Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-10-2019, 08:09 PM
Walken After Midnight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 4,298

In the future, when drones are the size of flies


Due to advances in technology and miniaturization, it is conceivable that drones will one day be the size of flies, or even smaller, and could perhaps also be disguised as flies or other flying bugs.

How will this affect society in the future, with regards to issues such as security and privacy?

Will futuristic houses have flypaper hanging by the windows to capture potential fly-sized drone intruders?
  #2  
Old 05-10-2019, 09:50 PM
Snowboarder Bo's Avatar
Snowboarder Bo is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 25,304
Perhaps this video about micro-drones would interest you.
  #3  
Old 05-10-2019, 10:51 PM
Walken After Midnight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 4,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
That was an interesting video about some of the military or terror-related applications, and it all seemed plausible.

On a more prosaic note, would open windows, without some kind of mesh or force field, be a thing of the past? Maybe by that time, one would be able to buy defensive drones for one's home or business to detect and deal with any intruding micro-drones, as well as spiders and other creepy-crawlies.

What about if you're walking down the street, and some kid a couple of blocks away has a wasp micro-drone and is impersonating an angry wasp and attacking you as you walk along? Perhaps the wasp micro-drone has AI that enables it to mimic the erratic flight of a wasp, and the only way to tell it apart from a real wasp is to crush it and reveal its mechanical parts.

Maybe the brain-computer interface, that we will probably be wearing at that time, will also be able to detect drones. But what if there are undetectable stealth micro-drones? Maybe in the future, we will carry cans of micro-drones, like people carry pepper spray or bear spray today, to guard against any attacking micro-drones or angry wasps.

The future holds many potential known and unknown unknowns.
  #4  
Old 05-11-2019, 12:10 AM
clairobscur is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Paris
Posts: 17,881
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
That is...impressive? Worrying? Shocking?
__________________
S'en vai la memoria, e tornara pu.
  #5  
Old 05-11-2019, 12:14 AM
Velocity is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 14,057
Yeah, the main terrifying thing is how indefensible these drones are - you can't stop them from coming at you. We'll be seeing a lot of assassinations. Wonder if some military will have them programmed to kill enemy personnel (the trick being how to program an effective way to identify enemy personnel - maybe kill anyone wearing certain patches on their uniform, or a particular uniform - or maybe, have your own personnel wear something akin to Identify Friend or Foe (IFF) beacons or patches, and program the drone swarms to kill anyone in a certain geographical area not wearing those IFF devices.)
  #6  
Old 05-11-2019, 06:26 AM
msmith537 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 27,385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
Also, this one that's less "murder".
  #7  
Old 05-11-2019, 07:49 AM
Walken After Midnight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 4,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by msmith537 View Post
It's pretty amazing what they can do now with drones, almost indistinguishable from magic. Check out these butterfly drones.
  #8  
Old 05-11-2019, 09:16 AM
Joey P is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 28,523
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walken After Midnight View Post
On a more prosaic note, would open windows, without some kind of mesh or force field, be a thing of the past?
I think that's already a thing of the past. Just about every house already has some type of mesh over it's windows specifically to keep fly sized things out.
  #9  
Old 05-11-2019, 09:44 AM
Anny Middon is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey P View Post
I think that's already a thing of the past. Just about every house already has some type of mesh over it's windows specifically to keep fly sized things out.
I know that window screens used to be pretty rare in Europe. Is that no longer true?
  #10  
Old 05-11-2019, 10:32 AM
Walken After Midnight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 4,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey P View Post
Just about every house already has some type of mesh over it's windows specifically to keep fly sized things out.
I don't think that's the case everywhere. In any case, a determined human controlling a flying insect micro-drone would have a good chance of getting into any enclosed space undetected when a door is opened.

Maybe in the future people will wear cork hats, like they do in Australia, to ward off all the flying micro-drones (and possible futuristic radioactive mutant angry wasps).

