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  #351  
Old 05-06-2010, 01:18 PM
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I'd never heard of Death before (no surprise there), but even those primitive recordings show some really great musicianship, and a sound that was ahead of their time.

And, you're right, WordMan, it does sound like Jimi singing punk.

Another great article.
  #352  
Old 05-06-2010, 01:34 PM
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I'd never heard of Death before (no surprise there), but even those primitive recordings show some really great musicianship, and a sound that was ahead of their time.

And, you're right, WordMan, it does sound like Jimi singing punk.

Another great article.
Trust me, kenobi - NO ONE had heard of Death before this stuff was recently released . It is just fascinating that bands like this go undiscovered for reasons that have little to do with their musicianship - it's a right time, right place thing. Luck is weird.

And thanks for the kind words.
  #353  
Old 05-06-2010, 02:25 PM
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Oh, and here's a thread about the Nashville Flood and losing some guitars and other gear...
  #354  
Old 05-06-2010, 05:22 PM
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I don't know if anyone has mentioned it yet, but "It might get loud" is now available on Netflix "Watch instantly" streaming. I'm gonna go watch it this evening.
  #355  
Old 05-06-2010, 08:27 PM
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I slacked off from practicing for about six weeks. I've been working my way through some beginner's books and the stuff at the end of book 1 just wasn't very interesting to me. But I felt like I should master one thing before I moved on to the next (and I didn't want to be swapping the play-along CDs back and forth while I was on the cusp of both books).

The other day I moved on to book 2 anyway. Great stuff, new chords and good songs; not super easy, but doesn't feel like I really have to grind through them, either. I may try recording one and you can all tell me how I'm doing.

I just hit the first lessons on second position. Man, that's gonna give me fits until I figure it out.
  #356  
Old 05-07-2010, 06:48 AM
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I just hit the first lessons on second position. Man, that's gonna give me fits until I figure it out.
Please forgive my complete lack of theory-tude, but what is second position?
  #357  
Old 05-07-2010, 10:20 AM
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First finger at the second fret.
  #358  
Old 05-07-2010, 11:18 AM
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First finger at the second fret.
I knew that.

  #359  
Old 05-07-2010, 02:02 PM
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Like I said, beginner books.

And some people can learn an instrument by instinct and feel. I've heard of people who can hear a song one time, and then sit down and play it flawlessly on a piano (or probably on a guitar, too). I am somewhat in awe of those people, because I am the exact opposite. The only way I can learn to play is to be absolutely methodical about it. Learn the strings, learn the notes, learn the staff, etc. I can hear when I'm playing and get a note wrong, but I don't think I could piece something together completely by ear.

The point is, I'm sure there are people who wouldn't know "second position" from second base, and could still blow my mind by just playing.
  #360  
Old 05-07-2010, 02:14 PM
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Like I said, beginner books.

And some people can learn an instrument by instinct and feel. I've heard of people who can hear a song one time, and then sit down and play it flawlessly on a piano (or probably on a guitar, too). I am somewhat in awe of those people, because I am the exact opposite. The only way I can learn to play is to be absolutely methodical about it. Learn the strings, learn the notes, learn the staff, etc. I can hear when I'm playing and get a note wrong, but I don't think I could piece something together completely by ear.

The point is, I'm sure there are people who wouldn't know "second position" from second base, and could still blow my mind by just playing.
I don't know that I could "blow your mind" - nor am I a guitaristic savant who can hear something once and play it. But I am not schooled in theory and wouldn't know a position unless it was introduced to me by an aggressive sorority girl back in my college days (a guy can dream).

Different genres of playing have different languages for discussing them - there is the famous Nashville Number system - fluency is a required ticket for many session players, but your average musician well-schooled in theory wouldn't know it from Adam. For me, I am, for want of a better term, a "street smart rock/blues musician" so I can get into a jam/woodshed situation with a bunch of peers and be the floor general to get them through a song - and yet, as stated, I don't know theory for squat. The language I use is an amalgam of chords, theory ideas (stated incorrectly, I am sure), and improvised phrases that somehow get the point across quickly and efficiently.

