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  #101  
Old 05-16-2019, 11:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
....This isn't a dry, rigorous academic journal on lingustics and history, it is a fish wrapper.
Sure. But it's a Peer reviewed fish wrapper, unlike your buddy Pelling and the Fortean Times, eh?

Look, Pelling is a pseudoscience nut who wrote his own hokum book on decoding the manuscript. So of course he is gonna attack any real attempt at doing so.
  #102  
Old 05-17-2019, 12:49 AM
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Do you ever tire of beclowning yourself?

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  #103  
Old 05-17-2019, 01:08 AM
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And speaking of--what I found earlier is The Journal of Romance Studies, not the journal Romance Studies.
  #104  
Old 05-17-2019, 07:08 AM
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I am saying his claims differ quite a bit from crazy people on youtube. Peer-reviewed means something.
In this case, I think it means the editor of the journal could be fired.

Last edited by Colibri; 05-17-2019 at 07:28 AM.
  #105  
Old 05-17-2019, 07:16 AM
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So, you are a ornithologist, yes? Do you think you are qualified to speak on languages?
I know more than a little about languages. But the main thing is that, as a scientist, I am qualified to speak on the scientific method. Now, the humanities may have different standards than the hard sciences, but they should still follow some basic rules of logic and evidence. Even the most cursory reading of this article shows, as I have described, his methodology is totally bogus. The reasoning is circular, he makes many statements for which there is no evidence and for which he provides no citations, and there is no verification. It completely boggles my mind that any serious journal in any field would publish something like this.
  #106  
Old 05-17-2019, 07:27 AM
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Or a guy with a PhD who published in a peer reviewed journal.
You of all people should realize that having a "Dr." in front of your name doesn't automatically give someone credibility. And peer review doesn't mean you can't apply critical thinking to an article but simply have to accept it.

Once again, I'm going to ask you to provide some "translations" from the article that you think make perfect sense. Then we can discuss the assumptions and leaps of logic behind it.

Last edited by Colibri; 05-17-2019 at 07:27 AM.
  #107  
Old 05-17-2019, 09:28 AM
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Colibri, are there not some respected ornithology journals out there that the layman would find boring and even obtuse?

Here's one: http://ardea.nou.nu/

I am sure that this- to a layman- would make great bird cage lining. Rather poetic also.
There is a range of ornithological journals, ranging from major widely respected journals to small regional ones. The level of peer review and the importance of the articles likewise varies.

I've been a reviewer for ornithological and other scientific journals. I've been sent some crappy and amateurish articles that I've dinged and recommended not be published. But I've never been sent one as bad as this one. In any scientific journal I know of, an article like this would have been consigned by the editor to the circular file without ever sending it out for review.

You don't have to be a primatologist to see the flaws in an article about Bigfoot, or an astronomer to debunk one on UFOs, or a geologist to debunk one on Atlantis. All you need is the ability to detect bullshit when you see it. And this article is bullshit from beginning to end.
  #108  
Old 05-17-2019, 01:21 PM
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Do you ever tire of beclowning yourself?
It is you that used as a refutation a cite from some nutjob who wrote a pseudoscientific book on the manuscript that was hailed by the fucking Fortean times.
  #109  
Old 05-17-2019, 01:28 PM
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Paper is cheap and widely available. Vellum, historically, has been neither cheap nor widely available.
Vellum was invented precisely because paper was neither cheap nor widely available. It was created as a response to a paper embargo.
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  #110  
Old 05-17-2019, 01:31 PM
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You of all people should realize that having a "Dr." in front of your name doesn't automatically give someone credibility. And peer review doesn't mean you can't apply critical thinking to an article but simply have to accept it.