Air travel is clearly a major potential danger area for drone attack, as it is today already. Aircraft being grounded after elderly Chinese passengers have thrown coins into the jet engines for good luck shows the havoc that be caused by relatively small objects.
  #11  
Old 05-11-2019, 12:58 PM
Snowboarder Bo's Avatar
Snowboarder Bo is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 25,304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walken After Midnight View Post
On a more prosaic note, would open windows, without some kind of mesh or force field, be a thing of the past? Maybe by that time, one would be able to buy defensive drones for one's home or business to detect and deal with any intruding micro-drones, as well as spiders and other creepy-crawlies.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey P View Post
I think that's already a thing of the past. Just about every house already has some type of mesh over it's windows specifically to keep fly sized things out.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walken After Midnight View Post
I don't think that's the case everywhere. In any case, a determined human controlling a flying insect micro-drone would have a good chance of getting into any enclosed space undetected when a door is opened.
Doors, windows and mesh screens will not save you.

Drone swarms are cool (and scary).

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 05-11-2019 at 12:58 PM.
  #12  
Old 05-11-2019, 03:39 PM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 10,407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walken After Midnight View Post
Check out these butterfly drones.

And, just like with the floating lightbulb, it is a trick. Those butterflies need to be surrounded by an array of infrared cameras to track their positions, the data is sent to an external computer that then sends the instructions to the butterflies how to move.


Let's look at some of the issues of a drone "the size of a fly or smaller."


Sensors: The reason that modern drones seem easy to fly is--like with the butterflies--computers are doing lots of work in the background. Modern drones contain multiple types of sensors that feed into internal processors that adjust the flight dynamically moment by moment. A "fly or smaller" sized drone would have to contain these sensors, too.



Cameras: The light-collecting ability of a camera decreases as the lens size decreases and as the CCD/CMOS cell size decreases. This means that any near-microscopic camera sensor is going to have a very low resolution and need bright light.


There are (at least) two imaginable operation modes for the drones.


1.) A fully autonomous one wouldn't need to have a radio transceiver built in, but it would have to contain all the processing power to handle the flight stabilization, image recognition and image processing. It would also need enough memory to store all those programs plus store mission instructions and captured photos/video.



2.) A remotely controlled one wouldn't need nearly as much processing and storage because the sensor data could be constantly streamed back to the controller, which would send back flight instructions dynamically like with the toy butterflies. However, it would require radio transceivers with enough bandwidth and range to reach the operator (and think of ranges measured in tens of feet.)



Power: You will have to have some internal power supply to power the flight, the positional sensors, the camera, whatever processors, memory, and radios installed.


Keep in mind that we are already very near the physical limit of how small transistors as we know them can be manufactured--current transistors can be made at the 7nm scale, 5nm transistor circuits are projected to be in production by 2021, and that may be it. Maybe a practical 3nm design will be developed that doesn't leak electrons like a sieve and can be cheaply mass-produced, but there is no guarantee of that. There is a very high chance that we will be at the end of transistor shrinking in less than 10 years--and that will still leave the circuits orders of magnitude too large to stuff everything needed into a "fly or smaller" size.



Tl;dr: I don't think you should be holding your breath expecting to ever see these things.
  #13  
Old 05-11-2019, 09:56 PM
Walken After Midnight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 4,298
In the future, one could envisage missiles sending hives of drones into enemy territory. Then swarms of drones would exit the hive to cause mayhem, and then return to the hive to recharge and rearm.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
And, just like with the floating lightbulb, it is a trick. Those butterflies need to be surrounded by an array of infrared cameras to track their positions, the data is sent to an external computer that then sends the instructions to the butterflies how to move.


Let's look at some of the issues of a drone "the size of a fly or smaller."


Sensors: The reason that modern drones seem easy to fly is--like with the butterflies--computers are doing lots of work in the background. Modern drones contain multiple types of sensors that feed into internal processors that adjust the flight dynamically moment by moment. A "fly or smaller" sized drone would have to contain these sensors, too.



