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Old 05-14-2020, 08:03 AM
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Looking for new ideas for pork shoulder / pulled pork recipes


So my go-to with pork shoulder is to give it a dry rub, slow-smoke it for 12+ hours and serve with BBQ sauce, classic American BBQ style (sort of North Carolina style, to get specific- I like a thinner, vinegary sauce with a hint of tomato).

This approach has served me well over the years. A few months ago, before the pandemic set in, I smoked two big shoulders and froze it in portions in quart-sized freezer bags. We're almost done with the leftover smoked pulled pork, and my wife and kids are getting kind of over it. I think smoked meats are kind of like a rich, chocolate dessert-- delicious occasionally, but eaten too often gets to be a little much. Plus smoking is probably not the healthiest way to always cook meat.

Recently when I saw the meat shelves starting to get bare, there were still a lot of cheap pork shoulders, and I bought and froze a couple ~8 pounders. So now I'm contemplating what to do with them. Hawaiian style? Asian style? Carnitas? Something else? Slow cook in our crock pot? Fast cook in our Instant Pot?

I've been looking at different recipes online, I'm more interested in hearing experiences like "I tried X recipe and I knocked it out of the park!" Also, do not need answer fast-- I forgot to take one out in advance for this weekend and it'll probably take almost a week to thaw out those bad boys.
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Old 05-14-2020, 09:50 AM
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This recipe is phenomenal. Cider Braised pork shoulder. try it without the sour creme first.

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/26...pork-shoulder/
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Old 05-14-2020, 10:18 AM
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You misspelled "Western North Carolina style."
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Old 05-14-2020, 10:26 AM
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Oh, i have a couple ideas. The first would be cochinita pibil. Recipe here.. But it requires some specialized ingredients like achiote paste and plantain/banana leaves. You can skimp on the latter, but not on the former.

The other -- an Italian milk-braised pork dish. Here's one recipe. They're all generally the same idea: braise pork in milk until the milk until it cooks through. That recipe also contains heavy cream -- I don't use heavy cream, just whole milk. Some recipes don't even add the aromatics like sage. I think the purist recipe is just pork and milk. Lemme check my cookbooks. Yes, Marcella Hazan (the Julia Child of Italian cookery) only has butter, oil, pork, salt, pepper, and whole milk in her recipe. That's it. No sage, no lemon, none of that stuff. When you're done with it, the sauce looks like a curdled mess, but it is so deliciously porky and caramelized. Whirl it with an immersion blender if you want it to look nice. Traditionally, this is made with pork loin, but American pork loin is way too lean for the cooking time required here -- like 2 1/2 - 3 hours according to Hazan. It's an unexpectedly delicious dish.

I also agree with turner's suggestion of cider-braised pork shoulder. It's like the pork version of Flemish beef carbonnade, which is beef braised in beer (usually like a belgian farmhouse ale or red ale or something of that sort.)
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Old 05-14-2020, 10:28 AM
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My go-to method for pork shoulder is a lot like this recipe. I'm fond a rub of salt, pepper, and garlic powder along with rosemary and/or tarragon or sometimes allspice and dry mustard. One important step left out of the linked recipe is deeply scoring the fat layer so you end up with delicious puffs of cracklin on the top. I would also go with something deeper than a baking sheet or you'll constantly worry about it overflowing. I do final crisping at 400-425 for about 45 minutes to an hour rather than 500 for 20 minutes. It works just as well and reduces the possibility of filling your kitchen with smoke.

A shoulder is often the main attraction of an old-fashioned Sunday dinner in our house, with mashed potatoes, stewed tomatoes, sauerkraut(nobody but me eats that), and fresh rolls or cornbread.

I'm ignoring the backstory that calls pulled pork "BBQ"
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Old 05-14-2020, 10:35 AM
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Carne Adovada: this is an outstanding recipe.
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Old 05-14-2020, 11:32 AM
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Ooh, some good ideas so far! Keep 'em coming.

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Originally Posted by turner View Post
This recipe is phenomenal. Cider Braised pork shoulder. try it without the sour creme first.

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/26...pork-shoulder/
This definitely sounds worth a try!