Once again, I'm going to ask you to provide some "translations" from the article that you think make perfect sense. Then we can discuss the assumptions and leaps of logic behind it.
Sure. No doubt. But Darren Garrison's big refutation is by a guy who wrote a nutjob pseudoscientific competing book on the manuscript that was hailed by the fucking Fortean times. So, altho yes, PhD doesnt automatically= Right, it certainly is more credible than being hailed by the Fortean Times. You have said you consider the manuscript untranslatable, thus how on earth did the computer game writer Pelling manage it? Why are you considering his bogus pseudoscientific refutation Ok, while getting down on Cheshire, who at least is a scientist?


"Figure 30 shows the word ‘palina’ which is a rod for measuring the depth of water, sometimes called a stadia rod or ruler....Figure 31 shows an illustration of a bearded monk in his washtub, from the monastery where the manuscript was created. The words read: opat a sa (it is abbot). His is one of very few male faces seen in the manuscript. The word opát survives to mean abbot in Polish, Czech and Slovak, demonstrating that proto-Romance reached as far as Eastern Europe. In Western Europe other variants survive: abat (Catalan), abad (Spanish), abbé (French), whilst the Latin is ‘abbas’. This also demonstrates the phonetic overlap between the sounds ‘p’ and ‘b’ in the manuscript alphabet....Figure 33 shows two women dealing with five children in a bath. The words describe different temperaments: tozosr (buzzing: too noisy), orla la (on the edge: losing patience), tolora (silly/foolish), noror (cloudy: dull/sad), or aus (golden bird: well behaved), oleios (oiled: slippery). These words survive in Catalan [tozos], Portuguese [orla], Portuguese [tolos], Romanian [noros], Catalan [or aus] and Portuguese [oleio]. The words orla la describe the mood of the woman on the left and may well be the root of the French phrase ‘oh là là’, which has a very similar sentiment...Figure 35 shows Folio 17 left: Mediterranean Sea holy (Eryngium bourgatii). The first line of the accompanying text reads: ‘pésaut om eos é péor é péia t’ (sorry/apologies people, they have the worst/potent sting). Sea holly has very prickly defences against being eaten by herbivores. The illustration shows the plant both in flower and in seed, where the heads are bluish and reddish-brown respectively. The text words survive in various Romance languages and Latin: pésaut (Old French) om (Romanian) eos (Latin) é péor é péia (Spanish) t [terminus] (Latin). The plant is native along much of the Mediterranean coastline. Mediterranean Sea holly contains volatile defensive chemicals called germacrenes, which are antimicrobial and insecticidal, so it was a useful antiseptic and repellent when applied to the skin."

Now, yes, Cheshire only translated short phrases, but they make sense to me.
  #111  
Old 05-17-2019, 01:46 PM
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Gizmodo article.
  #112  
Old 05-17-2019, 02:00 PM
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And the Beeb. I'm kind of suprised to see news outlets mentioning the "oops, never mind."


(Also, at least I wasn't the only one confused about where the paper was published.)
  #113  
Old 05-17-2019, 02:37 PM
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The Guardian gets a quote from Cheshire. (Paraphrased "Fools! They laugh at me now, but we will see who gets the last laugh!.")
  #114  
Old 05-17-2019, 02:40 PM
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That's the problem with peer review. Sometimes it's better to get someone actually knowledgeable about the subject to review it, instead of your peers.
  #115  
Old 05-17-2019, 02:44 PM
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Originally Posted by bonzer
Which, oddly, was pretty much your same reaction the last time a - completely different - supposed solution gained this amount of media traction. So, for example:
"Of course, maybe his "solve" is wrong. I dunno. "
So this time round the big difference to be inferred is thus that you don't now harbour any such caveats or doubts about this solution? At least that is well in line with the current remainder of this thread.

Last edited by bonzer; 05-17-2019 at 02:48 PM.
  #116  
Old 05-17-2019, 04:20 PM
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Sigh. My favorite YouTube VMer was picking out words, not in Proto-Romance, but in Proto-Romani. He was also starting with picking out the short strings (labels?) associated with illustrations. He concentrated on the astrology section.