Cameras: The light-collecting ability of a camera decreases as the lens size decreases and as the CCD/CMOS cell size decreases. This means that any near-microscopic camera sensor is going to have a very low resolution and need bright light.


There are (at least) two imaginable operation modes for the drones.


1.) A fully autonomous one wouldn't need to have a radio transceiver built in, but it would have to contain all the processing power to handle the flight stabilization, image recognition and image processing. It would also need enough memory to store all those programs plus store mission instructions and captured photos/video.



2.) A remotely controlled one wouldn't need nearly as much processing and storage because the sensor data could be constantly streamed back to the controller, which would send back flight instructions dynamically like with the toy butterflies. However, it would require radio transceivers with enough bandwidth and range to reach the operator (and think of ranges measured in tens of feet.)



Power: You will have to have some internal power supply to power the flight, the positional sensors, the camera, whatever processors, memory, and radios installed.


Keep in mind that we are already very near the physical limit of how small transistors as we know them can be manufactured--current transistors can be made at the 7nm scale, 5nm transistor circuits are projected to be in production by 2021, and that may be it. Maybe a practical 3nm design will be developed that doesn't leak electrons like a sieve and can be cheaply mass-produced, but there is no guarantee of that. There is a very high chance that we will be at the end of transistor shrinking in less than 10 years--and that will still leave the circuits orders of magnitude too large to stuff everything needed into a "fly or smaller" size.



Tl;dr: I don't think you should be holding your breath expecting to ever see these things.
Yeah, there's some issues. Potentially, there could be a "mothership" drone which streams back to, and is controlled by, the controller, and then a fleet of AI drones which accompany, and are controlled by, the mothership drone. There could even be an intermediate layer of "officer" drones that do the sensor work, act as the eyes or do the processing for a "squad" of drones, thus further lightening the load on the lowest-ranking "grunt" drones.

I was also wondering how close we are to building a replica artificial fly? So this artificial fly wouldn't have any capabilities or be able to accomplish any tasks beyond what a fly could do. It would just fly around doing fly stuff.
  #14  
Old 05-11-2019, 10:12 PM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 10,407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walken After Midnight View Post
I was also wondering how close we are to building a replica artificial fly? So this artificial fly wouldn't have any capabilities or be able to accomplish any tasks beyond what a fly could do. It would just fly around doing fly stuff.

A very long way off.
  #15  
Old 05-12-2019, 06:56 PM
Walken After Midnight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 4,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
Why so? We can make computers and jet fighters, so why, if humankind set its mind to it, could we not build an electro-mechanical fly? How well do we understand the fly brain - could we recreate one with a circuit board? Are there any parts of a fly that would be beyond our technological capabilities?
  #16  
Old 05-12-2019, 07:17 PM
beowulff's Avatar
beowulff is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 16,451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walken After Midnight View Post
Why so? We can make computers and jet fighters, so why, if humankind set its mind to it, could we not build an electro-mechanical fly? How well do we understand the fly brain - could we recreate one with a circuit board? Are there any parts of a fly that would be beyond our technological capabilities?
We need much, much better batteries. And, probably more efficient propulsion.
Neither is looking very promising right now.
  #17  
Old 05-12-2019, 07:31 PM
Walken After Midnight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 4,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulff View Post
We need much, much better batteries.
Why could we not recreate a real fly's digestive system and get the mechanical fly to eat what real flies eat, and convert it into energy? So its "battery life" would be however long a real fly can survive without food.
Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulff View Post
And, probably more efficient propulsion.
Surely we would be able to recreate a real fly's propulsion technique if we intensively studied and tested it?
  #18  
Old 05-12-2019, 07:45 PM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 10,407
Even the simplest brains in the animal kingdom (far simpler than a housefly brain) aren't understood well. And brains are orders of magnitude more energy efficient that current computer technology, and produce orders of magnitude less waste heat. And brains are agressively 3D, each neuron connecting to up to thousands of others and communicating not only through electrical pulses but through multiple types of chemical signals. Modern computers are good at crunching numbers but the best of them look like an abacus compaired to the total of what a brain can do. So a circuit board fully recreating the brain of a fly would be far too big to fit into a fly sized body, consume far too much electricity, and produce far too much waste heat. And as I have said earlier, transistors are not going to get much smaller than they are right now because we are pushing against fundamental limits of physics. The age of constant huge improvements in integrated circuits is over.



