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Old 06-03-2017, 01:45 AM
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Looks like some people just didn't do it!
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Old 06-03-2017, 08:03 AM
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I also didn't climb Everest, but it never occurred to me to take a picture!
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Old 05-21-2018, 11:23 AM
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Two foreign climbers dead so far in 2018. This site also lists the name of a Sherpa climber who died May 15.

So now we are at 41 straight years with at least one death on Mt Everest.

Mrs. South Africa, however, is safe.

Last edited by Biotop; 05-21-2018 at 11:25 AM.
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Old 05-21-2018, 12:50 PM
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Interesting bump. We just watched Everest last night. It didn't even occur to us that it was just a bit past the anniversary of the actual event.

We also just finished a documentary on the 24 hour race at Le Mans. I wondered if racing Le Mans was just as irresponsible to your family as climbing Everest. Sudden death for no really good reason. My wife knows my fascination with all things Everest, and asked if I could do one, which one would it be. Without hesitation I picked Le Mans. Much more my speed, so to speak.
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Old 05-21-2018, 08:02 PM
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I'm an Everest and true adventure junkie and read/watch everything about it I can get my greedy paws on. I did a lot of risky outdoor adventures when I was younger and I guess my (very amateur) track driving is my middle-age adventure (knees and back are no longer happy about vigorous physical activity).

So I understand the lust for adventure and plowing through physical hardship in order to reach a goal; I've been on hardcore wilderness survival trips that were hellish but exhilirating.

What I *do* wonder is how "pure" the Everest experience is if climbers are using fixed lines and Sherpas are hauling the heavy stuff (including people - I'm thinking about the socialite Krakaeur wrote about being physically hauled up and down the mountain by Sherpas).

Obviously, even with haulers and fixed lines, it's an arduous climb -- no denying it, but would fewer people try it if they were totally on their own, without Sherpa or pre-fixed equipment? Would there be fewer deaths because non-elite climbers realize their limitations before reaching the Death Zone?
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Old 05-21-2018, 08:03 PM
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Interesting bump. We just watched Everest last night. It didn't even occur to us that it was just a bit past the anniversary of the actual event.

We also just finished a documentary on the 24 hour race at Le Mans. I wondered if racing Le Mans was just as irresponsible to your family as climbing Everest. Sudden death for no really good reason. My wife knows my fascination with all things Everest, and asked if I could do one, which one would it be. Without hesitation I picked Le Mans. Much more my speed, so to speak.
I just watched a Le Mans doc on Amazon(?) It was a six or so episode thing -- is this what you watched?
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Old 05-21-2018, 08:15 PM
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Interesting bump. We just watched Everest last night. It didn't even occur to us that it was just a bit past the anniversary of the actual event.

We also just finished a documentary on the 24 hour race at Le Mans. I wondered if racing Le Mans was just as irresponsible to your family as climbing Everest. Sudden death for no really good reason. My wife knows my fascination with all things Everest, and asked if I could do one, which one would it be. Without hesitation I picked Le Mans. Much more my speed, so to speak.
There has been one fatality during the 24 Hours in the last 20 years.
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Old 05-21-2018, 08:33 PM
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I just watched a Le Mans doc on Amazon(?) It was a six or so episode thing -- is this what you watched?
That's the one! Pretty good.The beginning voice over reminded me of the Canadian Tow Truck series "Highway through Hell", and I don't mean that as a compliment. Modern documentaries just have to do that I guess.

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There has been one fatality during the 24 Hours in the last 20 years.
I did not realize it was that few.
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Old 05-21-2018, 08:36 PM
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That's the one! Pretty good.The beginning voice over reminded me of the Canadian Tow Truck series "Highway through Hell", and I don't mean that as a compliment. Modern documentaries just have to do that I guess.
I did not realize it was that few.
The night driving was pretty terrifying! For some reason it never occurred to me that a 24 hour race = driving at night. Duh!
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Old 05-21-2018, 08:49 PM
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I rode the subway for 20 years. That was enough adventure for me.
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Old 05-21-2018, 09:59 PM
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I suggest you watch The Race That Eats Its Young.
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Old 05-21-2018, 10:30 PM
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There has been one fatality during the 24 Hours in the last 20 years.
This is practically ancient history, but for what it's worth, no one ever died watching somebody climb Mount Everest.
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Old 05-21-2018, 11:18 PM
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Interesting. I hope he survived. Did he summit in May 1996? Was he on Hall's party? Or Fischer's? Or another?
Sorry I missed this last question last year. He was with Fischer's party...Tim Madsen. Yes, he survived! Just saw him a couple months ago. I didn't know him back then, as he and my cousin had not yet started dating. I think they met a few years after that.
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Old 05-22-2018, 09:55 AM
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Two more sherpa guides have died on Everest. This year's death toll now stands at 5.
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Old 05-22-2018, 10:43 AM
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This article from the NYT is fascinating. But be warned it is graphic.
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Old 05-22-2018, 11:10 AM
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If you die on Everest, you normally stay on Everest. Too dangerous to remove the bodies. Also the remains on the trail up serve as a warning to those climbing, just how dangerous it is.
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Old 05-22-2018, 01:09 PM
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This article from the NYT is fascinating. But be warned it is graphic.
You're right, it was. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 05-22-2018, 01:44 PM
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When I look at the number of fatalities on Everest it strikes me just how similar the numbers are to that most notorious race - Isle of Man TT.