I didn't bookmark him, though, thinking that there can't be that many VM videos. Hah! I'll probably never find it again.
  #117  
Old 05-17-2019, 04:30 PM
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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full...4.2019.1599566

That's the actual article, and seems legit.
Interesting that for a text written in vulgar latin, he's chosen to assume different glyphs for U and V.
  #118  
Old 05-17-2019, 04:44 PM
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I didn't bookmark him, though, thinking that there can't be that many VM videos. Hah! I'll probably never find it again.

In the comments on this page, two partial solvers showed up just yesterday. Cvetka Kocjancic figured out that it is in Carniolan-Illyrian and is pretty sure who wrote it, and Robert Funicella doesn't say what language it is in, but he seems to know at least one letter.
  #119  
Old 05-17-2019, 05:02 PM
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Now, yes, Cheshire only translated short phrases, but they make sense to me.
If this is translation, we will have to revise the definition. It does not mean "wild speculation without proof".
  #120  
Old 05-17-2019, 05:07 PM
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The guy whose article you guys think "took down" Cheshire is a avowed Voynich "expert" who wrote his own book where he "solved" the manuscript (which you say no one can do, so....) who has a MBA!
Nick Pelling wrote a book on the Voynich Manuscript and has created a website about it (and other ciphers), but I can find no indication anywhere that he claims to have "solved" it. Where are you getting your information?
  #121  
Old 05-17-2019, 05:10 PM
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The average contributor to this thread has read a few articles about the manuscript on the web and perhaps viewed a video or two. Possibly even looked at the online scan of it. IOW, the average contributor has no claim to any expertise on the topic of translating the thing. Being bilingual means just about jack and shit unless you can prove that one of the languages in which you are fluent is connected with the manuscript.The manuscript may well be a fraud and nonsense, but I enjoy the way it causes lazy pseudo-intellectuals to smugly self-identify. It is invaluable in that respect.
  #122  
Old 05-17-2019, 05:19 PM
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The average contributor to this thread has read a few articles about the manuscript on the web and perhaps viewed a video or two. Possibly even looked at the online scan of it. IOW, the average contributor has no claim to any expertise on the topic of translating the thing. Being bilingual means just about jack and shit unless you can prove that one of the languages in which you are fluent is connected with the manuscript.The manuscript may well be a fraud and nonsense, but I enjoy the way it causes lazy pseudo-intellectuals to smugly self-identify. It is invaluable in that respect.
I've read this post several times, and aside from apparently meaning to be vaguely insulting to a group of people I can't narrow down, I have no idea what you're trying to say.

Last edited by TimeWinder; 05-17-2019 at 05:20 PM.
  #123  
Old 05-17-2019, 05:47 PM
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Doesn't an academic translation still take three lines?


(text being translated) WORD . . . . . WORD . . . . . WORD . . . . . WORD.

(translation of each word, including affixes)
once+hypoth . . . . cat+young+sort . . . . born+past . . . . stable+obj+loc

(English translation) Once upon a time, a kitten was born in a stable.

When you go through the three lines, you know, among other things, that this is a story (+hypoth) not a statement of fact. You can also then apply the WORDs to other sentences.

For a VM translation, I'd want two additional lines. First, an image of the line being translated. Second, a list of the symbols in each word, in clean VA letters (Voynich Alphabet). Then we can check to be sure that WORD is a reasonable estimate of what's been written.

And he should have a table of his VA, so that we can check his estimates easily. And better explanations on why he thinks the gallows with one loop is an L while the gallows with two loops in an M. He just lists all of his decisions as fiats. And no, his VA does not match anyone else's VA.

