Director's Cuts are the edited versions.
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Old 05-12-2019, 01:46 PM
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The 'Love Conquers All' version of Brazil is the best....

In all seriousness, the released cut of Dune (Lynch version) was probably the best. The 'directors cut' of the movie wasn't so much a movie as it was all the unedited film.
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Old 05-12-2019, 02:25 PM
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I find it strange that people are referring to theatrical release versions as "edited." Whatever gets released in theaters is the real movie. Director's Cuts are the edited versions.
All versions of movies are edited to some extent or another. And various versions may be released theatrically, as well as on TV. Which one of those is the "real" movie?

Director's cuts are usually longer and contain material not in the theatrical release. The theatrical release may have been further edited from that originally planned by the director, sometimes by the director himself at the studio's behest, and sometimes by others. But a director's cut is of course closer to the "real" movie as planned by the director.
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Old 05-12-2019, 02:32 PM
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All versions of movies are edited to some extent or another. And various versions may be released theatrically, as well as on TV. Which one of those is the "real" movie?
The original theatrical release is the real movie. Everything else is edited.

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Director's cuts are usually longer and contain material not in the theatrical release. The theatrical release may have been further edited from that originally planned by the director, sometimes by the director himself at the studio's behest, and sometimes by others. But a director's cut is of course closer to the "real" movie as planned by the director.
A director's cut is essentially a vanity project. The theatrical release is the real movie.
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Old 05-12-2019, 02:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Ellis Dee View Post
The original theatrical release is the real movie. Everything else is edited.

A director's cut is essentially a vanity project. The theatrical release is the real movie.
If you want to impose your own personal definition of "real movie," go ahead. But saying that "everything else is edited" makes no sense. Generally "edited" means to have material removed or changed from the original version. And the theatrical release will normally have had material removed and be shorter than the director's cut.

Last edited by Colibri; 05-12-2019 at 02:41 PM.
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Old 05-12-2019, 03:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
If you want to impose your own personal definition of "real movie," go ahead. But saying that "everything else is edited" makes no sense. Generally "edited" means to have material removed or changed from the original version. And the theatrical release will normally have had material removed and be shorter than the director's cut.
Yep, and if there was a movie with no edition, then you would get monstrosities of movies lasting hours or days, with every error, alternate take or mikes showing in frame. Only guys like Andy Warhol got away with it.

You would also see movies where thanks to scheduling or other reasons the beginning was filmed last, ruining the movie even more.

Memento got away with it though...
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Old 05-12-2019, 08:51 PM
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i prefer the director's cut of ALIENS over the theatrical cut myself. I own The Alien Quadrilogy box set which has both theatrical and directors cuts of the first four alien movies. Of note Ridley Scott's director cut of the first film--Alien---is actually a minute shorter than the theatrical cut. Scott restored roughly four minutes of deleted footage while cutting about five minutes of other material.

And of course there is always the debate about which versions of The Original Star Wars Trilogy is better----the original theatrical versions or the Special Edition versions. Diehard Star Wars fans always say the original cuts were better but I actually prefer the Special Editions myself.
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Old 05-12-2019, 09:10 PM
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I really, really like that Greedo shot first instead of Han.


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Old 05-12-2019, 09:35 PM
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I really, really like that Greedo shot first instead of Han.


I admit one factor that affects my preference for The Special Editions is that I only saw the original version on television--either on cable or VHS tape. So when I saw in theaters for the first time when The Special Editions were released they looked and sound a lot more crisp than I have ever seen them before.
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Old 05-13-2019, 03:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
If you want to impose your own personal definition of "real movie," go ahead. But saying that "everything else is edited" makes no sense. Generally "edited" means to have material removed or changed from the original version. And the theatrical release will normally have had material removed and be shorter than the director's cut.
I think you're confusing the editing you do to prepare your movie for release, and the editing you do when creating alternate versions like Director's Cuts. Obviously every single movie has an editor, because you have to convert the raw footage into a coherent narrative. It seems odd that I need to explain this, but here we are.

As for "my own personal definition," not really. It's what I've heard numerous filmmakers say while listening to commentary tracks for various movies. (I love commentary tracks.)