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Originally Posted by ZonexandScout View Post
You misspelled "Western North Carolina style."
Heh, I was actually going to specify "Western" but thought I'd be getting unnecessarily specific. Should have known I''d be called out for that here!

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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Oh, i have a couple ideas. The first would be cochinita pibil. Recipe here.. But it requires some specialized ingredients like achiote paste and plantain/banana leaves. You can skimp on the latter, but not on the former.

The other -- an Italian milk-braised pork dish. Here's one recipe...
I like the cochinita pibil recipe! I am leaning towards something Mexican/south of the border.

That Italian milk-braised recipe sounds weird but intriguing. I'm not even sure what you'd serve with that- the recipe didn't have any suggestions. I'm sure the resulting sauce would be good maybe sopped up with some crusty bread.

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Originally Posted by Bayaker View Post
My go-to method for pork shoulder is a lot like this recipe. ...

A shoulder is often the main attraction of an old-fashioned Sunday dinner in our house, with mashed potatoes, stewed tomatoes, sauerkraut(nobody but me eats that), and fresh rolls or cornbread.

I'm ignoring the backstory that calls pulled pork "BBQ"
I like this cooking style idea. Simple but good, and creating a crispy cracklin's outside is appealing. And pork 'n sauerkraut does get in the rotation- my 17 yo son, who's ordinarily finicky, LOVES pork and sauerkraut, oddly. He often bugs me to make it (it's my Grandma's simple recipe, basically just simmering pork and sauerkraut with potatoes and sauteed onions).

BTW though, what did you mean by "I'm ignoring the backstory that calls pulled pork "BBQ" ". Not getting the joke there. Slow-smoked pulled pork is considered BBQ, is it not?

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Carne Adovada: this is an outstanding recipe.
This one sounds like a winner! It'll take finding some ingredients that I don;t think the grocery store will have, but as mentioned I'm kinda planning long-term here-- probably the weekend after this coming one.

Last edited by solost; 05-14-2020 at 11:35 AM.
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Old 05-14-2020, 12:01 PM
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We really like having it Korean taco style (not always with the tortillas, just with rice). Cook it and shred it (in the winter sometimes even use the Instant Pot and then 10 minutes under the broiler) and then a good sauce and serve it with lots of kim chi. Delicious!
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Old 05-14-2020, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by solost View Post
Ooh, some good ideas so far! Keep 'em coming.

This one sounds like a winner! It'll take finding some ingredients that I don;t think the grocery store will have, but as mentioned I'm kinda planning long-term here-- probably the weekend after this coming one.
Kenji knows his shit and the science behind it. The addition of fish sauce and raisins gives a nice bump to the umami. FWIW, I order my dried peppers from Amazon, especially the pasilla chilis, as they are just not available around here. For some reason, they're always 'fresher' than the ones in the local stores, which always seem to be brittle. The nice thing about adovada, carnitas and the like is the different uses for it, such as tacos, burritos, with eggs, etc.
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Old 05-14-2020, 01:41 PM
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Rub it with whatever you want, stick it in a pan, add chicken broth, and cook it on a very slow grill with the lid on.

It's done when the neighbors are crawling over your fence or beating down the front door.

We mostly stand at the kitchen sink and stuff our faces until we collapse.

Pork tamales are one way to go, and chile verde is ALWAYS a winner!


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Old 05-14-2020, 01:59 PM
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I like to use my sous vide at 165F (140 if you want to slice it instead of shredding it) for awhile, anywhere from 1-3 days. Then carefully remove it from the bag, pat it dry, gently apply a dry rub (without rubbing, or it falls apart), then use a blowtorch on it to create a crust. Serve with Korean barbecue sauce.
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Old 05-14-2020, 08:10 PM
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...BTW though, what did you mean by "I'm ignoring the backstory that calls pulled pork "BBQ" ". Not getting the joke there. Slow-smoked pulled pork is considered BBQ, is it not? ...
Not in Texas
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Old 05-14-2020, 08:26 PM
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Yeah, Texans somehow got this weird idea that barbecue involves beef in some bizarre way.

