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  #101  
Old 02-13-2018, 03:58 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is online now
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What value does a medieval scholar or Holocaust studies major or sociology major add? Yeah, sure, they may be able to get a job, working in HR or advertising or something - but how does anything they were taught help in any way?
Teach History. A Government or NGO worker. Write books.
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  #102  
Old 02-13-2018, 04:04 PM
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To whom? Part of the deal with capitalism...though it gets violated in a number of large ways...is that while you're enjoying your swanky dorm and lattes, other people are working. Those people are producing all the equipment to make all the stuff you enjoy, they are protecting you so that the campus is a safe space (for the most part), you're no doubt receiving tons of services which involve collective bits of time from thousands of people.

So it makes a kind of sense that you should finish that degree, ideally on time, and be able to work your tail off creating new accomplishments of your own. Whether it be working as part of a large team to make the robots that will change everything, or just planning the wiring runs for factories, you're doing something useful to the other people who created the resources needed for you to have a nice time in college. And if it's a good college, the knowledge you learned adds genuine value. You're doing a better job than someone who just picked it up 'on the job'. Your robots actually work because you know the math, your factories don't burn down because you properly designed the wiring runs.

What value does a medieval scholar or Holocaust studies major or sociology major add? Yeah, sure, they may be able to get a job, working in HR or advertising or something - but how does anything they were taught help in any way?
Well, those who do not understand the past are doomed to repeat it. There are those people who believe that there is more to contributing to society than adding economic value. I happen to agree - I have friends who are artists and musicians and writers - often supported by tolerant spouses.

However, I am unconvinced if SOCIETY needs to support them. Or all of them. I think having Historians work at the Smithsonian or Holocaust studies majors work with survivors of ethnic cleansing in Rwanda or funding Shakespeare in the park is probably useful to the human condition in a non-monetary sense - but you don't need nearly as many Historians as are produced through undergraduate programs (or even graduate programs). On the other hand, Historians go to law school and become lawyers - and if we measure economic worth by the size of law firms, lawyers are needed.

But just because you majored in Computer Science doesn't mean that you are going to spend the next 40 years contributing to society in the field in which you studied. During the height of the offshoring phase and the recession, we saw lots of developers out of work. I know lots of systems engineers that are out of work as we move more and more to the cloud/devops and data center automation. I know several former developers who have moved into non-STEM fields - often because they can make more money.

Which all brings us back to the question of gating. Say that as a society we somehow manage to agree that to maintain a cultural heritage, we want to get 50 Shakespearean actors and scholars out each year - and we need to get 100,000 CS Majors out each year. And we agree to pay for both of those. How do you pick who gets to study and who doesn't? And what about the CS major who gets through four years of school and decides that they want to be an artist after two years of writing code?
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  #103  
Old 02-13-2018, 04:08 PM
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Hoene said the high poverty rate in the supplemental report is driven by California’s stratospheric housing costs.


The economy is fine. The housing prices are incredible.
As is the traffic. California is so crowded that no one lives here anymore.
  #104  
Old 02-13-2018, 04:23 PM
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Which all brings us back to the question of gating. Say that as a society we somehow manage to agree that to maintain a cultural heritage, we want to get 50 Shakespearean actors and scholars out each year - and we need to get 100,000 CS Majors out each year. And we agree to pay for both of those. How do you pick who gets to study and who doesn't? And what about the CS major who gets through four years of school and decides that they want to be an artist after two years of writing code?
Back when I went to school college wasn't free, but it was sure cheaper than today, even counting for inflation. Were any of these things big problems? The programmer who now wants to be an artist? Programming is her day job. Or she saves up money to try it out.
What if you think you need 100K programmers but only have 75K competent students? Or, as you mentioned, the 100K jobs turn to 50K after the next crash. It happened in 2001, after all.
Plus most kids are smart enough to know what the employment situation is. People of my kids' generation are running scared, far more than I ever was.
The best thing about free college is that it lets kids decide what is best to do without crushing debt hanging over them. I know an English kid who is now has a job as a translator, but he never could have gone to college and then on if it weren't free. His mom is pretty poor. I was lucky enough to be able to pay for my kids, and they both could choose their future paths based on their skills and opportunities, not based on their debt.
And despite what spifflog thinks they both worked their asses off in college.
  #105  
Old 02-13-2018, 04:25 PM
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So if in the US we had a system where someone could be guaranteed a roof over their head, food, health insurance, and retirement their would be less need of college.
Grammar school, otoh …
  #106  
Old 02-13-2018, 04:32 PM
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Just a quick note about the economics of college: Degree programs and general education requirements in the humanities and many social sciences subsidize the rest of the university. These subjects have lower faculty salaries and usually do not require expensive equipment (although fine arts programs like music are an exception), while students pay the same per-credit-hour tuition for a humanities course as they do for a science course. The least cost-effective courses, from the institution's point of view, are usually lab sciences and practicums in pre-professional programs. So any solution that involves either incentivizing more students to major in STEM / pre-professional programs or cutting gen ed requirements is likely to result in higher tuition, not lower.
The author of your link neglects something important. A top university, like UCLA, has professors in STEM who bring in more money than just student fees. The grants they have include large amounts of overhead that go to the university, above and beyond the lab facilities they pay for. I've reviewed NSF grants and I assure you that these are significant. My daughter is a business school professor and has brought in all sorts of money for her department already.
So if you include student fees only he is correct, but that is only part of the story.

