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  #51  
Old 11-19-2019, 04:42 PM
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Heh, when we were playing Ticket to Ride Europa edition, everyone wanted to pronounce Chemnitz as "Chemnutz".
  #52  
Old 11-20-2019, 01:17 AM
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I've been through Yelverton, Ontario. It's my favourite hick place name.
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  #53  
Old 11-20-2019, 01:33 AM
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Fordyce, Ark.
Smackover, Ark.
Ogemaw, Ark.
Not sure if its a city, but they have a Fire station, Cooterneck, Ark.

Somehow there are 2 Evening Shade, Ark.

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 11-20-2019 at 01:35 AM.
  #54  
Old 11-20-2019, 03:23 AM
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St. Louis du Ha! Ha! in Quebec
Hear any good jokes there?

I've been to Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapikimaungahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu which is a hill in New Zealand. Longer name than that Welsh village.
  #55  
Old 11-20-2019, 04:12 AM
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Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch.

" [The] church of [St.] Mary (Llanfair) [of the] pool (pwll)[15] of the white hazels (gwyn gyll) near [lit. "over against"] (go ger) the rapid whirlpool (y chwyrn drobwll) [and] the church of [St.] Tysilio (Llantysilio) of the red cave (-ogo[f] goch)."
I have this theory that such place names are a defence strategy, the leader of the regional marauding horde wakes up, gathers the warriors and says "Right lads, today we are going to raid Llanfa... Llanfairp... ehmm, sod it, it's Springfield again"
  #56  
Old 11-20-2019, 04:24 AM
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In the eighties, I drove through the infamous Austrian hamlet Fucking. That was pre-internet, and I did not even bother to take a picture.
  #57  
Old 11-20-2019, 04:32 AM
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The twin villages of Cerezo de Arriba and Cerezo de Abajo: Upper Cherry Tree and Lower Cherry Tree. The upper/lower pair already sounds quaint, but when the name is "Cherry Tree"? Damn, it sounds as if they should be somewhere in the Shire!



I would like to thank people from agglutinative languages such as German, Welsh and Maori for making long Spanish names look better

Last edited by Nava; 11-20-2019 at 04:34 AM.
  #58  
Old 11-20-2019, 05:45 AM
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David Letterman used to love to cite Bad Axe, Michigan.
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Old 11-20-2019, 06:41 AM
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Germfask, MI -- named after the initials of 8 original settlers: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germfa...ip%2C_Michigan
I'm not sure if I've ever been there, but I find Cuba City, WI on interesting name

Brian
  #60  
Old 11-20-2019, 07:36 AM
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Hear any good jokes there?

I've been to Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapikimaungahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu which is a hill in New Zealand. Longer name than that Welsh village.
I've been to Lake Chargoggagoggmanchauggagoggchaubunagungamaugg in Massachusetts. It's not far from one place I used to work.

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The lake's name comes from Ln. Nipmuc, an Algonquian language, and is often said to mean, "Fishing Place at the Boundaries—Neutral Meeting Grounds". A more fitting translation is "lake divided by islands", according to anthropologist Ives Goddard.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Chaubunagungamaug
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Last edited by CalMeacham; 11-20-2019 at 07:37 AM.
  #61  
Old 11-20-2019, 07:43 AM
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Show Low, Arizona. Supposedly named after a poker game bet or hand.

Tombstone, Arizona
  #62  
Old 11-20-2019, 07:55 AM
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When my family and I went to Hawaii, I insisted that we stop for sign pictures in Aiea (the only city/town in North America with no consonants in the name) and in Ka'a'awa (the only city/town in North America with three of the same letter consecutive - at least in purely English letters, not sure how that apostrophe-thing counts).
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  #63  
Old 11-20-2019, 08:36 AM
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Texas has lots of oddly named towns, but the only ones I've been to(that I can remember) are Dime Box, Cut And Shoot, and Gun Barrel City.

I had friends who lived in Boring, MD.

A fishing trip took me to a seedy(heh) motel in Onancock, VA where I resisted the urge to find an ultra-violet light source. Onancock is just up the road from Little Hell, but I didn't visit there.
  #64  
Old 11-20-2019, 08:55 AM
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Well, Hilarity N. Suze won't allow Truth or Consequences so I'll mention Pie Town, New Mexico instead. I've driven through Muleshoe, Texas (Siam Sam is probably familiar with that one). I've visited Chloride, NM* a few times and if any other Dopers have been there I'll be shocked.