The most obvious thing I can point to to try and help you understand is that if you're referencing a Director's Cut of a movie, you have to actually say the words "Director's Cut" or people will think you're talking about the theatrical release. Any time you have to add a qualifier when referencing something by itself, you're not talking about the original thing.

Last edited by Ellis Dee; 05-13-2019 at 03:43 AM.
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Old 05-13-2019, 07:08 AM
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I don't think so -- after finally seeing the full, uncut versions of many silent films (Metropolis and The Lost World, chiefly, but some others as well), I was furious about the cuts that had been made, and much prefer the full versions, which make a heckuva lot more sense. In general, I'd mucxh rather see the full version of the film.

I think a lot of folks above feel the same way, but are interpreting "edited version" to mean "Director's cut". since the "Director's cut" is usually longer, I generally prefer them myself.

I think the OP is asking if you'd prefer the edited-down versions shown in other countries or for TV to the feature release or even Director's Cut, which is a very different question.




While I don't think I prefer the TV-edited versions, there are a few cases where IU like it a lot, maybe as much as the release version:


Creator -- the film based on Jeremy Leven's novel that starred Peter O'Toole as a Nobel Laureate trying to clone his dead wife is one of the better overlooked science fiction films out there. No special effects, but very witty dialogue, and with cloning handled properly. The TV version actually includes an important scene missing from the released film -- it's a flashback that O'Toole's character has of his deceased wife, including a scene at an amusement park. It showed why he was trying to recapture his life with her, and gave us a glimpse of their life together. In the released version the only sight of her we get, aside from a still photo, is a sort of "ghost of her" image at the end.

Dune -- The version released to TV, even though credited to "Alan Smithee", that pseudonym used by filmmakers when they don't like the hack job done by the Hollywood Powers-That-Be, actually was done by someone who knew and loved the novel. It included a voiceover explanation and illustrations at the beginning to make the story more clear, and included scenes cut from the movie (including the making of "Water Of Life")

The Thing -- Although the first TV release of this movie on CBS was abysmal (they actually cut almost every shot of the titular thing, which makes the film pretty damned pointless. They also re-arranged other shots), later releases to independent stations actually included a few shots not in the release version. They also added voiceovers explaining who the characters were and what their idiosyncrasies were, something that we could have done without -- the movie already did this.

Metropolis (Giorgio Moroder version) -- Although he did make use of the best prints available at the time, and edited back in a LOT of material that had been cut, Moroder's version was not the most complete that could be made at the time -- he actually cut material OUT that was in his hands. I think he did this to keep the film under an hour and a half, because his cut clocked in at the same time as the then "standard" version of the film. Although at first glance some of the material he cut looks repetitious, I think it was still important to making his point. But I love his film for the look of it and for two things that a lot of critics hated -- the tinting of the film and the rock score he employed. Some venues loved the restoration but hated the score so much that they turned it off and supplied live oran or orchestral accompaniment. But I liked the score.

and, just a note, I really do prefer the Director's cut of Bladerunner without that damned voiceover.
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Old 05-13-2019, 11:51 AM
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I think a lot of folks above feel the same way, but are interpreting "edited version" to mean "Director's cut". since the "Director's cut" is usually longer, I generally prefer them myself.
I'm the one saying that Director's Cuts are the edited version. Others are arguing that the original theatrical release is the "edited version," because "films are edited before release."

This thread is about when you prefer the edited version. Posts 2, 3, 6, 7, 9, 10 and 11 all say they prefer the theatrical release. So they're saying that the theatrical release is the edited version.

People must be confusing "edited" with "shorter." Editing does not imply removing (or adding) content; both are perfectly normal aspects of editing.

Last edited by Ellis Dee; 05-13-2019 at 11:52 AM.
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Old 05-13-2019, 12:18 PM
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I think the OP makes abundantly clear from context what's being asked since he gives several examples of preferring the version with less material than the alternative. But, if we're all messing it up, I'm happy to wait for the OP to say so himself.
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Old 05-13-2019, 12:30 PM
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I think the OP makes abundantly clear from context what's being asked since he gives several examples of preferring the version with less material than the alternative. But, if we're all messing it up, I'm happy to wait for the OP to say so himself.
The OP cites two examples, both where they prefer the edited version over the theatrical release. (For sure with Man Bites Dog, but I'll concede that "the uncut French version" is a bit ambiguous. By my read, the uncut French version was the original theatrical release, but I've never heard of that movie so I can't say for sure.)