I recognize the importance of humanities programs, and am fine with them being subsidized from programs where money is easier to get.
  #107  
Old 02-13-2018, 04:39 PM
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This would be a huge waste of money. If you let the money on fire it would be better because at least then people would get heat.
The point of college is to certify which students are smart enough to get into college and diligent enough to do the work. If you encourage more people to go to college by putting the costs of the taxpayer then instead of spending four years gaining skills in the work world they will spend it on campus. Many of these people will drop out, having wasted their time and other people's money. If people don't drop out then they will graduate with a credential that means significantly less than it used to. Currently more than half of college graduates are in jobs that do not require a degree, what would be the point in spending a hundred billion dollars a year to up that percentage to 75%?
The proposal seems to be that we pay for those who cannot get into college, not let everyone into college qualified or not.
I'm not sure what your experience was, but in mine - and my family's - you actually learn things in college, and get exposed to areas that you would not be exposed to at work.
Since most companies have dropped their education programs, I'm not sure what skills people will gain. Skilled trades need education too. Responsibility? What builds more responsibility - punching a time card and having the boss standing over your shoulder or being forced to plan your work through self motivation, with crappy grades (and angry parents) the punishment if you fail.
When I worked (before email, anyway) I could relax. When I went back to my dorm in college I had five problem sets staring me in the face.
  #108  
Old 02-13-2018, 04:42 PM
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It has certainly been tried in a number of places. I remember the City University of New York had it for several years--but had to drop it because of budget problems. And when they dropped it there was a substantial drop in the number of students.
http://www1.cuny.edu/mu/forum/2011/1...-free-sort-of/
More than several years. My mother went to Brooklyn College free in the late 1930s, and I could have gone to CCNY free in 1969.
Many of the well known intellectuals from the '30s went to CCNY, and probably couldn't go anywhere else. If they had gotten in to other places, which was unlikely because they were Jewish.
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Old 02-13-2018, 05:28 PM
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Back when I went to school college wasn't free, but it was sure cheaper than today, even counting for inflation. Were any of these things big problems? The programmer who now wants to be an artist? Programming is her day job. Or she saves up money to try it out.
What if you think you need 100K programmers but only have 75K competent students? Or, as you mentioned, the 100K jobs turn to 50K after the next crash. It happened in 2001, after all.
Plus most kids are smart enough to know what the employment situation is. People of my kids' generation are running scared, far more than I ever was.
The best thing about free college is that it lets kids decide what is best to do without crushing debt hanging over them. I know an English kid who is now has a job as a translator, but he never could have gone to college and then on if it weren't free. His mom is pretty poor. I was lucky enough to be able to pay for my kids, and they both could choose their future paths based on their skills and opportunities, not based on their debt.
And despite what spifflog thinks they both worked their asses off in college.
They might be if the government is looking for economic efficiency from the system - if the idea is that this will pay for itself in increased economic gain.

