Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-01-2019, 03:46 PM
rbroome is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 3,425

visiting NW New York State-Ithaca area


I will be in Pa. for a couple of weeks in July. I am interested in taking a couple of overnight trips to NW New York for the excellent reason that I have never been there. I see on the map that Ithaca NY, Watkins Glen, Seneca Falls are some places in the are that I have heard of but have no idea which if any to visit.

Does anyone have any experience in this area? Any suggestions on places to visit for an afternoon or so? I can't be away from Pa. for more than a couple of days, so any place I visit has to rate a quick visit.

Thanks
  #2  
Old 06-01-2019, 03:57 PM
P-man is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Washington, DC area
Posts: 1,690
Downtown Ithaca is a pretty cool place if you like college towns. There are also several gorges and waterfalls nearby. I don't think that many students stay around for the summer (our son sure isn't).
  #3  
Old 06-01-2019, 04:59 PM
Llama Llogophile is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: 50% chord point
Posts: 3,990
I used to live in the area, but not for quite a while, so YMMV.

Ithaca is beautiful and a really nice college town. If you hike, go see Buttermilk Falls.

Also some excellent used bookstores around there, including my favorite in the world: The Book Barn of the Finger Lakes. It's about 20 minutes east of Ithaca, IIRC. It's literally a barn filled with books. If it's still the same owner, his name is Vlad and I'd swear he's read every book he has in the place. I used to buy lots of airplane and space history books from him, and talking with him about them was often the best part. I'm due for a visit too.

Last edited by Llama Llogophile; 06-01-2019 at 05:00 PM.
  #4  
Old 06-01-2019, 06:13 PM
jasg is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upper left hand corner
Posts: 6,016
I haven't visited in years but the Corning Museum of Glass is pretty cool.
__________________
It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.
~ Jonathan Swift (1667 - 1745)
  #5  
Old 06-01-2019, 06:21 PM
jasg is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upper left hand corner
Posts: 6,016
Also, depending where you are in PA, this is very cool - one of two US Gold level Dark Sky parks at Cherry Springs State Park.
  #6  
Old 06-01-2019, 06:57 PM
rbroome is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 3,425
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasg View Post
Also, depending where you are in PA, this is very cool - one of two US Gold level Dark Sky parks at Cherry Springs State Park.
Cool! thanks. We visit family in Pa. We haven't ventured out much and I am looking to change that this trip.
  #7  
Old 06-01-2019, 07:06 PM
Little Nemo is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 80,939
If you like waterfalls, the gorge at Watkins Glen State Park is very nice. You should also check out nearby Montour Falls - they have a large waterfall right in the middle of their downtown. There's also Taughannock Falls, which is the highest waterfall in New York (the Niagara Falls drop more water but aren't as high).

If you're into airplanes or motorcycles, there's the Glenn Curtiss museum in Hammondsport (Curtiss' hometown).

This area is the heart of New York's wine-making region.

I also recommend a stop at Purity ice cream in Ithaca.
  #8  
Old 06-01-2019, 07:07 PM
thorny locust is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 736
I live in that area. There's all sorts of things to do, and lovely country to do it in.

If you like wine at all, or craft beer, there are tours of wineries etc. all around multiple Finger Lakes -- you can spend as little or as long as you like on this, depending on how many places you want to go to. There's a lot of local produce; also creameries and local cheese production. There's excellent hiking in the Watkins gorge and around Ithaca and in the Hector National Forest. You can rent kayaks etc. a number of places around the lakes, and there is some public swimming access, though much of the lakefronts is privately owned. There's the Women's Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, which hosted the first Women's Rights Convention in 1848. As others have said, Corning Museum of Glass is worth seeing, and Ithaca's a good place for bookstores; also for music, though both can be found elsewhere in the area. Watkins and Dundee and probably other places host car races, if you're into that -- mostly on the weekends.

(I wouldn't ordinarily call this Northwest NY -- that phrasing makes me think more of Buffalo, which is quite a ways away by my standards. Every place in NY probably thinks it's 'central NY', but we are sort of in the middle of the state. Ithaca, Watkins, and Seneca Falls are all generally considered to be in the Finger Lakes.)

ETA: traffic through Watkins can be, ah, interesting on a summer weekend, especially if there's a major race or concert on. Allow time.