Last edited by Yllaria; 05-17-2019 at 05:50 PM.
  #124  
Old 05-17-2019, 05:48 PM
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I would say vaguely is generous. I see at least one blatant swipe.
  #125  
Old 05-17-2019, 08:24 PM
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Sure. No doubt. But Darren Garrison's big refutation is by a guy who wrote a nutjob pseudoscientific competing book on the manuscript that was hailed by the fucking Fortean times. So, altho yes, PhD doesnt automatically= Right, it certainly is more credible than being hailed by the Fortean Times. You have said you consider the manuscript untranslatable, thus how on earth did the computer game writer Pelling manage it? Why are you considering his bogus pseudoscientific refutation Ok, while getting down on Cheshire, who at least is a scientist?
I haven't said anything about Pelling. My comments have been directed at the article itself. If Cheshire is a scientist, he appears to be entirely unacquainted with the scientific method.

Anyway, thanks for the quote from the article. It's ideal for showing just how bogus Cheshire's "methodology" is.

Quote:
"Figure 30 shows the word ‘palina’ which is a rod for measuring the depth of water, sometimes called a stadia rod or ruler....
There is no indication that the illustrated object is a palina or other measuring rod. It is not shown in association with water or being used to take a measurement. It's not clear exactly what it is supposed to be, especially with the snakelike head attached.

Quote:
Figure 31 shows an illustration of a bearded monk in his washtub, from the monastery where the manuscript was created. The words read: opat a sa (it is abbot). His is one of very few male faces seen in the manuscript. The word opát survives to mean abbot in Polish, Czech and Slovak, demonstrating that proto-Romance reached as far as Eastern Europe. In Western Europe other variants survive: abat (Catalan), abad (Spanish), abbé (French), whilst the Latin is ‘abbas’. This also demonstrates the phonetic overlap between the sounds ‘p’ and ‘b’ in the manuscript alphabet....
The illustration shows a bearded man in what appears to be a tub. There is nothing to indicate he is supposed to be a monk, let alone an abbot. Many men at the time wore beards, and he doesn't appear to be tonsured as a monk would likely be. (However, he may be wearing some kind of a cap.) There is also no evidence the manuscript was written in a monastery.

All we know about the figure is that it is male. Cheshire could equally well have searched through Romance languages for any other words referring to a male or male occupation, and come up with a different identification. Here we also have an example of Cheshire's circular reasoning: he has identified the figure as an abbot, and his transliteration of the word next to it is the same as the word for abbot in a non-Romance language, Polish. Since he has identified the language as being proto-Romance, that means proto-Romance must have extended to Poland.

Quote:
Figure 33 shows two women dealing with five children in a bath. The words describe different temperaments: tozosr (buzzing: too noisy), orla la (on the edge: losing patience), tolora (silly/foolish), noror (cloudy: dull/sad), or aus (golden bird: well behaved), oleios (oiled: slippery). These words survive in Catalan [tozos], Portuguese [orla], Portuguese [tolos], Romanian [noros], Catalan [or aus] and Portuguese [oleio]. The words orla la describe the mood of the woman on the left and may well be the root of the French phrase ‘oh là là’, which has a very similar sentiment...
This is a particularly nonsensical one. Cheshire doesn't seem to be a particularly good observer, since the five smaller figures are not children, since they all have breasts, quite prominent in the case of a couple of them. Why some figures are smaller than others is obscure, but there is no reason to think they are children.

And why should the words identify different temperaments, and if so, why these in particular? All of the figures show the same bland expression, so don't seem to illustrate different emotional states. The words Cheshire came up with don't even represent temperaments in the modern languages he found them in; Cheshire just assumes these words are being used figuratively. Do any other medieval texts on health identify a similar set of temperaments? Why not the classical humoral temperaments of choleric, phlegmatic, melancholic, and sanguine? At least those would make sense. Why not Happy, Grumpy, Bashful, Sneezy, and Dopey? And claiming that Portuguese "orla" for "on the edge" as the source of French "Oh, la, la!" seems to be some kind of parody.