Talking about music is, as the saying goes, like dancing about architecture...

Last edited by WordMan; 05-07-2010 at 02:15 PM.
  #361  
Old 05-07-2010, 02:46 PM
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...and yet, as stated, I don't know theory for squat.
I don't feel like I know much theory, either. I know that the spacing of the notes within an octave is a mathematical compromise to approach some idealized intervals, and I kinda know why, and that there are other ways of doing it; but that's about as theoretical as I get.

What I do know is that the second space up from the bottom of the staff is A (second fret on the G string). For about the last six months I've been playing that with my second finger. It's gonna take a little while to break that habit, and I'm not sure yet how I'll get my brain to shift positions when my hand does.

When I first started learning from this book, there was one thing that kinda caught me off guard. I used to play viola, and the intervals between the strings were such that the open notes were all on the spaces within the staff. It seemed weird at first that the guitar didn't follow that pattern, but it's almost second nature already.
  #362  
Old 05-07-2010, 02:53 PM
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I don't feel like I know much theory, either. I know that the spacing of the notes within an octave is a mathematical compromise to approach some idealized intervals, and I kinda know why, and that there are other ways of doing it; but that's about as theoretical as I get.

What I do know is that the second space up from the bottom of the staff is A (second fret on the G string). For about the last six months I've been playing that with my second finger. It's gonna take a little while to break that habit, and I'm not sure yet how I'll get my brain to shift positions when my hand does.

When I first started learning from this book, there was one thing that kinda caught me off guard. I used to play viola, and the intervals between the strings were such that the open notes were all on the spaces within the staff. It seemed weird at first that the guitar didn't follow that pattern, but it's almost second nature already.

Makes sense. I definitely base my learning and language on the layout of the guitar. The fact that, as was discussed in a thread a few months ago, many rock and blues tunes are in E and A to take advantage of open strings and other position-specific qualities (e.g., pull-offs and hammer-ons, drone strings, etc.) is the vocabulary I depend on, most guitarist are comfortable with and most other rock players pick up along the way because they have to deal with theory-impaired guitarists like me so much!

Last edited by WordMan; 05-07-2010 at 02:57 PM.
  #363  
Old 05-07-2010, 03:07 PM
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Trust me, kenobi - NO ONE had heard of Death before this stuff was recently released . It is just fascinating that bands like this go undiscovered for reasons that have little to do with their musicianship - it's a right time, right place thing. Luck is weird.

And thanks for the kind words.
Good little article, WordMan.

The Detroit Death band is good. Reminds me a lot of Radio Birdman.

I would advise anyone who likes this music to snap up a copy of the album NOW, before Chuck Schuldiner's estate sics a lawyer on the record label with a cease & desist order.

See, when most people want to listen to Death, they are expecting to hear stuff more like this.
  #364  
Old 05-07-2010, 03:12 PM
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Good little article, WordMan.
"Good little article" - I don't know if I should feel like I just got patted on the head or enjoy that fact that one of our resident punk/metal experts didn't find any glaring errors or issues with it! Since I totally respect your opinion in such matters, I will go with the latter.
  #365  
Old 05-07-2010, 03:18 PM
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"Good little article" - I don't know if I should feel like I just got patted on the head or enjoy that fact that one of our resident punk/metal experts didn't find any glaring errors or issues with it! Since I totally respect your opinion in such matters, I will go with the latter.
No no, that was praise! The article is just fairly short, and you had to split it pretty evenly to cover both punk rock and Death.
  #366  
Old 05-07-2010, 03:20 PM
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...many rock and blues tunes are in E and A to take advantage of open strings...
Really? Open strings are frowned on for the violin and viola because you can't play a vibrato. The only problem is that to play it with a finger you drop down one string and use the fourth finger. That's a bit of a reach with the weakest finger, though. I was never very good at it on the viola, but I can hit the F# on the D string pretty consistently by now.
  #367  
Old 05-07-2010, 03:21 PM
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No no, that was praise! The article is just fairly short, and you had to split it pretty evenly to cover both punk rock and Death.
We're good - I was just being feisty.
  #368  
Old 05-07-2010, 03:26 PM
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Really? Open strings are frowned on for the violin and viola because you can't play a vibrato. The only problem is that to play it with a finger you drop down one string and use the fourth finger. That's a bit of a reach with the weakest finger, though. I was never very good at it on the viola, but I can hit the F# on the D string pretty consistently by now.
Violin is a lead / melodic instrument, almost purely so. Guitar shares strings with a violin, but is obviously a chording instrument - and was so for the main part of its history until amplification re-set the balance between chord and lead work.