*A former mining town with a very interesting history and a nice little museum.
  #65  
Old 11-20-2019, 10:00 AM
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Forty-Fort, Pennsylvania, near Scranton. Named for the forty defenders of the fort in the Yankee-Pennamite wars of 1769-1784. This was a series of conflicts between the local Pennsylvanian population and newly arrived settlers from Connecticut. Bizarre.
  #66  
Old 11-20-2019, 10:02 AM
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Haven't been there but every time I pass signs for Scotrun, Pennsylvania, I misread it as
SPOILER:
Scrotum
, and pretty much everyone else does as well.
  #67  
Old 11-20-2019, 10:09 AM
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Germfask, MI -- named after the initials of 8 original settlers: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germfa...ip%2C_Michigan
Turns out there's a fair number of places whose names are initialisms of people's names: inevitable Wiki-list.

The earliest ones I could find are Le Mars, IA and Delmar, IA. Both were named in 1870 in the exact same way: a group of women on a train excursion to a new town were asked to name it, but couldn't agree on a name. So someone suggests they take their first initials and arranged them into a new name. I expect one was a copycat of the other, but don't know which was named first.
  #68  
Old 11-20-2019, 11:20 AM
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Well, Hilarity N. Suze won't allow Truth or Consequences
Truth or Consequences is near Elephant Butte, which it always amused us to pronounce "Elephant Butt." It's also near Socorro, whose name translates to "Help!".
  #69  
Old 11-20-2019, 12:07 PM
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Truth or Consequences is near Elephant Butte, which it always amused us to pronounce "Elephant Butt."
Yeah, we do that too.

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It's also near Socorro, whose name translates to "Help!".
I did not know that!
  #70  
Old 11-20-2019, 12:09 PM
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I've been to Titz, Germany.
There's also a town called Tit in Algeria, which is most famous for the Battle of Tit in 1902 between French colonial soldiers and local tribesmen. This caused no end of merriment for me and my juvenile friends.
  #71  
Old 11-20-2019, 12:24 PM
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Well, Hilarity N. Suze won't allow Truth or Consequences .
But I started this thread, and I'll allow it.

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Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
Truth or Consequences is near Elephant Butte, which it always amused us to pronounce "Elephant Butt."
Elephant Butte/Butt was part of All Things Considered's annual April Fools story about a decade ago. It was about a group of artists who made statues of the things towns are named after to donate to the towns. Except they misread the name of Elephant Butte and made them a statue of a giant elephant butt.
  #72  
Old 11-20-2019, 01:47 PM
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Supposedly there are quite a few plant specimens from Peru in the Missouri Botanical Gardens collection with the locality listed as "Curva Peligrosa" (Dangerous Curve). The collector, not speaking Spanish, assumed the road sign was the name of the of the closest town. (I'm not aware of any actual town named "Curva Peligrosa," but there should be.)
On a similar theme there is a place so small you could drive through it without thinking - but I think 'Dangerous Corner' deserves more respect - it was originally a traffic warning but eventually became the place name
https://www.google.com/maps/@53.9982...7i13312!8i6656
  #73  
Old 11-20-2019, 01:49 PM
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There's a few in New York City.

Spuyten Duyvil, "Spouting Devil," in the Bronx.

The Kill Van Kull and Fresh Kills in Staten Island, "kill" meaning creek in Dutch.

I've also been to Shinbone Alley in Manhattan, when it still officially had a street sign and you could still walk through it.
  #74  
Old 11-20-2019, 02:18 PM
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More like suburbs rather than towns, but I've been to The Village outside Annapolis MD and Barraterria outside St. Augustine FL.
Supposedly Severn means river in Welsh so the Severn River in Maryland means river river.

Last edited by furryman; 11-20-2019 at 02:21 PM.
  #75  
Old 11-20-2019, 02:32 PM
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Haven't been there but every time I pass signs for Scotrun, Pennsylvania, I misread it as
SPOILER:
Scrotum
, and pretty much everyone else does as well.
Guilty.
  #76  
Old 11-20-2019, 03:51 PM
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I've been in Rough and Ready, California.
I've also driven past Pasadena, Hollywood, and California, all small towns near to each other in Maryland.
I haven't been there, but there's a Ninety Six, South Carolina.
  #77  
Old 11-20-2019, 04:00 PM
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........Supposedly Severn means river in Welsh so the Severn River in Maryland means river river.
There's a whole huge wiki page of tautological place names like this.

j
  #78  
Old 11-20-2019, 04:20 PM
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I've been through Yelverton, Ontario. It's my favourite hick place name.
How about Hicksville, NY for a hick place name?

