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Old 11-25-2019, 04:18 AM
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the BURN turkey BURN ! mmp


so in honor of thanksiving this weeks topic is :

whats the worst thing youve eaten on thanksgiving? or the worst thanksgiving youve had? or hell the worst thing or meal youve made your self .....

share and discuss.......

Last edited by nightshadea; 11-25-2019 at 04:19 AM.
  #2  
Old 11-25-2019, 06:13 AM
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First!


The bottom element in the oven died; didn't know this until I went to cut it. The top of the turkey looked wonderfully brown, the thermometer said the breast was at the proper temp; the bottom parts were still raw.

Last edited by Spiderman; 11-25-2019 at 06:15 AM.
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Old 11-25-2019, 07:17 AM
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Good Mornin' Y'all! Up and caffeinatin'. *YAWN* 'Tis 38 Amurrkin out and clear (as opposed to murky?) with a predicted high of 64 and mostly N.O.S. for the day. Today I shall spiff da cave. I shall do a bit more deep cleanin' as we do have company comin' for Turkey Day pig out. That will pretty much take care of my day. Sup shall be boxed lasagna (don't judge!), sallit, and cheesey garlic bread. Tomorrow I shall begin prep for the big feast.

This is not a Turkey Day disaster, but it did involve a turkey. The first house I owned has a gas stove with an electronic pilot lighter. Thus, it was plugged into an outlet behind the stove. Unbeknownst to me, a friend (well, he was until he did this) had unplugged the stove from the outlet. So, I turn on the oven and notice it was not quite heatin' up. Couldn't figure it out but knew the temp was no where near what it should be and I had a fifteen pound turkey all ready to get cooked. I did not know what to do! I called an appliance repair place and fortunately someone could come out and take a look at the stove. He comes in, pulls the stove out and, lo and behold, 'tis unplugged. I knew I hadn't done that so was somewhat confuzzled. Anywho, turkey got baked up and other foods prepared. Company came to eat, includin' friend who had done the deed. He said he had unplugged the stove because since it's gas, didn't need to be plugged in. Needless to say, I got slightly (read largely) poed. Others there berated him, as well as me, for bein' so stoopit and in general for bein' a butt who would do such a thing in someone else's home. He got thrown out and became ex-friend.

I lived with someone for a few years who always burned bread. It got to the point he was not allowed to make bread because it was a small house and the whole place smelled like burnt bread for days when it happened. I was glad, not for that but for many other things I shall not go into, when I got rid of him.

Now I need more caffeine and to feed rumbly tummy. Then, onward into the day. Rah.

Happy Moanday Y'all!
  #4  
Old 11-25-2019, 07:40 AM
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Twenty-ish years ago when FCD was working at the wire mill in VA, they had a crew from Sweden there to commission some new equipment, and we invited them over for T-day dinner. I decided to set it up buffet-style and I also decided (NEVER DO THIS!!!) to try out a new recipe that day. Well, turkey dries out really fast in a buffet tray, and the side dish was awful! Other parts were OK, and the Swedes were exceedingly polite about it all. At least the punkin pies were good - I do make a good punkin pie.

When my mom was a new bride, she did the classic didn't-remove-the-packet-from-the-cavity-before-cooking. Her mother wasn't big on teaching in the kitchen - she wanted everyone OUT while she worked, so Mom is pretty much a self-taught cook. She done pretty good, since she spent a number of years as a self-employed caterer.

My turkey is starting to feel softer, so it should be good to smoke on Firday. It'll be consumed next month. Along with the deviled eggs, I'm taking a sweet N.O.T. casserole - the one with pecans on top, NOT marshmallows. Other than that, Mom didn't need anything.

Today has 3 chores - deposit a check for FCD's biz, take inlaws' laptop to see if it can be repaired, and take care of the leaves in the front and back yards. The computer place is right by the credit union, and it opens at 10, so those two will be the first chores. I'll do the leaves when it warms a bit - it's still sub-freezing here.

Roxy spent the night with her other grandmother, so it's very quiet here. For now.

Happy Moanday!
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Old 11-25-2019, 08:45 AM
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Make sure your bladders are empty...

The Daughter was dating a young man whose family was Vegetarian. We were included in an invitation by the young man's uncle and his wife for T-Day festivities.

The entire goup consisted of me, Mr VOW, our two kids, Boyfriend and his family.

I had never met Aunt and Uncle before this.

I make a great Vegetarian T-Day dish: stuffed pumpkin! Regular stuffing, but include diced dried fruits. Pumpkin (preferably a white one!) Is hollowed out, inside flesh is rubbed with just a dusting of cinnamon, cloves, etc. Stuff pumpkin, bake until knife can be easily inserted in pumpkin flesh.

Foolproof, right?

Well, THIS T-Day, I wanted to make a LOW-CARB stuffing. I went to a local health food store and bought several types of low-carb bread, focusing on ATKINS stuff.

I did everything like I usually do, and everything smelled SO GOOOOOD!