Last edited by thorny locust; 06-01-2019 at 07:10 PM.
  #9  
Old 06-01-2019, 07:23 PM
Ludovic is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: America's Wing
Posts: 29,987
Folks have already hit on the Ithaca / Watkins Glen area things to do, all of which I agree with, so I'd add that Naples, in the south of Canandaigua Lake, is, in the aspect of waterfalls trails, like a mini-Ithaca, and is also in the middle of wine country. (It's a bit out of the way versus Ithaca, but not farther than Seneca Falls is, which was on your list of possibilities.)

Grimes Glen, Conklin Gully, and Clark Gully are my favorite valley hikes in that area: the trails are more primitive (you might get wet [you definitely will get wet if you see Grimes Glen, but it is the shortest trail and is the closest to the falls]) and the waterfalls harder to find (with the exception of Grimes Glen.) If you had a choice between waterfall towns, Watkins Glen and Ithaca would be my choice but if your travels take you past Naples, keep it in mind.
  #10  
Old 06-01-2019, 07:59 PM
rbroome is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 3,425
Thanks to all the ideas!
I am taking good notes.
  #11  
Old 06-01-2019, 08:42 PM
P-man is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Washington, DC area
Posts: 1,690
Too bad you're not there in June. The Sturgeons swim up the creek near downtown Ithaca to mate.
  #12  
Old 06-02-2019, 11:49 AM
Spiderman's Avatar
Spiderman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: somewhere East of there
Posts: 10,598
If you want to go a bit further west, go to Letchworth State Park.
  • 2015 USA Today Best State Park in the nation
  • 2017 Best attraction in NY State
  • 600' gorge
  • 3 waterfalls, including 107' middle falls.
  • Hiking
  • Camping / cabins for rent
  • Balloon rides; sometimes over the falls (depending upon wind direction)
  #13  
Old 06-02-2019, 12:37 PM
TSBG is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 2,694
I spent two summers in Ithaca during college and, I'm not exaggerating, they were some of the happiest times in my life. I spent a lot of time hiking and swimming in gorges. There's a reason for the dopey bumper stickers-"Ithaca: It's Gorges." Agree with others that Watkins Glen is beautiful.

Others I went to:

Buttermilk Falls
Cascadilla Trail (on the Cornell campus)
Taughannock Park
Potter's Falls (unofficially nudist, if you like that)
Treman State Park

Cornell isn't exactly Harvard but there are some grand old buildings and a decent small contemporary art museum. The botanical gardens are nice to wander around in and you can get fresh ice cream, honeycomb, apples, and so forth.
  #14  
Old 06-02-2019, 04:01 PM
thorny locust is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 736
Occurs to me that I want to throw in here:

If you're driving: in much of this area, you're going to be sharing the roads with horse-and-buggy traffic, farm vehicles (some of them overwidth), and bicycles. Most of the roads in the area weren't properly designed for a mix of slow and fast traffic. There are few separate lanes; shoulders may be in poor condition for travel; shoulders may be narrow or even nonexistent; and lines of sight for passing may be terrible for some distance. Please give everyone enough room, and wait to pass until you've got clear visibility.
  #15  
Old 06-02-2019, 04:27 PM
Ludovic is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: America's Wing
Posts: 29,987
I can't say that I've experienced horses, farm vehicles, or bicycles in the area moreso than other semi-rural places, but now that you mention it there is a lack of passing lanes and visibility to pass. Plus, near the Ithaca area, it definitely is semi-rural, with a lot of unexpected blind driveways in places that don't seem like they are heavily inhabited.
  #16  
Old 06-02-2019, 08:11 PM
P-man is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Washington, DC area
Posts: 1,690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludovic View Post
I can't say that I've experienced horses, farm vehicles, or bicycles in the area moreso than other semi-rural places, but now that you mention it there is a lack of passing lanes and visibility to pass. Plus, near the Ithaca area, it definitely is semi-rural, with a lot of unexpected blind driveways in places that don't seem like they are heavily inhabited.
You won't have to worry about it while you're there, but there are "snowmobile crossing" signs in the Ithaca area.

Mansfield, PA has a nice small brewpub called Yorkholo, with a good ice cream shop a block away.
  #17  
Old 06-02-2019, 08:18 PM
Ukulele Ike is offline
Charter Member
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 17,097
Seneca Falls = birthplace of the American Women’s Rights Movement. Lotsa fascinating history there.