By the way, my two cents on this is that we should work to make college more accessible for more people - but that doesn't mean it needs to be free. I'm just asking questions because as Grim Render pointed out - what do we mean by free college? Until that question is answered - we know what we mean, we know what we are looking for in outcomes - then no, it isn't feasible in the U.S.
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  #110  
Old 02-13-2018, 05:47 PM
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What do you all think of the free college model at College of the Ozarks where students can work at on campus jobs and work their way thru college?
  #111  
Old 02-13-2018, 05:54 PM
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That would be the poster you just quoted

Re: Norway costs, I did find this article: http://sciencenordic.com/norwegian-h...d-institutions

"The average Norwegian university student costs 20,350 Euro a year", but that varies between €7700 (business admin) and €82,000 (medicine).

I didn't see a link to the actual report in the article.

And, "The study did not include the costs related to the buildings used by students and staff. Analysts said including these expenses would have made the calculations too complicated." It's customary the apply a general overhead rate here to account for buildings and grounds. Is it completely accurate? Probably not. But more so than zero. Blame Deloitte.
Along with that, a small country like Norway could look at its society needs and put out scholarships accordingly.

For example, they could survey industry and find out their is a need for 200 computer programmers, 100 elementary school teachers, 300 plumbers, 100 police officers... and so on.
  #112  
Old 02-13-2018, 06:05 PM
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The idea of the government allocating college majors does not appeal to me.

Even if you aren't paying tuition, there is still a cost to attending college. People will gravitate toward lucrative careers, with some natural gating based on interest and ability. Have too many programmers? They'll get paid less and attract fewer new ones.
  #113  
Old 02-13-2018, 07:18 PM
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I would like to tell a little story of a man I met nearly 60 years ago. Son of immigrants, he had not even heard of college when he graduated from a NYC HS in the 30s. A friend told him about CCNY and he decided to apply. He just made the 80% average that was required then and graduated as an engineer. When I met him he was working as an engineer in Philadelphia and teaching calculus to night students at Penn. (That's how I met him; as a grad student in math, I used to hang around at night a lot.) So the existence of a free college had changed his life and benefited him enormously. But it benefited society as well. CCNY started charging tuition during the financial crisis of the 70s and has never gone back.

Let me tell you my story, even if it is nearly 65 years old. I graduated #31 in a class of 255, so not in the top decile, but high in the second. My SATs totaled essentially 1300. My subject scores were 722, 722, and 594 (they didn't round in those days). So high average but not overwhelming so. I applied for scholarships and got 0. Although tuition at Temple was only about $500, my family simply could not afford even that. I would not have gone to college at all except for a real stroke of luck. Looking for a job, I came across a newspaper ad (that's how you found jobs in those bygone days), for a full-time job as a lab tech at Penn that allowed me to get paid and take night (or even day, when necessary) courses at Penn at half price and, eventually graduate in five years. If not for that, I very much doubt that I could have had a career as professor and research mathematician.
  #114  
Old 02-13-2018, 08:53 PM
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The idea of the government allocating college majors does not appeal to me.

Even if you aren't paying tuition, there is still a cost to attending college. People will gravitate toward lucrative careers, with some natural gating based on interest and ability. Have too many programmers? They'll get paid less and attract fewer new ones.
You actually have a classic problem in control theory here. This comes when you have too much gain (response to stimuli) and too much lag between taking an action and the result.

In this case, if you were the government, and you decided that you had too few computer programmers, you might take an action to incentivize training a bunch more. Like paying for their college. But it wouldn't actually have an effect on the number of coders for about 5-10 years : it would take time for each expanded class of programmers to get through school and graduate, and then it turns out that most employers want 3-5 years experience before they really think someone is competent enough to hire at all.

So you get oscillation.
  #115  
Old 02-13-2018, 10:19 PM
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You certainly can get oscillations and my nurse friends tell me they see it their profession. But it's not like the only source of new coders is now 18-year-olds. And the exit of older programmers can be delayed if the market incentivises it. Business that want people bad enough will train them. I'm seeing this now with "data science."

It's not like the point of college is to train you in some narrow and unbending career path. Hell, I'll hire that apocryphal french lit major to do comms or project management. Probably smarter than a comms major.
  #116  
Old 02-14-2018, 01:13 AM
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What do you all think of the free college model at College of the Ozarks where students can work at on campus jobs and work their way thru college?
It's how I paid for graduate school. Many of my friends there were working for the university, both grad and undergrad students, in multiple fields; one of the people doing research in our lab was a secretary who'd asked "so what is it you guys do, with this 'chemistry with computers' thing? I thought chemistry was done in labs!" After a year of puttering around with us she signed up for some undergrad courses; she could get a certain amount of credits with no tuition because of being a university employee.