Off to a stranger's house for the feast...

Everybody ooh-ed and aaah-ed over the pumpkin. Blessings were said, and we all dive in.

Oh, gear Gawd...

Atkins and other low carb breads, when used as stuffing, turn into those erasers we had in grade school. You remember them: Pink Pearl.


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Old 11-25-2019, 09:24 AM
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Morning all. As for the actual eats for dinner, it was probably when I was in Abu Dhabi, Thanksgiving was just another work day there, so wold have had sammiches and probably ate out in the evening.

For worst day, that was easy, it was several days before T-day and I was anticipating heading home and meeting my brand-new niece, who had been born the previous week, when I get a call from my brother (he had moved to St. Louis for a new job, his wife had given birth in Columbus, OH where then had lived before). Before I could say anything, he said "Don't say anything, I am at the airport, my baby has a hole in her heart." I spent the day arranging quarters for his Basset Hound and locking up his place and then driving to Columbus. We ate somewhere in Columbus that Turkey day, have no idea what or where.

The story has a happy ending. After two heart operations, my niece is finishing her Doctorate and is quite healthy and happy.

So...46F heading for 60, N.O.S. today but rain predicted for tomorrow. Need to look for a long-handled brush for cleaning the bathtub, its' at such an angle that I need to climb in it to get the farther areas, so something where I can stand and clean is indicated. Maybe a little furniture look-see is also indicated.

All y'all have a good Moanday.

Last edited by The Stainless Steel Rat; 11-25-2019 at 09:25 AM.
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Old 11-25-2019, 09:52 AM
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Oh, lort, the green beans!

A few years ago, hubby and the girls and I got roped into Thanksgiving at Mr. Matata's Dad's and stepmom's. It was a nice idea, but...

Cynthia, may she rest in peace, was a very nice lady, but not a cook. And common sense wasn't her strength. FIL did most of the cooking that day, and I brought some contribution, but Cynthia wanted to add something special to the table. She had recently come across the recipe for green bean casserole, (the bog standard one printed on every can of soup since the sixties,) and was reminded of her own mother, who apparently made it every year. Cynthia didn't get out much...

That would have been fine, except that, bless her heart, Cynthia wanted to to make it Extra Special. So she looks to the spice cabinet for inspiration. She's telling us about her exotic culinary journey as we are serving our plates, and she was so proud of herself.

Cinnamon, y'all. Cinnamon!

So there we all sit, trying to dip around the edges, push food around plates, sneak green beans into napkins, etc. Meanwhile, Cynthia - who barely ate, and hadn't sampled her creation - is anxiously, repeatedly, asking our opinions. I turned into Roget's thesaurus that Thursday. "Remarkable," "extraordinary," "bold," and so forth. Later, FIL discreetly scraped the scraps into a pan for the dog. The beagle wouldn't touch it. The BEAGLE!

(When I read the topic for the MMP, I laughed. Husband asked what was funny. I told him. He immediately said "oh God, the green beans!")

Back to the present: Cool, dry, and NOS here in SE Georgia. The 9yo had to be dropped off for a field trip this morning. Littlest Miss was feeling puny yesterday, and I thought she'd stay home today. But after a good long sleep, she jumped out of bed at 5:30, chattering like a magpie, so off to school with her.

Had Sunday dinner with the folks yesterday, and was assigned what to bring for holiday meals (Thanksgiving two, plus Christmas at my brother's house.) Naturally, I forgot to write it down, so all I remember is a spiral ham and pecan pie for Thursday, and iced tea for Sunday. And a to-go plate for the college girl Thursday (she's working retail, and scheduled all day at the grocery store plus the department store,) and go plates for both college students Sunday (The Boy works at the student dining hall.)

And I just found out that my stepbrother and his wife will be in for a couple of days. It's a big surprise, and our dad doesn't know. He'll be over the moon! Gotta check with bro, though, and see if he wants to join us for football on Saturday. I hope so. It would be really fun!

Last edited by Lacunae Matata; 11-25-2019 at 09:55 AM.
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Old 11-25-2019, 10:08 AM
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I bought a brined turkey from Trader Joe's on Thursday. It's 14 pounds, which is entirely too big, but it's the smallest they had. There's a can of cranberry sauce in the cupboard, and there are potatoes in another cupboard. I still have to buy stuffing, green beans, and cream of mushroom soup.
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Old 11-25-2019, 10:26 AM
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The worst turkey was at a neighbor's house a few years ago. She basically stewed it, and it was awful.

The worst gravy was my own first attempt when I was about 21 years old. In fact, it was the first time I ever attempted a turkey dinner, trying to impress my then girlfriend and some others. I called my mother and asked her how to make gravy. She said "Just use an equal amount of flour and fat and then add water", etc. She said nothing about cooking the fat/flour before adding liquid, nor did she happen to mention that using ALL of the fat would create a trough of gravy.