Last edited by Ellis Dee; 05-13-2019 at 12:35 PM.
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Old 05-13-2019, 01:38 PM
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I watch a lot of foreign movies, specifically east Asian. Many, MANY times there is a domestic version and an international version. They both are shown in theaters, so which is the "edited" version?

For Korean films, when the DVD is released, often you will get both versions. The "international" version is usually labeled as such, and the Korean domestic version is labeled the "director's cut." To confuse matters more, sometimes the director indulges himself with an "expanded" version which adds scenes specific to the DVD. So, that's a re-edited version, whereas the original two I described are both "theatrical" versions--just depends on which theater you were at. I've seen movies where I preferred the Korean domestic version, but in other cases, the international version is better (My Sassy Girl, and A Moment to Remember, for instance).

It's worse for Hong Kong movies. Some of those have 3, 4, 5 versions released at once due to local mores. So folks in Singapore get a certain version, and then there is a Taiwanese version and a mainland China version. In addition to the HK version. There's an old joke in HK that you can go to 5 different theaters in the city and see 5 different versions of the film. Which of these is the "edited" version? In many cases, the differences are minor, but in some cases the entire ending is completely changed (Infernal Affairs, for instance).
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Old 05-13-2019, 02:05 PM
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I'm the one saying that Director's Cuts are the edited version. Others are arguing that the original theatrical release is the "edited version," because "films are edited before release."

This thread is about when you prefer the edited version. Posts 2, 3, 6, 7, 9, 10 and 11 all say they prefer the theatrical release. So they're saying that the theatrical release is the edited version.

People must be confusing "edited" with "shorter." Editing does not imply removing (or adding) content; both are perfectly normal aspects of editing.
The OP doesn't include "Director's cut" among any of his examples, and I don't think he's considering them at all. He cites cases where a version where material has been removed, making the piece shorter. He writes of releases for different countries, but I expand that to include versions for television. But none of these are "Director's cuts", which I put in a different class altogether, and which I think demands a separate thread.
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Old 05-13-2019, 03:50 PM
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The Director's Cut of Aliens has a few good bits but the longest section is the dull "Newt's parents find the eggs" sequence that is poorly paced and just sort of plods along. If I was showing it to someone for the first time, I'd definitely go with the theatrical version and if they ever care enough to see the other parts later, it'll be there for them.
Also the scene in the dropship before they launch. God bless Bill Paxton and everything he has ever done but that speechifying he does about how badass he is with all the weapons the Marines have is both overdone and poorly paced

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Not quite what you're looking for perhaps, but I nostalgically prefer the TV edit of Die Hard from my childhood. Yippee-ky-ay, Kimo Sabe (sp) is real to my mind, even if 'Motherfucker' might be the proper line.
I saw Quick Change several times on VHS while overseas and knew it fairly well. On my flight back to the states I saw it again and I had a good laugh when the mobster says "Open the Viking door" as opposed to the "fucking door."
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Old 05-13-2019, 04:12 PM
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Not quite what you're looking for perhaps, but I nostalgically prefer the TV edit of Die Hard from my childhood. Yippee-ky-ay, Kimo Sabe (sp) is real to my mind, even if 'Motherfucker' might be the proper line.
In my market the edited version was "Yippee Ky Ay, Mr. Falcon!"
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Old 05-13-2019, 06:36 PM
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When I was a kid I say Saturday Night Fever on TV. I remember it not being my cup of tea, but fun, harmless fluff nonetheless. Disco. The Bee Gees. Vinnie Barbarino dancing. Working class New Yorkers. It wasn't a film I ever thought about again over the years.

I watched the R-rated theatrical release a few years ago and boy was I shocked. And not in a good way. What a dark, depressing and ugly mess of a movie. The woman I watched it with also had only seen the 80s TV version. We just kept looking at each other and saying WTF?
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Old 05-13-2019, 08:09 PM
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IMO, the theatrical version (for the director's intended audience, i.e. country of origin) of a movie is the official release. All other versions (international, director's edition) are not official even if the director states that this is what they intended.