With chording instruments, yeah, it is all about open strings - you want the sustain and resonance that open strings bring as you deposit a layer of sound into the foundational rhythm of the song you're playing so you single-note melodic types have a context to be heard within...

...I swear, we rhythm types have to do all the work...<grumble, grumble...>
  #369  
Old 05-07-2010, 03:33 PM
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...I swear, we rhythm types have to do all the work...<grumble, grumble...>
Dude, don't even pick on the viola players, here. One more waltz, or Pachelbel's fucking Canon, and I've taken the C string off my viola and garroted somebody with it.
  #370  
Old 05-07-2010, 11:14 PM
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Violin is a lead / melodic instrument, almost purely so. Guitar shares strings with a violin, but is obviously a chording instrument - and was so for the main part of its history until amplification re-set the balance between chord and lead work.

With chording instruments, yeah, it is all about open strings - you want the sustain and resonance that open strings bring as you deposit a layer of sound into the foundational rhythm of the song you're playing so you single-note melodic types have a context to be heard within...

...I swear, we rhythm types have to do all the work...<grumble, grumble...>
It doesn't get a sweeter then this...Apocolypitca

or

Hip Hop Strings

Last edited by Perciful; 05-07-2010 at 11:16 PM.
  #371  
Old 05-09-2010, 01:13 PM
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Just thought I'd chime in to say I've been really concentrating on two areas of my playing lately - alternate picking and modal playing.

Alternate picking is very frustrating. I've been playing for more than 30 years and this one piece of my technique is average at best. I've been playing with a metronome and trying to get my speed up, but all my drills are stuck at 103 bpm's. I don't think I can get any faster than that. But I'll keep trying...

Being mostly a blues influenced player, I never really used the modes much. (Dorian, Mixolydian, etc.) But now that I'm using these scale patterns in my alternate picking exercises, I'm starting to understand them better and learning how to incorporate them into my style. They really open up a lot of tonal possibilities and make for much more interesting lead lines...
  #372  
Old 05-09-2010, 10:46 PM
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I'm at a point where I'm trying to memorize the frets and notes and notes on frets. I sort of dig chords, but I'm not _understanding_ them. I want to be able to look at a note and play the fret without thinking. More practice!
  #373  
Old 05-10-2010, 06:14 AM
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I am not getting enough playing time to push things forward, but I am keeping my edge reasonably sharp. We have a dance gig at the local club this weekend which should be fun - worked up a new lead for Brand New Cadillac. Our unplugged line-up was auctioned off for a couple of house gigs (a couple invites a few friends over and we perform in their house) so we got over $6,000 for the local Art Center. Pretty cool.

BigShooter - I envy your ability to work through theory; I just can't do it.
  #374  
Old 05-10-2010, 11:30 AM
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My learning has slowed waaaay down because of work. I didn't touch it all last week - I've been home long enought to eat, sleep, shower, shave, and leave again for seven days straight. Then, last night, after paying bills, I picked it up for a few minutes just before going to bed. I played through the open chords I've learned so far, A, D, E, G and I picked through a few first position scales and a couple of melody drills. It seemed to take about 20 lbs of frustration off of my shoulders.