I followed her instructions, mixing all of the fat in the pan with what was likely a cup or more of flour. Then I dumped in about a quart of water, which was sucked up immediately. Another quart had similar effect. In the end, I had one of those large roaster pans about half full of what can only be described as a pale, semi-liquid spackle, and tasted about like one would imagine spackle to taste.

People gamely ladled it onto their food and went into the living room to eat, leaving the ladle sitting in the pan of gravy. I went back into the kitchen some time later and went to pull the ladle out, but the "gravy" had hardened and I lifted the entire pan up. Someone took a photo of me holding the ladle handle with the gravy pan hanging from the end of it.
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Old 11-25-2019, 10:29 AM
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I cooked a turkey one time with the bag of innards still in it. Yuck.

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Old 11-25-2019, 10:41 AM
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Happy Moonday!

It's a N.O.S. 45 degrees outside, supposed to get up to 55 today.
It was a bit chilly but not so bad at the park this morning.
The water is still turned on.

I have a lot to do this week. In addition to making the turkey and a few sides, I have to get everything out and ready for the ex-bf of niece2 to do some irk around here. I should probably buy stuff like roofing paper and roofing nails before Firday. I thought we could do that on Firday, but I imagine even Home Depot and Lowes are going to be horrible that day. I'll do that Hump Day while the pups are at daycare.
I may also buy paint. The bathroom walls are peeling, I guess whoever painted them used the wrong kind of paint. I may scrape and sand them and my niece's ex can paint for me. I'm not sure how much he can get done in one day, and what all I want to get done that day. I need a new front gate too, the one I have is falling apart. And I need some pavers for him to put in where the trash can lives.
I need to make a list.

Then I'll be cooking again on Sunday.

I can't think of any cooking disasters on Thanksgiving. The one year I made dinner, the turkey drippings spilled over into the oven and caught on fire. My ex-husband came running with the fire extinguisher, but several of us were able to block him before he could ruin the turkey.
There was another year, but that ... well, it didn't involve cooking.
  #12  
Old 11-25-2019, 11:10 AM
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Oh, gravy... The year my mother brined the bird, she used those dripping to make the gravy. OMG, nothing has ever been so salty in the history of salt! It was inedible! That was the year I decided I'd never ever EVER brine a turkey. ick.

Back from erranding. The computer fixers were locked up, so the laptop came home with me. But I took care of the banking, and I made a stop at Food Lion and McKay's. I'm about to go out and fire up the leaf blower - good times!
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Old 11-25-2019, 11:41 AM
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Chefguy (sorry, I don't remember your MMP nickname. Chefdude? Cookie? Grumpy Guy with Weird Hat?) the gravy story reminds me of my youthful efforts at expanding my culinary horizons.

Picture it: I'm a 20-year-old newlywed, from Middle of Nowhere Georgia. (Nearest landmark: Okefenokee Swamp.) I grew up in the kitchens of some estimable southern cooks, but I had visions of Samantha and Durwood hosting the Tates for regular dinners, and assumed that I was expected to put on the hog for fancy meals for husband's boss on the regular. So I set out to teach myself. But gravy? That's basically half of one's genetic inheritance and bloodstream if you grow up with grannies from rural Georgia.

Now, my grandmother was a seriously amazing cook. And she owned one cookbook: The Joy of Cooking. So I figured I'd start with that. Invested in a copy. (It was about $30 in 1989. A substantial investment!)

And I had taken just enough French language/culture classes in school to understand that sauces are supposed to be the ne plus ultra of classic cuisine. So I flipped to that chapter and started reading.

Alfredo: "well, that's just cream gravy with garlic and cheese!"
Bechamel: "Who the hell wants nutmeg in the gravy?!"
Etc.

I don't know if there's a term for the opposite of culture shock (probably a 27-letter German word.) But I got a lot more comfortable playing around in the kitchen once I learned that most of the mother sauces are just gravy!
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Old 11-25-2019, 12:17 PM
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Just finished blowing the leaves off the deck and porch and out of a couple of flower beds. I'm having a bowl of veggie soup, and after, I'll fire up the mulcher/vac - it shouldn't take much more than an hour.

Supper will be a ham/N.O.T./onion casserole with green beans on the side. So, the rest of my day is planned.

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Old 11-25-2019, 12:19 PM
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Howdy Y'all! Takin' a break from cave defilthyfyin'. Actually I am almost done. All that's left is to mop da cave which is relatively easy with my wunnerful steam mop. Then I shall chill until time to start sup which will be easy to get done. YAY!

Peaches I agree. Not a whole lot of difference between sauces and gravy. I figured out a long time ago they were no big mysteries. Some folks, however, are eternally confuzzled with both of 'em.
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Old 11-25-2019, 12:28 PM
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Quote:
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Peaches I agree. Not a whole lot of difference between sauces and gravy. I figured out a long time ago they were no big mysteries. Some folks, however, are eternally confuzzled with both of 'em.
You were obviously raised by southern ladies who made gravy twice a day and wore hats to church.

