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Old 05-14-2019, 12:26 PM
JcWoman is offline
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Is it normal to get intolerant of work annoyances the older you get?


I know I regaled you guys excessively with my trials and tribulations of my last toxic job, so I've been trying to lay low. The new job isn't as toxic, but it's still annoying as heck. I think I'm just getting less tolerant of crap the older I get. I'm 55 now. I've saved up enough to retire early and I'm almost there. I've been talking to my husband about an idea to "phase myself out" of full time work. As some of you know, I launched a side business three years ago. It's doing fine, I'm having a blast working on it, but it doesn't yet bring me a salary nor does it yet need my full time attention. It is still my "retirement job" after I'm too old for a corporate career.

But my new idea, given that I can't seem to go a full year at any corporate job before I'm grinding my teeth and ranting, is to quit and become a freelance business analyst consultant. At first I would work 75% on the freelance and 25% on the shop, next year I'd work 50/50, then later I'd back down further to 25% freelance gigs and 75% managing my shop. I'm running numbers, doing some research and playing around with the idea right now and so far it sounds like a good idea for me.

But I'd love to hear from any other 50+ people: did you get (or are you becoming) too freaking crotchety to deal with a full time job? Is it just me?
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Old 05-14-2019, 01:00 PM
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Somewhat, yes. But I think it's more a willingness to face the actual problems head on instead of just laying low and putting up with it.

With me, it's "ok, I've dealt with this, that, that other thing too many times, I've seen how this bullshit works and I'm not inclined to put up with a bully for a boss, a raging bitch for a coworker, that lazy asshole who doesn't do his share, etc."

With bosses, it's more like "We're all people here, we're all adults, this isn't the military, get over your authoritarian ass."

Last edited by Chimera; 05-14-2019 at 01:01 PM.
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Old 05-14-2019, 01:48 PM
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I don't quite get what you mean about the bosses, but I appreciate the earlier part. With me, it's not even the glaringly bad things like you mention. It's more that everybody just stumbles along doing mediocre work and not communicating with each other, causing problems for others and not caring to do better.... ESPECIALLY at the management level. I'm also resenting more and more how if I point out the elephant in the room - no matter how politely - I get a reputation for being the jerk who can't get along or something.

I'm thinking maybe freelancing will be good for me, even though it's more work to find clients, because I can do work for different companies on a short term basis, moving on when they irritate the shit out of me. And if I ever stumble upon one that's actually really awesome (I hear they're out there even though I've never worked in one), then I can do work for them longer term. Basically the work durations will be on my terms, without feeling straight-jacketed with "don't quit without something else lined up".
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Old 05-14-2019, 01:52 PM
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Missed the edit window, but I re-read your reply and now I understand your comment on the bosses. There is that, but what I'm dealing with right now is a completely incompetent manager. Had one in my last job, too. I just don't even know what to do with that. It would be a full time job all by itself to manage up in that situation because I'd basically be giving her management training.
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Old 05-14-2019, 02:07 PM
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No one else likes crotchety, grumpy old farts at work, either. I remember starting at my current company nearly 19 years ago, and wondering what it was that made some of the older employees crotchety and grumpy all the time, and I've never figured it out. Instead, I've become one of those crotchety, grumpy old farts.
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Old 05-14-2019, 02:27 PM
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Somewhat, yes. But I think it's more a willingness to face the actual problems head on instead of just laying low and putting up with it.

With me, it's "ok, I've dealt with this, that, that other thing too many times, I've seen how this bullshit works and I'm not inclined to put up with a bully for a boss, a raging bitch for a coworker, that lazy asshole who doesn't do his share, etc."

With bosses, it's more like "We're all people here, we're all adults, this isn't the military, get over your authoritarian ass."
Obviously everyone's situation is different, but most of the stuff that's the subject of my work rants is stuff that's way above my boss' boss' pay and grade. Consequently, there's no 'face it head on' alternative (other than quitting, and on the whole, I'm happy with my job), just a 'put up with it' non-choice.

