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  #51  
Old 02-18-2016, 09:35 PM
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Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
It's a movie, but that's not important right now. Surely you know that.
Don't call me Shirley!


Most young'uns now are probably more familiar with "Monty Python's Holy Grail" than they are with the actual Arthurian legends or the knights of the round table.

Not quite what the OP had in mind, but I'd bet most people nowadays are much more familiar with the campy "Mommy Dearest" than they are with any of Joan Crawford's actual movies.
  #52  
Old 02-18-2016, 09:45 PM
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Actor Kenny Delmar's blowhard Southern politician {"Eliminate the North! Make the whole country South!"} Beauregard Claghorn was a popular character on Fred Allen's 40s radio show, but has almost been forgotten now. Foghorn Leghorn, however, the cartoon rooster who began life as a parody of Claghorn, has lived on in fame and gone on to eclipse his progenitor.
  #53  
Old 02-18-2016, 09:57 PM
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You sure you guys aren't thinking of Tom Lehrer's "Lobachevsky," a parody of Danny Kaye's song about Russian actor Constantin Stanislavski? Although I don't think either of those are particularly well known.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobachevsky_%28song%29
He copied that from Danny Kaye too.
  #54  
Old 02-18-2016, 09:58 PM
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Anybody that's known me for less than 15 years knows the Parody That Is My Life more than the original.
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Old 02-18-2016, 10:53 PM
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That's mostly because he's an untalented hack.
Someone either really hates pouches, or really likes feet....


But seriously, like half his Youngblood characters were ripoffs of his own New Mutants/X-Force characters.
  #56  
Old 02-19-2016, 02:13 AM
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How many people have seen Zero Hour?
Here!
  #57  
Old 02-19-2016, 02:20 AM
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I've seen it once on TCM, and I was really amused at how close some of the dialog in "Airplane!" was to the original. Even the hero's name, Ted Stryker, is the same except for the spelling.
The screenplay was based on a novel by Arthur Hailey, in fact, who later went on to write the novel Airport.
  #58  
Old 02-19-2016, 02:25 AM
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Which parodies of his would you say are better known than the originals? I'm not the biggest Weird Al fan, though I'd say I'm familiar with his biggest hits, and with the exception of "I Lost on Jeopardy!", I don't think I'd have any trouble naming the originals.
I remember one Saturday afternoon in the mid-eighties, the radio started playing I Want A New Duck.

I was actually surprised when Huey Lewis started singing.

Last edited by kaylasdad99; 02-19-2016 at 02:25 AM.
  #59  
Old 02-19-2016, 04:34 AM
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George MacDonald Fraser's Flashman series is based on a character from Thomas Hughes' book Tom Brown's School Days. I know of Tom Brown, although I've never read the book. But I've never read the Flashman books, either. Saw the movie Royal Flash, though.
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This surely counts. Even those of us who have read Fraser have surely no more than skimmed Hughes.

Except that I'm not sure I'd describe Fraser as a "parody" of Hughes. The Flashman novels are more of an "anti-riff" on him rather than a detailed parody. Fraser was running with elements of Hughes, but, more importantly, was satirising other elements of Victorian culture. Hughes was only the starting point.
There's some entertaining "interweaving" in the Flashman novels: a few characters from Hughes's Tom Brown's Schooldays show up in them now and again, including Tom Brown himself.

Rather delightfully IMO, at the end of the Indian Mutiny (the novel Flashman In The Great Game), Flashy is congratulating himself on his having made it alive and in one piece, through sundry horrific perils in that conflict, when he receives a present sent out from England: the book Tom Brown's Schooldays -- historic-accurately, it had just been published then (late 1850s). It's a gift from a bitter enemy of his, Lord Cardigan, which causes Harry F. to wonder what that's all about. He soon finds out: it's been sent to him exactly because of its very unflattering portrayal of him. He's still relatively young and un-philosophical about things; he gets furiously angry at this bastard Thomas Hughes for describing him in his true colours, and for the harm that this is likely to do to his reputation.
  #60  
Old 02-19-2016, 05:45 AM
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The screenplay was based on a novel by Arthur Hailey, in fact, who later went on to write the novel Airport.
In point of fact, before Hailey did the novel in '58, Zero Hour came out in '57; and before that, it was James Doohan at the controls but not yet over the war in '56, after the pilot and co-pilot and half the passengers had fish for the in-flight meal during the Flight Into Danger TV movie, which got the "Alcoa Hour" treatment as soon as the Americans realized those Canadians were on to something.