Did your granny sweep her yard?
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Old 11-25-2019, 12:41 PM
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What's so hard about gravy? You open a can, dump it in a glass measuring cup, and nuke it for a minute. Big fat hairy deal!





<pause while swampy runs to his fainting couch>
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Old 11-25-2019, 12:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lacunae Matata View Post
Chefguy (sorry, I don't remember your MMP nickname. Chefdude? Cookie? Grumpy Guy with Weird Hat?) the gravy story reminds me of my youthful efforts at expanding my culinary horizons.

Picture it: I'm a 20-year-old newlywed, from Middle of Nowhere Georgia. (Nearest landmark: Okefenokee Swamp.) I grew up in the kitchens of some estimable southern cooks, but I had visions of Samantha and Durwood hosting the Tates for regular dinners, and assumed that I was expected to put on the hog for fancy meals for husband's boss on the regular. So I set out to teach myself. But gravy? That's basically half of one's genetic inheritance and bloodstream if you grow up with grannies from rural Georgia.

Now, my grandmother was a seriously amazing cook. And she owned one cookbook: The Joy of Cooking. So I figured I'd start with that. Invested in a copy. (It was about $30 in 1989. A substantial investment!)

And I had taken just enough French language/culture classes in school to understand that sauces are supposed to be the ne plus ultra of classic cuisine. So I flipped to that chapter and started reading.

Alfredo: "well, that's just cream gravy with garlic and cheese!"
Bechamel: "Who the hell wants nutmeg in the gravy?!"
Etc.

I don't know if there's a term for the opposite of culture shock (probably a 27-letter German word.) But I got a lot more comfortable playing around in the kitchen once I learned that most of the mother sauces are just gravy!
I think I was dubbed "Cookie". I can't remember my neighbors' names, let alone those in this thread.

My other near-disaster T-day meal was when I cooked a traditional dinner for a Spanish family when I was stationed in Rota. It all was going just fine until I turned the oven on and put the bird in and then went for a walk with the lady I was interested in. We got about three blocks away when her sister came tearing after us and yelling excitedly. My Spanish wasn't up to her speed, but I did hear "pavo" and "fuego" (turkey and burn). Ran back to her place to find smoke filling the house. Turns out, she never used the oven and didn't realize that it only had two settings that worked: off and holy shit! I ended up cooking the bird by alternately turning the oven on, letting it heat to not smoking, turning it off, repeat for several hours. Yeah, it was dry.
  #19  
Old 11-25-2019, 12:59 PM
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Thank your for that!

I don't have a gravy boat. I can put the gravy in a measuring cup. Not classy, but it'll irk.


I got my new flatware already. I like the new stuff.
Now I have 10 forks, 10 knives, 10 spoons, 4 salad forks, and 16 teaspoons.
The new stuff matches the 12 extra teaspoons I bought a long time ago.
Still waiting for the new plates, then everything can go into the sidhwasher.
  #20  
Old 11-25-2019, 01:01 PM
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OK, since this happened a few weeks ago it's not really Thanksgiving, but it involved pumpkin pies so....

The recipe called for a can of pumpkin, can of evaporated milk, etc. Mix up the filling, pour it in into the prepared crust, and then look at the recipe to see if it should be a 9" crust or 10" crust; it didn't say. Of course I was using a 9" crust, which got filled to the very brim.

Carefully, oh so carefully, carried it to the oven, open the door with one hand while balancing the nearly-overflowing pie with the other, and gracefully bumped the pie against the oven door. About a third of it spilled onto the back of the 400-degree hot door and down the front of the oven below the door. It was too hot to wipe up immediately; I had to let the oven cool down enough to get the pumpkin goo wiped up off the door. Since this was the first of two overfilled pies, I poured a third of the second pie's filling into an unlined baking dish, heated up the oven again, and then cooked the two (less-full) pies and the pumpkin mixture. (They all tasted fine.)

Next time: put the crust-lined pie tin in the oven on a foil-lined tray, then pour the mixture into the crust, so I don't have to carry it and spill it.
  #21  
Old 11-25-2019, 01:08 PM
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My MIL's pumpkin pie recipe, doubled, fills 2 deep-dish crusts or 3 regular crusts. I prefer the deep dish, and I place both on a cookie sheet, just in case they overflow. Last time, they were great. We'll see how it goes next time.

We'll not go into how many times I've spilled stuff going into or coming out of a hot oven.
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Old 11-25-2019, 01:22 PM
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Up, caffeinated, and sheveled. I suppose the "worst" Thanksgiving was when I was first on my own, and 1st payday was the day before TDay.. I ended up having La Choy Chicken Chow Mein for dinner.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lacunae Matata View Post
The beagle wouldn't touch it. The BEAGLE!

Beagles eat rocks and Naugahyde.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FairyChatMom View Post
What's so hard about gravy? You open a can, dump it in a glass measuring cup, and nuke it for a minute. Big fat hairy deal!