Ithaca is one of my favorite college towns. My college clique was great friends with another clique at Cornell, and we used to swap New Haven-Ithaca road trips to hang out with each other.
__________________
Uke
  #18  
Old 06-02-2019, 08:42 PM
rbroome is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 3,425
The Dope always comes through!
Now I want to move to the area!
  #19  
Old 06-02-2019, 09:53 PM
jasg is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upper left hand corner
Posts: 6,016
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludovic View Post
I can't say that I've experienced horses, farm vehicles, or bicycles in the area moreso than other semi-rural places, but now that you mention it there is a lack of passing lanes and visibility to pass. Plus, near the Ithaca area, it definitely is semi-rural, with a lot of unexpected blind driveways in places that don't seem like they are heavily inhabited.
The last time I was in that area two years ago, I was amazed at all the young Amish families moving in and buying small farms that have fallen into disuse. Based on my class reunion, very few boomers took over the family farms in that area.
  #20  
Old 06-03-2019, 10:38 AM
kopek is offline
born to be shunned
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Southwestern PA
Posts: 14,781
Watkins Glen is terrific not just for nature but for the races if the timing works out right.
https://www.theglen.com/

Sylvan Beach NY is one of our fallbacks from the WB area. A lot of small cool little places around there and a nice little funky amusement park with a haunted house that is actually haunted according to local lore.

In PA around there but requiring the standard commercial mention are
a) Knoebels Grove Amusement Park
https://www.knoebels.com/
with over 60 attractions, no admission or parking fees, and great shows and a couple museums right in the park

b) French Azilum historic site
http://www.frenchazilum.com/
a seriously hidden treasure (trust me -- you will need to ask directions and/or call to find it) and some great scenery.
  #21  
Old 06-03-2019, 11:19 AM
Quercus is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: temperate forest
Posts: 7,114
If you're there July 18-21, and are at all into roots/folk/zydeco/whatever music, you could swing by the Grassroots festival in Trumansburg, NY.
If you're there at that time, and not into the music, be warned that driving through Trumansburg might take longer than usual.
  #22  
Old 06-03-2019, 11:48 AM
TSBG is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 2,694
Trumansburg is very close to Ithaca, if you wanted to go to the festival and enjoy the area.
  #23  
Old 06-03-2019, 12:26 PM
Motorgirl is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Boston Metro
Posts: 4,372
Scooped by everyone. :-(

I grew up there, and went to Cornell, but I haven't lived there since the 90s.

In the summer, if you see a sign for a chicken barbecue, or smell a delicious cooking smell wafting down the "highway" - pull over and eat some chicken! It's soooo delicious!!
https://www.atlasobscura.com/article...-sauce-upstate
I'd quibble with the article author's "all of upstate New York" assertion, as it seems to me more localized to Central and Western NY with a big concentration in the Finger Lakes.
The chicken bbqs are pretty much always fund raisers for this or that. Very common for the volunteer firemen to be selling chicken.

I so miss the smell of summer in the Ithaca area - chicken!

I make Cornell recipe chicken at home but it's not the same as that serendipitous hasty "omg chicken! pull over!" moment on a summer day.
  #24  
Old 06-03-2019, 09:16 PM
Little Nemo is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 80,939
Quote:
Originally Posted by kopek View Post
Watkins Glen is terrific not just for nature but for the races if the timing works out right.
https://www.theglen.com/
But unless you're going there specifically to watch the races, it's the worst possible time to visit the area.
  #25  
Old 06-03-2019, 09:38 PM
thorny locust is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 736
Well, it's not a good time to visit Watkins, anyway. (Unless, as has been said, you want to go to the races.)

If you're around the north end of the lakes, or over around Ithaca or Naples but not driving through Watkins, you'd never know there was anything going on in Watkins.
  #26  
Old 06-04-2019, 12:12 PM
kopek is offline
born to be shunned
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Southwestern PA
Posts: 14,781
Quote:
Originally Posted by kopek View Post
Watkins Glen is terrific not just for nature but for the races if the timing works out right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
But unless you're going there specifically to watch the races, it's the worst possible time to visit the area.
It depends on the event being run. My experience is a little dated but for things like the "auto-cross" and some of the F-V events the crowds numbered in the tens of tens.