Have you thought about pernil?. I’ve never made it myself, but I’ve devoured it in various Brooklyn restaurants. I know Biggirl makes it — she must have a drop of Caribbean blood in her somewhere — maybe she’ll drop by to advise.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pernil
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Old 05-14-2020, 08:28 PM
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That Italian milk-braised recipe sounds weird but intriguing. I'm not even sure what you'd serve with that- the recipe didn't have any suggestions. I'm sure the resulting sauce would be good maybe sopped up with some crusty bread..
Yep. Just a simple starch like polenta. Or you can do risotto if you're feeling fancy and want some more work to do. Not much to go with it. Let me quote Macella Hazan's intro to the recipe. I think it's short enough that it shouldn't fall afar from copyright issues:

Quote:
If among the tens of thousands of dishes that constitute the recorded repertory of Italian regional cooking, one were to choose just a handful that most clearly express the genius of the cuisine, this one would be among them. Aside from a minimal amount of fat required to brown the meat, it has only two components: a loin of pork and milk. As they slowly cook together, they are transformed, The pork acquires a delicacy of texture and flavor that lead some to mistake it for veal, and the milk disappears to be replaces by clusters of delicious, nut-brown sauce.
Like I said, she is talking about loin there. Her specific recipe is rib roast, but she also does say "another cut of pork that is well suited to this dish the the boneless roll of muscle at the back of the neck, sometimes known as Boston butt". That's your pork shoulder, basically. That's what I make this dish with. Just serve it with a fairly neutral starch, and you're good to go.

Last edited by pulykamell; 05-14-2020 at 08:31 PM.
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Old 05-14-2020, 09:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Yeah, Texans somehow got this weird idea that barbecue involves beef in some bizarre way.

Have you thought about pernil?. I’ve never made it myself, but I’ve devoured it in various Brooklyn restaurants. I know Biggirl makes it — she must have a drop of Caribbean blood in her somewhere — maybe she’ll drop by to advise.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pernil
A drop of Caribbean blood? I will cutchu! I'm so Puerto Rican I can vote in their elections.

Everybody makes pernil there own way. Basics are: A shoulder with skin. A slow oven and a knife to make many holes in the beast for. . . The marinade.

My marinade consists of olive oil, vinegar, pepper, Adobo, recaito, sazon, oregano, fresh garlic, fennel seeds (not at all 'authentic' but you can't go wrong with fennel seed in pork), cumin and paprika. No salt, adobo is saltier than salt. I do not have measurements. I look at the pig and then eye everything until the paste looks good and there is enough.

And then you stab the fuck out of that shoulder. Stab it and stab it. When it looks like you couldn't possibly stab it any more-- stab it some more. When you're done stabbing it, stab it a little more and take a spoon and put your marinade/paste and spoon it into all the holes. Put the spoon deep into the stab wounds to make sure you fill the whole cavity with marinade. Slather all the leftover marinade all over the pig.

Turn it skin side down, cover with plastic wrap and stick in the fridge for however long you got. I have skipped this step in a pinch and your meat still states fine but, you know, marinade needs to marinate.

When ready for cooking, flip meat skin side up, tent with foil (don't touch the skin!) and put in a 250 degree oven. 2 or 3 or 4, maybe 5 hours later (matters how big your pig is), when the smell is driving you insane and making you leave a trail of drool (check temp, should be at least 135), remove tent and raise temp to 400. When the cuedo (skin) is hard and crunchy, pull it out and let it sit for at least a half an hour (I try at my house to do this, but everyone always comes by and sneaks pieces because OMG! the aroma! It can drive you batty!)
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Old 05-15-2020, 09:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
I like to use my sous vide at 165F (140 if you want to slice it instead of shredding it) for awhile, anywhere from 1-3 days. Then carefully remove it from the bag, pat it dry, gently apply a dry rub (without rubbing, or it falls apart), then use a blowtorch on it to create a crust. Serve with Korean barbecue sauce.
Sous vide I have not ventured into yet. I'm ok waiting 12+ hours, but 1-3 days? I don't know if I have that much patience...

I like the Korean BBQ sauce idea though.

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Originally Posted by Bayaker View Post
Not in Texas
i see, brisket boy. For what it's worth, I do BBQ a lot of beef brisket too!