All still Hailey's credit, of course -- but screenplay before novel.
  #61  
Old 02-19-2016, 06:02 AM
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Would Quiet Riot's cover of Slade's Cum On Feel the Noize fall under the definition of a parody? From Wiki,

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Kevin DuBrow and Frankie Banali were dead set on not covering the song, because they claimed that they hated it. Instead, they decided to try to cover the song as badly as they could so the label would refuse to release it.
  #62  
Old 02-19-2016, 07:48 AM
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By the way, if you haven't seen the side-by-side Zero Hour/Airplane! comparison it's worth the watch---you'll appreciate Airplane! on a whole new level!
  #63  
Old 02-19-2016, 08:06 AM
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Maybe it's just me, but I'd wager more people remember Weird Al's "Jurassic Park" song than the original "MacArthur Park." And honestly, "MacArthur Park's" lyrics are so weird to begin with that you might not be able to tell which is the original and which the parody.
Oh, c'mon, "MacArthur Park" is famous for being the Worst Song Ever, thanks to Dave Barry.
  #64  
Old 02-19-2016, 08:27 AM
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Someone either really hates pouches, or really likes feet....
Or even likes human bodies that actually bend in ways that a human body can actually bend.
  #65  
Old 02-19-2016, 08:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Crafter_Man View Post
Would Quiet Riot's cover of Slade's Cum On Feel the Noize fall under the definition of a parody? From Wiki,
Not really. For one thing, that story is largely bullshit. They probably did hate the idea of covering the song, but Banali's claim that the record is the very first take can't possibly be true.
  #66  
Old 02-19-2016, 09:35 AM
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Actor Kenny Delmar's blowhard Southern politician {"Eliminate the North! Make the whole country South!"} Beauregard Claghorn was a popular character on Fred Allen's 40s radio show, but has almost been forgotten now. Foghorn Leghorn, however, the cartoon rooster who began life as a parody of Claghorn, has lived on in fame and gone on to eclipse his progenitor.
I was going to mention this. More broadly, there are many, many cartoon characters who are based on live-action characters or real people, and many are probably better known than the originals. These mostly fall more into the category of tributes or ripoffs than parodies, however.
  #67  
Old 02-19-2016, 11:08 AM
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I was going to mention this. More broadly, there are many, many cartoon characters who are based on live-action characters or real people, and many are probably better known than the originals. These mostly fall more into the category of tributes or ripoffs than parodies, however.
Good point. Kenny Delmar's Senator Claghorn is probably the most familar case. But Betty Boop's singing style -- the "boop-boop-a-Doop" that gave her her name -- was lifted from singer Helen Kane, the "Boop-Oop-a-Doop" girl, as she was known. She brought suit against Fleischer studios in 1932, claiming basically that they stole her act.

During the trial, Fleischer's attorneys showed footage of "Baby" Esther Jones, an African-American performer at the Cotton Club who used the same style earlier than Kane. They had a vocal recording, too, and a witness who testified that Kane had seen Esther's act. Kane lost the case.

Esther used the verbal interpolation "boo-boo-boo" and "doo-doo-doo" to punctuate her songs, which Kane had changed to "boop-oop-a-doop", but the difference apparently wasn't judged significant enough.

Esther herself is thought to have died by 1934, when the case came to trial. She never sued, although she might arguably have had a case. From her pictures, she looked kinda like Betty Boop, as well.
  #68  
Old 02-19-2016, 11:31 AM
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Maybe it's just me, but I'd wager more people remember Weird Al's "Jurassic Park" song than the original "MacArthur Park."
I'd wager that you're wrong. MacArthur Park is a very, very well known song. Weird Al isn't as popular as his fans think he is.