But it brings up a point of visiting any area; check what the BIG DRAWS are and avoind them. You do not want to be anywhere near Knoebels when the big monster-truck thing is in Bloomsburg or the Little League World Series is in Williamsport. Nashville or Gnaw Bone Indiana can get a little strange during the Indiana Bean Blossom Bikerfest at Bill Monroe's Music Park --- not in a bad way but strange. No matter where you go or what you have planned there are going to be days to avoid.
  #27  
Old 06-05-2019, 11:52 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
The Finger Lakes! I live about 75-90 minutes east of the Finger Lakes, but I've taken a lot of day trips though the area. Coincidentally, my sister, her hubby, and my nephew are coming back to the area to visit in July for the first time in a few years and I'll be playing tour guide in the Finger Lakes (although they also want to go to the Cooperstown/Oneonta area).

In addition to checking out the attractions, also check the calendar for events. The Finger Lakes is chock full of events in the summer. Some of them you might want to attend, and some you might want to avoid because of traffic, crowds, etc.

Outside of, say, Ithaca and Corning, there are not really any major attractions in the Finger Lakes that require a lot of time, but there are tons of minor ones. You can just drive around aimlessly and stumble across things to see or do. Your best bet is to find a Tourist Information Center and load up in maps and info to plan things out.
  #28  
Old 06-07-2019, 11:00 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
Since I already have to do research on Finger Lakes attractions, I figured I might as well keep posting it in this threadÖ..

First, you need to have basic sense of Finger Lakes geography if youíre going to be driving around. The major Finger Lakes going east to west are: Skaneateles (not far from Syracuse), Owasco, Cayuga, Seneca, Keuka, and Cananandagua.(not far from Rochester). The Finger Lakes are long, narrow, deep lakes* created by retreating glaciers. Several of the lakes are in deep valleys, which are why there are so many waterfalls in the area. The northern shores of the Finger Lakes are roughly parallel to each other. US Route 20 runs through the towns on the north end of the lakes.

Keuka Lake is the oddball. It is Y-shaped and its northern branch only reaches about halfway up Seneca Lake.
  #29  
Old 06-08-2019, 08:56 AM
thorny locust is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 736
That's a good point, bmoak.

All of those long skinny lakes mean that places that are four miles apart in direct line may be 40 miles apart by road. Many years ago there used to be ferries across the middle of the larger lakes, but they're all long gone.

There's a saying: 'the Finger Lakes, where you have to go north and south in order to go east or west'.
  #30  
Old 06-08-2019, 09:22 AM
Ludovic is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: America's Wing
Posts: 29,987
And oddly enough, the similarly-looking Chautauqua Lake in far western NY has both a ferry and a bridge across it. I've taken the ferry both when it was the only way to shave 20 miles off your car ride and a couple times when it was the olde-fashioned alternative to the bridge. But to be fair, the reason they could build a bridge across the lake is because it is only 70-something feet deep (and people would nowadays likely protest a bridge across a Finger Lake: people protested the bridge across Chautauqua but only because they thought it was a boondoggle rather than for aesthetic reasons.)
  #31  
Old 06-08-2019, 03:44 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
A couple of points for Ludovic:

1) I'll be getting to Finger Lakes towns later, but the town and cities are either on the north end of the lakes or the south ends of the lakes. They are not opposite each other on the east and west shores of the lake like Chautauqua Lake.

2) The bridge over Chautauqua Lake is for US Interstate 86 a major route. The only major routes through the Finger Lakes are either south of the lakes or north of the lakes.

3) Seneca Lake is 618 feet deep. Cayuga Lake is 435 feet deep. The other major lakes are at least 150 feet deep. Have fun building bridges!
  #32  
Old 06-08-2019, 06:54 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
Now on to the cities/town/villages of the Finger Lakes are

South of the Finger Lakes, US 86/NY 17 runs roughly along the NY/PA state line.

The notable towns along that route, going from east to west, are:
Owego (SE of Ithaca), Elmira (SW of Ithca, S of Watkins Glen) and Corning (SW of Watkins Glen)

US20 runs along the north edge of Finger Lakes:

The notable towns along that route, from east to west and by lake, are:

Skaneateles (Skaneateles), Auburn (Owasco), Seneca Falls (Cayuga), Geneva (Seneca),
and Canandaigua (Canandaigua).

The notable towns along the south shores of the Finger Lakes, from east to west and by lake, are:

Ithaca (Cayuga), Watkins Glen (Seneca), Hammondsport (Keuka), Penn Yann* (Keuka), and Naples (Canandaigua)

*Penn Yan is on one of the northern forks of Y-shaped Keuka Lake, but is far south enough that it is due east from Naples.
  #33  
Old 06-09-2019, 06:42 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
Some general Finger Lakes driving tips. Yes, there are quite a few Amish in the area, especially in the areas between the lakes, and you can see them on the roads. A few years ago, there was a bad multiple fatality accident when someone crashed into a buggy with a bunch of Amish teens.