I think that in principle it's a perfectly fine model. Like any business model it can be applied well or badly, but the idea is sound and in fact widespread under different names.
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Old 02-14-2018, 07:05 AM
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What do you all think of the free college model at College of the Ozarks where students can work at on campus jobs and work their way thru college?
That in addition to work, like Harvard, its heavily funded by outside donations and isn't a sustainable model on a large scale. Its acceptance rate is close to a school like Tufts - at 14% - it hasn't been able to scale itself - its only 1500 students which is tiny for a college. And it isn't "free" - the average cost of attendance is $13k a year according to Niche. And out of that, you get a subpar earnings post graduation for a four year school.
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Old 02-14-2018, 09:29 AM
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I just want to make a quick post about something I've heard before. The US has been slipping for many years in what's known as social mobility. The ability to rise due to your own determination and hard work. Once, the US was the undisputed champion of this. Now, its near the bottom of the developed world. The top nations are the Nordics, mostly. And the reason I've heard is, free college. There are other factors, but that is the 800-pound gorilla. The more your education depends on your parents wallet, the more stratified a society gets.
  #119  
Old 02-14-2018, 09:40 AM
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I was lucky enough to be able to pay for my kids, and they both could choose their future paths based on their skills and opportunities, not based on their debt.
And despite what spifflog thinks they both worked their asses off in college.
We'll everyone's kids are the best right? Just ask them.

As has been pointed out, first and foremost what must be ascertained is if this is actually a problem. Are we short college grads? Do we really need more?

If so, is it true that people can't go to college due to finances? There are many scholarships, loans, grants and companies that are willing to pay for college. Is that not enough? My father was a brick layer and my mother was a housewife. I worked my tail off and still had to take a year off to earn more money. I didn't get my dream school, I went to a state school and I waited until I had a job to get my Master's. I don't drive a Tesla not either but such is life.

Free ice cream for everyone is nice. But is it better than free healthcare? Free food? Housing? A free Tesla?

Last edited by spifflog; 02-14-2018 at 09:42 AM.
  #120  
Old 02-14-2018, 09:55 AM
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The proposal seems to be that we pay for those who cannot get into college, not let everyone into college qualified or not.
I'm not sure what your experience was, but in mine - and my family's - you actually learn things in college, and get exposed to areas that you would not be exposed to at work.
Since most companies have dropped their education programs, I'm not sure what skills people will gain. Skilled trades need education too. Responsibility? What builds more responsibility - punching a time card and having the boss standing over your shoulder or being forced to plan your work through self motivation, with crappy grades (and angry parents) the punishment if you fail.
When I worked (before email, anyway) I could relax. When I went back to my dorm in college I had five problem sets staring me in the face.
If you made college free then more people would use it, college is no different than anything else. How are you going to restrict the people who get the free tuition? Free tuition just means more people with no purpose wandering around college trying to figure out what to do with there lives. There is already a huge problem with fly by night colleges hoovering up government tuition assistance and providing no benefit.
I learned alot in college but see no reason people who have never met me should have paid my college 25K per year for me to do so. Trades need training, not college. Work builds alot more responsibility than college, 26% of college students report skipping at least one class a week and the average student studies 17 hours a week.
  #121  
Old 02-14-2018, 11:34 AM
Fretful Porpentine Fretful Porpentine is offline
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If you made college free then more people would use it, college is no different than anything else. How are you going to restrict the people who get the free tuition? Free tuition just means more people with no purpose wandering around college trying to figure out what to do with there lives. There is already a huge problem with fly by night colleges hoovering up government tuition assistance and providing no benefit.
Since I live in an area where community college tuition is currently free, I'd like to speak to this. It's fairly easy to restrict who gets this benefit after the first semester -- all you have to do is insist that students maintain a certain GPA and make satisfactory progress toward graduation. (This isn't a perfect solution, since, as a few other people have pointed out, this means that students receiving the benefit are disproportionately those who with adequate academic preparation and a reasonably stable life -- but identifying and cutting off students who are not taking advantage of the education they're being offered isn't particularly difficult from a logistical point of view.)
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Old 02-14-2018, 04:42 PM
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Since I live in an area where community college tuition is currently free, I'd like to speak to this. It's fairly easy to restrict who gets this benefit after the first semester -- all you have to do is insist that students maintain a certain GPA and make satisfactory progress toward graduation. (This isn't a perfect solution, since, as a few other people have pointed out, this means that students receiving the benefit are disproportionately those who with adequate academic preparation and a reasonably stable life -- but identifying and cutting off students who are not taking advantage of the education they're being offered isn't particularly difficult from a logistical point of view.)
This is what they did to people at the University of Kansas. if you were not making progress, meaning taking certain number of hours and getting a certain GPA, you were asked to leave.