Also, all video releases are color graded, resolution edited and highly compressed for home viewing. Even HDR UHD releases are color graded (until we get home displays that can do BT.2020) and resolution reduced from true 4K, 4096 x 2160 to 3840 x 2160, and compressed from 2TB+ masters to 100GB or less.

Bottom line is unless you're watching your movies in a properly calibrated movie theatre, you're watching an "edited" version!

Last edited by lingyi; 05-13-2019 at 08:11 PM.
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Old 05-13-2019, 09:17 PM
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I'm late coming back here because I thought this thread wasn't going to get any responses. I guess I should have been clearer - basically a preference of an expurgated version of a film over its original release. tbh the director's cut angle never crossed my kind.
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Old 05-13-2019, 10:56 PM
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FWIW, I had the same puzzlement as Ellis Dee did in response to many of the first few posts ITT. I don't know that it's worth making a fuss over, but I definitely understand ED's reaction.


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I prefer the voice over version of Blade Runner over the director's cut.

Same here! For which other cinephiles, including my son, give me endless shit.
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Old 05-14-2019, 12:26 AM
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As I understand it, The Professional was the edited, sanitized version of Leon: The Professional, and it's a damned good thing they changed it for American audiences. I would not have been cheering for Jean Reno's character if, as in the French release, they had been physically intimate.
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Old 05-14-2019, 05:18 AM
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In my market the edited version was "Yippee Ky Ay, Mr. Falcon!"
For years I thought maybe I had imagined it. It was even a much different voice.

Aliens, either the VHS or cable TV version had a scene with remote guns that I didn't see in theater
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Old 05-14-2019, 05:40 AM
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I'd submit that Apocalypse Now falls into the same category.
I agree. Apocalypse Now was made by 1979 Francis Ford Coppola, the greatest director of his time, while Apocalypse Now Redux was made by 2001 Francis Ford Coppola, a hack. Of course the former is better.
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Old 05-14-2019, 05:43 AM
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IMO, the theatrical version (for the director's intended audience, i.e. country of origin) of a movie is the official release. All other versions (international, director's edition) are not official even if the director states that this is what they intended.

Also, all video releases are color graded, resolution edited and highly compressed for home viewing. Even HDR UHD releases are color graded (until we get home displays that can do BT.2020) and resolution reduced from true 4K, 4096 x 2160 to 3840 x 2160, and compressed from 2TB+ masters to 100GB or less.

Bottom line is unless you're watching your movies in a properly calibrated movie theatre, you're watching an "edited" version!
I agree about what constitutes an "official release." Anything other than that is a re-edit.*

Can you explain what you mean by: "all video releases are color graded"? AFAIK, all film and video released for public consumption--whether in a theater, an airplane, or at home--is color graded. Are you referring to something which is only done to home video releases? I guess I don't understand.

ETA: also, can you explain what you mean by "resolution edited"? Maybe you mean converted? Or do you mean that entertainment converted to a different resolution is re-edited????



*I guess you could call that an "edited version" as the OP does but it's not a super-good term because all versions of a film are edited. Re-edited works better, I think.

Maybe "cut-down"?

Last edited by I Love Me, Vol. I; 05-14-2019 at 05:48 AM.
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:39 AM
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As I understand it, The Professional was the edited, sanitized version of Leon: The Professional, and it's a damned good thing they changed it for American audiences. I would not have been cheering for Jean Reno's character if, as in the French release, they had been physically intimate.

Cite? I thought I saw the French version, but I donít remember that.
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:51 AM
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Cite? I thought I saw the French version, but I donít remember that.
From IMDB:
Quote:
The original cut of the film had more scenes with "awkward sexual tension" between Mathilda and Lťon. These scenes were later cut out for the American release dubbed "The Professional", but were included in the 1996 European release, as well as in the deleted scenes of the special edition DVD. They were reintegrated back into the film for the 'International Cut', which is now available on DVD.
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:57 AM
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OIC. I understand “intimate” to mean actual sex.
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Old 05-14-2019, 11:51 AM
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I prefer the "melon farmer" TV version of Repo Man to the original. The insane choices for the overdubbing add an extra layer of absurdity to an already whacked-out movie.
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Old 05-14-2019, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by I Love Me, Vol. I View Post
I agree about what constitutes an "official release." Anything other than that is a re-edit.*

Can you explain what you mean by: "all video releases are color graded"? AFAIK, all film and video released for public consumption--whether in a theater, an airplane, or at home--is color graded. Are you referring to something which is only done to home video releases? I guess I don't understand.