However, IMHO, the main reason you have to be careful driving ing and be sure to leave a good gap between you and the car you're following is because drivers are constantly stopping or suddenly slowing or swerving to pull over to see a scenic view or pull into a winery, a yard/anitque sale, a farmstead, a chicken BBQ*, etc.

*As mentioned upthread, chicken BBQ is a specialty of the area, and well worth trying.

Of course, the Finger Lakes area has a LOT of wineries. Far too many to try. If a winery is big enough for you to know about it, the odds are it will draw crowds of wine tour buses and limos. You might be better off stopping at a smaller or newer winery, or one a little off the beaten path where there are fewer wineries, like along Keuka Lake or along the east shore of Cayuga Lake.

In addition the the Wine Trails around the main lakes, there are also trails for breweries and distilleries, which have been springing up lately. There is also a Finger Lakes Cheese Trail, and there is a lot of agritourism in the area. There are a lot of artists and crafters in the area as well.
  #34  
Old 06-09-2019, 07:02 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
Now on to the villages/towns/cities! I've never been as far west as Lake Canandaigua, so I'll leave that out. I was planning on doing links for things, but that would be too time intensive.....

Owego: No special attractions, but Owego is very picturesque and the kind of place that gets mentioned in lists of America's best small towns. The village is prosperous, with the economy underpinned by Lockheed-Martin. The walkable downtown is filled with an eclectic selection of shops, eateries, and antique centers. A few miles east is Tioga Downs Casino/Horsetrack (harness)/Hotel/Spa. The casino hotels are sometimes the best nightly rates in the area (There is another one near Geneva.).

Elmira: A very not picturesque city. Elmira is a small city that is getting by after its primary industry (railroads) disappeared. Mark Twain summered in Elmira for the last twenty years of his life, and Elmira doesn't let you forget it, as every fourth thing in the city either has Clemens or Twain in its name. He's buried in Elmira, and the detached study where he did his writing is at Elmira College, which hosts the Center for Mark Twain Studies. There is also the Arnot Art Museum. Outside of Elmira is the Harris Hill Soaring Center and the National Soaring Museum, dedicated to motionless flight. If you want to ride in a glider or get lessons, this is the place to go.
  #35  
Old 06-09-2019, 07:23 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
Corning: One of the main towns in the area, you can easily spend a whole day in Corning. The town is built around Corning Inc, so the town is prosperous.

The big attraction is the Corning Museum of Glass, which is well worth the trip/time and is easily worth a few hours to check out. I would recommend going as early as you can to beat the crowds. Also check the schedule for glassblowing demos and hot glass shows, or even take a class/lesson.

A lot of people just see CMOG and donít bother to walk across the bridge to0 the restored downtown pedestrian-friendly Gaffer District, which has a shopping/restaurant district and also the Rockwell Museum (nothing to do with Norman Rockwell). Formerly the Rockwell Museum of Western Art (i.e. cowboys and Indians), it is now part of the Smithsonian and has rotating exhibits of other periods of American art in addition to the regular collection. Iíve always enjoyed visiting there. Corning also has the Heritage Village of the Southern Finger Lakes, a series of retired building with living history re-enactors.
  #36  
Old 06-09-2019, 11:59 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
Skaneateles: Another very picturesque village, even more so than Owego, and right on the lake. So picturesque that the village puts on Dickens Weekends before Christmas, with costumed re-enactors playing characters from his novels.

Auburn: A not-picturesque city, dominated by it's large maximum security prison. It's actually a few miles north of Lake Owasco, as the north end of the lake is a little swampy. However, Auburn has some historical significance. Both the Harriet Tubman Home, a National Park Site with rangers giving tours, and the William Seward House Museum.

