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Old 05-22-2020, 03:05 PM
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A bad case of palimpsest - words that mean the wrong thing.


You know what I mean? There are certain words that just have no business meaning what they actually mean. OK, let me explain.

For some reason I was musing on the word pulchritudinous. Now, whoever came up with that word clearly meant for it to be used to convey “Angry and looking for trouble” or “Spoiling for a fight”. But then something went horribly wrong at Team English Language headquarters. An intern on their first morning on the job made a disastrous clerical error, which led to it being defined as “Beautiful”. What?? Oh, come on – that should have been picked up and corrected by a line manager – but no, it wasn’t. It still means beautiful.

There are others. Palimpsest – as in the title – is the sort of rash in the moist nether regions that you absolutely wouldn’t want to get – except it isn’t. A palimpsest is

Quote:
…..a manuscript page, either from a scroll or a book, from which the text has been scraped or washed off so that the page can be reused for another document.
Again, it’s a word that clearly means the wrong thing. There must be many more examples out there, and I would like to be introduced to them. I need you to tell me what these words ought to mean, and what they actually mean; and if you wish, an example of how the word should be used, like:

That’s Davey over there, watch out for him - if he’s had a couple of drinks he can be a proper pulchritudinous bastard.

See what I mean – that just sounds right.

What have you got?

j

PS: examples from other languages also welcome!
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Old 05-22-2020, 03:28 PM
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OP is off his rocker. Palimpsest is clearly an ornate pillow.

A credenza is some sort of creeping vine plant.

Meretricious should mean malevolently cunning.

A virago is someone who busts in like a whirlwind and then disappears as quickly as they arrive having made a mess of everything.
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Old 05-22-2020, 03:42 PM
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'Copacetic' - a word I first encountered right here on this board - should clearly be a technical term in psychology for some sort of personality disorder.

I see from your history that you've been suffering from bipolar disorder with copacetic tendencies.
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Old 05-22-2020, 03:44 PM
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Old 05-22-2020, 03:58 PM
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Some of us who took Latin in high school knew all along that "pulchra" means beautiful, sooooo...
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Old 05-22-2020, 04:11 PM
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Hey, I didn't know that that palimp was my second cousin.
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Old 05-22-2020, 04:27 PM
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What a load of crepuscular nonsense!

The OP may be interested in Douglas Adams's [the Hitchhiker's Guide guy] little but well-loved book, The Meaning of Liff, which aims to pair essential concepts describing modern life with otherwise wasted place-names, just sitting around on signposts doing nothing, e.g. "SLIGO (n.) An unnamed and exotic sexual act which people like to believe that famous films stars get up to in private. 'To commit sligo.'" or "GRIMMET (n.) A small bush from which cartoon characters dangle over the edge of a cliff." Unputdownable.
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Old 05-22-2020, 04:47 PM
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I dunno, something that's scraped off isn't all that far separated from crotch rot. Palimpsest is fine.
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Old 05-22-2020, 04:53 PM
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Palimpsest is the title of an oddball L&O: Criminal Intent episode. I've never heard it used other than that, so that's what it means to me. A made up word.
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Old 05-22-2020, 05:16 PM
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Palimpsest is the title of an oddball L&O: Criminal Intent episode. I've never heard it used other than that, so that's what it means to me. A made up word.
It is also one of my favorite time travel stories and a fantasy novel that I haven't read.
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Old 05-22-2020, 05:22 PM
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Some of us who took Latin in high school knew all along that "pulchra" means beautiful, sooooo...
So "sepulchral" means...?
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Old 05-22-2020, 05:25 PM
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"Anorexia" is a simply lovely name for a young woman (complete with built-in charming nicknames Ana, Rexy, and Sia). No idea how such a delightful word got tied up with an eating disorder.
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Old 05-22-2020, 05:46 PM
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This is not a cromulent thread.
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Old 05-22-2020, 06:12 PM
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Old 05-22-2020, 06:16 PM
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Niggardly. Although I would keep its meaning as is.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
Some of us who took Latin in high school knew all along that "pulchra" means beautiful, sooooo...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
So "sepulchral" means...?
Must have to do with necrophilia, best I can figure.
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Last edited by Siam Sam; 05-22-2020 at 06:21 PM.
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Old 05-22-2020, 06:57 PM
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Vichyssoise-swordplay or other form of attack that is cruel and devoid of humanity. "The evil knight, not above heinous acts of vichyssoise, attacked his noble, unarmed foe when his back was turned...then stole his soup coldly."