<pause while swampy runs to his fainting couch>
: borrows peals, clutches them :
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Last edited by dogbutler; 11-25-2019 at 01:24 PM. Reason: [Jedi Mind Trick]These are not the typos you are looking for.[/Jedi Mind Trick]
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Old 11-25-2019, 01:44 PM
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Beagles eat rocks and Naugahyde.
We had a beagle when I was a little kid. His name was Hush Puppy, because my mom vetoed Daddy's suggestion of "Shut up, you (fill in the four letter words.)" Hush Puppy ate the screen fabric off the door. Twice. Not "chewed it out of the spline." Ate it.

Anything that a beagle refuses to eat is truly inedible, nu?

Last edited by Lacunae Matata; 11-25-2019 at 01:45 PM.
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Old 11-25-2019, 01:49 PM
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I don't know if there's a term for the opposite of culture shock (probably a 27-letter German word.) But I got a lot more comfortable playing around in the kitchen once I learned that most of the mother sauces are just gravy!
"Allesknowsdasistgerstupider."

I hate people who list more than one answer to a question, but Mama Plant ties herself.

Discovering that I baked acorn squash with butter and brown sugar, she prepared it with margarine and artificial sweetener.

Her Mother made oyster dressing that I liked when I was a kid. Believing that a lot is better than a little, she put approximately three pounds of oysters in the dressing. We had to take it home, and the cat would not eat it.
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Last edited by carnivorousplant; 11-25-2019 at 01:51 PM. Reason: to add verisimiloitude to an otherwise bland and uninteresting narrative.
  #25  
Old 11-25-2019, 02:35 PM
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Flytrap, your post reminded me of a cake fiasco my sister created eons ago. This was back when the recipe for putting pudding in a box cake mix showed up in a magazine. My mom tried it, we all loved it, and it's been my go-to ever since.

My sister (jr-high age at the time) wanted to make a cake, so she followed that recipe... AND the recipe on the box. So there were 6 or 7 eggs, a cup of milk, a cup of water, a cup of oil...

No cake that night.
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Old 11-25-2019, 02:38 PM
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I spent about 20 years pretending to be madly enthusiastic about receiving "my favorite candy" for Christmas every year from my grandmother. She asked. I told her Almond Roca. She heard "Ferraro Roche."

Twas okay.

Still better than the aunt who thinks that my food allergy is just something I've imagined, because "no one is really allergic to peppercorns." Old people are weird.
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Old 11-25-2019, 02:39 PM
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Define "old" (she says as she rounds up the retirees in the MMP...)




  #28  
Old 11-25-2019, 02:39 PM
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I wasn't there, but the way I heard it was...

The men went out hunting and brought home a wild turkey for Thanksgiving Dinner.

The bird was in the oven and something didn't smell right.
It got to smelling so bad that people had to leave the house.
Turns out, whoever had shot the bird had shot it through the bowel, spreading the contents throughout the meat.
You'd think somebody would have noticed when cleaning the bird?

New plates got here, all safe and none broken.
Everything is in the dishwasher, clothes are in the dryer.

Puppy food got delivered too. Probably the last bag I'll buy as it is recommended that you put shar pei puppies on adult food between 4 and 5 months. It'll be a good thing, as Ripple steals the puppy food and he is getting a bit pudgy.

I still have lots to do.
  #29  
Old 11-25-2019, 02:46 PM
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Love all the cooking stories everybody told and it makes me rather happy I never learned to cook much beyond the basics...probably would have burned my house down several times over by now...

Managed to find two bathroom brushes with long (extendable) handles at Target, will try them out later today. Also looked at more furniture, it's amazing how prices vary from place to place. Nice outside but I'm probably a homebody for the rest of the day.
  #30  
Old 11-25-2019, 02:58 PM
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No truly horrible Thanksgiving meals for me - of the fall / winter holidays it's still my favorite.

As a child I remember really enjoying Maryland Beaten Biscuits much to my elder's amusement.

Taking most of this week and all of next week off and truly looking forward to it.

For the first time in 16 years I overslept and missed the beginning of my shift. Truly my own fault as I had made the schedule (admittedly a month ago) and forgot I scheduled myself to cover a morning shift (4a - 12p_) instead of my usual 10a - 6p shift.

Oops.

Woke up to 10 missed calls on my cell phone, though it's nice that the only thing I heard was concern for my health not catching shit for missing it. That and it was a really quite morning so we really didn't miss anything other than a 2 alarm fire in Annapolis (fortunately no injuries).

Did I mention I'm ready for some time off?
  #31  
Old 11-25-2019, 03:00 PM
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I woke up today with a massive headache. The weather is changing (rain, finally!) and I apparently double as a barometer. I wanted to get somethings picked up outside before the rain, but I'm not sure that will happen.


Johnny - that brined turkey from TJs sounds like the way to go. I'll try to get one of those.