We live not far from Hicksville and when friends from the UK visited us and saw signs for it, they couldn't stop laughing.
  #79  
Old 11-20-2019, 04:24 PM
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Some early pioneers, OTOH, just weren't interested in creative names. Take the Hole-in-the-Ground volcanic crater in Central Oregon. It's located near Big Hole and Crack in the Ground.

Let's try to find a better pic of that hole. Hey, it's on Atlas Obscura.

(That whole area has all sorts of fun stuff to explore like lava tube caves, lava cast forests, lava pickup trucks, etc. )
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Old 11-20-2019, 06:02 PM
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Turns out there's a fair number of places whose names are initialisms of people's names: inevitable Wiki-list.

The earliest ones I could find are Le Mars, IA and Delmar, IA. Both were named in 1870 in the exact same way: a group of women on a train excursion to a new town were asked to name it, but couldn't agree on a name. So someone suggests they take their first initials and arranged them into a new name. I expect one was a copycat of the other, but don't know which was named first.
On further research, it turns out I had wrong info on the origin of Delmar IA. I must have gotten the two conflated. Anyway, Delmar was named by a train conductor based on the initial letters of six women passengers. He needed a name for a place starting with D and came up with it that way. Also, it was in 1871, a year after the naming of Le Mars, so he likely got the idea from that.
  #81  
Old 11-20-2019, 06:10 PM
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I've driven on Rough and Ready Highway in Grass Valley, but I haven't actually been in the town of Rough and Ready.
  #82  
Old 11-20-2019, 06:44 PM
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French Lick Resort
  #83  
Old 11-20-2019, 07:05 PM
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I've also driven past Pasadena, Hollywood, and California, all small towns near to each other in Maryland.
The town of Paris, Panama, is not named after the city in Texas , but after a local Indian chief.

Last edited by Colibri; 11-20-2019 at 07:05 PM.
  #84  
Old 11-20-2019, 07:13 PM
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I've driven on Rough and Ready Highway in Grass Valley, but I haven't actually been in the town of Rough and Ready.
Now I just went and looked at Rough and Ready on Google Maps, and it appears there's a little dead end street there named Slave Girl. At least that's how it's labeled on the map. On Street View I couldn't see any street sign with that name on it. So I'm not sure if that's the official name of the street or a case of Google Maps vandalism (if there is such a thing). But it would be interesting if we had a case of an odd name within a place with an odd name.
  #85  
Old 11-20-2019, 07:42 PM
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I've also driven past Pasadena, Hollywood, and California, all small towns near to each other in Maryland.
There's a Pasadena in Newfoundland of all places (and it was, in fact, named after the one in California) and a California in England. Haven't been to either one, though.
  #86  
Old 11-20-2019, 08:45 PM
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I've been to Truth or Consequences, New Mexico!

I've also been to Sunspot, NM- which may not be such a strange name when you consider the National Solar Observatory facility located there. Well worth a visit.

My sister and brother-in-law live just outside Persia, Iowa.
  #87  
Old 11-20-2019, 09:33 PM
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I took a road trip to Oregon and went the long way up CA 1. It was taking too long so I found a route to I-5. Along the way I came to an intersection with a CA highway sign that only said “Remote” with an arrow pointing right. I wanted to check it out but I was already running late. I still regret passing it by.
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Old 11-20-2019, 09:43 PM
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I once hopped a bus from Cuba to La Florida, both town names in the Risaralda department of Colombia.

I could give directions from my former home in Cayman to Hell that included taking the first right turn after the intersection of Off the Beaten Path Road.
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Old 11-20-2019, 11:50 PM
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I've been to Te Urewera, New Zealand, which is Maori for "The Burnt Penis." One tale says it's from a chief who rolled into a fire while sleeping and burned his naughty bits. Others say the member was burned in vengeance.