Props to some of "four bears"

John Lennon (A Spanner in the Works, In His Own Write)
Lewis Carroll (Jabberwocky)
And of course, Norm Crosby.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YS1Ftfc1P8Y

And this gem from Don McLean
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBsC8uQ-tgs

All the stalactites and vicious vertebrae
Hunt the stalagmites while laryngitis slay
All that parasites that come from Paraguay in the spring
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Old 05-22-2020, 07:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Asking Questions View Post
Palimpsest is the title of an oddball L&O: Criminal Intent episode. I've never heard it used other than that, so that's what it means to me. A made up word.
In a strange coincidence, two different science fiction authors independently used Palimpsest as the title of a work in 2009; Charles Stross, for a novella and Catherynne Valente, for a novel.
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Old 05-22-2020, 09:33 PM
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Esprit d’escalier is a high end cologne, and Treppenwitz is a quaint village in Austria, right?
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Old 05-22-2020, 09:37 PM
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Drosophila is obviously the name of the evil sorceress who put the Prince under a terrible curse, and Melanogaster is the wise old wizard who was eventually able (with the help of brave heroes) to break the curse. No way either is a tiny speck of an insect.
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Old 05-22-2020, 09:37 PM
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Drosophila is obviously the name of the evil sorceress who put the Prince under a terrible curse, and Melanogaster is the wise old wizard who was eventually able (with the help of brave heroes) to break the curse. No way either is a tiny speck of an insect.
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Old 05-22-2020, 09:46 PM
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"Upshot" should not be the final outcome or solution of something. It should be the good parts of what happened:

Yes, Covid-19 has been terrible, but the upshot was that I got a $1,200 stimulus check!
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Old 05-23-2020, 01:24 AM
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Esprit d’escalier is a high end cologne ...
"And these girl Marines have a wonderful esprit de corps. That's their expression meaning,'See if he has a brother.' " -- Bob Hope
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Old 05-23-2020, 04:38 AM
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.....Treppenwitz is a quaint village in Austria, right?
You know, posts like this make me really bucolic.

j
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Old 05-23-2020, 04:46 AM
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In other news, who would have thought that you could have a whole thread on Where I came across the word Palimpsest?

My contribution is this: I first saw the word in an interview with David Bowie, where he used it to describe the song The Bewlay Brothers:

Quote:
The only pipe I have ever smoked was a cheap Bewlay. It was a common item in the late Sixties and for this song I used Bewlay as a cognomen in place of my own. This wasn’t just a song about brotherhood so I didn’t want to misrepresent it by using my true name. Having said that, I wouldn’t know how to interpret the lyric of this song other than suggesting that there are layers of ghosts within it. It’s a palimpsest, then.
j
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Old 05-23-2020, 07:32 AM
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Everyone knows that when you first get a facebook account you find all your relatives, classmates, co-workers, pals, buddies and “friend” them.
Then later when they piss you off or annoy you you can “befriend” them.
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Old 05-23-2020, 07:47 AM
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We all need to get together for a rousing game of Balderdash. No, I'm not kidding, it's an actual game. A card has a word, say "palimpsest", and five possible definitions -say, old manuscript, ornate pillow, TV episode title, etc. Players have to guess the correct definition. It's the ultimate word-nerd game and one of my favorites.