You say "we can make computers and jet fighters", but I fail to see computers runing at 100 GHz and jet fighters crusing at Mach 50. That's because there are limits to what the matter in this universe is capable of being shaped into. That includes limits on how small electronic components can be made.


It is concievable that in the future (several decades from now) we will know enogh about brains and genetics to make a fly sized drone from a fly (wherther or not it will have the capacity to store enough orogramming and data to be useful for anything is a different question) but it isn't going to be made with the crude cludge of a technology that we call electronics.
  #19  
Old 05-12-2019, 07:56 PM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 10,407
This article is about the human brain, but you can imagine that even scaled down to a fly brain the power and computing used aren't going to be especially tiny. The mistake is in thinking that transistor-based computers are something especially effecient, when actually using them to "think" is sort of like using a rocket motor to lift an elevator.
  #20  
Old 05-13-2019, 07:01 AM
UnwittingAmericans is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 272
I suppose it could take care of the anti-vaxxing problem.
  #21  
Old 05-13-2019, 07:22 AM
iiandyiiii's Avatar
iiandyiiii is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 33,566
I think it's possible that, at some point, privacy outside of rooms specially designed for it will not exist any more. Conceivably, we could have tiny cameras almost everywhere on Earth, recording almost everything. This would have a very strong deterrent effect on crime, and possibly we'd get to a point in which the only significant crime were impulse and substance-driven crimes.
  #22  
Old 05-13-2019, 07:36 AM
BrotherCadfael is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 10,178
Basically the plot of Danny Dunn and the Invisible Boy, published in 1983.
  #23  
Old 05-13-2019, 09:12 AM
Velocity is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 14,057
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnwittingAmericans View Post
I suppose it could take care of the anti-vaxxing problem.
........by zapping people with vaccines?
  #24  
Old 05-13-2019, 09:22 AM
UnwittingAmericans is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocity View Post
........by zapping people with vaccines?
Yeah.
  #25  
Old 05-13-2019, 06:44 PM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 10,407
A new article on a hummingbird-scale drone. (Note that it is wired for power--it isn't specified if processing is external.) Researchers speculate that it could help with search and rescue after disasters.
  #26  
Old 05-13-2019, 08:52 PM
Walken After Midnight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 4,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
This article is about the human brain, but you can imagine that even scaled down to a fly brain the power and computing used aren't going to be especially tiny.
I can't really get my head around mind-boggling sentences like this (from the article):
Quote:
It took 40 minutes of computing time for this [720 square meter] supercomputer to process and simulate the data for just one second of human brainís 1% activity.
I mean, even if I think really hard about something, I don't usually accomplish a great deal of thought within that specified timeframe. What is the supercomputer doing that's taking so much processing power to recreate one second of 1% of human brain activity?
Quote:
Originally Posted by iiandyiiii View Post
I think it's possible that, at some point, privacy outside of rooms specially designed for it will not exist any more. Conceivably, we could have tiny cameras almost everywhere on Earth, recording almost everything. This would have a very strong deterrent effect on crime, and possibly we'd get to a point in which the only significant crime were impulse and substance-driven crimes.
They will probably need to put anti-drone nets around nudist beaches.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrotherCadfael View Post
Basically the plot of Danny Dunn and the Invisible Boy, published in 1983.
Sometimes I see a bug flying around the room and wonder if it's an alien spacecraft sent to observe humans while trying to remain inconspicuous. Everyone does this, right...?
  #27  
Old 05-13-2019, 09:23 PM
Wesley Clark is offline
2018 Midterm Prediction Winner
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 21,716
We already have cell phones, laptops and digital assistants like alexa and google home around us at all times. These could be used to spy on us. So its not anything new.