Also worth considering is that the bike riders are not the average street motorcycle riders, these are drawn from experienced ranks of racing men.

Look at the following

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...rse_fatalities

Add in the deaths of non-competitors, spectators and marshalls and you get a total that is not at all far from Everest death roll. The situation is likely even worse, because regular bike riders get a chance to rip around on 'Mad Sunday' and those fatalities are not included on the list of deaths from the racing and race practice.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/bp/surviv...l?guccounter=1

Each and every year similar questions are posed to those raised in relation to Mount Everest, and the responses seem to be very similar. Seems to me there is no answer to such risk taking, its just the way some folk happen to be.

If you have ever observed racing at trackside, its quite an experience, but to watch the racing on the Isle of Man on largely unprotected open roads is just something else, the fatalities take place literally right in front of you - the sheer violence of what takes place is astounding, and you can pretty much watch it for free, and even take part on Mad Sunday.

Perhaps it is this closeness to the action that maybe keeps the complete novice from even considering doing it, and maybe the remoteness of Everest means that the true dangers are not fully appreciated - you can't sit at the side of the road watching the climbers risking their necks trying to get to the summit.

Just for fun, try joining current lap record holder John McGuinness for a lap

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFJSVtsckyI
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Old 05-26-2018, 10:20 AM
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Lam Babu Sherpa died this year on Everest participating in a publicity stunt for a cryptocoin hunt. I guess the idea now is for other bitcoin enthusiasts to climb Mount Everest to try to find the hidden cache.
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Old 05-28-2018, 12:13 AM
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I recall reading a memoir of Lemans by one of the drivers. Driving in the rain, at night, basically blind - screaming down the nearly 4 mile long Muslanne Straight at something like 170 mph and seeing a glimpse of red ahead and immediately you are on top of a car traveling 60 mph slower. Damn. So he backed off to 150 or something. It wasn't any better so he shrugged and went back to full chat.

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Old 05-28-2018, 10:46 AM
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I suggest you watch The Race That Eats Its Young.
I love that movie!
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Old 05-16-2019, 02:42 PM
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2nd death on Everest this year.

The first was a man who grew up not far from my birthplace in Richmond.

The last year without a death on Mount Everest was 1977.
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Old 05-17-2019, 10:47 AM
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And now an Indian climber Ravi Thakar has died in his tent at Camp 4.
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Old 05-17-2019, 11:10 AM
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This video about Shriya Shah from Canada shows the issue pretty starkly, I think. On one hand she was clearly unqualified to go to Everest, but on the other hand she was an adult, determined, and she demonstrated a grit few would have shown to reach her goal.

So should she have been allowed to try?

10 others climbers died on Mount Everest in 2012 along with Shriya Shah. But probably most every year several seemingly unqualified climbers make it to the top and back safely. I don't know what the answer is. I guess there is none.
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Old 05-17-2019, 11:32 AM
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Sherpa Kami Rita has summited 23 times:
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/sherpa-...tain-23-times/

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Last edited by N9IWP; 05-17-2019 at 11:35 AM.
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Old 05-17-2019, 04:44 PM
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This video about Shriya Shah from Canada shows the issue pretty starkly, I think. On one hand she was clearly unqualified to go to Everest, but on the other hand she was an adult, determined, and she demonstrated a grit few would have shown to reach her goal.

So should she have been allowed to try?

10 others climbers died on Mount Everest in 2012 along with Shriya Shah. But probably most every year several seemingly unqualified climbers make it to the top and back safely. I don't know what the answer is. I guess there is none.
To be honest, I'm divided about this.