Last edited by Toxgoddess; 05-23-2020 at 07:48 AM.
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Old 05-23-2020, 08:20 AM
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Quote:
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Esprit d’escalier is a high end cologne, and Treppenwitz is a quaint village in Austria, right?
That reminds me of a good entry of this sort from Monty Python: Wainscotting sounds like a quaint Dorset village and not the strip of wood at the bottom of a wall. When I first heard that I couldn't agree more with that observation.
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Old 05-23-2020, 08:32 AM
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Hoi polloi sounds like it should be society's pompous elites, not the rabble.
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Old 05-23-2020, 08:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
Some of us who took Latin in high school knew all along that "pulchra" means beautiful, sooooo...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
So "sepulchral" means...?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siam Sam View Post
...Must have to do with necrophilia, best I can figure.
Sepulchral is not derived from pulchra.
sepulchral (adj.)
1610s, "pertaining to a burial or place of burial," from Latin sepulcralis "of a tomb, sepulchral," from sepulcrum (see sepulchre) + -al (1).
Transferred sense of "gloomy" is from 1711.
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Old 05-23-2020, 10:37 AM
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I dunno, I always think of "wainscotting" as being some fortunately bygone aspect of uncomfortable women's fashion. Something like those elaborate sculpted dresses that make it impossible to sit down.
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Old 05-23-2020, 10:41 AM
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Not to be confused with a different time travel novel called Palimpsests
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Old 05-23-2020, 10:45 AM
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Patriarchy is a system of government where political power is based on who is the most patriotic.
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Old 05-23-2020, 10:47 AM
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piquant sounds like a fruit, perhaps having the taste the word describes.
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Old 05-23-2020, 10:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Asking Questions View Post
Palimpsest is the title of an oddball L&O: Criminal Intent episode. I've never heard it used other than that, so that's what it means to me. A made up word.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
In a strange coincidence, two different science fiction authors independently used Palimpsest as the title of a work in 2009; Charles Stross, for a novella and Catherynne Valente, for a novel.
I now see Darren Garrison provided the same information well before I did. In my defense, I did do a word search for Stross and Valente before posting.
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Old 05-23-2020, 11:06 AM
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Hoi polloi sounds like it should be society's pompous elites, not the rabble.
Yes, exactly. "Hoi polloi" = "high people."
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Old 05-23-2020, 11:28 AM
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A Yellow Tamarillo is a tiny South American field rodent similar to the vole.
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Old 05-23-2020, 11:36 AM
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Cruciferous means crunchy. That's why broccoli is cruciferous.
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Old 05-23-2020, 12:01 PM
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OP is off his rocker. Palimpsest is clearly an ornate pillow.
Don't be silly.

It's obviously a musical instrument in the harpsichord family.

I do medieval-style calligraphy, I can't recall ever not knowing what a palimpsest is. They're a great resource.

In a scribal/medieval vein...

An oubliette is some kind of paring knife not a prison.
An angstloch is a panic attack, not a trapdoor.
A misericord is a divorce agreement in which neither party is really satisfied, not a seat.
A refectory is another name for a hall of mirrors. Not a dining room.
A seminary is some kind of brothel, not a school.
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Old 05-23-2020, 12:43 PM
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Palimpsest sounds like it should have some sort of illicit sex definition. "Your honor, my client has been charged with palimpsest, but he never went near his friend while he was still on crutches."
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Old 05-23-2020, 01:30 PM
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Palimpsest sounds like it should have some sort of illicit sex definition. "Your honor, my client has been charged with palimpsest, but he never went near his friend while he was still on crutches."
I think it sounds like a fancy type of fainting couch. You know, a welcoming piece of furniture for people who need to lie down.