I've also been to Shag Point, which is named after a kind of cormorant, rather than Austin Powers' favorite activity.
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Old 11-21-2019, 01:18 AM
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According to the map I had at the time, I must have driven through Dirty Sock, CA as I approached Yosemite from the south, though I don't remember noticing any sort of town or settlement. There's still a place called Dirty Sock Spring, CA, but that's quite some distance away from where Dirty Sock is, or was.
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  #91  
Old 11-21-2019, 03:13 AM
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There's a Pasadena in Newfoundland of all places (and it was, in fact, named after the one in California) and a California in England. Haven't been to either one, though.
And Ontario, California takes its name from the Canadian province:

Quote:
It [that is, Ontario, California] takes its name from the Ontario Model Colony development established in 1882 by the Canadian engineer George Chaffey and his brothers William Chaffey and Charles Chaffey. They named the settlement after their home province of Ontario.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontario,_California
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Old 11-21-2019, 01:05 PM
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I've been to Storm King Mountain, New York, and Mount Aspiring, New Zealand, both of which sound like they're something out of Tolkein. Breakneck Ridge is across the Hudson from Storm King. I've also camped on the Hen and Chicken Islands in New Zealand.
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Old 11-21-2019, 03:07 PM
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I once hopped a bus from Cuba to La Florida, both town names in the Risaralda department of Colombia.

I could give directions from my former home in Cayman to Hell that included taking the first right turn after the intersection of Off the Beaten Path Road.
I've seen Lois Lane, Margo Lane, Dunwich Rd. and Green Acres Rd.
  #94  
Old 11-21-2019, 03:40 PM
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I'm an avid reader of Regency novels, many of which are set in small rural towns rather than London. I thought the authors were making the names up. Then I got an atlas of England* and started looking up some of the weirder names (plus looking for other funny names)

When I got to Giggleswick, I gave up. Apparently in England you don't have to make up names, there's bound to be one out there to give just the right feel for your story.

* Note this happened long before such information could easily be looked up on the Internet.
Been to Giggleswick


Also been to Pennsylvania, Catbrain, and London Apprentice. All of which are in England and tiny.
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Old 11-21-2019, 03:59 PM
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I've been to Pennsylvania too! Almost went to the Shell station but was too exhausted to make the 100 feet off the Cotswold Way even if it meant the possibility of indulging in alcohol before hitting Bath.
  #96  
Old 11-22-2019, 01:29 AM
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S
Boring, OR and Drain, OR.
Make up your mind.
Is it "Boring", or is it "and Drain", or something else?
  #97  
Old 11-22-2019, 09:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Piper
Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch.

" [The] church of [St.] Mary (Llanfair) [of the] pool (pwll)[15] of the white hazels (gwyn gyll) near [lit. "over against"] (go ger) the rapid whirlpool (y chwyrn drobwll) [and] the church of [St.] Tysilio (Llantysilio) of the red cave (-ogo[f] goch)."
This might be not countable - the town changed their name in the Victorian era in order to set the record at the time for longest place name, and thus attract tourism.
It's unclear. The story that the name was changed is based on one person's memoirs, but he refuses to name the person who made the name change, making it sound like a bit of a story.

There's also an earlier parish return that has a longer form of the name, not quite the same as the current version, but of similar length.

It may be that there were different forms of the name floating about, some longer, some shorter, before it got set in the mid-19th century.

From wikipedia:

Quote:
The true originator and date of the longer version of the name is less certain, however: an ecclesiastical directory published several years before the claimed renaming gives what it calls the "full" parish name in the slightly differing form of Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerbwlltysiliogogo ("St Mary's church of the pool of the white hazels over against the pool of St Tysilio Gogo [Tysilio of the cave]"),[17] while exactly the same form appears in an paper on placenames published in 1849, its author noting that "the name was generally abridged" by locals.[8] While the addition regarding the Swellies is supposed only to have been made in the 1860s, early 19th century guidebooks had already suggested a derivation of the element pwllgwyngyll from pwll, gwyn and gwyll ("gloomy raging pool"), in reference to the Swellies.[24]
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  #98  
Old 11-22-2019, 09:36 AM
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When my family and I went to Hawaii, I insisted that we stop for sign pictures in Aiea (the only city/town in North America with no consonants in the name) and in Ka'a'awa (the only city/town in North America with three of the same letter consecutive - at least in purely English letters, not sure how that apostrophe-thing counts).
I'll agree that these are city/town names in the United States, but not in North America.
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Old 11-22-2019, 10:05 AM
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More like suburbs rather than towns, but I've been to The Village outside Annapolis MD and Barraterria outside St. Augustine FL.
There is also The Villages in Florida, which I have driven past on the way to Walt Disney World.
  #100  
Old 11-22-2019, 10:07 AM
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I used to have family in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, whom I visited. And stayed with some friends in England in the town of Biggleswade (which, IMHO, is the best name for an English town; does anything sound more 'English' than Biggleswade)?
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