The number of microphones and cameras you have around you at home is constantly growing. Just looking at my apartment I count at least 5 microphones and 2 cameras.
__________________
Sometimes I doubt your commitment to sparkle motion

Last edited by Wesley Clark; 05-13-2019 at 09:24 PM.
  #28  
Old 05-13-2019, 09:34 PM
Walken After Midnight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 4,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wesley Clark View Post
We already have cell phones, laptops and digital assistants like alexa and google home around us at all times. These could be used to spy on us. So its not anything new.

The number of microphones and cameras you have around you at home is constantly growing. Just looking at my apartment I count at least 5 microphones and 2 cameras.
Well, I do have a piece of tape over my laptop's webcam. I don't know what the risk is of one's webcam getting hijacked, but I'm not taking any chances. I know I'm not alone in doing this, as I've seen it on other people's laptops.
  #29  
Old 05-13-2019, 10:33 PM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 10,407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walken After Midnight View Post
I can't really get my head around mind-boggling sentences like this (from the article):

I mean, even if I think really hard about something, I don't usually accomplish a great deal of thought within that specified timeframe. What is the supercomputer doing that's taking so much processing power to recreate one second of 1% of human brain activity?

Simulating reality a lot harder than reality. For instance, any idiot can turn on a flashlight, but rendering a photorealistic ray-traced image takes a lot of code and a lot of processing power.


As for the specifications in the article, if everything scaled linearly--which it wouldn't, but let's pretend anyway--to simulate a full human brain in realtime would take 3 gigawatts of electricity and 169 billion CPU cores. Of course, that is trying to simulate the raw chemical and electrical physics of the brain. If we ever fully understand the "rules" of the brain, we may be able to cut corners instead--who knows, someday it may take only a few hundred million CPUs and only a modest dedicated nuclear power plant to simulate a human brain in silicon!
  #30  
Old 05-13-2019, 10:58 PM
Walken After Midnight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 4,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
Simulating reality a lot harder than reality. For instance, any idiot can turn on a flashlight, but rendering a photorealistic ray-traced image takes a lot of code and a lot of processing power.
What about first-person video games, which are getting closer and closer to photorealistic? A home games console is not just presenting how we perceive the reality of the game world, through visuals and sounds, but also calculating the reality itself in real time, such as the physical movement of many on-screen AI characters and objects.
  #31  
Old 05-13-2019, 11:00 PM
beowulff's Avatar
beowulff is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 16,451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walken After Midnight View Post
Well, I do have a piece of tape over my laptop's webcam. I don't know what the risk is of one's webcam getting hijacked, but I'm not taking any chances. I know I'm not alone in doing this, as I've seen it on other people's laptops.
Who would want to look at you?
  #32  
Old 05-13-2019, 11:02 PM
Walken After Midnight is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 4,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulff View Post
Who would want to look at you?
Hillary Clinton and the Deep State!
  #33  
Old 05-13-2019, 11:10 PM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 10,407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walken After Midnight View Post
What about first-person video games, which are getting closer and closer to photorealistic?

A process that has taken decades of research and development in developing both the hardware and the software, and who knows how millions of person-hours and billions of dollars to achieve. Because it is very, very hard.
  #34  
Old 05-14-2019, 11:46 PM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 10,407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
Keep in mind that we are already very near the physical limit of how small transistors as we know them can be manufactured--current transistors can be made at the 7nm scale, 5nm transistor circuits are projected to be in production by 2021, and that may be it. Maybe a practical 3nm design will be developed that doesn't leak electrons like a sieve and can be cheaply mass-produced, but there is no guarantee of that.