For instance, the crappy email system we switched to nearly five years ago: that decision was made at the top levels of the government agency I work for, and it had to meet specifications handed down from OMB. I won't derail the thread with details, but obviously there's not a damn thing I can do about that. The sources of most of my other major work annoyances are similarly high up in the food chain.

The people I work with directly, OTOH, are great. I have some minor problems with some of them, but it's all really white-noise stuff that I only notice when I have to deal with it, and half an hour later I've already forgotten about it.
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Old 05-14-2019, 02:31 PM
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I'm also 55, but I'm the opposite. Now that I'm older, I recognize that the annoyances will pass, and I don't get all frustrated and upset by them. I just let them roll off my back and worry about the actual work that I need to get done.

It sounds like this is less about your age, and more about "senioritis" - the end is in sight, so you don't have the patience to put up with crap because you're thinking about what it will be like when you don't have to deal with it any more. Good luck with your transition plans - unless something changes, I'm looking at another 12 years in the rat race.
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Old 05-14-2019, 02:37 PM
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What kind of place do you work at? Because corporate culture plays a big role in how "annoying" people are.

I've mostly encountered three broad "cultures" in my work, each with their own strengths and own annoyances:

Startup - Typically tech companies, usually skewed towards young people. Sort of places where they have open plan seating, make people work a hundred hours a week and serve free food to make it the "best place to work". People are usually motivated and hard working, but only when working on stuff that interests them. Lots of new-age management 360 feedback, yet people tend to be sensitive of criticism that might make them not look like geniuses or make the company not look like it will be a multi-billion dollar "unicorn". Management tends to be immature and flakey. Like my 50 year old boss who would bring his skateboard to work.

Big-4 / Wall Street - Kind of stuffy, pretentious, old school culture of big money. People tend to work hard, but there tends to be a lot of classism based on school, title or whatnot (so and so went to Wharton. Oh he's ex Goldman Sachs. She's a VP of this, etc, etc).

Dilbert - I found this at a lot of mid-level companies where people are just mediocre. They just sort of schlep into the office, do their work (which usually isn't super thought provoking) and count the minutes until they go home. Management is largely there to keep the wheels on the bus. Maybe do token performance reviews that have no real bearing on compensation.
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Old 05-14-2019, 03:13 PM
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What kind of place do you work at? Because corporate culture plays a big role in how "annoying" people are.

I've mostly encountered three broad "cultures" in my work, each with their own strengths and own annoyances:

Startup - Typically tech companies, usually skewed towards young people. Sort of places where they have open plan seating, make people work a hundred hours a week and serve free food to make it the "best place to work". People are usually motivated and hard working, but only when working on stuff that interests them. Lots of new-age management 360 feedback, yet people tend to be sensitive of criticism that might make them not look like geniuses or make the company not look like it will be a multi-billion dollar "unicorn". Management tends to be immature and flakey. Like my 50 year old boss who would bring his skateboard to work.

Big-4 / Wall Street - Kind of stuffy, pretentious, old school culture of big money. People tend to work hard, but there tends to be a lot of classism based on school, title or whatnot (so and so went to Wharton. Oh he's ex Goldman Sachs. She's a VP of this, etc, etc).

Dilbert - I found this at a lot of mid-level companies where people are just mediocre. They just sort of schlep into the office, do their work (which usually isn't super thought provoking) and count the minutes until they go home. Management is largely there to keep the wheels on the bus. Maybe do token performance reviews that have no real bearing on compensation.
Don't forget that the "startup" may come up with excuses to not pay their employees.
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Old 05-14-2019, 03:41 PM
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I seem to have a knack for finding/getting myself into Dilbert companies. Except the last few I was in (including the current one) management didn't keep the wheels on the bus but actually was the cause of them falling off on a regular basis.