No, you were not told, you were asked.

Now many people (like me) took that advice and left with our tails between our legs. I went back to a community college, worked on the basics, and then went back to KU and did fine.
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Old 02-14-2018, 05:02 PM
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The problem with free college is that it doesn't actually solve the real issue. Employers are not using degrees to rule out the uneducated, but rather the undesirable. The education is irrelevant. For instance, being an administrative assistant where I work now requires an Associates Degree. Why? There aren't true skills being conveyed by an AA that a high school graduate should not possess. It's answering phones and scheduling meetings with occasional dictation duties. This shouldn't and doesn't require two years of post-secondary education. What the AA requirement does though is weed out the lower classes (and I would even go so far as to say minority applicants in many cases) and the unambitious.

What this means (and we're already seeing it happen) is that as degrees become more common, they become less useful as tools to weed out the poor and minorities from applicant pools, so the educational requirements get raised. I'm in a department where 6 of 8 people have doctorates for a job that 30 years ago required a high school education. Providing free college doesn't do anything except shift the bar.
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Old 02-14-2018, 06:25 PM
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If you made college free then more people would use it, college is no different than anything else. How are you going to restrict the people who get the free tuition? Free tuition just means more people with no purpose wandering around college trying to figure out what to do with there lives. There is already a huge problem with fly by night colleges hoovering up government tuition assistance and providing no benefit.
I learned alot in college but see no reason people who have never met me should have paid my college 25K per year for me to do so. Trades need training, not college. Work builds alot more responsibility than college, 26% of college students report skipping at least one class a week and the average student studies 17 hours a week.
And you'd limit access, like they do in Europe. No doubt some people blocked from free college whose parents have money will go to paid ones, which is fine with me. I know community colleges would be covered by this plan - I'd hope certified trade schools would be also.
There is plenty of absenteeism in the work place also. Some students skip too many classes, some workers watch youtube videos all day. (We had a thread about that.) It happens. Not a reason to make it sound like all students or all workers are goof offs.
The two good things about this proposal are that it lets kids go to the best college they can get into, not the best they can afford or think they can afford, and it removes the sword of student loan repayments hanging over their heads.
Sure it costs money. So does new tanks and planes, and we seem to have plenty for them, don't we?
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Old 02-14-2018, 06:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Fretful Porpentine View Post
Since I live in an area where community college tuition is currently free, I'd like to speak to this. It's fairly easy to restrict who gets this benefit after the first semester -- all you have to do is insist that students maintain a certain GPA and make satisfactory progress toward graduation. (This isn't a perfect solution, since, as a few other people have pointed out, this means that students receiving the benefit are disproportionately those who with adequate academic preparation and a reasonably stable life -- but identifying and cutting off students who are not taking advantage of the education they're being offered isn't particularly difficult from a logistical point of view.)
Today there is a disincentive to kicking out students not making it, which is that you don't get their tuition money. This is especially prevalent in the ripoff for profit colleges. If the government didn't pay for those not making progress, it would pay the colleges to offer more counseling or to kick them out. Big plus for everyone.
  #126  
Old 02-14-2018, 06:32 PM
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We'll everyone's kids are the best right? Just ask them.

As has been pointed out, first and foremost what must be ascertained is if this is actually a problem. Are we short college grads? Do we really need more?