Auburn is also home to New Hope Mills, a long-time local specialty producer of pancake mixes and flours. Their plant and store are in Auburn, with a well-regarded mostly-breakfast cafe attached. The original old water-powered mill is outside of town, and is being restored/converted to a museum.
  #37  
Old 06-10-2019, 06:36 AM
rbroome is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 3,425
Thanks again for all this input!
I appreciate it.
  #38  
Old 06-10-2019, 08:30 AM
thorny locust is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 736
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmoak View Post
Auburn is also home to New Hope Mills, a long-time local specialty producer of pancake mixes and flours. Their plant and store are in Auburn, with a well-regarded mostly-breakfast cafe attached. The original old water-powered mill is outside of town, and is being restored/converted to a museum.
Penn Yan has Birkett Mills, which has been in operation since the late 1700's. The mill's no longer in operation, but the building that the mill went with is still in use, though it's now not their only one.

-- there are a lot of Amish on the roads; also a lot of Old Order Mennonites, a different group sometimes confused with them by people not familiar with either. From the point of view of buggy traffic, of course, it doesn't make much difference; basically, there's a lot of it in some areas in the region, little or none in some other places (which is also true of the farm equipment). And yes, the tourists abruptly stopping to look at things, and/or driving erratically because they're trying to find something, are an additional hazard. On the main roads, the situation's further complicated by tractor trailers in a hurry to get somewhere.

All of which description makes it sound more terrifying than it is; most of these roads are low traffic by city standards and some of them low traffic by just about any standard. Just be aware of people moving at a wide variety of different speeds on the roads.
  #39  
Old 06-10-2019, 10:28 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
Penn Yan has Birkett Mills, which has been in operation since the late 1700's. The mill's no longer in operation, but the building that the mill went with is still in use, though it's now not their only one.
I've seen the building for Birkett Mills, but I don't think it's open to the public or has a store or anything. Birkett Mills specializes in buckwheat. I had no idea they made Wolff's Kasha.
  #40  
Old 06-10-2019, 10:41 PM
Ukulele Ike is offline
Charter Member
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 17,097
Another thing about Watkins Glen ó it was the site of the hugest open-air rock concert in the US....bigger than Woodstock...with just the Allman Brothers, the Grateful Dead, and the Band. Consider it a historic site.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Motorgirl View Post
I so miss the smell of summer in the Ithaca area - chicken!

I make Cornell recipe chicken at home but it's not the same as that serendipitous hasty "omg chicken! pull over!" moment on a summer day.
Iíve heard of Cornell chicken, but never tasted it. DETAILS, lady, DETAILS!!!
__________________
Uke
  #41  
Old 06-10-2019, 10:51 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
Seneca Falls: Set slightly off the lake on the old Seneca-Cayuga Canal, Seneca Falls is primarily known for being a birthplace of the Women's Rights Movement in America. The Elizabeth Cady Stanton House. is part of the Women's Rights National Historical Monument, which is part of the National Parks Service.

The actual northern end of Lake Cayuga is taken up by the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge, a major wetlands for migratory birds and other wildlife. Trails, observation towers, and a visitor/education center. The Monetzuma Audubon Center is also nearby.
  #42  
Old 06-11-2019, 11:50 AM
JohnT's Avatar
JohnT is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 22,711
I've spent a fair amount of time up there and can pretty much agree with all the other posters - it's lovely, the roads are tight, traffic can be a problem, there's a ton X 10 of things to do.

I'm a bit of a bore and so I like industrial/economic history, so one weekend I had a fun time driving Route 6 in Northern PA, turning onto 62, and visiting Titusville, Oil City, Franklin, Pithole, and other locations where the modern oil industry was born.
  #43  
Old 06-11-2019, 02:53 PM
jasg is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upper left hand corner
Posts: 6,016
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmoak View Post
Skaneateles: Another very picturesque village, even more so than Owego, and right on the lake. So picturesque that the village puts on Dickens Weekends before Christmas, with costumed re-enactors playing characters from his novels.
I know the original closed long ago but I heard that there is now a Krebs v2.0 restaurant in Skaneateles.

Any idea how it compares to the exceptional original?
  #44  
Old 06-11-2019, 03:32 PM
Little Nemo is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 80,939
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Iíve heard of Cornell chicken, but never tasted it. DETAILS, lady, DETAILS!!!
It's also known as State Fair chicken.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srfTVlVOkhs
  #45  
Old 06-11-2019, 07:30 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasg View Post
I know the original closed long ago but I heard that there is now a Krebs v2.0 restaurant in Skaneateles.