I've worked in large corporations, small companies, one startup, one local government agency, and lots of medium sized companies.
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Old 05-14-2019, 03:49 PM
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There's a reason this is a thing...
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Old 05-14-2019, 03:56 PM
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........I'm thinking maybe freelancing will be good for me, even though it's more work to find clients, because I can do work for different companies on a short term basis, moving on when they irritate the shit out of me. And if I ever stumble upon one that's actually really awesome (I hear they're out there even though I've never worked in one), then I can do work for them longer term. Basically the work durations will be on my terms, without feeling straight-jacketed with "don't quit without something else lined up".
Are there agencies out there who provide - well, people like you, with your skill set - to companies on a contract basis? They may use you on a consultant basis without you having to be their employee, essentially acting as an booker for you. It's the easy way to transition into full or partial "true" freelancing.

If possible, see if you can pick the brains of someone in your field who has already done this. Every extra bit of information helps.

I did partial "true" freelancing for 12 or 13 years (working some of the time through a consultant group but also finding my own clients), but I started in my mid forties. That may be a significant point because it's hard work with long hours. Bear in mind that if you are brought in by a client as a freelancer/consultant, it's very often to clear up a mess which is too unpleasant or too difficult for someone in-house to clear up. They're not going to bring you in because everything is just great. And if you present yourself as an expert, people are expecting to see an expert.

Also consider: everyone who is self employed overcommits - it's really hard to turn away work. You may end up with less time for your side business, at least at first.

All of that said, it was absolutely the best thing for me. I had sellable skills, made good money, and was able to start fading away in my mid fifties, so that when I fully retired it was without a bump.

And the best thing about freelancing is you get to step out of the company politics that eventually drive everyone crazy. That'll go some way to sorting out the work annoyances which (of course) everyone gets more intolerant of as they get older.....


j
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Old 05-14-2019, 05:08 PM
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I was annoyed by just about everything by the time I was 40. Now, I'm not. I think I recognized that companies and people have reasons to do things a certain way, and that my own goals are rarely part of their plans. It's certainly made my life easier.

Regarding consulting, it rarely works well on a percentage basis. Companies bringing on consultants usually expect 30-55 hour a week out of you or they will opt for another candidate. Just an FYI.
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Old 05-14-2019, 06:16 PM
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I went the SpoilerVirgin route my last few years. I developed a crucial system which no one else understood very well. My boss was incompetent but nice, and never bugged me with suggestions from ignorance. If he was more with it I might have gotten raises (which were rare so I wasn't being singled out) but I was making enough that I didn't care.
I got a bit cross at supposedly top engineers who were flummoxed at the concept of a command line, but I managed to keep it in.

I sat through lots of meetings about a screw up by some people which was delaying release months and months. If I was 30 this would have made me way nervous, at 62 it was amusing.
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Old 05-14-2019, 06:23 PM
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I'm the opposite. I used to get so worked up at the injustices is saw at work. It took me a while to realize that NONE OF THIS SHIT MATTERS!

The only thing that matters is the stuff that happens after I punch the clock.
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Old 05-14-2019, 06:38 PM
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Representing the blue collar world here. I definitely get more annoyed at various aspects of my job as I get older. I'm almost 62. The constant din of back up alarms on forklifts and other noises associated with them gets under my skin more than it did a few years ago. Also things like whistling co-workers, particularly when they make repetitive whistling noises that aren't really tunes, just nervous habits. I spend a big part of my day on a forklift but I also have a work station with a computer on which I am expected to make many, many transactions of inventory with no mistakes but my work station is located in the warehouse at the main intersection for forklift traffic, right at a blind corner where forklift drivers are expected to sound the horn going in each direction. So there I am trying to focus as as forklift drivers race back and forth, honking the horn which is right at my ear level. This area is also where people tend to congregate, so lots of conversation going on as well. I used to be much better at tuning all this out but it increasingly makes me twitchy.
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Old 05-14-2019, 06:39 PM
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When I start getting really annoyed, that's my cue to take a mental health day.

