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Old 05-14-2019, 05:52 AM
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Have you had your Tiliacora triandra infusion today?


Retiring to an orchard/garden in the middle of nowhere wasn't my boyhood dream, but it's working out OK for me. (Certainly I'd be stressed to live in U.S.A. knowing that a huge majority of the white males I run into would have idiotic political opinions.)

We have a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, medicinal plants and flowers in our orchard and garden here. It's a pleasant place the hoopoe birds are still knocking on my window. I've been trying to make sense of the flora by finding the scientific and English names as well as the Thai names. Bai Ya-Nang (Tiliacora triandra) is sold on Ebay and Amazon, but I see no English common name except 'Yanang.' It isn't sold in the markets here, but may be present in old gardens. (Though disappearing as young'uns can't remember why Grandma planted those bushes.)

Bai Ya Nang is a rejuvenating agent valuable for its anti-bacterial, anti-malarial, anti-cancer, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant, anti-fever, and alcohol detoxification properties. It may help prevent hyperglycemia. It may be useful as an antibiotic against some strains of multi-resistant bacteria (e.g. tuberculosis). Bai Ya-Nang infusion has been observed to enhance spatial learning and learning flexibility in mice.

I help my wife pound the Yanang leaves to a paste; water is added to make an infusion. Normally pandan leaves would also be infused. We have pandan trees in our orchard, but using them would be too time-consuming so my wife substitutes ground jasmine blossoms in her Yanang water recipe! (My wife has great intuition for cooking, etc. She talks to the old women about old lore, but also studies articles on the 'Net.) Add a pinch of brown sugar and chill. Delicious! And very helpful to health if my wife (and the Internet) are to be believed.

We'll keep drinking Yanang water for another month or so, then, since variety is key even for medicinals, switch to other healthy special foods from our orchard.
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:44 AM
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Sounds like a much better way to spend the day than what I have planned.
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Old 05-14-2019, 08:11 AM
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yes, that does sound nice.
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Old 05-15-2019, 08:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by septimus View Post
Bai Ya Nang is a rejuvenating agent valuable for its anti-bacterial, anti-malarial, anti-cancer, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant, anti-fever, and alcohol detoxification properties. It may help prevent hyperglycemia. It may be useful as an antibiotic against some strains of multi-resistant bacteria (e.g. tuberculosis). Bai Ya-Nang infusion has been observed to enhance spatial learning and learning flexibility in mice.
I am impressed, especially with the spatial learning in mice thing (they solve mazes faster?), but would here note Jackmannii's Law of Drugs and Supplements, which states:

The more conditions a drug or supplement is claimed to cure or alleviate, the less likely it is to be effective for any of them.

Keep us informed of how the infusions progress.
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Old 05-16-2019, 01:33 AM
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Since I started bragging about my wife's preparation of food and remedies, let me mention that today was a special day at the local temple and my wife made merit by presenting five food dishes and five dessert dishes. Among the foods was her own Nam phrik (chili sauce). The monks said this was the most delicious chili sauce they'd ever tasted, a reaction similar to what she got from friends last time she prepared it.

There are many varieties of chili sauce (and chili peppers) but this list of ingredients from Wikipedia comes closest to my wife's:

Quote:
Nam phrik pla yang (Thai: น้ำพริกปลาย่าง) is mainly minced, grilled fish, usually pla chon, mixed with onion, garlic, powdered (freshly roasted) chili, tamarind, shrimp paste, fish sauce and a very tiny amount of sugar (and MSG).
I've amended Wiki's recipe to conform with my wife's rendition.
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