ETA: also, can you explain what you mean by "resolution edited"? Maybe you mean converted? Or do you mean that entertainment converted to a different resolution is re-edited????



*I guess you could call that an "edited version" as the OP does but it's not a super-good term because all versions of a film are edited. Re-edited works better, I think.

Maybe "cut-down"?
I agree that that "re-edited" is a better term, though it doesn't always have to be "cut-down" as international and director's cut versions are often longer, though some scenes may be have removed or rearranged.

As for color grading, yes all video releases are color graded for home release because of the much smaller color space of even the latest UHD displays. I can't find it right now, but there was an excellent article that talks about how the color grader must make changes to the theatrical master for the limitations of consumer displays.

Add in the fact that most people don't watch their displays in a properly darkened room and the color space is further reduced (in a sense edited).

IMO, the greatest fraud pulled on the public is advertising UHD displays as 4K. True 4K is 4096 x 2160, while UHD is 3840 x 2160. I used the term "resolution edited" to fit the theme of this thread, but mean reduced resolution/converted. And in the case of UHD, the image is cropped either on the sides or top/bottom. At least 1080p displays matched the resolution of 1080p cameras.

Ironically, in the days of film, particularly in Cinerama theaters (which didn't mask the sides off the screen with curtains, if you saw a first run screening, you were seeing the movie as "unedited" as possible. Full color, full screen.

Last edited by lingyi; 05-14-2019 at 12:49 PM.
  #43  
Old 05-14-2019, 01:05 PM
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I've lamented and gotten no sympathy on a video forum that we'll likely never have a true theatrical ("unedited"), video release for the home because the studios would never allow that. While there may be some very well connected individuals who have the connections to receive the multi-terabyte theatrical masters and IMAX (starting at $2mil) or THX certified "home" theaters to view them in, they're far fewer than those in the film days when theatrical prints were legally or illegally obtained and kept.
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Old 05-14-2019, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Horatio Hellpop View Post
As I understand it, The Professional was the edited, sanitized version of Leon: The Professional, and it's a damned good thing they changed it for American audiences. I would not have been cheering for Jean Reno's character if, as in the French release, they had been physically intimate.
I only half-remembered that from a different long-ago thread, but now that you say this, yeah, I'll take the edited American version over a creepier French original release any day. Natalie Portman was (or at least appeared to be) prepubescent in that movie.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
As for color grading, yes all video releases are color graded for home release because of the much smaller color space of even the latest UHD displays. I can't find it right now, but there was an excellent article that talks about how the color grader must make changes to the theatrical master for the limitations of consumer displays.

Add in the fact that most people don't watch their displays in a properly darkened room and the color space is further reduced (in a sense edited).
Can we send you back in time around 6 months so you can explain this to the people who make Game of Thrones?

Their color grading in episode 3 this season was so poor that the majority of home viewers couldn't see what the hell was going on because it was so dark, which was particularly unfortunate because it was the biggest, most epic battle they every put on screen.
  #45  
Old 05-14-2019, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Ellis Dee View Post
I only half-remembered that from a different long-ago thread, but now that you say this, yeah, I'll take the edited American version over a creepier French original release any day. Natalie Portman was (or at least appeared to be) prepubescent in that movie.

Can we send you back in time around 6 months so you can explain this to the people who make Game of Thrones?

Their color grading in episode 3 this season was so poor that the majority of home viewers couldn't see what the hell was going on because it was so dark, which was particularly unfortunate because it was the biggest, most epic battle they every put on screen.
I don't watch Game of Thrones, but I wonder how much of the bad reviews were because of improperly set displays or improperly lit (i.e. overly bright) rooms.