If so, is it true that people can't go to college due to finances? There are many scholarships, loans, grants and companies that are willing to pay for college. Is that not enough? My father was a brick layer and my mother was a housewife. I worked my tail off and still had to take a year off to earn more money. I didn't get my dream school, I went to a state school and I waited until I had a job to get my Master's. I don't drive a Tesla not either but such is life.

Free ice cream for everyone is nice. But is it better than free healthcare? Free food? Housing? A free Tesla?
As we've seen, scholarships are not so easy. Loans you can get - and then have them hanging over your head forcing you to take the jobs needed to pay the loans, not taking your best career path.
My loans were deferred until after I finished grad school which was a big help. They also got repaid after the period of 10% inflation or more, which really helped.
And I'm sure some qualified people do not try to get into schools which they think are too expensive, which hurts everyone.
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Old 02-14-2018, 06:39 PM
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Cooper Union in New York used to be a free college also. They had a rigorous set of tests after you qualified with good enough SAT scores. I got in, but I went to MIT instead because it was much better. I was lucky in that we could afford it. My career would have been much worse going to Cooper Union - which is a great school, just not as good as MIT.
  #128  
Old 02-14-2018, 07:16 PM
Ruken Ruken is online now
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Originally Posted by Grim Render View Post
I just want to make a quick post about something I've heard before. The US has been slipping for many years in what's known as social mobility. The ability to rise due to your own determination and hard work. Once, the US was the undisputed champion of this. Now, its near the bottom of the developed world. The top nations are the Nordics, mostly. And the reason I've heard is, free college. There are other factors, but that is the 800-pound gorilla. The more your education depends on your parents wallet, the more stratified a society gets.
It's complicated. Gregory Clark found similarly low mobility regardless of country, social policy, or time period. He didn't look at Norway but did look at Sweden.
And it depends a bit on how you measure mobility. We have very high income inequality here. A change in income that can boost you from the lowest income quintile to the highest in some northern european countries will only bring you to about average income here.

Tuition prices here are heavily dependent on income. Sticker prices are high, but the higher sticker price school may be a lower net price school.
https://trends.collegeboard.org/coll...-public-sector
https://trends.collegeboard.org/coll...private-sector
https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2...1-550-colleges
  #129  
Old 02-16-2018, 09:36 AM
Dangerosa Dangerosa is offline
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And you'd limit access, like they do in Europe. No doubt some people blocked from free college whose parents have money will go to paid ones, which is fine with me. I know community colleges would be covered by this plan - I'd hope certified trade schools would be also.
The real issue isn't the kids whose parents have money going to other colleges, the real issue is that while this might help shore up the middle class, many of the kids who don't qualify are going to be poor and/or minority. And they've usually had the deck stacked against them to start with. The idea of limiting access further stacks that deck.

And yet it isn't fair to the low end of the middle class - who make too much to qualify for grants and for whom even $6k a year for a public school tuition is still out of reach - to keep the aid levels so low that free aid really applies only for such a small subset.

But it isn't fair that someone should get to go to college for free when mom and dad are middle class and are leasing new cars every two years and have been since the kids were born, and have put a year of college tuition into Dance and Travelling Basketball and just spend $80k putting granite countertops and new cabinets into their kitchen and spend every penny they make (my neighbors who lobby for free college tuition). I really don't feel like subsidizing someone's six years of gymnastics and annual vacations growing up because they can't be bothered to save. If you decided to have the kids, and you are well off enough to "afford" them - college should be your responsibility.
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  #130  
Old 02-16-2018, 10:55 AM
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Voyager Voyager is offline
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The real issue isn't the kids whose parents have money going to other colleges, the real issue is that while this might help shore up the middle class, many of the kids who don't qualify are going to be poor and/or minority. And they've usually had the deck stacked against them to start with. The idea of limiting access further stacks that deck.
Today the deck is stacked against them for those reasons and money. This would at least eliminate the money issue. And I'm definitely in favor of programs to raise the level of incoming students - which should start long before college age, of course.
Quote:
And yet it isn't fair to the low end of the middle class - who make too much to qualify for grants and for whom even $6k a year for a public school tuition is still out of reach - to keep the aid levels so low that free aid really applies only for such a small subset.