I don't care if I ever learn to play a complete tune on the darn thing. It's worth its purchase price if I can pick it up an change my attitude from time to time.
  #375  
Old 05-10-2010, 02:31 PM
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BigShooter - I envy your ability to work through theory; I just can't do it.
Don't really think of it as "theory". It's more like just learning some new scale patterns and knowing when best to use them. For example, the Dorian scale seems to fit best over the minor 2nd (ii) or major 4th (IV) chords of a key. So if, I'm in the key of A minor, I can switch from the pentatonic or blues scale to the Dorian if the chord progression goes to a B minor chord or a D chord...

I also learned that the Dorian and Mixolydian modes are actually the same patterns - just moved up a fourth. So A Dorian is the same as D Mixolydian. Plus, Mixolydian tends to sound best over the perfect 5th (V) chord. Cool...

"Theory" would be more about WHY what I wrote above works. Of that I have no clue...

Last edited by BigShooter; 05-10-2010 at 02:35 PM.
  #376  
Old 05-10-2010, 02:35 PM
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Don't really think of it as "theory". It's more like just learning some new scale patterns and knowing when best to use them. For example, the Dorian scale seems to fit best over the minor 2nd (ii) or major 4th (IV) chords of a key. So if, I'm in the key of A minor, I can switch from the pentatonic or blues scale to the Dorian if the chord progression goes to a B minor chord or a D chord...
You already lost me . To me, I anchor on the Blues Pent, but have some basic mental notes about what other "Accidental" notes I can toss in depending on where I am over the chords being played. Folks tell me I am throwing in a modal approach or adding a flatted X or a diminished Y, but I just think of it as that cool, slinky note or riff that I know I can tuck into that one spot during a solo...

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  #377  
Old 05-10-2010, 02:45 PM
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Yeah, that's basically it I think. Just two different approaches. I wish we lived near each other - a jam session would definitely be in order.
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Old 05-10-2010, 03:03 PM
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Yeah, that's basically it I think. Just two different approaches. I wish we lived near each other - a jam session would definitely be in order.
Absolutely - true with a lot of us Dopers...
  #379  
Old 05-10-2010, 07:56 PM
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Different genres of playing have different languages for discussing them - there is the famous Nashville Number system - fluency is a required ticket for many session players, but your average musician well-schooled in theory wouldn't know it from Adam.
Interesting. I learned about that from a jazz playing friend years (and years) ago. It never occurred to me that there was a name for it. But yes it does make transcribing easier.
  #380  
Old 05-10-2010, 09:28 PM
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The new issue of teemings is up, featuring a new column by me on the proto-punk band Death - link here.

I hope you get a chance to read it and I would appreciate your thoughts.

WordMan
Hey, I just got around to this. Nice article! I'm not sure I'd describe it as "Hendrix singing punk", but definitely a very unexpected sound for 1974. The drums have a really nice dialog with the guitar & bass going, really powerful. The vocals are angry, especially in "Rock n' Roll Victim", spitting out the lyrics in a "screw you" way -- pretty punk.

Re the recording - definitely crude. I hear multitracking (hand claps, two guitars, etc) in those recordings, so it wasn't like it was just a mic in a room where the band played. Was it really just the three brothers? Were there other members?

Anyway, cool coverage on a band nobody ever heard of that was really ahead of their time. Thanks!
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Old 05-11-2010, 06:20 AM
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Hey, I just got around to this. Nice article! I'm not sure I'd describe it as "Hendrix singing punk", but definitely a very unexpected sound for 1974. The drums have a really nice dialog with the guitar & bass going, really powerful. The vocals are angry, especially in "Rock n' Roll Victim", spitting out the lyrics in a "screw you" way -- pretty punk.