Quote:
Figure 35 shows Folio 17 left: Mediterranean Sea holy (Eryngium bourgatii). The first line of the accompanying text reads: ‘pésaut om eos é péor é péia t’ (sorry/apologies people, they have the worst/potent sting). Sea holly has very prickly defences against being eaten by herbivores. The illustration shows the plant both in flower and in seed, where the heads are bluish and reddish-brown respectively. The text words survive in various Romance languages and Latin: pésaut (Old French) om (Romanian) eos (Latin) é péor é péia (Spanish) t [terminus] (Latin). The plant is native along much of the Mediterranean coastline. Mediterranean Sea holly contains volatile defensive chemicals called germacrenes, which are antimicrobial and insecticidal, so it was a useful antiseptic and repellent when applied to the skin."[/I]
The identification of the plant as Sea Holly is questionable. The structure of the flower is quite different. Leaving that aside, and assuming it is a really bad illustration of that species, the best he can come up with is "they have a potent sting." (It doesn't actually sting, like a nettle, but has spines.) Sea Holly's most notable medicinal use is an aphrodisiac, and the part that is used is the root. If it actually is Sea Holly, I would expect a medieval herbal to show the root as part of the illustration, and mention that as well as the other medicinal uses described by Cheshire.

(Actually, one reason I think the MS is a fabrication is that the botanical illustrations are so bad. Very few of the plants illustrated can be reliably identified with real plants used by herbalists. The illustrations were either made up or are by the worst illustrator in the world.)


Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDeth
Now, yes, Cheshire only translated short phrases, but they make sense to me.
Yes, and there we have our problem.

Last edited by Colibri; 05-17-2019 at 08:53 PM.
  #126  
Old 05-17-2019, 08:42 PM
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The average contributor to this thread has read a few articles about the manuscript on the web and perhaps viewed a video or two. Possibly even looked at the online scan of it. IOW, the average contributor has no claim to any expertise on the topic of translating the thing. Being bilingual means just about jack and shit unless you can prove that one of the languages in which you are fluent is connected with the manuscript.The manuscript may well be a fraud and nonsense, but I enjoy the way it causes lazy pseudo-intellectuals to smugly self-identify. It is invaluable in that respect.
What a completely worthless post. Since this can't be appropriately responded to here, I invite you to to continue this discussion in your long-running Pit thread (though I'm pretty sure you won't show up).

Last edited by Colibri; 05-17-2019 at 08:42 PM.
  #127  
Old 05-17-2019, 08:59 PM
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This is a particularly nonsensical one. Cheshire doesn't seem to be a particularly good observer, since the five smaller figures are not children, since they all have breasts, quite prominent in the case of a couple of them. Why some figures are smaller than others is obscure, but there is no reason to think they are children.

I'm not bothering to dig it up again right now, but IIRC Cheshire claims that at least one of the illustrations shows the queen and some foreign dignitaries bathing together and having trade talks.
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Old 05-17-2019, 09:33 PM
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Incidentally, checking Cheshire's profile on LinkedIn, his Ph.D. isn't in linguistics but in Human Behavioral Ecology. He has a Masters in Insect Ecology, and a Bachelors in Anthropology, which he received in 1994, making him at least around 45 now. He lists his profession as "science writer."

Last edited by Colibri; 05-17-2019 at 09:34 PM.
  #129  
Old 05-17-2019, 11:40 PM
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Take a look at his Twitter account (linked on this page.) I'm not saying scientists should be all business all the time, but there is nothing that seems academic about it.


He does have a bunch of books, though. Maybe next up Scary Creatures of the Voynich Manuscript?
  #130  
Old 05-18-2019, 12:01 AM
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But you gotta hand it to him, he sure knows how to start heated discussions.
  #131  
Old 05-18-2019, 05:08 AM
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I think I figured out the key to the manuscript. If I'm right here is the first line:

SPOILER:
Be sure to drink your Ovaltine
  #132  
Old 05-18-2019, 05:29 AM
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University backtracks on "code solved" claim.