Mooomm - your ham casserole sounds yummy. Can you share the recipe?
  #32  
Old 11-25-2019, 03:30 PM
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From the Better Homes & Gardens cookbook of 1981 - my copy is falling apart and this is one recipe that'll stay open:

2 C cubed, fully cooked ham
2# potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced (I don't always peel them)
1/4 C chopped onion (I prefer to slice a large onion 'cause I like onions)
1/3 C all-purpose flour
2 C milk
3 T fine breadcrumbs (I don't use these)
1 T melted butter or margarine
2T finely snipped parsley (I don't bother with this either)

Sometimes I'll add a cup of frozen peas.

Grease a baking dish. Layer half the ham, potatoes, onions, (& peas) then the rest of the ham, potatoes, onions (& peas) - I actually use 1/3 of the potatoes per layer so I end with potatoes on top.)

Another change I make - I put the flour and milk in a shaker with some salt and pepper, shake it up really well, then pour it over the layered stuff. Bake, covered, at 350 for 60-75 minutes, till the potatoes are "nearly tender" according to the recipe.

At that point, if you want to, you combine the crumbs with the butter, sprinkle them over the casserole, sprinkle the parsely, then bake another 15 minutes.

Since I don't bother with the crumbs, I just bake till the potatoes are done. I may top it with cheese.

And now, I'm off to the kitchen to build this.
  #33  
Old 11-25-2019, 03:40 PM
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Originally Posted by nightshadea View Post
so in honor of thanksiving this weeks topic is :

whats the worst thing youve eaten on thanksgiving? or the worst thanksgiving youve had? or hell the worst thing or meal youve made your self .....

share and discuss.......
The last one is easy; groundhog. My Great-Aunt Bardi could make groundhog that tasted like something that you would pay $100 a plate for in some fancy joint downtown. I can't make it taste like anything other than old dirt and moss. It's edible ------ just terribly so. I follow her recipe, I've tried other recipes - nothing comes out right. Except the grease --- you could lube a fleet of beer trucks with the grease.

I haven't had a really bad Thanksgiving; ever. Some really great and mostly real good but even the worse was a pretty good day. I've always been lucky in avoiding the complete-disasters-in-the-making by finding ways not to be there.


Now if we remove the turkey from Thanksgiving; the church we were at last night is where I won the infamous Birdzilla ----- 46 pounds dressed of farm raised turkey. We kept it frozen until into the summer when the history events began and with some friends partly pre-cooked it in a real oven before going over the campfire with it -- for 12 straight hours. It was a demonstration and the meal for several Units. And while it wasn't bad some parts were MUCH better than others. How our ancestors dealt with wild game of a size found back then I don't know. But by the time it was all said and done ------ I really wanted a cheeseburger.
  #34  
Old 11-25-2019, 03:48 PM
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Did your granny sweep her yard?
No but mine (hand to God) used to sweep the dirt floor in the shed. God love her, the older I get the more I miss Rosa. I wish I could be more her style of strange.

And cook! That woman could take things damn near garbage (I don't doubt a time or two it was garbage) and produce feasts! Growing up poor had its advantages and she mastered each and every one.


  #35  
Old 11-25-2019, 03:50 PM
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Not Thanksgiving, but as a dumb twenty-year-old, I decided to make a pumpkin pie from scratch. How dumb, you ask? Dumb enough that I wasn't sure what part of the pumpkin went into the pie. I thought maybe the flesh was part of the rind so ended up removing the seeds from the guts and using that. The pie contained mildly pumpkin-flavored custard with weird orange strings running through it.
  #36  
Old 11-25-2019, 04:28 PM
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I tried roasting a pumpkin once - damned thing NEVER got tender, and I tossed it. Never again.

Meanwhile, my casserole is in the oven. We'll eat in an hour or so. I's hongreeeee!!

Roxy is home and sleeping. Apparently her other grandmother won't put her down to nap in a quiet room, so she never naps over there. Poor kid is whipped!
  #37  
Old 11-25-2019, 05:13 PM
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I tried roasting a pumpkin once - damned thing NEVER got tender, and I tossed it. Never again.

Meanwhile, my casserole is in the oven. We'll eat in an hour or so. I's hongreeeee!!

Roxy is home and sleeping. Apparently her other grandmother won't put her down to nap in a quiet room, so she never naps over there. Poor kid is whipped!
There are sweet pumpkins made for roasting (which is most of them), and those that are Halloween decorations. It's like the difference between sweet corn and silage.
  #38  
Old 11-25-2019, 05:14 PM
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No but mine (hand to God) used to sweep the dirt floor in the shed. God love her, the older I get the more I miss Rosa. I wish I could be more her style of strange.

And cook! That woman could take things damn near garbage (I don't doubt a time or two it was garbage) and produce feasts! Growing up poor had its advantages and she mastered each and every one.


My sister in law tried to argue last week that "I know poor rural south, and my granny used a brush broom to sweep the yard!" I shut up (for once.)