I'm a big advocate of informed adults being able to take risks. And no one gets to Everest base camp by accident, much less up the mountain itself.

You can't say Ms. Shah wasn't warned - from the sound of it she was repeatedly warned in very, very blunt terms of "If you do this you will die and maybe/probably take others with you". She went ahead anyway.

Which brings up the other side of this equation - unskilled sub-par climbers really do put other people at risk, people who are already to risk just by being on a mountain that high up with so little oxygen. Too many people on the mountain just adds to the risks inherent in climbing Everest. No one gets to Everest by accident, but just about anyone in the First World and probably most of the Second can get there if they are determined and willing to work for it. More and more unqualified climbers every year.

Either we accept an annual death toll if we maintain the status quo regarding lack of qualifications and, essentially, unlimited climbing permits or someone starts to put a filter in base camp to limit the climb to those fit enough and qualified to have a decent chance to not only summit but survive the trip back down. Which latter I don't think will happen because Nepal needs the money and it will piss off too many (relatively) wealthy westerners used to having their way as "consumers" - they paid for a ticket to the top, dammit!

That's assuming climate change doesn't turn climbing Everest into something impossible.
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Old 05-17-2019, 06:21 PM
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I think the Nepalese fee is currently around $11,000. Suppose the fee were $50,000. Would that result in substantially fewer climbers or not?
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Old 05-17-2019, 06:45 PM
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I think the Nepalese fee is currently around $11,000. Suppose the fee were $50,000. Would that result in substantially fewer climbers or not?
I think the Nepalese probably charge as much as they think they can. A higher fee may bring in less income if it dissuades enough folks. Then there is the local economy, which is dependent on the large number of climbers and support staff.
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Old 05-17-2019, 08:45 PM
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2nd death on Everest this year.

The first was a man who grew up not far from my birthplace in Richmond.

The last year without a death on Mount Everest was 1977.
Are you this obsessed with other dangerous mountains, or just Everest?
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Old 05-18-2019, 12:22 AM
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Are you this obsessed with other dangerous mountains, or just Everest?
I think fascinated is a better word. Everest is different than most of other dangerous mountains. Amateurs are probably not going to try their hand at K2, Manaslu or Annapurna. What happens on Mount Everest every year is unique and the desire to climb it is both wildly absurd and deeply understandable.

I think anyone who has ever climbed a mountain can identify with the idea of Everest. The money and health needed to climb it are beyond most of us to ever consider the prospect. But seeing the pictures, reading the stories, and immersing in mystique of Everest is appealing to many. It sure is to me.

Then there is the simplicity of the idea. The tallest mountain. Getting to the top requires determination and will. Quit when the odds turn against you, or push on? Taking a step and then another and then another when any "reasonable" person would turn around. Knowing you could easily die but still not giving up. What is inside these seemingly average people that gets them to make this climb and to continue as the struggle gets harder and the air gets thinner? Where did the strength come from and do we have it? Do I have anything in me that strong?

Then there is the whole difference of cultures. The poverty of the people contrasted with the wealth of the climbers. The amazing ability of some of the Sherpas and the ethical questions regarding exploitation versus economic benefit. There is the circus atmosphere where people try to be the first vegan or the oldest or youngest or whatever to climb the mountain. There are people who want to glide off the top, or snowboard off the summit, or plant treasures for others to find. There is the chance that the climber who passes the dead body as landmark may become a dead body landmark themselves.

Everest is fascinating and maybe even worthy of obsession because so much of what it is to be human is on display there.
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Old 05-18-2019, 06:03 AM
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Sorry I missed this last question last year. He was with Fischer's party...Tim Madsen. Yes, he survived! Just saw him a couple months ago. I didn't know him back then, as he and my cousin had not yet started dating. I think they met a few years after that.
Sorry I missed your answer last year. Tim Madsen — one of the survivors in “the huddle”, the group caught in a fierce blizzard on the South Col that fateful night in May 1996. It was dark, and with visibility near zero they did not want to stumble in the wrong direction and fall off the nearby Kangshung Face — a drop of many thousands of feet. Later that night during breaks in the stormy blizzard they were able to make their way with some help to Camp IV.