Last edited by RobDog; 05-18-2019 at 05:30 AM.
  #133  
Old 05-18-2019, 08:03 AM
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Here's the first paragraph from his article Linguistically dating and locating the origin of Manuscript MS408 (2018)*


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerard Cheshire
Having announced the discovery of the writing system used for manuscript
MS408, in the paper titled Linguistic Missing Links, it has become apparent that
the concept of a solution comprising an unknown language and alphabet has
been difficult for some to accept, despite the paradigm being entirely logical and
the argument being supported by a raft of supporting evidence. Above all, it is
apparent that those unfamiliar with the science of palaeography have a naïve
expectation that the solution should offer a means of simply rendering the
manuscript text into modern language without the application of effort and the
deployment of intelligence.
Translation: "My translations don't make sense to anyone but me.** But if you don't understand them, it's obviously because you are stupid."

In this and his other publications his extreme arrogance is evident. The combination of ignorance and arrogance is of course typical of those that think they have suddenly solved a mystery that has stumped everyone else, as we often see in the more peculiar visitors to the board.

*This and his other previous "publication" on the Voynich MS are listed with a source of "Science Surveys." I have been unable to find any journal by this name, and since they are called pre-prints I would guess that they have never actually passed peer-review or been formally published. The recent article seems to be the guy's first scientific research publication of any kind. (And odds are that the journal will publish a retraction if it has any integrity.)

**And evidently now DrDeth.

Last edited by Colibri; 05-18-2019 at 08:20 AM.
  #134  
Old 05-18-2019, 08:59 AM
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In this and his other publications his extreme arrogance is evident. The combination of ignorance and arrogance is of course typical of those that think they have suddenly solved a mystery that has stumped everyone else, as we often see in the more peculiar visitors to the board.
I'm hoping that he is the one who wrote the breathless press release praising him as a sooper genius. Because it would make me sad to think that there are two giant tits* writing there.





Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
(And odds are that the journal will publish a retraction if it has any integrity.)

According to this post, the journal's most popular article before this one has been viewed 1720 times since 2014. (Very roughly one view per day.) The Voynich one has been viewed more that 60,000 times. They'll probably give him a monthly column, dribbling out translations. Voynich disproves evolution and relativity! Voynich built the pyramids! Voynich predicts 9/11!




*Not the kind ot tits you like, Colibri**

**I mean birds, sheesh!
  #135  
Old 05-18-2019, 10:18 AM
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University backtracks on "code solved" claim.
Great link, RobDog. I particularly like this line:
The University of Bristol said that the work by its research associate Gerard Cheshire, which was published in the Romance Studies journal, had caused disquiet among fellow academics.
  #136  
Old 05-18-2019, 10:37 AM
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Here's the first paragraph from his article Linguistically dating and locating the origin of Manuscript MS408 (2018)*




Translation: "My translations don't make sense to anyone but me.** But if you don't understand them, it's obviously because you are stupid."
....

**And evidently now DrDeth.
I cant translate anything using his system. But the few short snippets match the pictures.
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Old 05-18-2019, 10:46 AM
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Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
I cant translate anything using his system. But the few short snippets match the pictures.
According to Cheshire (and you). But no one else.

In other news, Nostradamus predicted WW2.
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Old 05-18-2019, 01:22 PM
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. . . the five smaller figures are not children, since they all have breasts, quite prominent in the case of a couple of them. Why some figures are smaller than others is obscure, but there is no reason to think they are children. . . .
In medieval art, often size was used to indicate how important figures were. More important people were drawn as bigger. That's assuming that the figures were drawn to plan rather than some being made smaller because the drafter was running out of room.
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Old 05-18-2019, 01:26 PM
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In medieval art, often size was used to indicate how important figures were. More important people were drawn as bigger. That's assuming that the figures were drawn to plan rather than some being made smaller because the drafter was running out of room.
You could be right; this is not my level of expertise. But it is not out of line to say, "Cite?"
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Old 05-18-2019, 01:38 PM
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You could be right; this is not my level of expertise. But it is not out of line to say, "Cite?"
I'm mostly going by old art history classes.
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Old 05-18-2019, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
I cant translate anything using his system. But the few short snippets match the pictures.
That's because he made the translation match what he tells you the picture represents! In most cases, there is no reason to assume the illustration is of what he says the word is. The whole thing is circular.