I definitely see a lot of frustrated and irritated coworkers in their 50s. I guess there's only so many software upgrades, database overhauls, email client switch-overs, reorganizations, projects stuck in limbo, jerkish coworkers, and the never-ending cycle of training newbies only to watch them disappear forever before a person just says "fuck it".
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:38 PM
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When I start getting really annoyed, that's my cue to take a mental health day.

I definitely see a lot of frustrated and irritated coworkers in their 50s. I guess there's only so many software upgrades, database overhauls, email client switch-overs, reorganizations, projects stuck in limbo, jerkish coworkers, and the never-ending cycle of training newbies only to watch them disappear forever before a person just says "fuck it".
I see a lot of young people pretty frustrated and irritated. We have lots of wonderful young teachers as well, and I don't want to do anything as trite as typecast a generation, but it just seems like half the young people we hire have the most bizarre expectations about the job. Like, not only should it not have any unpleasant parts, but any unpleasantness at all is a sign that "they"--I don't know who that is. I think they think there's some shadowy smokefilled room where these things are decided--are either vindictive or stupid. They can't seem to grasp that all jobs are shitty at times, and that sometimes things are just complicated and you don't get what you want. They are really, really hung up on "fair" in this microscopic level that just seems designed to make them miserable--they always feel like everything is unfair and it makes them angry and sad.

Personally, the biggest change I am finding as I am getting older is that I am a LOT less concerned with having everyone like me/making sure I never piss anyone off. I still want MOST people to like me, but it's more like as long as I have done what I consider my due diligence as a decent human, I don't worry too much about whether every single person in the room knows it.

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Old 05-14-2019, 07:46 PM
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I still want MOST people to like me, but it's more like as long as I have done what I consider my due diligence as a decent human, I don't worry too much about whether every single person in the room knows it.
That's a good attitude. I wish more people would consider "I've done the best I could today" as a measurement of their success.
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Old 05-14-2019, 08:04 PM
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Personally, the biggest change I am finding as I am getting older is that I am a LOT less concerned with having everyone like me/making sure I never piss anyone off. I still want MOST people to like me, but it's more like as long as I have done what I consider my due diligence as a decent human, I don't worry too much about whether every single person in the room knows it.
Yes, this. And no matter where you work, there are some of the same old stupid things that happen over and over again (ex: boss/client wants X and you work hard to get it done by deadline; boss/client changes mind and wants Y instead by same deadline, which happens to be tomorrow morning. Or maybe boss/client neglects to mention some crucial detail that affects the entire project and now you have to twist yourself into a pretzel to make the necessary changes that entails at the very last minute). There's a point at which you just think: fuck this noise. The problem comes in whether you can afford to leave that behind or not.
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Old 05-14-2019, 10:55 PM
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About six weeks ago, I got tired of being angry all the time and gave notice. Then folks got sick, went on travel, they couldn't find new employees, so I went on a semi-permanent on-call status. Since then, I've worked more than I have since I first started. (That's a whole other rant.) But now it's fine because on those rare occasions I give a shit, I tell them ratherly impolitely. The manager commented that I seemed to be happier, and I told her why. She's had trouble accepting that as not a joke.
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Old 05-14-2019, 11:39 PM
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I turned 60 and started doing that "not getting undies in a bundle" thing at work.

I'm now pretending that I'm retired, or that I'm a consultant, and that nothing anyone thinks about me matters. Because I finally figured out that it doesn't. If this were a workplace dark comedy, by not caring, I'd end up doing a better job. By ignoring others, they'd respect me more.

(My brother turned 60 and I texted "Welcome to the Not Caring What Anyone Thinks Of You decade!")
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Old 05-15-2019, 02:35 AM
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Somewhat, yes. But I think it's more a willingness to face the actual problems head on instead of just laying low and putting up with it.
To me another part is that my bullshitradar and shitradar have gotten better: I detect the problems faster. Stuff which would have blindsided me after months twenty years ago, now I see it before the end of the first week, day or even meeting.