Re the recording - definitely crude. I hear multitracking (hand claps, two guitars, etc) in those recordings, so it wasn't like it was just a mic in a room where the band played. Was it really just the three brothers? Were there other members?

Anyway, cool coverage on a band nobody ever heard of that was really ahead of their time. Thanks!
Thank you sir. I haven't read about any track breakdowns of the demo, but I assume they have guitars on at least 2 - 3 tracks in most songs. I assumed it was just David multi-tracking...pretty common even back then...
  #382  
Old 05-11-2010, 07:02 AM
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Folks tell me I am throwing in a modal approach
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Which means I play a wrong note now and then
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You already lost me
Modes are really very simple, but the starting point to understanding them is the major scale which doesn't get much action in rock or blues* You can see the basis of modes using pentatonics if you compare the major and major pentatonic, they're exactly the same notes, A minor = C major - which one you are currently using depends on the context (what the bass player is doing ).




* the Mixolydian** does but do we really want to go there


** The Dorian crops up a bit, IIRC No Quarter and Any Colour You Like (off Dark Side...) are both D Dorian.
  #383  
Old 05-11-2010, 07:18 AM
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Modes are really very simple, but the starting point to understanding them is the major scale which doesn't get much action in rock or blues* You can see the basis of modes using pentatonics if you compare the major and major pentatonic, they're exactly the same notes, A minor = C major - which one you are currently using depends on the context (what the bass player is doing ).

* the Mixolydian** does but do we really want to go there

** The Dorian crops up a bit, IIRC No Quarter and Any Colour You Like (off Dark Side...) are both D Dorian.
Small Clanger, you have such an engineer's mindset. You break down the problem into its component parts, process it and understand the whole better.

I have come to realize over the years that I play guitar for one reason: the flow. Getting into that zone where time slows down, the groove feels easy and I am fully in the moment. Coming at music from a theory standpoint, for me, is not conducive to flow. I wish I could explain it better - I learn by getting into the flow and then trying new stuff - new notes/phrasing, a different chord, a different rhythmic approach - within that context. If it doesn't make sense to me that way, I can't pull it into my playing. I try out the Theory columns in the guitar magazines and while I "get" them - I can't integrate them into my playing until I fit them into the flow...
  #384  
Old 05-11-2010, 11:09 AM
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A thread on guitar picks
http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=562764

A thread on how many strings in your bass
http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=562728
  #385  
Old 05-11-2010, 06:32 PM
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I may try recording one and you can all tell me how I'm doing.
I've suffered my art, now it's your turn.

Me.

Be gentle.
  #386  
Old 05-12-2010, 08:42 AM
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I've suffered my art, now it's your turn.

Me.

Be gentle.
Cool! Clean and accurate and in the groove - well done. You're playing a Strat, right? Sounded very Stratty.

Last edited by WordMan; 05-12-2010 at 08:42 AM.
  #387  
Old 05-12-2010, 12:38 PM
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Cool! Clean and accurate and in the groove - well done.
Thanks. I feel like I could get it a little cleaner if was willing to record a few more takes.
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You're playing a Strat, right? Sounded very Stratty.
I'm surprised you can tell. That little effects box I use sounds okay when I'm practicing, but now that I've had a chance to hear it in isolation, the jazz setting (for the lead track) sounds a little sterile. The accoustic setting on the rhythm track still sounds okay, but probably doesn't hold a candle to the real thing. I don't know if I'd want to perform with either of them, but I can tell when I'm getting the technique right, which is all I need for the moment. And it's cheaper than two guitars.
  #388  
Old 05-12-2010, 06:54 PM
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Since we're posting samples of our playing - - and I just happened to have these two videos lying around that I recorded for my nieces:

Catfish Blues:

http://www.vimeo.com/11697752


Little Wing (SRV version):

http://www.vimeo.com/11697810


There's a couple of clams here and there, but it's the blues man...
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Old 05-13-2010, 09:58 AM
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Hey - that sounds great! Nice groove you get goin' there. Hard to keep the flow when you move between rhythm and lead. Like your homebrew with the copper pickguard, too. You are going with a very clean tone - I have my Rat on, like, full time. I always promise myself I am going to explore the clean channel more, but I never end up doing it
  #390  
Old 05-13-2010, 10:36 AM
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Hey - that sounds great! Nice groove you get goin' there. Hard to keep the flow when you move between rhythm and lead. Like your homebrew with the copper pickguard, too. You are going with a very clean tone - I have my Rat on, like, full time. I always promise myself I am going to explore the clean channel more, but I never end up doing it
Thanks. "Keeping the flow" is something I learned early in my teen years.

There was this little segment of a Stephen King movie called Maximum Overdrive where the soundtrack had Angus Young just chunking away in A and throwing these tasty licks over the top of it - totally in the zone. I thought it sounded beyond cool, so I sat in front of the TV with my guitar and rewound the tape about two million times and learned it by ear. That was my initiation to "flow"...

What do you know - I found it on youtube. Around the 7:28 mark:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTWpR...eature=related

By the way, I'm not always clean. In that second video, you can see my Marshall behind me in the closet.
  #391  
Old 05-13-2010, 04:48 PM
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I just spotted this pedal and had to share with everyone. Why didn't Boss come out with this years ago?
  #392  
Old 05-13-2010, 10:03 PM
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I just spotted this pedal and had to share with everyone. Why didn't Boss come out with this years ago?
Ha! That's pretty funny. I'd use that pedal, but I'm far too modest.
  #393  
Old 05-14-2010, 06:45 AM
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I just spotted this pedal and had to share with everyone. Why didn't Boss come out with this years ago?
That is freakin' hilarious - already shared it with a bunch of guitar friends...
  #394  
Old 05-14-2010, 10:14 AM
LawMonkey is offline
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So I can actually see the day when I can play Pink Floyd's "Wish You Were Here" sometime in the not too distant future! Just working on getting the lead together. And I'm making progress on "Eruption," heh. It's just a trick, but it's fun anyhow.

Anyway, mostly I popped in here for a couple of pick related questions. First: what's the basic thinking on picks? What I mean is that while there's definitely a level on which it's just a matter of personal preference, looking at the guitar pick thread it seemed as if "everybody knew" that certain styles/materials/thicknesses of pick were associated with jazz or country or rock or a certain tone or whatever. Me, I like a medium thickness pick, but it's just because I like how it feels sure and concrete against the strings vs. the thinner picks I started with.

Second, and less important: In addition to the familiar fretting calluses, I've also got a callus on my picking thumb. Is that just from holding a pick, or do I just have a coincidental completely un-guitar-related callus going on?
  #395  
Old 05-14-2010, 10:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LawMonkey View Post
Second, and less important: In addition to the familiar fretting calluses, I've also got a callus on my picking thumb. Is that just from holding a pick, or do I just have a coincidental completely un-guitar-related callus going on?
Obligatory Kindergarten Cop reference:
"Maybe it's a tumor!"
"It's naht a tumah!"

That does sound rather odd; I'm not sure how you'd build up a callus by holding a pick, unless you were somehow generating a lot of friction there.
  #396  
Old 05-14-2010, 10:40 AM
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Typically folks start with Fender Mediums - or Thins if they are very strum-oriented - and then, a few years in, go through a big Pick Quest(tm) where they try the ones made from petrified mammoth tusk and Illodium Q-36 and the like...and they typically end up with a basic shape - often either Fender or Dunlop - that is easy to buy in bulk and gets them what they need. I wouldn't overthink it.