But it isn't fair that someone should get to go to college for free when mom and dad are middle class and are leasing new cars every two years and have been since the kids were born, and have put a year of college tuition into Dance and Travelling Basketball and just spend $80k putting granite countertops and new cabinets into their kitchen and spend every penny they make (my neighbors who lobby for free college tuition). I really don't feel like subsidizing someone's six years of gymnastics and annual vacations growing up because they can't be bothered to save. If you decided to have the kids, and you are well off enough to "afford" them - college should be your responsibility.
That type of person likes to send their kids to community colleges not for the education benefit but to save money. And some parent seem to think that having kids pay for college themselves builds character or something. I'm with you that parents should pay if they can, but today the ones getting screwed are not the parents but the kids.

FAFSA forms assume parents are going to pay - I filled in my income on the 8 I did - but can't make parents pay.
  #131  
Old 02-16-2018, 02:37 PM
Dangerosa Dangerosa is offline
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Today the deck is stacked against them for those reasons and money. This would at least eliminate the money issue. And I'm definitely in favor of programs to raise the level of incoming students - which should start long before college age, of course.


That type of person likes to send their kids to community colleges not for the education benefit but to save money. And some parent seem to think that having kids pay for college themselves builds character or something. I'm with you that parents should pay if they can, but today the ones getting screwed are not the parents but the kids.

FAFSA forms assume parents are going to pay - I filled in my income on the 8 I did - but can't make parents pay.
That seems to be between you and your parents. I'm not sure what anyone else has to do with that problem.
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  #132  
Old 02-16-2018, 03:48 PM
k9bfriender k9bfriender is offline
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That seems to be between you and your parents. I'm not sure what anyone else has to do with that problem.
Having free college would have meant that his parents wouldn't have screwed him over so much.

I understand, I'm in the same situation. I couldn't get any financial aid, as my parents made too much, but they refused to help with tuition costs, so I didn't go until I was 25.

They weren't cheap, they were just assholes.
  #133  
Old 02-16-2018, 06:32 PM
proudfootz proudfootz is offline
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As we've seen, scholarships are not so easy. Loans you can get - and then have them hanging over your head forcing you to take the jobs needed to pay the loans, not taking your best career path.

My loans were deferred until after I finished grad school which was a big help. They also got repaid after the period of 10% inflation or more, which really helped.
And I'm sure some qualified people do not try to get into schools which they think are too expensive, which hurts everyone.
Scholarships aren't that easy. A handful of students out of the millions get as 'free' education. It's apparent the students who do have to pay - by taking loans, or working their way through, or use family savings - are subsidizing them.

It does hurt everyone - what possible benefit to society or the nation to make education hard to get a chance at, and saddle most graduates with onerous debts?

The 'competition'?
  #134  
Old 02-16-2018, 07:49 PM
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That seems to be between you and your parents. I'm not sure what anyone else has to do with that problem.
I had no problem. My kids had no problem. But you seem to think that parents should be obligated to pay, and many parents disagree with you. (Not this one.) The question is what about the kids screwed by this parental opinion?
  #135  
Old 02-16-2018, 07:51 PM
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Having free college would have meant that his parents wouldn't have screwed him over so much.

I understand, I'm in the same situation. I couldn't get any financial aid, as my parents made too much, but they refused to help with tuition costs, so I didn't go until I was 25.

They weren't cheap, they were just assholes.
Ahh! My parents didn't screw me over. The loan repayment system was a lot more forgiving when I went through it, and by the time I had to pay the loans back I had a good job. It was pre-computer, and after two years of filling out the multiple page forms my father decided it was easier to just pay.

But I know plenty of kids for whom it is a problem. None of them majored in basket weaving.
  #136  
Old 02-16-2018, 10:08 PM
epbrown01 epbrown01 is offline
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And they have a point - nothing is really free, it's a question of how it's paid for.

So having said that, I would gladly agree to pay for fully subsidized college for all through taxes.
Everyone knows it's paid for by taxes - the real issue is we often would rather spend the money negatively than positively, or evenly cross communities. Money for schools in bad neighborhoods? No way! Money to imprison the kids from those areas after the schools have failed them? No problem! The average annual cost to send someone to college locally is ~$10,000. The average annual cost to keep someone in prison is ~$31,000. Americans will cheerfully pay the latter, and freak about their tax dollars going to the former, despite the fact their own kids would get the same deal.
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