Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-07-2019, 12:12 PM
Zyada is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Foat Wuth!
Posts: 5,108

It's 2019 - what do you do for a living, and how has that changed since Y2K?


I'm still a programmer, but I now work on web applications, mostly front-end work (but a little back end)

I am allowed to WFH occasionally, but I don't very much because I have a harder time concentrating on work when I'm at home. In 2000, working from home was almost unheard of, and I don't think there were any web applications out there - certainly there were web pages, but they were for the most part static? (Wow, Amazon has been around since 1998)

What do y'all do today, and how has it changed in the past ~20 years?
  #2  
Old 06-07-2019, 12:50 PM
Telemark's Avatar
Telemark is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Yet again, Titletown
Posts: 22,553
In 2000 I had just left my job of 15 years as a compiler and library programmer for a major HW/SW manufacturer, eventually becoming a project leader. I left for a start up doing Internet consulting, I was the 13th employee. With so few people there I did a bit of everything; client interaction, budgeting, architecture, coding, etc.

Now I'm back with a large HW/SW company, as a project manager on security software.
  #3  
Old 06-07-2019, 01:01 PM
Llama Llogophile is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: 50% chord point
Posts: 3,974
I was a teacher back in 2000, now I fly airplanes.
  #4  
Old 06-07-2019, 01:16 PM
Gatopescado is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: on your last raw nerve
Posts: 21,884
Bum then, bum now. I got a bigger TV.
  #5  
Old 06-07-2019, 01:20 PM
JohnT's Avatar
JohnT is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 22,485
Lol, I delivered phone books. Now am running an insurance agency.
  #6  
Old 06-07-2019, 01:27 PM
Inigo Montoya's Avatar
Inigo Montoya is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: On the level, if inclined
Posts: 15,693
2000 Administering the agent training program for a 5 state region of a major insurance company

2019 Working at a plaintiff law firm that targets major insurance companies.
Pretty much nuked the bridge back to insurance land with that move.
  #7  
Old 06-07-2019, 01:36 PM
Icarus's Avatar
Icarus is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: In front of my PC, y tu?
Posts: 5,091
No change at all. The application I work with has evolved (they are always adding new features and functions) and I have expanded my knowledge of the various functional modules. But I am doing fundamentally the same job with the same product in the same way as when I started back in the late 90's.

What can I say, I like variety.
  #8  
Old 06-07-2019, 01:41 PM
Balthisar is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Southeast Michigan, USA
Posts: 11,095
In 2000 I was working as a vehicle body launch engineer for an American auto OEM in Silao, Mexico, thinking snarkily that if civilization ended at midnight, I'd probably be okay in Leon (where our hotel was).

I left that company shortly afterward in 2000 to join a competitor (the company I really wanted to be with in the first place), and held a powertrain plant engineering/supervision position for a little while, before joining the vehicle body launch organization. In 2011 I joined the management ranks and moved to China. In 2016 I returned to my current role as an engineering subject matter expert in a management position with no direct reports (which is awesome).

Despite how it sounds, I've not done the same thing for 20 years; in fact, it's been one hell of a wild ride.
  #9  
Old 06-07-2019, 01:42 PM
Shodan is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Milky Way Galaxy
Posts: 39,096
Before Y2K: I was a programmer making peanuts, and my company thought I couldn't go anywhere else and make more.

Y2K: My company found out they were wrong.

After Y2K: I am still a programmer, with a different company, but a lot more peanuts.

Regards,
Shodan
  #10  
Old 06-07-2019, 01:44 PM
Lancia's Avatar
Lancia is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Denial
Posts: 1,718
Quote:
Originally Posted by Llama Llogophile View Post
I was a teacher back in 2000, now I fly airplanes.
I wanted to fly airplanes in 2000, now I'm a teacher.