I'm very grateful that I learned to say "not my circus, nor my monkeys", but even so I don't think I'll ever learn to not be irritated by willful stupidity. Haven't found any reasons why I should, other than "it's bad for my liver", but given that my liver profile is fine...
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Old 05-15-2019, 02:45 AM
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I'm also 55, but I'm the opposite. Now that I'm older, I recognize that the annoyances will pass, and I don't get all frustrated and upset by them. I just let them roll off my back and worry about the actual work that I need to get done.

What I consider annoyances are precisely the things that keep the work from being done in any kind of reasonable fashion. Having to fill up a bunch of forms every week, ok, I've had bosses who needed more forms and others who needed less but they all need some kind of reports; the formats changing every week, improductive and therefore irritating. Clients having different ideas about how to do the same task, normal; having several of my so-called main contacts be on the project 10% of the time (or even 5%), or them having bosses who couldn't be arsed to do the job but who also can't accept what the subordinate says, improductive and therefore irritating. A company which has broad-strokes policies and details which vary by site, fine; one where the policies handed down on stone tablets don't and can't work on the floor, and where every factory has come up with a different solution to what's actually a common problem, and where it is considered unacceptable to point out that this problem exists (when not only does it exist but it exists in each and every one of the factories): improductive, stupid and irritating.

Last edited by Nava; 05-15-2019 at 02:47 AM.
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Old 05-15-2019, 04:46 AM
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When I start getting really annoyed, that's my cue to take a mental health day.

I definitely see a lot of frustrated and irritated coworkers in their 50s. I guess there's only so many software upgrades, database overhauls, email client switch-overs, reorganizations, projects stuck in limbo, jerkish coworkers, and the never-ending cycle of training newbies only to watch them disappear forever before a person just says "fuck it".
I agree. Eventually the accumulation of micro-humiliations and degradations in corporate life reach someone's personal limit. Even at decent companies you still face these, along with whatever middle-school fad management has adopted in their never-ending quest to believe they're relevant. The latest trend seems to be open-office, which is the only thing actually worse than a cube. I guess we're pretending to be Agile now too, but I really don't care anymore. I'm still figuring out who Fagan was.

Here's the most recent FU from the corp. Apparently some pisswipe in a suit decided to change the leave rules at our company this year. I was off for a week for heart stents and got back to discover I had been denied paid leave because it wasn't a consecutive calendar week. And received a message that I was facing disciplinary action for being away from work without legitimate leave (I had entered the normal code for hospital leave, assuming nothing had changed). They told me I needed to do something about this immediately.

So I obliged them -- Yesterday I chose the date and formally requested my retirement separation package. I've been considering it for a while but that pushed me over the edge.

Instead of a mental health day, I'm taking a mental health life.
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Old 05-15-2019, 06:26 AM
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As some of you know, I launched a side business three years ago. It's doing fine, I'm having a blast working on it, but it doesn't yet bring me a salary nor does it yet need my full time attention. It is still my "retirement job" after I'm too old for a corporate career.
Quick take: if it isn't bringing in money, it's not a business; it's a hobby. Sorry, I don't mean to come across as snarky, but I've been confronted with that reality myself when it comes to my own side-hustles. That doesn't mean it can't eventually become profitable of course, and I assume that's the goal. But it's always important to remember the bottom line and make financial decisions based on that.

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But I'd love to hear from any other 50+ people: did you get (or are you becoming) too freaking crotchety to deal with a full time job? Is it just me?
Not quite 50, and I'm already there. But I need the money.
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Old 05-15-2019, 06:39 AM
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I think they think there's some shadowy smokefilled room where these things are decided
I don't necessarily think that there is a back room per se, but one thing I've noticed over the years is that there definitely is such a thing as an inner circle in every workplace. There's usually a clique or a group of people, which includes management and even management-wannabes looking for the next rung on the ladder, who informally discuss changes to the workplace, make decisions informally, and then present everyone else with what their brainchild has given birth to. Many of these in the clique are young and inexperienced but are tech savvy and think they know everything, and then they seem surprised when they get told that their brilliant ideas involving managing people might have flaws or might not work the way they anticipated. And then these young Napoleons or Queen Elizabeths get defensive and testy when people speak up.