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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Have you thought about pernil?.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pernil
This one sounds intriguing, too!
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Old 05-15-2020, 10:01 AM
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Save some of the pulled pork to make Brunswick stew.
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Old 05-15-2020, 11:12 AM
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ok make a tater tot waffle put some pulled pork on it (bbq) and top with 2 over easy eggs..... it's whats for breakfast!
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Old 05-15-2020, 12:39 PM
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Biggirl @15:. Thanks for this; generous of you to share the family secrets. I’m gonna print that out and paste it into the big book of home recipes that I only bring out when there’s guests. The Ukulele Lady won’t eat pork shoulder because she is afraid of Fat.
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Old 05-15-2020, 01:36 PM
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My wife does a salt rub and cooks the shoulder at a low temp (250 I think) for four or five hours. Turning up the heat makes the fat softer and makes the salt fall off, so that doesn't work. The pork is very tender after this.
The last one we did we had for dinner, and we had pulled pork, and she made enchiladas with it, and I had it for sandwiches a few days and we're going to finish it off in a stir fry. And we've got another in the fridge.
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Old 05-15-2020, 02:05 PM
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Biggirl @15:. Thanks for this; generous of you to share the family secrets. I’m gonna print that out and paste it into the big book of home recipes that I only bring out when there’s guests. The Ukulele Lady won’t eat pork shoulder because she is afraid of Fat.
I second the thanks, Biggirl! I should have given you credit instead of Ukelele Ike. He did mention pernil first, but then he goes and links to a lousy Wikipedia entry instead of having the basic human decency to post or link to an actual recipe
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Old 05-15-2020, 02:05 PM
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The Ukulele Lady won’t eat pork shoulder because she is afraid of Fat.
I do not like fat. That's one reason the sous vide works so well for me. I trim off as much fat as possible before sous vide and then after I pour much of the fat down the drain when sous vide is complete.
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Old 05-15-2020, 02:15 PM
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Save some of the pulled pork to make Brunswick stew.
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Originally Posted by flaming yawn View Post
ok make a tater tot waffle put some pulled pork on it (bbq) and top with 2 over easy eggs..... it's whats for breakfast!
Ideas for leftovers are great too! I made a mean gumbo awhile back with chicken, shrimp and leftover smoked pulled pork-- I still dream about it sometimes...
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Old 05-15-2020, 02:17 PM
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A drop of Caribbean blood? I will cutchu! I'm so Puerto Rican I can vote in their elections.

Everybody makes pernil there own way. Basics are: A shoulder with skin. A slow oven and a knife to make many holes in the beast for. . . The marinade.

My marinade consists of olive oil, vinegar, pepper, Adobo, recaito, sazon, oregano, fresh garlic, fennel seeds (not at all 'authentic' but you can't go wrong with fennel seed in pork), cumin and paprika. No salt, adobo is saltier than salt. I do not have measurements. I look at the pig and then eye everything until the paste looks good and there is enough.

And then you stab the fuck out of that shoulder. Stab it and stab it. When it looks like you couldn't possibly stab it any more-- stab it some more. When you're done stabbing it, stab it a little more and take a spoon and put your marinade/paste and spoon it into all the holes. Put the spoon deep into the stab wounds to make sure you fill the whole cavity with marinade. Slather all the leftover marinade all over the pig.

Turn it skin side down, cover with plastic wrap and stick in the fridge for however long you got. I have skipped this step in a pinch and your meat still states fine but, you know, marinade needs to marinate.

When ready for cooking, flip meat skin side up, tent with foil (don't touch the skin!) and put in a 250 degree oven. 2 or 3 or 4, maybe 5 hours later (matters how big your pig is), when the smell is driving you insane and making you leave a trail of drool (check temp, should be at least 135), remove tent and raise temp to 400. When the cuedo (skin) is hard and crunchy, pull it out and let it sit for at least a half an hour (I try at my house to do this, but everyone always comes by and sneaks pieces because OMG! the aroma! It can drive you batty!)
White vinegar or cider or?
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Old 05-15-2020, 02:32 PM
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I usually use cider but have used white in a pinch.
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Old 05-16-2020, 03:20 PM
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I usually use cider but have used white in a pinch.
I know you don't use measurements, but can you give an approximation, or at least an idea of relative amounts of the pepper, adobo, recaito, sazon, oregano, fresh garlic, fennel seeds, etc? I've just ordered the adobo, recaito and sazon from Amazon, because I'd like to try my hand at this.