Granny Sue (my SIL's mother) came to Mama's for Sunday lunch yesterday. She spotted the straw broom in the corner. "Oh, that's what we used to sweep the house with, and we made gallberry brooms to sweep the yard!" SIL had enough Grace to hush.

Bless her, my sister in law has Lazarus Long Syndrome. She's the bride at every wedding and the corpse at every funeral. She has never been mistaken.

We good. She's my brother's third wife. I've learned how interact.
  #39  
Old 11-25-2019, 05:27 PM
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(my raising was pretty solid middle class through about 1977, when my father was diagnosed with a cancer that was rare then, and 95% survivable now. How cool is that?!)

Bless her, my SIL likes to imagine that she's the only survivor of a generation who picked tobacco and sugar cane. My brother is a patient man.
  #40  
Old 11-25-2019, 06:11 PM
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My father liked smoked turkey, so it fell on Mom to do all the work associated with smoking a turkey, including getting up at an ungodly hour to put the turkey in the smoker. She smoked the turkey (and a couple of other things, IIRC), through my high school years.

One year, she had a dream that she woke up in the middle of the night with a fire burning outside. The next morning she woke up and went to check on the smoker... which had caught on fire in the middle of the night, and the turkey was lost. Not a dream, and she never smoked a turkey again.


My biggest mistake - many years my family has done Spanish Spare-ribs and Rice (family recipe) for turkey day or Christmas, with turkey & fixings on the other day. After my divorce, I started being the bringer of the spanish rice, but it had been a while since I had made it.

First or second year, I was short a small amount on the rice. But I had brown rice as well, so I topped off the measuring cup with that. Bad idea. The brown rice never cooked, and I stirred it so much, the white rice turned into effectively a risotto. Next year I cooked it at Mom's so she could show me where I was going wrong, and I've gotten it right ever since.
  #41  
Old 11-25-2019, 06:19 PM
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Howdy Y'all! I finished spiffin' da cave, chilled, and made sup which has been et. I shall sleep well tonight. Also, I went to pick up a prescription I had forgotten about. Good thing Walgreen's knows I'm not right in the haid, so they texted me to remind me.

Peaches my grandmother lived in town when I was born so she didn't sweep her yahd. However, my mother talked about sweepin' the yahd of the farm where she grew up. So, I reckon my grandmother did as well back then. And, yes, she wore hat and gloves to church. Also to go shoppin'. She would not dare be seen in public without hat, gloves, earrings, makeup and her pearls. QUELLE HORREUR!

Last edited by swampbear; 11-25-2019 at 06:20 PM.
  #42  
Old 11-25-2019, 06:22 PM
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Hi, guys.
Worst T-day disaster. Mr.Wrekker went goose hunting. Got home with a nice goose. The guys he hunted with told him how to pluck it and gut it for cooking. I was told to put it in a large roaster pan with a lid. To season it as duck. I did as told. It smelled good. I had cooked it long enough (Joy of cooking recommendations). Pulled it out. Opened the roaster, there was a small bird swimming in approximately 2 gallons of goose grease. We fished it out. It tasted like over cooked shoe tongue. Never again. I don't like messing with wild duck either. It's never as good as it should be.
====*
In other news I have had a shooting lesson on a bigger gun in case I run into the bear again. That was just so much fun.
====*
Mid-daughter and family will get in tomorrow evening. The lil'wrekker is home. Well she's in the county. She went to see some of her girlfriends this evening. Her boyfriend will show up Wednesday. She lobbying for a shopping trip with dear ol' Mom. Ugh!
(Mo---ther! I have nothing, NOTHING to wear)
Heard that before. I told her if she'll go through her closet here at home and subtract a substantial amount to donate, we'll talk.
We'll see how that goes.
I think I'm ready for the cooking to start.
I bought 2 poinsettias for the mantle. I had a serious talk with my Cats about not eating them. I've got my eyes peeled and a squirt bottle full.
Have a happy evening all.

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 11-25-2019 at 06:23 PM.
  #43  
Old 11-25-2019, 06:35 PM
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There are sweet pumpkins made for roasting (which is most of them), and those that are Halloween decorations. It's like the difference between sweet corn and silage.
I bought what was advertised as a pumpkin for pie. It was small and hard as a rock. Maybe it was a plot by Libby's...?

Supper was good. Dishes are done, and I just finished making a cuke-onion salad. Time to assume the position till beddy-bye time.
  #44  
Old 11-25-2019, 06:52 PM
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One year, she had a dream that she woke up in the middle of the night with a fire burning outside. The next morning she woke up and went to check on the smoker... which had caught on fire in the middle of the night, and the turkey was lost. Not a dream, and she never smoked a turkey again.
One year, a long, long time ago (back in the day when the supermarkets were all closed on holidays; that long ago.); it wasn't us but...a recipe was found for low & slow cooking of the turkey, kinda like smoking one, except in the oven. Turkey was put in the night before, & somehow the self-clean function was engaged. Now any decent self-cleaning oven has a lockout function preventing one from opening the oven until it has cooled sufficiently as to not cause burns when the oven is opened. When the oven was finally able to be opened it was discovered that the turkey had been, aah, cremated & since there were no stores open to get a replacement, the main course was...tuna fish.
  #45  
Old 11-25-2019, 06:59 PM
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We good. She's my brother's third wife. I've learned how interact.
My brothers has had but one ------- I've more learned to ignore.