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Personally, the biggest change I am finding as I am getting older is that I am a LOT less concerned with having everyone like me/making sure I never piss anyone off. I still want MOST people to like me, but it's more like as long as I have done what I consider my due diligence as a decent human, I don't worry too much about whether every single person in the room knows it.
This.

And also, don't bring work home with you.
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Old 05-15-2019, 08:00 AM
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Quick take: if it isn't bringing in money, it's not a business; it's a hobby. Sorry, I don't mean to come across as snarky, but I've been confronted with that reality myself when it comes to my own side-hustles. That doesn't mean it can't eventually become profitable of course, and I assume that's the goal. But it's always important to remember the bottom line and make financial decisions based on that.
No offense taken, and I've heard that before. I was very flippant (in order to be brief) when I described my shop, and I agree that it's currently at hobby levels. But it's in it's 4th year of existence, and after I rebranded/pivoted it last year it's picking up momentum. Now I've settled into a pattern where I spend my time on it 50% order fulfillment and 50% marketing tasks. I take it completely seriously and run it as a business, with a business plan that I update annually, budgets and forecasts and financial analysis, and definitely the goal to be profitable. One of the things that has been really annoying me is having to sit at my paid desk job for hours each day pretending to work because there's not enough to do, when I *could* be working on my shop. It's an odd irony that I'm being paid to be unproductive while my side business that I actually can be productive at isn't yet at the level to bring me a wage. But it will get there.

I'll post more in a bit. I need to run to a 4-hour meeting for my paid job now.
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Old 05-15-2019, 08:21 AM
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Are there agencies out there who provide - well, people like you, with your skill set - to companies on a contract basis? They may use you on a consultant basis without you having to be their employee, essentially acting as an booker for you. It's the easy way to transition into full or partial "true" freelancing.
I'm not sure, but I will definitely look for them. There are a million contracting and staffing agencies around, but I think the challenge these days is to figure out which are the body shops and which are legit agencies. I am also thinking of registering to work with several of the online ones like Upwork, Toptal, and Freelancer.com. I'm hearing bad things about all of them, but other freelancers have said that it's a good idea to not limit yourself to just one. I also expect that it will take some time to get work. There are many more people freelancing than there are projects/gigs (at least on Upwork), so even freelancing is highly competitive. I do have my many years of experience in my favor, though. Also, I know how to present myself as a professional instead of a bottom-dollar hack.
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Old 05-15-2019, 08:24 AM
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I need to run to a 4-hour meeting for my paid job now.
Ne'er were more tragic words penned...

I started drawing in meetings. So now I can tolerate the needlessly long ones, knowing that I'll get some solid doodling time in. If you prop your padfolio just right, no one can see what you're writing, and they'll assume you're attentively taking notes, especially if you occasionally look up and nod. (I've perfected the Raised Eyebrow Nod that says "Wow, you get what's going on. I'm going to write down your insightful comment so I can reread it once a day.")

And lately my side hustle is selling my drawings, so I can look around the conference room and feel superior, because I'm the only one for whom the meeting is profitable.
  #31  
Old 05-15-2019, 10:47 AM
bump is offline
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Originally Posted by Grrr! View Post
I'm the opposite. I used to get so worked up at the injustices is saw at work. It took me a while to realize that NONE OF THIS SHIT MATTERS!

The only thing that matters is the stuff that happens after I punch the clock.
I had a sort of epiphany about 3 years ago, after working for the same company for about 8.5 years at that point.