In 2000 I was 19 and was working in a bookstore and as a janitor in a nursing home. The nursing home shut down that fall and I hooked up with a organization that paid me to go back to school. I wanted to learn to fly but they wouldn't pay for it. So I went into healthcare: I got my CNA license that winter. I did that for ~14 years before going back to school. Now I teach for my local community college's adult basic skills (so, GED acquisition classes) department.
  #11  
Old 06-07-2019, 01:50 PM
Frodo's Avatar
Frodo is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Posts: 2,218
Then: Junior Programmer.
Now: Senior Programmer.
  #12  
Old 06-07-2019, 01:52 PM
Red Wiggler is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,772
I count beans for a small university. In Y2K I counted beans for a small retail/service company. My benefits are a lot better now.
  #13  
Old 06-07-2019, 01:54 PM
ZipperJJ's Avatar
ZipperJJ is offline
Just Lovely and Delicious
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 25,243
I do full-stack web development. In 2000 I did classic ASP coding with VBScript. Since then we've had...

C#
ASP.NET (with 4 versions)
Jquery (3 versions)
Bootstrap (4 versions)
Ajax
Silverlight
Linq
MVC (5 versions)
Razor
DotNetCore (2 versions)
Angular (5 versions)

Not to mention the loss of Netscape and rise of Firefox, and the absolute mandatory need for mobile-friendly design.

And that's just the tiny bit of stuff I've managed to use and pay attention to in my corner of the Internet. There have been oodles of other things I never dipped my toe into that have come and gone, or come and stayed but I still haven't checked them out.

The world of Web development moves QUICK. And I am slow af.
  #14  
Old 06-07-2019, 01:56 PM
Spoons is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Lethbridge, Alberta
Posts: 16,731
In the year 2000, I was a technical writer. Got tired of that, so I went back to school. Today, I'm a lawyer.
  #15  
Old 06-07-2019, 01:59 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan's Avatar
Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
zymolosely polydactile
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Slithering on the hull
Posts: 27,072
Physician, and I've moved onto the dreaded electronic medical record from paper charts.

And I hate it. It has slowed the flow, reduced me to a data entry clerk, impaired relationships with my patients, and resulted in degradation of quality of medical care, rather than its improvement, which is what it was touted to do.

In large part that's due to the fact that it's not a real medical record, it's a billing platform with some add-ons. It needs to be able to talk to all over EMRs out there, but the companies that create and sell and service these things want lots of extra $$$$ to allow it to talk to other EMRs.

In my system, it's eroding my legacy of over a decade of system improvement, by rendering useless my previously implemented chronic disease care plans and monitoring templates. Our EMR agency tells us they can't be adapted to their system, but for a few $million extra they'll customize some things for us. So we don't use them to track chronic disease anymore. And as a result do a poorer job at it.

I could go on with 3 dozen more pet peeves about it that make patient care harder, less personal, more time consuming, and generally angrifying of my blood.

I'm not alone in this despair. Recent articles and research show it's negatively impacting physicians and patients across the US. I don't know if other countries do it better; I suspect some must do better.

And don't get me started on my compensation . . .

Last edited by Qadgop the Mercotan; 06-07-2019 at 02:00 PM.
  #16  
Old 06-07-2019, 02:18 PM
Filbert is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 5,413
Well, in 2000 I was a student, only working at a casual job on weekends and holidays. Now... uhh... I'm a student, only working at a casual job on weekends and holidays.

I did do other stuff in the middle though. All sorts of things, just nothing that both led to possible progression and was the kind of thing I wanted to progress in.
  #17  
Old 06-07-2019, 02:57 PM
slalexan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 351
Because I'm a teeny, tiny baby-

In 2000, I was 11 years old, in the 6th grade, being extremely frustrated with the fact that I was taller than all the boys in my class (I was 5'9" then, the height I am now).

Now, I am a project engineer, doing engineering stuff and not using the chemical part of my chemical engineering degree hardly at all. I don't know that I really predicted that I'd be where I am not when I was in the 6th grade. I ain't mad though. I like what I do, even if it is really damn stressful some times.
  #18  
Old 06-07-2019, 03:10 PM
teela brown is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Almost Silicon Valley
Posts: 9,466
In 1999 I was a legal secretary in early-middle-age, moving to Silicon Valley and looking for a job. I interviewed at several firms and got three job offers, I think. I called a random secretary at each place and asked what it was like to work there, and chose the place that got the most enthusiastic recommendation from an actual employee.