As for calluses on your picking hand - well, I have one on the side of my index finger, the part that holds the pick along with the pad of my thumb...
  #397  
Old 05-14-2010, 02:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LawMonkey View Post
Second, and less important: In addition to the familiar fretting calluses, I've also got a callus on my picking thumb. Is that just from holding a pick, or do I just have a coincidental completely un-guitar-related callus going on?
Sounds like you're probably brushing the strings with your thumb when you choke up on the pick. If I'm doing heavily strummed barre chord work, the side of my thumb tends to brush inaudibly against the strings just a bit on upstrokes, maybe you're doing the same sort of thing. This is neither good nor bad technique, just something to be aware of.

Last edited by squeegee; 05-14-2010 at 02:35 PM.
  #398  
Old 05-14-2010, 02:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WordMan View Post
Typically folks start with Fender Mediums - or Thins if they are very strum-oriented - and then, a few years in, go through a big Pick Quest(tm) where they try the ones made from petrified mammoth tusk and Illodium Q-36 and the like...and they typically end up with a basic shape - often either Fender or Dunlop - that is easy to buy in bulk and gets them what they need. I wouldn't overthink it.
Don't get me wrong--I'm not devoting much thought to it. I'm perfectly happy with my Dunlop Tortex yellow or blue, or the Fender medium that I lost somewhere in the basement the other day. But some of the talk in the pick thread made it sound as if certain styles or thicknesses of pick were naturally associated with certain styles of music or playing. E.g., "Well, I'm a jazz player, so naturally I use Anaesthesia Brand picks for that super-smooth mellow sound."

Dunno what's up with my thumb callus--might be I just noticed it when I started playing. I'm still mildly fascinated by my hard fingertips.

Oh, also... *d&r from all the jazz players*

Last edited by LawMonkey; 05-14-2010 at 02:40 PM. Reason: Found a missing definite article. Now if I could only find that pick...
  #399  
Old 05-14-2010, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by squeegee View Post
This is neither good nor bad technique, just something to be aware of.
Nice observation squeegee - if that is what LM is doing, then you're correct when it comes to standard strumming. When it comes to lead playing, though, you are describing a specific technique - pinch harmonics. Thats when you pick a note but have enough thumb-flesh brushing the string when you pick it that you change the character of the note. Very ZZ Top - most of Billy Gibbons' leads involve a bit of pinching - and very metal - that squealing note you hear in metal leads is obtained that way...

ETA - just saw your reply LM - well, sure, there are certain "truths" or stereotypes:

- folks who mostly strum tend to go with Thin picks
- jazz cats tend to use very small, thick picks because they need super-fast maneuverability and tend not to do big strumming
- some folks turn their standard-sized picks and use one of the rounder corner - especially if they do rock lead work without a ton of switching between lead and rhythm work

Last edited by WordMan; 05-14-2010 at 02:43 PM.
  #400  
Old 05-14-2010, 02:55 PM
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Quote:
ETA - just saw your reply LM - well, sure, there are certain "truths" or stereotypes:[...]- jazz cats tend to use very small, thick picks because they need super-fast maneuverability and tend not to do big strumming
It also doesn't help that those small picks are commonly called "jazz picks"and Dunlop brands theirs as "Jazz III" or similar. Really, you can use any type of pick for any style of playing if that works for you. That Dunlop M pick isn't holding you back from your jazz calling, LawMonkey, but it is worth just buying one of every weight & style of cheap picks and experimenting. I hear thumb picks are quite useful, go try one!


Quote:
Originally Posted by WordMan View Post
Nice observation squeegee - if that is what LM is doing, then you're correct when it comes to standard strumming. When it comes to lead playing, though, you are describing a specific technique - pinch harmonics. Thats when you pick a note but have enough thumb-flesh brushing the string when you pick it that you change the character of the note. Very ZZ Top - most of Billy Gibbons' leads involve a bit of pinching - and very metal - that squealing note you hear in metal leads is obtained that way...
I meant when strumming, though my "choking up" comment probably could have been taken to mean lead/single note playing. I think I learned LaGrange when I was 17 (very long ago), and figured out the pinch harmonics by trial and error. But, yeah, I meant while strumming, not pinching.
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