Last edited by Chefguy; 05-16-2020 at 03:22 PM.
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Old 05-16-2020, 04:04 PM
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Pat the shoulder dry, then rub with olive oil. coat it with your favorite dry rub and let it sit for about an hour while you start your fire.
Smoke the shoulder in an off set smoker with hickory splits. Once it hits 140f it is done forming its smoke ring.
Watch it until it hits the color and bark level you like and then wrap it in heavy duty foil. Continue to cook to an internal temp of 205f
Wrap it in a towel and put it in a cooler to rest for an hour or so.

Make your favorite mashed potato recipe. Mine is Yukon Gold mashed with some butter, heavy cream, Parmesan cheese and roasted garlic.

Make your favorite sausage country gravy recipe. Mine has some diced thick cut bacon, Italian sausage, scallions, shallots and whole milk.

Slice a French baguette on a wide bias and lightly toast.

Assemble your bread, pulled pork mashed potatoes and country gravy into a nice hot pulled pork and gravy sandwich, with mashed potatoes on the side.
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Last edited by longhair75; 05-16-2020 at 04:04 PM. Reason: stupid spelling error
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Old 05-16-2020, 06:10 PM
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I know you don't use measurements, but can you give an approximation, or at least an idea of relative amounts of the pepper, adobo, recaito, sazon, oregano, fresh garlic, fennel seeds, etc? I've just ordered the adobo, recaito and sazon from Amazon, because I'd like to try my hand at this.
I was gonna say 3 or 4 glugs of oil, one or two glugs of vinegar, some Adobo but not too much because it can get salty, a lot of oregano, can never be too much oregano. . . but decided to look for a recipe that matched mine with actual measurements. Instead I spent more than 15 minutes scrolling through Puerto Rican style roast pork recipes and found that nobody, but NOBODY makes this the same and, in fact, recipes range wildly. Some recipes call for sticking whole garlic cloves into the holes. Some call for sour orange juice, but that sounds more Central American to me than Puerto Rican. Then again, I put fennel in mine, so who am I to judge? Some don't have any acid at all. Weird.

Goya's recipe is the closest I could find to mine, except they use lime juice instead of vinegar. And minced jarred garlic is an inspiration. Goes along with my paste style marinade better than the crushed whole cloves I usually use.
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Old 05-16-2020, 06:43 PM
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Originally Posted by longhair75 View Post
Pat the shoulder dry, then rub with olive oil. coat it with your favorite dry rub and let it sit for about an hour while you start your fire.
Smoke the shoulder in an off set smoker with hickory splits. Once it hits 140f it is done forming its smoke ring.
Watch it until it hits the color and bark level you like and then wrap it in heavy duty foil. Continue to cook to an internal temp of 205f
Wrap it in a towel and put it in a cooler to rest for an hour or so.

Make your favorite mashed potato recipe. Mine is Yukon Gold mashed with some butter, heavy cream, Parmesan cheese and roasted garlic.

Make your favorite sausage country gravy recipe. Mine has some diced thick cut bacon, Italian sausage, scallions, shallots and whole milk.

Slice a French baguette on a wide bias and lightly toast.

Assemble your bread, pulled pork mashed potatoes and country gravy into a nice hot pulled pork and gravy sandwich, with mashed potatoes on the side.
Been there done that on the BBQ part but the rest sounds deliciously decadent. Not the typical BBQ sides but I like it.

205f internal temp? I call it done at 190 and it’s falling apart. That’s all you need to render the collagen.

Last edited by solost; 05-16-2020 at 06:46 PM.
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Old 05-16-2020, 06:52 PM
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Originally Posted by longhair75 View Post
Pat the shoulder dry, then rub with olive oil. coat it with your favorite dry rub and let it sit for about an hour while you start your fire.
Smoke the shoulder in an off set smoker with hickory splits. Once it hits 140f it is done forming its smoke ring.
Watch it until it hits the color and bark level you like and then wrap it in heavy duty foil. Continue to cook to an internal temp of 205f
Wrap it in a towel and put it in a cooler to rest for an hour or so.