Twenty years later, I'm still here. During my time here, I changed from floater to real estate law secretary. As many of you know, the commercial real estate market in Silicon Valley is white-hot and we have more work than we can handle.

Job security, I say.
  #19  
Old 06-07-2019, 03:14 PM
enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 14,213
I'm a GIS programmer. I still work for the same county and the same boss. Oh it's changed a lot, all app development has. But I have the same job at the same place.
__________________
I don't live in the middle of nowhere, but I can see it from here.
  #20  
Old 06-07-2019, 03:17 PM
campp is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Arizona, USA
Posts: 3,119
In 2000, I was about five years into my last job, which lasted until 2012.

Then sweet retirement. Way happier now.
  #21  
Old 06-07-2019, 03:19 PM
neutro is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Redmond, WA
Posts: 55
Year 2k I was an engineer director of a group in charge of developing and maintaining a cross platform game engine. It ran on Xbox, PS2, Gamecube and many more systems as they came online.

Currently I'm an entrepreneur that owns pieces of multiple companies. I also advise on both business and technology for several companies and also am an angel investor. I still keep my hands dirty doing actual work on products as well. I primarily work from home although I do have an office with dozens of employees.
  #22  
Old 06-07-2019, 03:21 PM
KneadToKnow is offline
Voodoo Adult (Slight Return)
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Charlotte, NC, USA
Posts: 26,022
Subtle changes that would probably only matter to another librarian. In 2000, I had my MLIS but was, job-title-wise, tech support who just happened to spend a lot of time on the reference desk. Became a "real" librarian in 2001. In 2014, I became a cataloger.
  #23  
Old 06-07-2019, 03:30 PM
Zyada is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Foat Wuth!
Posts: 5,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
I do full-stack web development. In 2000 I did classic ASP coding with VBScript. Since then we've had...

C#
ASP.NET (with 4 versions)
Jquery (3 versions)
Bootstrap (4 versions)
Ajax
Silverlight
Linq
MVC (5 versions)
Razor
DotNetCore (2 versions)
Angular (5 versions)

Not to mention the loss of Netscape and rise of Firefox, and the absolute mandatory need for mobile-friendly design.

And that's just the tiny bit of stuff I've managed to use and pay attention to in my corner of the Internet. There have been oodles of other things I never dipped my toe into that have come and gone, or come and stayed but I still haven't checked them out.

The world of Web development moves QUICK. And I am slow af.
You could just about be a programmer for our company. We are using two different flavors of Angular, dotNetCore, C#, and we just got rid of silverlight. And we have a whole group that works remotely, so you could be one of those guys!
  #24  
Old 06-07-2019, 03:49 PM
Doctor Jackson's Avatar
Doctor Jackson is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Jawja
Posts: 10,319
Y2K - Business Manager for a mom and pop, 2 site business
2019 - Director within a division of a Fortune 500 company.

Other than the scale, not a lot of changes in what I do or how I do it.
  #25  
Old 06-07-2019, 04:00 PM
ZipperJJ's Avatar
ZipperJJ is offline
Just Lovely and Delicious
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 25,243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zyada View Post
You could just about be a programmer for our company. We are using two different flavors of Angular, dotNetCore, C#, and we just got rid of silverlight. And we have a whole group that works remotely, so you could be one of those guys!
It's good to know that I'm marketable I just recently delved into Angular, starting with 5, and the fact that it's so new and 3 & 4 were so different makes learning about 5 via search engine a nightmare.