Any idea how it compares to the exceptional original?
Never been. The new owners renovated/rsetored the place, but are not using the original's menu/recipes. Haven't been to Skaneateles in a while, but I pretty much stuck to the good low-end eateries like Doug's Fish Fry and Joe's Pasta Garage.
  #46  
Old 06-11-2019, 08:47 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
Geneva: A handsome college town on the north shore of Lake Seneca, Geneva is a college town (the adjoining campuses of Hobart and William Smith Colleges), and thus has more varied food options than a town of this size in upstate NY would have. Geneva also has a very nice lakefront park. Belhurst Castle is a swanky resort/hotel that's out of most traveller's price range, but they have a winery and brewery on premises, and those, the restaurants, and the grounds are open to the public.

Nearby are the Warerloo Outlets shopping center and the Del Lago, a relatively new casino/hotel.
  #47  
Old 06-11-2019, 10:22 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
Hammondsport: A small village on the south shore of Keuka Lake. A few restaurants, bed & breakfasts, and a very nice old-fashioned ice cream parlor. Hammondsport is a good base for visiting the Keuka Lake wineries, including the highly-regarded Dr. Konstantin Frank Winery. Just outside of town are the Glenn Curtiss Aviation Museum and the Finger Lakes Boating Museum.

Penn Yann: A handsome town on the north fork of Keuka Lake, with nice downtown shops. The Keuka Lake Outlet Trail is a 7 mile hiking trail along the waterway that outlets at Dresden on Seneca Lake.

Between Penn Yan and Dundee on the road to Watkins Glen is the Windmill Market, a large indoor/outdoor farmer's market, craft fair, and flea market. Only open on Saturdays. Quite a few Mennonite vendors here, including a really good bakery. A few miles closer to Penn Yann is Oak Hill Bulk Foods, a large Mennonite-run bulk foods grocery store with a deli, bakery, and cafe.
  #48  
Old 06-11-2019, 11:41 PM
thorny locust is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 736
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmoak View Post
Penn Yann: A handsome town on the north fork of Keuka Lake, with nice downtown shops. The Keuka Lake Outlet Trail is a 7 mile hiking trail along the waterway that outlets at Dresden on Seneca Lake.

Between Penn Yan and Dundee on the road to Watkins Glen is the Windmill Market, a large indoor/outdoor farmer's market, craft fair, and flea market. Only open on Saturdays. Quite a few Mennonite vendors here, including a really good bakery. A few miles closer to Penn Yann is Oak Hill Bulk Foods, a large Mennonite-run bulk foods grocery store with a deli, bakery, and cafe.
Penn Yan with that number of N's, please.

The Windmill market has large quantities of all sorts of things from everywhere. There are some actual local producers there, but you have to ask; otherwise you may be buying produce and other goods shipped in from far outside the area. There are local-only, producer only, markets in downtown Penn Yan on Saturday mornings and in Watkins on Friday afternoons and in a number of other villages and cities including Geneva and Ithaca on various days of the week; most much smaller than the Windmill (Ithaca's an exception, that's quite a large market) but with only local items and vendors.

That doesn't matter to everybody, of course. But a lot of people seem to assume that if Mennonites or Amish are running the stand, then the items on it must be local, and some even assume that any such produce must be organic. Neither of those is necessarily true, though they might be. Ask the vendor if it matters to you.
  #49  
Old 06-12-2019, 07:16 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
I spelled Penn Yan right the second time!

Windmill might not be the best or most local authentic farmer's market in the Finger Lakes, but people go there for all the other stuff, too. Also, I don't care if they are crafty Mennonites who shipped their baked goods in from Indiana, I'm still there buying pastry and pie from Stoltzfus Pastries.
  #50  
Old 06-12-2019, 09:06 PM
bmoak is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,266
Watkins Glen:A heavily-touristed village on the south shore of Seneca Lake. Watkins Glen is pretty heavily trafficked for such as small village, as the two-lane roads to Corning, Elmira, Ithaca, Geneva. and Penn Yan all run through the main downtown intersection and one traffic light. It can get especially crowded on event weekends, such as WineFest (July 12-14) or a race at Watkins Glen International speedway.

The big attractions are the non-oval racetrack, where you can ride in a racecar for a few laps if there is not a race, and Watkins Glen State Park, with its gorges, falls, and chasms and many many stairs.

Unfortunately, the town's lakefront is dominated by a Cargill Salt factory of all things.

There are ton of wineries going up the shores of Lake Seneca, especially the west shore, but Castle Grisch is a winery off the beaten path up the hill overlooking the town.

Just south of Watkins Glen is the village of Montour Falls, which has its falls right in town.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:52 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017