Here’s a picture of Beck Weathers, ”left for dead” that night on the south col, at a local venue where he talked of his experience and then with my wife and me afterwards:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/tFNzRJNhQ8oq3n6u9

After his presentation, when the auditorium was emptying, I entered a backstage door and there he was. It was nice meeting him and he was gracious enough to be in our picture.
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Old 05-18-2019, 07:16 AM
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Did I read a Sherpa has set the world record by reaching the summit twenty-four times?
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Old 05-19-2019, 12:49 AM
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Sorry I missed your answer last year. Tim Madsen — one of the survivors in “the huddle”, the group caught in a fierce blizzard on the South Col that fateful night in May 1996. It was dark, and with visibility near zero they did not want to stumble in the wrong direction and fall off the nearby Kangshung Face — a drop of many thousands of feet. Later that night during breaks in the stormy blizzard they were able to make their way with some help to Camp IV.

Here’s a picture of Beck Weathers, ”left for dead” that night on the south col, at a local venue where he talked of his experience and then with my wife and me afterwards:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/tFNzRJNhQ8oq3n6u9

After his presentation, when the auditorium was emptying, I entered a backstage door and there he was. It was nice meeting him and he was gracious enough to be in our picture.
Thanks for sharing your pictures! Very cool.
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Old 05-19-2019, 06:21 AM
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Did I read a Sherpa has set the world record by reaching the summit twenty-four times?
Unless Kami Rita did it since May 15, no. He holds the record at 23 with no one active is close. Not definitive, but Wikipedia has a list:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o..._to_the_summit

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Old 05-19-2019, 09:33 AM
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Are you this obsessed with other dangerous mountains, or just Everest?
This is a thread about the dangers of Everest. Why did you open it if you weren't interested in the subject?
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Old 05-19-2019, 11:18 PM
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The family of Seamus Lawless who disappeared near the summit last week has raised nearly a quarter of a million dollars to try and recover his body before the climbing season ends. The challenge of putting together such a recovery operation in the few short weeks left in the climbing season seems insurmountable.
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Old 05-20-2019, 12:11 AM
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The family of Seamus Lawless who disappeared near the summit last week has raised nearly a quarter of a million dollars to try and recover his body before the climbing season ends. The challenge of putting together such a recovery operation in the few short weeks left in the climbing season seems insurmountable.
Depends on where he is. He might be near irrecoverable. Up there, depending on where you are, you might as well be on the moon. I hope they succeed.
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Old 05-20-2019, 03:27 AM
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The family of Seamus Lawless who disappeared near the summit last week has raised nearly a quarter of a million dollars to try and recover his body before the climbing season ends. The challenge of putting together such a recovery operation in the few short weeks left in the climbing season seems insurmountable.
Yeah, there are a lot of people questioning just what is going on with that Gofundme page. It wasn't set up by the family but supposedly by somebody who worked with the deceased. It was presented as raising funds for search and recovery of a still alive but missing climber and raised a lot of money from people who clearly didn't realise that there was practically no chance of him still being alive. When anybody tried to point this out their comments were deleted, and days later it was still being sold as a search for a missing man.

Even if the fundraising is genuine people still know damn well that any recovery would be dangerous and could cause further loss of life, but the page is still looking for more money regardless.

Its gofundme so there will be practically zero oversight of what happens the money, frankly I think it is a scam in all but name.
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Old 05-20-2019, 11:01 AM
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I'm with Biotop on this. I find Everest, even more than other mountains like K2, fascinating. Not just the mountain, but the psychology, the ethics. What causes people to do things with a high risk of death? Since we're all going to die eventually anyway, are they better than me for having taken the risk for big reward? I don't know. And Everest is the whole discussion in a nutshell.

K2 is much more of a technical climb, and far fewer people do it. You have to be skilled. No amateurs there. Yet, I watched a video where a guy came rolling down the mountain at high speed to his death. Was it worth it? I don't know.
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Old 05-20-2019, 11:24 AM
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I'm with Biotop on this. I find Everest, even more than other mountains like K2, fascinating. Not just the mountain, but the psychology, the ethics. What causes people to do things with a high risk of death? Since we're all going to die eventually anyway, are they better than me for having taken the risk for big reward? I don't know. And Everest is the whole discussion in a nutshell.

K2 is much more of a technical climb, and far fewer people do it. You have to be skilled. No amateurs there. Yet, I watched a video where a guy came rolling down the mountain at high speed to his death. Was it worth it? I don't know.
Are you telling us? Or are you just asking questions?
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Old 05-20-2019, 12:22 PM
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Are you telling us? Or are you just asking questions?
I don't know!



I've been thinking about this since my post.