We ditched Angular for the moment
  #26  
Old 06-07-2019, 04:17 PM
ZipperJJ's Avatar
ZipperJJ is offline
Just Lovely and Delicious
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 25,243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor Jackson View Post
Y2K - Business Manager for a mom and pop, 2 site business
2019 - Director within a division of a Fortune 500 company.
Is it the same company?!
  #27  
Old 06-07-2019, 04:38 PM
panache45's Avatar
panache45 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: NE Ohio (the 'burbs)
Posts: 42,813
I was an artist in 2000, and still am. But I'm doing a totally different type of art now.
  #28  
Old 06-07-2019, 04:44 PM
Crafter_Man's Avatar
Crafter_Man is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Ohio
Posts: 11,275
I started working at my present employer in 1996. But a few things have changed since Y2K:

- I'm doing different work
- I'm a supervisor
- I work an Air Force Base (as an onsite contractor)
  #29  
Old 06-07-2019, 04:56 PM
Bear_Nenno's Avatar
Bear_Nenno is offline
Endowment Member
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Bavaria
Posts: 8,711
In 2000, I was working three jobs: selling machineguns and tactical gear; managing a gun range, and working as a substitute teacher. I had only an associates degree which I obtained from a combination of local university and the community college. None of the classes were online. In English 101, we had to make a simple web page using html.

In 2019, I am near the end of my career. I only intended to join the Army for as long as the war lasted--which I figured would be a couple years, max. Sixteen years later, here I am. I have a Master's degree now, thanks to distance learning and online education. I finished my undergrad and then completed my graduate degree, all online. In 2000, I don't think any accredited universities were offering classes online--certainly not an entire curriculum. I'm looking at post graduate study at University of North Dakota, and they offer the entire program online with no on-campus matriculation necessary.
The internet hasn't just changed how we work, it's completely changed how we communicate at work. What used to take the Army hours of telephone calls and alert rosters, can now be done instantly with a single What'sAPP message. That's not necessarily a good thing, though. And don't even get me started on emails. Ugh...
  #30  
Old 06-07-2019, 05:25 PM
dwyr's Avatar
dwyr is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Just outside the group
Posts: 2,823
I was a Medical Technologist in 2000 and I still am now, albeit in a different hospital lab. Automation has improved a lot in the intervening period significantly widening the range of testing we do but I still spend my days playing with blood, body fluids, and recalcitrant instrumentation. And avoiding really annoying coworkers.
  #31  
Old 06-07-2019, 05:32 PM
aceplace57 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: CentralArkansas
Posts: 25,604
Still a computer analyst/bean counter. Constantly bemused at the various statistical reports I have to compile and create for vendors and Uncle Sam.

It's one of the perils of a large database. The number of requested reports has tripled since I started in the late 80's.
  #32  
Old 06-07-2019, 05:49 PM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is online now
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 14,762
At the beginning of 2000, I made a career change, moving from a food manufacturing company (where I was a market researcher) to an ad agency, where I became a strategist, while still doing a little bit of market research as well.

Now, I work at a (different) ad agency, where I'm a strategist, while still doing a little bit of market research.



What's changed about the job in the past 19 years is how prevalent the digital space is in advertising, and how much more access we have to research data, and information on societal trends.

Last edited by kenobi 65; 06-07-2019 at 05:51 PM.
  #33  
Old 06-07-2019, 06:04 PM
digs's Avatar
digs is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: West of Wauwatosa
Posts: 9,527
Realized I was never going to get to know my kids if I kept working 60-80 hours a week. So I quit working in advertising and finally got my dream job teaching.

Then I retired.

21st century been beddy beddy gooood to mee!
  #34  
Old 06-07-2019, 06:13 PM
Snowboarder Bo's Avatar
Snowboarder Bo is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 25,605
I've been earning a living doing lighting for well over 3 decades, so no change for me. I work with and for a lot of different people compared to 19 years ago (a few old friends are still around, thankfully), and a lot of the equipment has changed (and changed a lot), but it's all still about pumping photons.
  #35  
Old 06-07-2019, 06:46 PM
Baker is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Tottering-on-the-Brink
Posts: 20,105
I am a baker. My job has not changed at all really, at least not due to technology.
__________________
Never give up, never surrender!
  #36  
Old 06-07-2019, 06:52 PM
FairyChatMom's Avatar
FairyChatMom is offline
I'm nice, dammit!
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Southern Merrylande
Posts: 41,278
I was an aerospace structural engineer for the Navy in Y2K. I retired in 2011. Since then, I've had a few temp gigs, but now I'm working as a mechanical drafter for a company that builds flight and maintenance trainers for various military organizations. I'll be re-retiring at the end of this year - maybe for good this time.
  #37  
Old 06-07-2019, 06:52 PM
Projammer's Avatar
Projammer is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: SW Arkansas
Posts: 6,612
In 2k I was a software developer working on a municipal court management package.