Make your favorite mashed potato recipe. Mine is Yukon Gold mashed with some butter, heavy cream, Parmesan cheese and roasted garlic.

Make your favorite sausage country gravy recipe. Mine has some diced thick cut bacon, Italian sausage, scallions, shallots and whole milk.

Slice a French baguette on a wide bias and lightly toast.

Assemble your bread, pulled pork mashed potatoes and country gravy into a nice hot pulled pork and gravy sandwich, with mashed potatoes on the side.
I'd add some ground fennel to that gravy, and finish it with a knob of butter. But that's me.
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Old 05-16-2020, 06:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Biggirl View Post
I was gonna say 3 or 4 glugs of oil, one or two glugs of vinegar, some Adobo but not too much because it can get salty, a lot of oregano, can never be too much oregano. . . but decided to look for a recipe that matched mine with actual measurements. Instead I spent more than 15 minutes scrolling through Puerto Rican style roast pork recipes and found that nobody, but NOBODY makes this the same and, in fact, recipes range wildly. Some recipes call for sticking whole garlic cloves into the holes. Some call for sour orange juice, but that sounds more Central American to me than Puerto Rican. Then again, I put fennel in mine, so who am I to judge? Some don't have any acid at all. Weird.

Goya's recipe is the closest I could find to mine, except they use lime juice instead of vinegar. And minced jarred garlic is an inspiration. Goes along with my paste style marinade better than the crushed whole cloves I usually use.
Muchas gracias.
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Old 05-16-2020, 07:33 PM
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You are not going to use not even a tenth of whatever size jar of recaito you have. My I suggest making arroz con habechuelas gizadas on the side (rice and beans!)?

Again, Goya comes close to how I make it. I never put ham in mine, but I don't doubt that tastes really good. Mi abuela used to put fatback. And instead of yucca or yautia, I may or may not put a small, diced potato. I also put stuff in a the hot oil a bit differently.

onions, peppers
garlic
recaito
powder spices, stirring constantly
potatoes
beans

Then all the liquid (half water, half chicken stock).

Would it surprise anyone if I admit that I make my own recaito?
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Old 05-16-2020, 09:48 PM
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You are not going to use not even a tenth of whatever size jar of recaito you have. My I suggest making arroz con habechuelas gizadas on the side (rice and beans!)?

Again, Goya comes close to how I make it. I never put ham in mine, but I don't doubt that tastes really good. Mi abuela used to put fatback. And instead of yucca or yautia, I may or may not put a small, diced potato. I also put stuff in a the hot oil a bit differently.

onions, peppers
garlic
recaito
powder spices, stirring constantly
potatoes
beans

Then all the liquid (half water, half chicken stock).

Would it surprise anyone if I admit that I make my own recaito?
Not at all. I make my own sofrito for paella.
  #34  
Old 05-16-2020, 10:59 PM
CairoCarol is offline
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Originally Posted by solost View Post
Hawaiian style?
Yes, they make great pork and cabbage plate lunches here! I made up a recipe to try to duplicate it at home and later found a recipe in a local cookbook; I was gratified to discover that my version was spot-on. This is good stuff because the ingredients aren't too finicky as long as you have the pork the freezer; cabbage and onions keep a long time so you can wait until the mood strikes to whip up this dish. And you can balance the teriyaki/BBQ/soy flavors to suit you and your family's preferences.

(The recipe says kalua pork but any pulled pork will do fine.)

HAWAIIAN STYLE PORK AND CABBAGE

Olive or corn oil, ~ 3-4 TBS
2 large onions, quartered and sliced
1 medium head cabbage, chopped into bite-size pieces and washed (leave some water clinging to the pieces)
Large knob of fresh ginger – enough for ~ 2 TBS chopped
1 pound kalua pig
¼ cup barbeque sauce, more to taste
¼ cup soy sauce, more to taste
¼ cup teriyaki sauce (flavored, ex ginger or mango, is fine), more to taste


Heat oil in wok and add onions. Allow to cook over low heat until limp and beginning to caramelize. Add the cabbage and ginger and stir to combine. Put the lid on, turn heat up slightly, and allow the cabbage to wilt. When the cabbage-onion mixture is starting to brown, add the kalua pig and stir to mix. Then add barbeque sauce, soy soy sauce, and teriyaki sauce. Stir well and allow to cook a few minutes so that flavors combine and extra moisture boils off. Taste and add BBQ/soy/teriyaki sauce if needed.