Something in me -- maybe the time of year -- but I find myself missing some of my "dearly departed" more than normal. I get like that now and again but this round just seems a little stronger than most.
  #46  
Old 11-25-2019, 07:18 PM
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I have a large group of Sibs. All fully related (no halves or steps). Don't let's get me started on their various mates.
My oldest brothers first wife (he just divorced #3) was a joyful, helpful & happy person. I still email with her. I tell him every time he gripes about wives and gfs, he shoulda kept #1. When she waxes sentimental about him, I tell her she's better off without him.

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 11-25-2019 at 07:20 PM.
  #47  
Old 11-25-2019, 07:30 PM
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WTG on the raise butters!

Yay on the doggy feeling better and going to your son's nellie. Give the pupper a skritch from one of your imaginary friends on the intertoobs.

metal mouse, I was going to suggest https://www.officesupply.com/cleanin...cefa7f0445e2fa this one from Tarjay (it's what I use), but it looks like you have things covered.

ruble, you don't want ground hog once it's much past adulthood. That and making sure that you get the musk glands out right will go a long way to make one palatable. I have had good luck par boiling them before roasting.

To answer the OP, I was assigned to bring fudge to one Turkey day feast. Only the fudge never set. I picked up some ice cream and nuked the fudge after the meal to salvage it.

Not me, but my parents. Back when Baby Sis and her hubby were granolaheads, they invited the folks to the northwest suburbs of Chicago for Thanksgiving dinner. It consisted of a tofurkey, a stuffed pumpkin, brussels sprouts, beets and the piece de resistance: an egg-dairy-wheat free pumpkin pie. The folks stopped at the truckstop in Plymouth IN on the way home for some real food.

Irk is over until a week from tomorrow. Tonight, I pack up stuff to load in the car in the morning to drive up to Dad's. I'll have limited access to the intertoobs, so's y'all have a good Thanksgiving if I don't post before!

Last edited by missred; 11-25-2019 at 07:33 PM.
  #48  
Old 11-25-2019, 07:34 PM
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My brothers has had but one ------- I've more learned to ignore.

Something in me -- maybe the time of year -- but I find myself missing some of my "dearly departed" more than normal. I get like that now and again but this round just seems a little stronger than most.
This is really the most wonderful time of the year, in my estimation. But I miss my father and sister and granddads and grandma and granny so much right now. I miss them so much.

Especially my sister. She and I were supposed to conquer the whole world.
  #49  
Old 11-25-2019, 08:38 PM
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My brothers has had but one ------- I've more learned to ignore.

Something in me -- maybe the time of year -- but I find myself missing some of my "dearly departed" more than normal. I get like that now and again but this round just seems a little stronger than most.
This is really the most wonderful time of the year, in my estimation. But I miss my father and sister and granddads and grandma and granny so much right now. I miss them so much.

Especially my sister. She and I were supposed to conquer the whole world.
  #50  
Old 11-25-2019, 09:42 PM
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Hi, guys.
Worst T-day disaster. Mr.Wrekker went goose hunting. Got home with a nice goose. The guys he hunted with told him how to pluck it and gut it for cooking. I was told to put it in a large roaster pan with a lid. To season it as duck. I did as told. It smelled good. I had cooked it long enough (Joy of cooking recommendations). Pulled it out. Opened the roaster, there was a small bird swimming in approximately 2 gallons of goose grease. We fished it out. It tasted like over cooked shoe tongue. Never again. I don't like messing with wild duck either. It's never as good as it should be.
====*
In other news I have had a shooting lesson on a bigger gun in case I run into the bear again. That was just so much fun.
====*
Mid-daughter and family will get in tomorrow evening. The lil'wrekker is home. Well she's in the county. She went to see some of her girlfriends this evening. Her boyfriend will show up Wednesday. She lobbying for a shopping trip with dear ol' Mom. Ugh!
(Mo---ther! I have nothing, NOTHING to wear)
Heard that before. I told her if she'll go through her closet here at home and subtract a substantial amount to donate, we'll talk.
We'll see how that goes.
I think I'm ready for the cooking to start.
I bought 2 poinsettias for the mantle. I had a serious talk with my Cats about not eating them. I've got my eyes peeled and a squirt bottle full.
Have a happy evening all.
According to stories I heard from both my mother and my grandmother, a goose is simply a bag of fat with a bill and webbed feet.

Rural folk used goose grease for damned near everything--except food. You need a liniment, a salve, a lubricant, hell, you could probably mix it with pigment and make halfway decent oil paint.

And as my grandmother said, it was slicker than snot.


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