But, I don't see any means of settling our wager.
  #69  
Old 02-19-2016, 11:38 AM
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Three Stooges short "Men in Black" with its theme of "for duty and humanity" and "Dr Howard, Dr Fine, Dr Howard" pages is a parody of the 1934 Clark Gable Myrna Loy film "Men in White"
  #70  
Old 02-19-2016, 11:43 AM
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I'd wager that you're wrong. MacArthur Park is a very, very well known song. Weird Al isn't as popular as his fans think he is.

But, I don't see any means of settling our wager.
Maybe people under 30(arbitrary cutoff) are less likely to know the original.

I'm also thinking that Al's parody got more publicity than normal due to it's subject matter.

Still, can't imagine how to get the numbers.
  #71  
Old 02-19-2016, 11:47 AM
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Hm, it's not really a parody or a satire, but Lord of the Flies is clearly a reaction to The Coral Island. How may people have even heard of The Coral Island today (and of those who have, how many of them know about it because it was brought up when they were reading Lord of the Flies in English class?)
  #72  
Old 02-19-2016, 12:04 PM
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The Roadrunner and Coyote are probably just as well known as Tom and Jerry who they were parodying.
  #73  
Old 02-19-2016, 12:29 PM
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What about that international bestseller "National Lampoon's Bored Of The Rings", which I just found out was a parody of an obscure fantasy trilogy(which I can't recall the name of) by some English professor.
Well to be fair, "Bored of the Rings"was hilarious, a nice antidote to all the Tolkein worship that went on back then.
  #74  
Old 02-19-2016, 02:20 PM
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"Electric Boogaloo" as a subtitle to a sequel is well-ensconced in popular culture, but few people know or have seen the movie sequel title it actually came from (Breakin' 2).
  #75  
Old 02-19-2016, 02:27 PM
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Not exactly a parody, but Metallica have covered Diamond Head's Am I Evil? throughout their career and only relatively recently started telling people it was a cover.
Is this a whoosh or do you have a very strange definition of "relatively recently"?


If the cut off date is around 30 yo, then I would think most yungins know "Are you talking to me?" from Aladdin instead of Taxi Driver. (To be fair, most of the Aladdin references)

Or The Simpsons' Cape Fear episode. (I think about 50 more Simpson ones just popped into my head)
  #76  
Old 02-19-2016, 02:32 PM
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Maybe it's just me, but I'd wager more people remember Weird Al's "Jurassic Park" song than the original "MacArthur Park." And honestly, "MacArthur Park's" lyrics are so weird to begin with that you might not be able to tell which is the original and which the parody.
I listen to a good bit of Weird Al, but I'd be surprised if more people know Jurassic Park vs MacArthur Park, but I bet that's also generational (I'm not entirely sure I know Weird Al's version. ETA: Nevermind. I had that album. Huh. How do I not remember it? Memory is weird.) I can't really think of one of his songs that I would say definitively is better known by the general population than the original. I think psychonaut's suggestion of "I Lost On Jeopardy" might work, but I do hear the original "Jeopardy" ("Our love's in jeopardy, baby...") often enough on 80s stations that I'd guess it's fairly familiar to people (like me) who grew up in that era, but "I Lost on Jeopardy" might eclipse it in the popular culture. Among Weird Al fans, sure, I wouldn't be surprised that his parodies are more well-known. In the general pop culture? I'm not so sure.

Last edited by pulykamell; 02-19-2016 at 02:35 PM.
  #77  
Old 02-19-2016, 03:25 PM
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And What's Opera, Doc? Easily a wider audience than Wagnerian opera.
Easily? I'm not much of a Wagner fan—I'd rather watch Bugs than sit through the Ring cycle any day—but Wagner's operas are performed to sold-out houses all the time, all over the world, and that's been going on for about 175 years. I doubt that one Bugs Bunny cartoon could eclipse all that.
  #78  
Old 02-19-2016, 03:40 PM
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Here!
I saw it for the first time last summer. I was about half an hour into it before I realized it was the original of AIRPLANE.
  #79  
Old 02-19-2016, 03:46 PM
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I'd wager that you're wrong. MacArthur Park is a very, very well known song. Weird Al isn't as popular as his fans think he is.