I realized that NOTHING I had done outside of about a 2 years prior horizon mattered at all, other than it had kept me employed that long. Nobody cared about it anymore, and hell, nobody even knew about it anymore. And I reflected on a couple of co-workers who'd left a few years prior- nobody knew or cared one bit about their contributions; a few of us remembered them as people, but that was as far as it went. And along with this, I realized that I have very little inclination to actually get promoted very far and run things. I've seen my brother-in-law's lifestyle (he's a IT VP for an insurance company, while I'm a senior staff/jr. management sort), and I wouldn't trade him for anything.

So I basically decided that none of it was worth the amount of stress and anguish that I was experiencing in trying to keep the wheels on around there. I found a new job in public service/government IT, and now I am much less stressed and worried about things. If it's important, it'll get done, and if it's not, it won't. Things have a way of sorting themselves out without me trying to force the square pegs into round holes.

About the only things that still make me clench my teeth are dumb-ass petty office politics and counterproductive policies (especially). For example, we're bound by law to follow some byzantine and convoluted purchasing processes - a lot of stuff has to go out for competitive bid (lowest bidder). This sounds good from a cost minimization perspective, but for a lot of IT stuff, it's not as simple as ordering a pallet of ballpoint pens, and the purchasing/bid process introduces a whole lot of ambiguity and confusion that private companies typically avoid. That kind of thing frustrates me, because it seems simple to solve, but nobody seems willing.

Last edited by bump; 05-15-2019 at 10:47 AM.
  #32  
Old 05-15-2019, 12:34 PM
JcWoman is offline
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Originally Posted by digs View Post
And lately my side hustle is selling my drawings, so I can look around the conference room and feel superior, because I'm the only one for whom the meeting is profitable.
You, sir, are a God. Well done!

I admit that I spend too much time in my head. But I'm an introverted analyst, so... yeah, it's hard to avoid the crazy. I think I do a fair job of hiding it from others, but I do make myself insane at times, and that's when I start venting online. Anyway, after many vents and people telling me that my primary problem is that I care too much, I've been working on that. I've gotten to a place where I don't care so things that used to enrage me, no longer do. But now I frequently wonder if I'm being so care-free that people are noticing that I don't give a shit and I'm one step from being terminated. Now I make myself crazy by wobbling madly between "this is stupid, it shouldn't be like this" and "not my circus not my monkeys, oh the director is glaring at me, am I acting too cavalier?"

  #33  
Old 05-15-2019, 04:12 PM
Rocketeer is offline
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Originally Posted by pullin View Post
...micro-humiliations and degradations in corporate life
Best description of late-career work life ever!
  #34  
Old 05-15-2019, 05:06 PM
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Bear in mind that if you are brought in by a client as a freelancer/consultant, it's very often to clear up a mess which is too unpleasant or too difficult for someone in-house to clear up. They're not going to bring you in because everything is just great. And if you present yourself as an expert, people are expecting to see an expert.

And the best thing about freelancing is you get to step out of the company politics that eventually drive everyone crazy. That'll go some way to sorting out the work annoyances which (of course) everyone gets more intolerant of as they get older.....
I don't know about that. My experience has been that freelancers and consultants are pretty easy to cut loose when they can't unfuck the mess the company made.

I'm kind of reminded of Tommy Lee Jone's quote from Under Siege: "I got tired of coming up with last-minute desperate solutions to impossible problems created by other fucking people."

Of course, Steven Segal had the perfect response:
"All of your ridiculous pitiful antics aren't gonna change a thing. You and me, we're puppets in the same sick game. We serve the same master, and he's a lunatic and he's ungrateful. But there's nothing we can do about it."
  #35  
Old 05-15-2019, 08:00 PM
Jackmannii is offline
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Tolerance for asinine behavior/comments by colleagues does tend to decrease as one gets older, particularly as one begins to see the retirement light at the end of the tunnel.

I find myself emulating comedian Franklin Ajaye, who got through on-the-job annoyances by appending silent comments to his verbal interactions with customers.

"Do you carry Pierre Cardin slacks?" "Yes, sir" (but they won't fit your fat ass).
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