I ran across this article a few minutes ago. A year old, but probably still pretty accuate.
  #35  
Old 05-15-2019, 12:20 AM
Voyager's Avatar
Voyager is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Deep Space
Posts: 45,543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
I ran across this article a few minutes ago. A year old, but probably still pretty accuate.
That article notes, correctly, that the economics is the killer, not the technology. They only mention fab costs peripherally, and building a new 3 nm fab is going to be real expensive, especially at a time when Intel can't keep its fabs full with its own product.
Their claim of design costs seems pretty iffy. Design of what? New processor from scratch at the bleeding edge, maybe. But I was working on 7 nm when I retired and while our masks were damn expensive, they weren't that expensive, nor was the design. If it had been, we wouldn't have done it. Our design reused a lot of old design, which helped, but almost all new processor do the same thing.

The time lag between nodes due to economics has been happening for a while now.
But I don't think you need 3 nm chips to power a fly drone. It's not going to be run by a standard processor but by custom logic with a processor core. You clearly are going to want to build a ton of them, so they need to be relatively cheap. We're doing stacking already (I just reviewed a paper where the memories were stacked) so the footprint won't be much of a problem. Power supply would be a problem, but a lot of these are going to be spending time waiting, when they can recharge. Hell, they might want to fly around lightbulbs to recharge. Now that mimics nature.
  #36  
Old 05-15-2019, 12:21 AM
Voyager's Avatar
Voyager is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Deep Space
Posts: 45,543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walken After Midnight View Post
Well, I do have a piece of tape over my laptop's webcam. I don't know what the risk is of one's webcam getting hijacked, but I'm not taking any chances. I know I'm not alone in doing this, as I've seen it on other people's laptops.
The last few laptops I've had come with pieces of tape. My laptop is pointed to the back of my monitor, since I use a wireless keyboard, mouse, and a big screen.
  #37  
Old 05-15-2019, 12:25 AM
Voyager's Avatar
Voyager is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Deep Space
Posts: 45,543
I wonder if they can invent some kind of pulse that could zap drones coming through doors, and we could electrify our screens just enough to short the drones out, but not enough to hurt people.
So buy stock in the bug zapper industry.
  #38  
Old 05-15-2019, 12:25 AM
Mijin's Avatar
Mijin is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 8,945
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walken After Midnight View Post
What about first-person video games, which are getting closer and closer to photorealistic? A home games console is not just presenting how we perceive the reality of the game world, through visuals and sounds, but also calculating the reality itself in real time, such as the physical movement of many on-screen AI characters and objects.
A couple of things here.

Firstly the "photorealistic" thing is misleading. We have been able to photorealistically render, say, a glass ball on a marble floor for maybe 35 years. What happens over time is the set of environments and conditions we can render photorealistically increases.
There is not going to be a clear line between not / being able to render environments photorealistically: it depends on the environment.

And games necessarily cut out a lot of the detail of the environments they are simulating.
Yes there is a reality inside the computer and graphics card memory, that is being accurately and consistently mathematically modelled.
However it is not the same reality as the one the gamer is associating it with in the real world. A tree in a game is a very different thing to a tree in the real world.
  #39  
Old 05-15-2019, 01:25 AM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 10,407
As an aside, flies use modified wings as gyroscopes for stabalising their flights, as do these charming creatures, which have lives straight out of the creepiest SF horror movie you can imagine.
  #40  
Old 05-15-2019, 05:05 AM
Spoons is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Lethbridge, Alberta
Posts: 16,552
Have none of you folks ever used a flyswatter?

SPLAT!

Humans:1
Flies: 0

No fly-sized drone could survive a splat from a flyswatter from the local hardware store.
  #41  
Old 05-15-2019, 09:05 AM
Velocity is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 14,057
Considering the lethality of even miniscule amounts of toxins like VX, this would also work for assassinations; just send a fly-sized drone and spray a mist of VX in front of the victim's face for him to inhale, or inject it into him.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:24 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017