The stories about people like Shriya Shaw seem to focus on those that died. I guess that makes for more interesting copy, but it only tells part of the story.

The linked video quoted her husband that she was "looking for something" on Everest. (people are really looking for things in themselves, but they have to go to extremes to find it.) But I am curious about the rest. As of this year there have been over 4000 different people that have summited Everest compared to the 300 that died.

What are the stories of those who successfully made it and returned? I bet many of them could be described as "looking for something". I would like to know how many of them found what they were looking for. Did their lives change? Or did they instead return to lives of quiet desperation?

What happened to them when they didn't find what they were looking for? Or they didn't like the answers they found? For those that tried and failed, was it worse living with their failure? Did climbing Everest and succeeding (or and failing) make a difference, for either better or worse, in their lives?

This is what fascinates me. I admit, I feel the call. I want to test myself. I want to prove to myself that I am as good as those that made it. I want to stand on the top of the world. But unless someone builds an escalator, I know I'll never see the summit. I have accepted it. Am I better or worse than those that tried?
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Old 05-20-2019, 12:32 PM
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I really enjoyed Wade Davis’s book Into the Silence: the Great War, Mallory, and the Conquest of Everest, which came out around 2012.

I figure if George Mallory couldn’t get his bony ass up and down and stay in one piece, there would never be any chance I could do it.
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Old 05-20-2019, 03:40 PM
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The stories about people like Shriya Shaw seem to focus on those that died. I guess that makes for more interesting copy, but it only tells part of the story.

The linked video quoted her husband that she was "looking for something" on Everest. (people are really looking for things in themselves, but they have to go to extremes to find it.) But I am curious about the rest. As of this year there have been over 4000 different people that have summited Everest compared to the 300 that died.

What are the stories of those who successfully made it and returned? I bet many of them could be described as "looking for something". I would like to know how many of them found what they were looking for. Did their lives change? Or did they instead return to lives of quiet desperation?
There are stories of/from those who lived to tell the tale. Sometimes they came back very changed (Beck Weathers for example, nearly died and lost body parts to frostbite), others not so much but still have a story to tell (Jon Krakauer). The mainstream press tends to focus most on the disasters and maiming, but if you look you can find the stories of those who went up and came back down with all body parts intact. Some of them more than once.

Quote:
Did climbing Everest and succeeding (or and failing) make a difference, for either better or worse, in their lives?
It varies, of course.

One forgotten group are the Sherpas - THEY have a lot to gain by risking the hazards of Everest. Some of them have pulled their families out of dire poverty, were able to send their kids to schools, and otherwise vastly improved the lives of themselves and their families, sometimes by working just one or a few seasons on the big mountain.

But since the 4000-5000 people who have tried to climb Everest are a group made of individuals their stories vary considerably. Many different reasons to climb, many different outcomes from complete disaster to uplifting and motivating.

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This is what fascinates me. I admit, I feel the call. I want to test myself. I want to prove to myself that I am as good as those that made it. I want to stand on the top of the world. But unless someone builds an escalator, I know I'll never see the summit. I have accepted it. Am I better or worse than those that tried?
I think there is a LOT to be said for knowing your limitations.

Don't recall the exact show, but there was (yet another) documentary about a group climbing Everest and one of the members had asthma. Now, he's still an athlete and it seemed to me (from what was shown and also from what I know as a person with asthma) that he had it under control but he did not make it to the top. At a certain point he said "this is my summit" meaning he didn't have it in him to go higher. So he turned around and went back down. And you know what? I've got a LOT of respect for that guy, for having the good sense to know when he reached his limit, accepting it, dealing with it, then going on to other goals in life. He's just as much an achiever as anyone who stands on the top of Everest because he sought his own limits AND had the good sense to realize when he got there.

A little bit of a tangent - I have an internet friend who started skydiving. But after a few jumps and witnessing an accident (just injury, no fatalities, although it was still serious) he started feeling uneasy about things and was berating himself for being a coward for not continuing. I said no, you're not a coward. You are making an informed decision that you no longer find the benefits worth the risk to you personally. There is nothing cowardly about that, it's actually being pretty smart.