Now I do things with Microsoft Active Directory. And some Powershell scripting.
  #38  
Old 06-07-2019, 07:30 PM
Enginerd is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 5,803
In 2000 I was a jack-of-all-trades civil engineer for a start-up company that manufactured pollution control systems. I did product development, manufacturing process, and on-site support and inspections, but most of my time was really spent as a sales engineer. It was a great first job (I finished college in 1997), but a few years into it the company got stable (great!) and the work got repetitive (less great). That's the kiss of death for me in any job.

Now I'm a hydrology professor. I'm five years into the job (13 if you count grad school and postdocs) and I haven't been bored once.
  #39  
Old 06-07-2019, 07:50 PM
Northern Piper is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: The snow is gone. For now
Posts: 28,968
2000 - lawyer who wrote opinions and briefs with a fountain pen and went to the law library to research in books before going off to court.

2019 - lawyer who writes opinions and briefs on a computer and researches law on my desktop computer, before going off to argue cases in court.

In other words, the things that I like the most (reading cases and statutes, writing briefs and opinions, and standing up on my hind feet to argue) haven't changed at all.
__________________
"I don't like to make plans for the day. If I do, that's when words like 'premeditated' start getting thrown around in the courtroom."
  #40  
Old 06-07-2019, 07:58 PM
Richard Pearse is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 10,444
2000 I flew aeroplanes, this was one: https://images.app.goo.gl/Dv4YZsVvKK4M7fjx6
2019 I fly aeroplanes, this is one: https://cdn.planespotters.net/photo/...90452ea71b.jpg

Itís just occurred to me that the colour scheme is quite similar.
  #41  
Old 06-07-2019, 08:46 PM
jz78817 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Under Oveur & over Unger
Posts: 11,776

It's 2019 - what do you do for a living, and how has that changed since Y2K?


Automotive engineer. hasn't changed, I've been doing this my whole career.
  #42  
Old 06-08-2019, 03:55 AM
Spoons is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Lethbridge, Alberta
Posts: 16,731
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
In other words, the things that I like the most (reading cases and statutes, writing briefs and opinions, and standing up on my hind feet to argue) haven't changed at all.
Me too. I seem to recall you once saying that arguing in court is the most fun you can have standing up. I feel the same about research, preparing, and arguing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Pearse View Post
2000 I flew aeroplanes, this was one: https://images.app.goo.gl/Dv4YZsVvKK4M7fjx6
Holy cow, Richard, you flew a Pitts? I will never worry if you are at the controls of any flight I am on.
  #43  
Old 06-08-2019, 04:50 AM
Richard Pearse is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 10,444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spoons View Post
Me too. I seem to recall you once saying that arguing in court is the most fun you can have standing up. I feel the same about research, preparing, and arguing.

Holy cow, Richard, you flew a Pitts? I will never worry if you are at the controls of any flight I am on.
I didn't say I flew it well...
  #44  
Old 06-08-2019, 05:21 AM
pullin is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: N Texas
Posts: 2,966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
Physician, and I've moved onto the dreaded electronic medical record from paper charts.

And I hate it. It has slowed the flow, reduced me to a data entry clerk, impaired relationships with my patients, and resulted in degradation of quality of medical care, rather than its improvement, which is what it was touted to do.
Believe me, we patients don't like it either. I've mentioned some recent heart problems here, and one thing I can say about my new cardiologist is -- he looks just like the top of an HP laptop. Because that's all I've ever seen of him. He sits at a desk behind a laptop and, thus far, has never actually touched me. It's questionable whether I would recognize him in public, and I'm sure he wouldn't know me.