Years ago, I was watching a Korean horror movie set primarily in a dark morgue. There's a scene where the heroine is hiding in a corner and she's barely visible. I was thinking about how difficult it must have been to setup and light that scene, when it dawned on me that if I wasn't watching this on my beloved plasma and a nearly pitch black room, I wouldn't have been able to see that she was in that corner.

When Halloween and Alien were originally shown on TV, they had to brighten some scenes, particularly when The Shape steps out of the shadows and the alien uncurls in the shuttlecraft, because their appearance (on normal TVs) would have been delayed or lost to most viewers.
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Old 05-14-2019, 02:04 PM
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I saw Battle for the Planet of the Apes when I was a kid. The only two scenes I remembered were one where a human tells a character how the word, "No" is verboten to Apes because they heard it so much when they were slaves and a scene at the end that reveals how the group of mutants in Beneath the Planet of the Apes started worshiping a bomb. It turns out both those scenes were only added to the TV version and weren't in the original theatrical release.

Last edited by Quimby; 05-14-2019 at 02:04 PM.
  #47  
Old 05-14-2019, 04:48 PM
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I watch a lot of foreign movies, specifically east Asian. Many, MANY times there is a domestic version and an international version. They both are shown in theaters, so which is the "edited" version?

For Korean films, when the DVD is released, often you will get both versions. The "international" version is usually labeled as such, and the Korean domestic version is labeled the "director's cut." To confuse matters more, sometimes the director indulges himself with an "expanded" version which adds scenes specific to the DVD. So, that's a re-edited version, whereas the original two I described are both "theatrical" versions--just depends on which theater you were at. I've seen movies where I preferred the Korean domestic version, but in other cases, the international version is better (My Sassy Girl, and A Moment to Remember, for instance).

It's worse for Hong Kong movies. Some of those have 3, 4, 5 versions released at once due to local mores. So folks in Singapore get a certain version, and then there is a Taiwanese version and a mainland China version. In addition to the HK version. There's an old joke in HK that you can go to 5 different theaters in the city and see 5 different versions of the film. Which of these is the "edited" version? In many cases, the differences are minor, but in some cases the entire ending is completely changed (Infernal Affairs, for instance).
I don't know if it's still true today, but in the 80's and 90's, Hong Kong movies were usually released in Taiwan first and often these releases contained extended or different scenes from what was later released in Hong Kong. The most well known (for Asian cinema enthusiasts) is the "extended" version of John Woo's The Killer which was first shown in Taiwanese theaters, then redited for Hong Kong release. As I stated above, IMO, the "official release/edit" of a movie is the one released in theaters of the country of origin.

As for Singapore and Mainland China versions of movies, this is usually less a matter of directorial editing by choice, but (I hate to use the word) censorship due to local standards.

Then there's movies like The Great Wall and other Chinese/Hollywood co-productions where scenes and storylines are altered for Western and Eastern audiences. Which version is the "real" version?

BTW, I completely agree with you about My Sassy Girl. The "edited" international version fills out the storyline so much better. And while I have the theatrical version of A Moment to Remember, I'll probably never watch it because the international version of the movie is perfect as is it.
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Old 05-16-2019, 06:15 PM
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And of course there is always the debate about which versions of The Original Star Wars Trilogy is better----the original theatrical versions or the Special Edition versions. Diehard Star Wars fans always say the original cuts were better but I actually prefer the Special Editions myself.
Even then, the various home releases over the years had minor changes here and there, well before the Special Editions were released (to theaters! They also have changes in the subsequent DVD and BluRay releases).
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Old 05-16-2019, 06:29 PM
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Even then, the various home releases over the years had minor changes here and there, well before the Special Editions were released (to theaters! They also have changes in the subsequent DVD and BluRay releases).
Disney should release an edited and improved version of The Star Wars Holiday Special. It originally aired at 98 minutes. If they cut all the bad parts they could go straight from the opening credits to the end credits.
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Old 05-16-2019, 06:41 PM
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Disney should release an edited and improved version of The Star Wars Holiday Special. It originally aired at 98 minutes. If they cut all the bad parts they could go straight from the opening credits to the end credits.
Even that is too much.
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