And actually, as I pointed out, in the case of the "children," the words he transliterates 1) aren't even temperaments. Since when are "buzzing," "on the edge," "cloudy," "golden bird," and "oiled" temperaments? 2) even though he chose words from three different languages spread over 2000 miles apart, the only way he can get the words to even vaguely to match temperaments is to imagine they are being used in outlandishly figurative ways.

You really don't get this whole methodology thing, do you?

Last edited by Colibri; 05-18-2019 at 02:28 PM.
  #142  
Old 05-18-2019, 02:40 PM
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In medieval art, often size was used to indicate how important figures were. More important people were drawn as bigger. That's assuming that the figures were drawn to plan rather than some being made smaller because the drafter was running out of room.
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You could be right; this is not my level of expertise. But it is not out of line to say, "Cite?"
It was common to illustrate more important people larger, as for example Edward the Confessor in the Bayeux Tapestry. In the Voynich illustration, the larger figures are wearing tiaras or some other headgear, and have much more elaborate hairdos, suggesting they may be noblewomen and the others lesser members of their court.
  #143  
Old 05-18-2019, 03:02 PM
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And actually, as I pointed out, in the case of the "children," the words he transliterates 1) aren't even temperaments. Since when are "buzzing," "on the edge," "cloudy," "golden bird," and "oiled" temperaments?

My favorite is where he claims that "life-force pots" means pregnant women.
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Old 05-18-2019, 03:09 PM
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I've been unable to find out the title of his Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Bristol website or his own websites, which is distinctly odd. He only cites himself twice in his own article, both to articles listed as "preprints" and not actual publications. Many of the other references in his article also look rather dicey.
  #145  
Old 05-18-2019, 03:24 PM
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Nick Pelling wrote a book on the Voynich Manuscript and has created a website about it (and other ciphers), but I can find no indication anywhere that he claims to have "solved" it. Where are you getting your information?

Pelling talks about his ideas in new comments today, starting here.


On a related topic, look in the comments from the blog entry I mentioned earlier for comments by Rick Sheeger: it has been noticed that "Richard Sheeger" is a perfect anagram for Gerard Cheshire, so you can add sock puppeteer to his resume.
  #146  
Old 05-18-2019, 03:30 PM
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Check out this hilarious comment from Sheeger/Cheshire:


Quote:
The kind of people who work in academia don’t have egos and they tend to be passive by nature, so they find this sort of pseudo-intellectual noise rather unpleasant and unnecessary. They studiously get on with trying out ideas and they don’t offer them to the arena unless they are sure they have something worthwhile to present.
  #147  
Old 05-18-2019, 03:42 PM
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Nm. Misread.

Last edited by pulykamell; 05-18-2019 at 03:43 PM.
  #148  
Old 05-18-2019, 05:18 PM
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Check out this hilarious comment from Sheeger/Cheshire:
You're not going back to that beloved of Fortean times pseudoscientist nutcases again, with his competing Manuscript book/theory?

The reason why I am not buying any of you other cites is because you haven't conceded this Pelling guy is a total woo-woo nutcase.
  #149  
Old 05-18-2019, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
You're not going back to that beloved of Fortean times pseudoscientist nutcases again, with his competing Manuscript book/theory?

The reason why I am not buying any of you other cites is because you haven't conceded this Pelling guy is a total woo-woo nutcase.

A general rule of thumb in life for finding the right answer is to find the side that you are on and pick the opposite. I am just devastated at your disapproval.
  #150  
Old 05-18-2019, 05:39 PM
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The reason why I am not buying any of you other cites is because you haven't conceded this Pelling guy is a total woo-woo nutcase.
Yeah, that's totally rational.
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