Getting back to the OP's question:
2000: Programmer, large engineering firm, simulation software
2019: Programmer, DARPA research lab, autonomous vehicle controls.
and the biggest change
July 2019: Retiree, boat, fishing
  #45  
Old 06-08-2019, 08:00 AM
Northern Piper is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: The snow is gone. For now
Posts: 28,968
Side note - my GP doctor has gone electronic, and I've not noticed any decline in care. He does all the normal things, asking why I've come in, checking the affected bit, and only goes to the computer when it's time to check prescription history. He's got my prescription history, the Cub's, and Mrs Piper's all available easily, can print out the prescription, so no handwriting issues, and can send the prescription directly to my pharmacy of choice. I understand that the prescription history is available to all doctors and pharmacists, to prevent double-shopping for prescriptions and so on. He just enters the new prescription on the spot, and done.

Of course, it probably helps that the prescription database was set up by the provincial health system to improve patient care, rather than to make a buck.
__________________
"I don't like to make plans for the day. If I do, that's when words like 'premeditated' start getting thrown around in the courtroom."
  #46  
Old 06-08-2019, 09:57 AM
panache45's Avatar
panache45 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: NE Ohio (the 'burbs)
Posts: 42,813
Quote:
Originally Posted by pullin View Post
Believe me, we patients don't like it either. I've mentioned some recent heart problems here, and one thing I can say about my new cardiologist is -- he looks just like the top of an HP laptop. Because that's all I've ever seen of him. He sits at a desk behind a laptop and, thus far, has never actually touched me. It's questionable whether I would recognize him in public, and I'm sure he wouldn't know me.
This. Of all the doctors I see, my favorite it my nephrologist. He's an osteopath and is interested in every aspect of my life and my health. But I keep forgetting what he looks like, since he's glued to his laptop on our visits. He has to enter every datum 2 or 3 times.
  #47  
Old 06-08-2019, 10:09 AM
Happy Lendervedder's Avatar
Happy Lendervedder is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Michigan
Posts: 14,942
2000: Just started my first post-college job as a reporter for my local newspaper.
Now: Own my own organic lawn care business.
In between: Worked in organized labor as an organizer and educator.

I'm currently happier than I've ever been in my professional life. I work outside all summer, set my own hours, and take the months of November-March off (being in Michigan, that means I can sit back and watch all the commuters struggle through the snow and ice and sip my coffee in my pajamas ). With our business, we'll never be rich, but we're comfortable, and the one thing I've learned in the past 20 years is that free time and doing something you enjoy is more valuable than more money.
  #48  
Old 06-08-2019, 10:23 AM
Spud's Avatar
Spud is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 3,839
Well, if we can go back to Y1999 I was on a Y2K project because a core piece of our mainframe system used 12/99 as the available date for "put it out of service". We found the quickest and most cost effective solution was to change it to 12/70 since our company started in 1971 and besides we would be changing systems in a few years. They are still using the same system... so now it may be something my grand kids or great grand kids will have to deal with.

As far as me, I'm still in the same industry but with a different company doing mostly the same job but now in an office instead of a cube and much happier.
  #49  
Old 06-08-2019, 11:40 AM
Nava is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Hey! I'm located! WOOOOW!
Posts: 41,508
2000 was a crazy year. I started it unemployed, having spent the last year and a half back at my parents', "helping" to care for Dad (read: primary careworker) and working short-term contracts, mostly as a lab tech. He died in February; on July 3rd I started working at a local factory. Two new positions had been created as lab tech, 4th shift: our initial contracts were 6 months and if we worked out ok we'd be made permanent. At the end of November we were told we weren't being renewed; on December 27th the factory manager walked into the lab as I was working and told me I was, in fact, being renewed: confused because the reports that "the new lab girl" contradicted themselves, she'd investigated and found out that the bad stuff was all about "the short one", the good stuff all about "the tall one".

A year later I was already working in the project that implemented SAP in that factory, which eventually led to my current job as a self-employed SAP consultant

Last edited by Nava; 06-08-2019 at 11:42 AM.
  #50  
Old 06-08-2019, 12:16 PM
Chefguy's Avatar
Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 41,762
In 2000 I had a position called "Construction Coordinator". Since then, I held the jobs of Director of Construction, Chief Operating Officer, RV Salesman, Facilities Manager and Quality Control Manager. Retired in 2008. The last was my best occupational description.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:56 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017