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Old 05-16-2020, 08:06 AM
solost is offline
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Yet another “left it out is it ok” question: salsa, 4-5 hours


I have no problem consuming it myself, but for the sake of my wife and kids I want to make sure.

I made a batch of salsa the day before yesterday, “garden fresh” style- all raw ingredients: jalapeño, habanero, bell pepper, onion, garlic, lime juice, diced tomatoes out of cans, dried oregano, salt. Yesterday I left it out, as mentioned for 4 or 5 hours. I used my last jalapeño on this salsa and don’t want to make a grocery run again soon! I’m guessing the acidity from the lime juice and tomatoes is a protective factor, but again, I want to use an abundance of caution for my family.
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Old 05-16-2020, 08:33 AM
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FWIW, I googled.

On the Counter
Freshly made salsa only keeps for two hours outside of the refrigerator before bacteria begins to grow to dangerous levels. If the surrounding air temperatures are 90 degrees Fahrenheit or higher, the salsa only remains safe to eat for one hour before bacteria levels begin to rise. Do not refrigerate or freeze fresh salsa that sits out longer than recommended. Instead, throw it away and thoroughly wash the container with hot, soapy water.

https://oureverydaylife.com/long-can...out-41432.html

Shame to waste it....
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Old 05-16-2020, 09:05 AM
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If it was in the refrigerator and nice and cold before you left it out then you just missed the eat by time. At this point you'd be playing Salsa Roulette. Your problem is the fresh ingredients you used providing a starter culture for all sorts of bacteria.
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Old 05-16-2020, 09:12 AM
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Dammit. Yeah I was thinking about native bacteria since it’s all raw ingredients. Would I maybe be able to tell if there was bacterial activity by any bubbles forming? At this point I won’t let my family eat it but I may still play roulette. It’s a tasty batch and I don’t want to dump it.
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Old 05-16-2020, 09:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solost View Post
Dammit. Yeah I was thinking about native bacteria since it’s all raw ingredients. Would I maybe be able to tell if there was bacterial activity by any bubbles forming? At this point I won’t let my family eat it but I may still play roulette. It’s a tasty batch and I don’t want to dump it.
You need to take multiple samples, let the bacteria grow in the samples for set periods of time at a known temperature, then use a microscope to count the number of bacteria found after each incubation period. Take those numbers and you can use extrapolation to determine the bacteria count in the salsa at the time the samples were taken.

Or just consider it a lesson learned.
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Old 05-16-2020, 09:29 AM
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No vinegar or lemon juice in the recipe?
EDIT: Wait, I missed the lime juice. Then it'll depend on how much lime juice there was.

Last edited by Chronos; 05-16-2020 at 09:30 AM.
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Old 05-16-2020, 09:56 AM
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People were eating salsa hundreds of years before refrigeration. A few hours out wont hurt anyone. And garlic has been an antibacterial for centuries.
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Old 05-16-2020, 10:05 AM
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Also a proper salsa has a shit-ton of salt in it. That would prevent microbial growth quite well.
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Old 05-16-2020, 10:09 AM
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Originally Posted by lobotomyboy63 View Post
Do not refrigerate or freeze fresh salsa that sits out longer than recommended. Instead, throw it away and thoroughly wash the container with hot, soapy water.
And then make sure to rinse the container thoroughly or the next batch will taste like cilantro.
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Old 05-16-2020, 10:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
No vinegar or lemon juice in the recipe?
EDIT: Wait, I missed the lime juice. Then it'll depend on how much lime juice there was.
Just the juice of one particularly juicy lime. So probably not enough to fight antibacterial activity.
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Old 05-16-2020, 11:45 AM
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I don't know about garlic being antibacterial... It's said to be dangerous to make homemade garlic-infused oil, because of the risk of botulism.
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Old 05-16-2020, 11:48 AM
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I wouldn't hesitate to eat this salsa.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solost View Post
Just the juice of one particularly juicy lime. So probably not enough to fight antibacterial activity.
There's acidic tomatoes, too.
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Old 05-16-2020, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
I don't know about garlic being antibacterial... It's said to be dangerous to make homemade garlic-infused oil, because of the risk of botulism.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10594976

Quote:
Abstract

Allicin, one of the active principles of freshly crushed garlic homogenates, has a variety of antimicrobial activities. Allicin in its pure form was found to exhibit i) antibacterial activity against a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including multidrug-resistant enterotoxicogenic strains of Escherichia coli; ii) antifungal activity, particularly against Candida albicans; iii) antiparasitic activity, including some major human intestinal protozoan parasites such as Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia; and iv) antiviral activity. The main antimicrobial effect of allicin is due to its chemical reaction with thiol groups of various enzymes, e.g. alcohol dehydrogenase, thioredoxin reductase, and RNA polymerase, which can affect essential metabolism of cysteine proteinase activity involved in the virulence of E. histolytica.
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