But, I don't see any means of settling our wager.
Here's a list of over 100 covers of MacArthur Park.

I love Dave Barry, but his notorious "worst song" poll is largely responsible for the myth that MacArthur Park is an obscure, unpopular song. It isn't and it never was.
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Old 02-19-2016, 04:24 PM
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I was about half an hour into it before I realized it was the original of AIRPLANE.
That's understandable; it's an entirely different kind of movie altogether.
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Old 02-19-2016, 06:17 PM
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I was going to mention this. More broadly, there are many, many cartoon characters who are based on live-action characters or real people, and many are probably better known than the originals. These mostly fall more into the category of tributes or ripoffs than parodies, however.
For me personally, I saw Bugs Bunny doing Liberace waaaay before I saw Liberace. And I had no idea the Mad Scientist (BOO!) was supposed to be Peter Lorre until I saw Casablanca much, much later.

Also, I had no idea Foghorn Leghorn was supposed to be parodying anybody until about 60 seconds ago.
  #82  
Old 02-19-2016, 10:04 PM
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For me personally, I saw Bugs Bunny doing Liberace waaaay before I saw Liberace. And I had no idea the Mad Scientist (BOO!) was supposed to be Peter Lorre until I saw Casablanca much, much later.

Also, I had no idea Foghorn Leghorn was supposed to be parodying anybody until about 60 seconds ago.
Help me out here. Liberace was the first concert I've ever seen. (I think I was in fourth or fifth grade and I begged my dad to get tickets to the show. Only time I ever remember going to any sort of musical performance with either of my parents.) Which Bugs Bunny skits are Liberace parodies?

And who is Foghorn Leghorn parodying?

Or am I being wooshed here?
  #83  
Old 02-19-2016, 10:19 PM
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It's an entirely different kind of movie.
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Old 02-19-2016, 10:25 PM
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Help me out here. Liberace was the first concert I've ever seen. (I think I was in fourth or fifth grade and I begged my dad to get tickets to the show. Only time I ever remember going to any sort of musical performance with either of my parents.) Which Bugs Bunny skits are Liberace parodies?

And who is Foghorn Leghorn parodying?

Or am I being wooshed here?
For Leghorn, see post 52...
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Old 02-19-2016, 10:32 PM
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Help me out here. Liberace was the first concert I've ever seen. (I think I was in fourth or fifth grade and I begged my dad to get tickets to the show. Only time I ever remember going to any sort of musical performance with either of my parents.) Which Bugs Bunny skits are Liberace parodies?
[url="https://youtu.be/dcqmvGVH9c0"Like this?[/url]

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And who is Foghorn Leghorn parodying?

Or am I being wooshed here?
I was referring to Penfeather's post 52.
  #86  
Old 02-20-2016, 12:34 AM
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While not parodies, my introduction to classical music was Disney's Fantasia. I see hordes of dancing mops on hearing. The 1812 Overture - the bang part - triggers, " Quaker's Puffed Rice, shot from guns", in my shrinking pool of neurons.
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Old 02-20-2016, 11:29 AM
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Fixed my link
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Old 02-20-2016, 01:55 PM
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Fixed my link
Yep, definitely Liberace. Somehow, I don't ever remember seeing that episode, and I thought I saw them all. Thanks!
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Old 02-20-2016, 04:40 PM
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That's understandable; it's an entirely different kind of movie altogether.
It's an entirely different kind of movie.
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Old 02-21-2016, 03:48 AM
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I have my doubts when looking at the box office numbers for GWTW, including its several re-releases when it was making more money than many new films. The Carol Burnett sketch was shortly after GWTW was televised for the first time in 1976, which made GWTW available to people who hadn't been born when it was first released.