Sure, I'd love to stand on the top of the world, but I know better than to try it. For me, Everest base camp would be as high as I'd care to struggle. There are other things I want to put my life and energy into more than struggling up the world's highest mountain. It's not about being better or worse than someone who chooses to try that mountain, it's more about what your priorities are. There are a lot of things I prioritize over climbing mountains. For others, climbing Everest is top on the list. I wish them well, I really hope they get the training and conditioning they need to make a successful go of it, and hope they have a successful attempt should they actually get a chance to try it.
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Old 05-22-2019, 02:59 PM
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A Utah man died today descending Mt Everest. Donald Cash was 55.
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Old 05-23-2019, 10:16 AM
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Two Indian women have died in separate incidents on Mount Everest yesterday and today. Kalpana Das was 49. Anjali Kulkami was 54. Both died just after descending the summit, just as did Don Cash and Seamus Lawless earlier. Ravi Thakar died in his tent at Camp 4 after descending.

The major issue this year seems to be the crowds at the summit. After reaching the top, the descent is taking to long because so many people are coming up the ropes that those in trouble above are having to wait too long for the opportunity to come down. There is too much time being spent simply waiting in the death zone.

Perhaps here there could be agreement on regulation. Instead of leaving it up to the individual groups to coordinate the number of climbers attempting to reach the summit, perhaps there could be a governing body operating from base camp that would limit the number of attempts on a given day. If the weather does not allow for the opportunity for all groups to ascend during the climbing system, then it doesn't.
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Old 05-23-2019, 11:02 AM
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The major issue this year seems to be the crowds at the summit. After reaching the top, the descent is taking to long because so many people are coming up the ropes that those in trouble above are having to wait too long for the opportunity to come down. There is too much time being spent simply waiting in the death zone.
There's a point in the video linked above that shows the crowds at a different point on the mountain (see 39:47). It starts out looking OK, then just keeps panning and panning.

I assume there is simply no way to have adjacent ropes or different routes on the Step bottleneck for uphill versus downhill. I'd like to think it might be more possible since the Step changed in the 2015 earthquake to more of a slope, but obviously I am incorrect in that, or they'd be doing it.
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Old 05-23-2019, 11:55 AM
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Perhaps here there could be agreement on regulation. Instead of leaving it up to the individual groups to coordinate the number of climbers attempting to reach the summit, perhaps there could be a governing body operating from base camp that would limit the number of attempts on a given day. If the weather does not allow for the opportunity for all groups to ascend during the climbing system, then it doesn't.
A fine idea, but the problem with this is it's much easier to get permits and labor on the Nepalese side. China (Tibet) can afford to limit the number of permits and access; Nepal is a third-world country with a barely functioning government of dubious stability, and they will enthusiastically rake in cash from anyone who wants to give it to them.

Drawing on numbers from this site: http://www.alanarnette.com/blog/2017...-2018-edition/

The Tibet side sees about 40% less climbers than the Nepal side. The death rate of the two major routes are similar, at 3.3% (Tibet) and 3.4% (Nepal). Major causes of death on the Tibet side are falls, acute mountain sickness, exposure, and exhaustion. Major causes of death on the Nepal side are overwhelmingly avalanches and falls, on the mountain and in the Khumbu Icefall, along with almost identical numbers as Tibet for acute mountain sickness, exposure, and exhaustion.

Perhaps the two countries could come to some sort of an agreement about having one route be "UP ONLY" and the other route "DOWN ONLY," but I doubt that will ever happen.

ETA: I know, there are a lot more than just two routes.

Last edited by DCnDC; 05-23-2019 at 11:56 AM.
  #198  
Old 05-23-2019, 05:47 PM
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Perhaps the two countries could come to some sort of an agreement about having one route be "UP ONLY" and the other route "DOWN ONLY," but I doubt that will ever happen.
Seems pretty intractable because don't the different routes have different camp locations? You'd either have to haul your stuff with you to the summit or hope that someone taking the other route left you enough supplies.
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Old 05-23-2019, 11:54 PM
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This photo is why I think permits should be limited: 320 people in a "traffic jam" approaching the summit. One person died. You won't find 320 people in line for a ride at Disneyland, and Everest ain't Disney. Sure, Nepal is poor and desperate to make money, but I still think raising the fee to four times its current amount wouldn't reduce the number of applicants by more than 3/4, so Nepal wouldn't suffer any loss.

I'm fascinated by Everest, too. I love to read about it, watch documentaries on it, and dream of what it'd be like to summit. But even when I was younger, I wouldn't have tried to climb it any more than I'd try to break the record for trekking to the South Pole. The mountain is over-climbed. More of us who love it should stay home.
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Old 05-23-2019, 11:54 PM
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Oh your god! Look at the lineup. Once you get to the summit, how much time do you actually get to spend there?

That is so far from what I consider a good time or good idea.
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