A pal for the limp set, if you will.
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Old 05-23-2020, 01:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toxgoddess View Post
We all need to get together for a rousing game of Balderdash. No, I'm not kidding, it's an actual game. A card has a word, say "palimpsest", and five possible definitions -say, old manuscript, ornate pillow, TV episode title, etc. Players have to guess the correct definition. It's the ultimate word-nerd game and one of my favorites.
Balderdash is the outdoor game where all the great-uncles have a relay race.
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Old 05-23-2020, 02:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toxgoddess View Post
We all need to get together for a rousing game of Balderdash. No, I'm not kidding, it's an actual game. A card has a word, say "palimpsest", and five possible definitions -say, old manuscript, ornate pillow, TV episode title, etc. Players have to guess the correct definition. It's the ultimate word-nerd game and one of my favorites.
I immediately thought of the ancient TV show (UK; apparently based on a US original) Call My Bluff. Here's a taster - the video quality is pretty awful, BUT the edition I happened upon features the recently deceased Tim Brooke-Taylor and the wonderful and much missed Victoria Wood, both looking alarmingly young. So I'm sticking with this video for sentimental reasons.

j
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Old 05-23-2020, 03:21 PM
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...then stole his soup coldly."
Must have been gazpacho (my Mexican friend, who is also my accomplice in banditry)
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Old 05-23-2020, 04:07 PM
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Old 05-23-2020, 05:24 PM
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And I'm not trying to bring up Trump's statement, but:

Testing positive for a disease should meant you don't have it. "I tested positive for cancer. That's a very positive thing."

Testing negative should be the other one because it is bad.
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Old 05-23-2020, 06:07 PM
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Old 05-23-2020, 06:10 PM
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"Palimpsest" was the name of a literary magazine featuring Iowa-only authors that was published for many years.

One of James Michener's books, that was set in the present day (IIRC it was "Space") featured a phony TV preacher named Leopold Strabismus; he chose that surname because few people would know what that really meant.
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Old 05-23-2020, 06:43 PM
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Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
"Palimpsest" was the name of a literary magazine featuring Iowa-only authors that was published for many years.

One of James Michener's books, that was set in the present day (IIRC it was "Space") featured a phony TV preacher named Leopold Strabismus; he chose that surname because few people would know what that really meant.
Quote:
Strabismus is a visual problem in which the eyes are not aligned properly and point in different directions. One eye may look straight ahead, while the other eye turns inward, outward, upward, or downward. The eye turn may be consistent, or it may come and go.
There was a girl with this condition in my high school class. It always seemed that she was looking just to the side of you.
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Old 05-24-2020, 05:56 AM
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If another Briton might weigh in --

Quote:
Originally Posted by Treppenwitz View Post
I immediately thought of the ancient TV show (UK; apparently based on a US original) Call My Bluff. Here's a taster - the video quality is pretty awful, BUT the edition I happened upon features the recently deceased Tim Brooke-Taylor and the wonderful and much missed Victoria Wood, both looking alarmingly young. So I'm sticking with this video for sentimental reasons.
There's a British thing -- I gather, initially a brainchild of Tim Brooke-Taylor among others -- called the "Uxbridge English Dictionary": featuring a huge number of "what words ought to mean..." ; including the use of many British place-names, Uxbridge being one. I'm hopeless at doing links: so need to take the tack of "Google Uxbridge English Dictionary; the first 'hit' should be the online edition of same, 'ready to go' in all its glory."

(I'm often a miserable so-and-so; this subset of humour does little for me -- but "for them as likes...")

Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post

One of James Michener's books, that was set in the present day (IIRC it was "Space") featured a phony TV preacher named Leopold Strabismus; he chose that surname because few people would know what that really meant.
A very similar thing was done by the British humorist J.B. Morton (pseudonym "Beachcomber"). fl. 1925 - 75 -- shall we figure that he and Michener thought of it independently? "Beachcomber" turned out great quantities of, to my taste, wonderfully crazy and off-the-wall stuff: created many weird characters, including Dr. Strabismus of Utrecht -- the ultimate mad scientist and inventor of useless / non-functioning devices.
  #50  
Old 05-24-2020, 06:50 AM
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"Sued" and "Impeached" should mean you successfully did the thing. And NOT tried to do the thing.
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