Serve with steamed rice.
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Last edited by CairoCarol; 05-16-2020 at 10:59 PM.
  #35  
Old 05-17-2020, 09:31 AM
solost is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CairoCarol View Post
Yes, they make great pork and cabbage plate lunches here! I made up a recipe to try to duplicate it at home and later found a recipe in a local cookbook; I was gratified to discover that my version was spot-on. This is good stuff because the ingredients aren't too finicky as long as you have the pork the freezer; cabbage and onions keep a long time so you can wait until the mood strikes to whip up this dish. And you can balance the teriyaki/BBQ/soy flavors to suit you and your family's preferences.

(The recipe says kalua pork but any pulled pork will do fine.)

HAWAIIAN STYLE PORK AND CABBAGE

Olive or corn oil, ~ 3-4 TBS
2 large onions, quartered and sliced
1 medium head cabbage, chopped into bite-size pieces and washed (leave some water clinging to the pieces)
Large knob of fresh ginger – enough for ~ 2 TBS chopped
1 pound kalua pig
¼ cup barbeque sauce, more to taste
¼ cup soy sauce, more to taste
¼ cup teriyaki sauce (flavored, ex ginger or mango, is fine), more to taste


Heat oil in wok and add onions. Allow to cook over low heat until limp and beginning to caramelize. Add the cabbage and ginger and stir to combine. Put the lid on, turn heat up slightly, and allow the cabbage to wilt. When the cabbage-onion mixture is starting to brown, add the kalua pig and stir to mix. Then add barbeque sauce, soy soy sauce, and teriyaki sauce. Stir well and allow to cook a few minutes so that flavors combine and extra moisture boils off. Taste and add BBQ/soy/teriyaki sauce if needed.

Serve with steamed rice.
So you make this recipe with already cooked pork? Sounds like a great way to repurpose a large amount of leftover pulled pork from a previous meal. Definitely going to hang on to this recipe!
  #36  
Old 05-17-2020, 12:02 PM
CairoCarol is offline
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Originally Posted by solost View Post
So you make this recipe with already cooked pork? Sounds like a great way to repurpose a large amount of leftover pulled pork from a previous meal. Definitely going to hang on to this recipe!
Yes, exactly. They sell ready-to-eat kalua pork by the pound here and it's delicious.

Another nice thing about the recipe is that if you're trying to stretch your meat (which I think we all are as shortages may loom ahead), you can use more cabbage/onions and less meat, and it's just as good.

(BTW, I can explain the possibly jarring reference to "kalua pig" rather than "pork" in the recipe - I didn't notice that when I posted. When I wrote out the recipe, a native Hawaiian friend had recently corrected me for talking about "kalua pork," insisting that locals call it "kalua pig." So for a while I tried hard to switch my vocabulary. I think she may have been having a little joke at my expense, though. Now that I've lived here a couple of years, I find that grocery store pork is still pork - it's only "pig" if you catch a wild one.)
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  #37  
Old 05-17-2020, 01:47 PM
Tarataratara is offline
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Posts: 106
I cooked a very tasty pork butt in the Instant Pot a few days ago. I seasoned both sides of the pork with salt, pepper, celery salt, onion powder, and garlic powder. I put half a chunked onion, a few cloves of garlic, and half a chopped apple on the bottom of the pot, then put the pork in fat side up, topped it with more onion and garlic, then poured over about one cup of Coke. I cooked it for 15 minutes per pound.

We at it with barbecue sauce and buns for two meals. Tonight, I'm going to mix some pulled pork with leftover baked beans and corn, pour it into a baking dish, top with cornbread batter, and bake. I think I will freeze the rest of the pulled pork.
  #38  
Old 05-25-2020, 05:58 PM
solost is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
Carne Adovada: this is an outstanding recipe.
I made this for dinner today. Turned out fantastic! Even the kids liked it. Served it with corn tortillas and fixings as the recipe recommended. Thanks Chefguy! Did you make Biggirl’s pernil recipe yet?
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