Possibly now that much of the original 1939 audience has died off, Carol Burnett might be getting close, but it's not a sure thing. Worldwide, it might be a conservative guess that ~400 million people saw GWTW. Give it another few decades for old age to thin out that number a little more.
If you're considering a worldwide audience, then there's no contest: GWTW is a classic film that's shown on TV fairly often, and Carol Burnett is practically unknown outside North America.
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Old 02-21-2016, 05:30 AM
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The Energizer Bunny was originally a parody/mockery of a very similar (and long-forgotten) Duracell commercial.

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Would Quiet Riot's cover of Slade's Cum On Feel the Noize fall under the definition of a parody?
Not really. For one thing, that story is largely bullshit. They probably did hate the idea of covering the song, but Banali's claim that the record is the very first take can't possibly be true.
Why would they lie? Lots of songs have been recorded in a single take. And it happens to be kind of song (like "Wild Thing") that sounds better the worse you play it.

Also, Metallica never lied about Diamond Head cover songs being their own. They've always been very upfront about how their style was inspired by the NWOBHM scene.
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Old 02-21-2016, 07:39 AM
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Blazing Saddles is partly a parody of Destry Rides Again. In particular, the "Teutonic Titwillow" = Marlene Dietrich.

Also, I'll bet that more people today know Hedly Lamarr than know Hedy.
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Old 02-21-2016, 01:12 PM
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I'll bet more people have read Poe's "The Raven" in the Mad version, accompanied by Bill Elder's bizarre illustrations, than have read it in some stodgy anthology. And the parody didn't change a word of Poe's work.
Stan Freberg's "Banana Boat" song probably got to be more famous than Harry Belafonte's original. In fact, when Freberg's version was played on the radio, I thought Belafonte was performing!
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Old 02-21-2016, 01:19 PM
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I thought Dr. Strangelove was a parody of the movie "Fail Safe" but apparently it's actually a parody of the novel "Red Alert." Either way, I bet more people have heard of "Dr. Strangelove than either of the other two stories.

I'd consider Sailor Moon to be more of a pastiche than a parody but it's definitely a lot more well known than any of the other magical girl cartoons that came before it.
  #95  
Old 02-21-2016, 01:21 PM
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I'll bet more people have read Poe's "The Raven" in the Mad version, accompanied by Bill Elder's bizarre illustrations, than have read it in some stodgy anthology. And the parody didn't change a word of Poe's work.
I dunno about that. I read the MAD version when it got included as a bonus in one of the Special Issues I had as a kid, long after it had originally appeared. Where would most people have encountered it? On the other hand, isn't the poem still printed pretty regularly in school literature textbooks?

Probably the Simpsons version is more familiar than MAD's.
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Old 02-21-2016, 01:35 PM
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A part of the Marx Brothers' Animal Crackers is a direct parody of Eugene O'Neill's play Strange Interlude. Groucho even has the line "Pardon me while I have a strange interlude." I don't think the O'Neill play is as well known these days.
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Old 02-21-2016, 03:04 PM
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Alan Sherman's songs are better-known to one generation of kids than the classical pieces they parody ("Hello Fadduh, Hello Muddah" et al), but that was an isolated, localized effect. Similarly, to the generation for whom The Lone Ranger was a thing, the theme song is better known for that than for William Tell.

"It's Now or Never" isn't exactly a parody of "O Sole Mio," but it's probably better-known in America. I guess we could do a whole separate thread on popular music pieces that appropriated a well-known classical tune.
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Old 02-21-2016, 03:28 PM
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And the parody didn't change a word of Poe's work.
Then it's not a parody.
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Old 02-21-2016, 03:44 PM
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Then it's not a parody.
See here and judge for yourself

PDF warning

http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~cavitch/pd...ag%20Raven.pdf

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  #100  
Old 02-21-2016, 03:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
See here and judge for yourself

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http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~cavitch/pd...ag%20Raven.pdf
You might want to look up the definition of "parody." Printing a famous poem with funny illustrations isn't parody.
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