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Old 01-14-2019, 12:42 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is online now
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What was South Asian cuisine like before the Columbian Exchange ?

Peppers are such a key ingredient in South Asian cuisine.

But peppers came from the New World in the Columbian Exchange.

So what was South Asian cuisine like before peppers arrived?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbian_exchange
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Old 01-14-2019, 12:49 AM
AK84 AK84 is offline
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There are multiple different kinds of South Asian cuisine and pepper is not used in all.
But generally, stuff like Long (or Indian) pepper was used.
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Old 01-14-2019, 12:57 AM
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As an aside the biggest thing that I find amazing is that Tomatos and maiz/corn were not intriduced fully until the British conquest, in 1849.
Yet, tomato is pretty much used in every dish and the streotypical street snack is roasted corn on the cob or corn kernals...
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Old 01-14-2019, 03:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
Peppers are such a key ingredient in South Asian cuisine.

But peppers came from the New World in the Columbian Exchange.

So what was South Asian cuisine like before peppers arrived?
Have you ever had Hare Krishna food? It tends, IME, not to be as spicy as modern Indian food. Or rather, not as "hot" spicy, as it's plentifully-spiced.
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Old 01-14-2019, 05:00 AM
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Have you ever had Hare Krishna food? It tends, IME, not to be as spicy as modern Indian food. Or rather, not as "hot" spicy, as it's plentifully-spiced.
Lots of South Asian food is not heavily spiced. It’s just the stuff most well known in the West is.
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Old 01-14-2019, 05:28 AM
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Originally Posted by AK84 View Post
Lots of South Asian food is not heavily spiced. It’s just the stuff most well known in the West is.
I know - I was going by what someone in the West might possibly have experienced that wasn't. When I said "modern Indian food" I should have qualified that with "...in the West" as well - the ridiculously hot post-pub vindaloos being one example.

Last edited by MrDibble; 01-14-2019 at 05:29 AM.
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Old 01-14-2019, 09:35 AM
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Most Cambodian and Vietnamese food still isn't hot.
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Old 01-14-2019, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by AK84 View Post
As an aside the biggest thing that I find amazing is that Tomatos and maiz/corn were not intriduced fully until the British conquest, in 1849.
Yet, tomato is pretty much used in every dish and the streotypical street snack is roasted corn on the cob or corn kernals...
Potatoes are also ubiquitous in South Asian cuisine today and they were not present until the Columbian exchange.

It's not just the Columbian exchange that changed things with South Asian cuisine. I believe tea, peaches and oranges are from China, apples from central Asia and so forth. Lots of foods now common throughout the world were only present in one place until people started to move them around.
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Old 01-14-2019, 09:44 AM
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Originally Posted by MrDibble View Post
I know - I was going by what someone in the West might possibly have experienced that wasn't. When I said "modern Indian food" I should have qualified that with "...in the West" as well - the ridiculously hot post-pub vindaloos being one example.
BTW, in my experience in the US, Indian food doesn't have the reputation for extremely spicy foods the way it does in the UK.
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Old 01-14-2019, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by AK84 View Post
There are multiple different kinds of South Asian cuisine and pepper is not used in all.
But generally, stuff like Long (or Indian) pepper was used.
Agree, along with what we know as black pepper (peppercorns), which are also native to India. More here on the spice trade.

As far as what South Asian cuisine in general was like, maybe we'd have to get an idea of what spices and ingredients that are common today in these foods are originally from the Americas. Chilies are a good example, but what others? Sriracha sauce is a great example of this mish-mash (a Vietnamese sauce made with jalapeno peppers), and I know some Indian dishes contain potato, but what other classic Indian or SE Asian foods are dependent on ingredients from the Americas?
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Old 01-14-2019, 09:52 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by Dewey Finn View Post
BTW, in my experience in the US, Indian food doesn't have the reputation for extremely spicy foods the way it does in the UK.
It's thought of as spicy, but tinadaloos and phalls are essentially unknown here, but you will often see vindaloo. Your average UK Indian restaurant has a somewhat different menu than the average Indian restaurant at least here in Chicago. And, yes, I understand tindaloo and phall are extreme even for the UK, but, as far as I know, they are completely non-existent here.

And my impression of Indian cuisine, at least in Mumbai, Gujarat, and Rajasthan, is that the average level of spiciness for all dishes is spicier than the typical American dish. And I mean that both in terms of heat level and amount of spices used. Now, it certainly isn't all that way, and certainly not all foods are spicy hot. But most foods I've had were spiced with a more varied spice mixtures than the typical salt-and-pepper standard.

Last edited by pulykamell; 01-14-2019 at 09:53 AM.
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Old 01-14-2019, 10:01 AM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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I once saw a play about Vasci Da Gama's influence on Indian cuisine that made these points

- No tea
- No chicken eggs (a type of chickens were native to India but for some reason this wasn't part of the cuisine until European influence)
- No chilis, including bell peppers (capsicum)
- No onions or garlic (?)
- No tomatoes
- No potatoes (my mom puts potatoes in everything, so I can't imagine Indian food without it)
- No corn (maize)

What else?
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Old 01-14-2019, 10:59 AM
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Originally Posted by AK84 View Post
There are multiple different kinds of South Asian cuisine and pepper is not used in all.
But generally, stuff like Long (or Indian) pepper was used.
Oh, cool, thanks for reminding me. I just ordered some online. I know I've heard of it before, but I've never had the opportunity to try it. I'm curious to find out what it tastes like. The descriptions seem to be that of black pepper mixed with undertones of fragrant spices like ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon, etc.
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Old 01-14-2019, 11:41 AM
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There are other ways to add heat to a dish. Black pepper, ginger, etc. The closest to the type of heat from hot peppers is hot basil. When the Thai cook with basil, they don't add a small handful they use bags of it.
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Old 01-14-2019, 01:13 PM
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Not south Asian, but east, Korea made its famous pickled vegetables, including kimchi, without chilis. They added other vegetables for strengthening flavor, like garlic, onions, radishes. Also some fruits as well. They still do make those dishes, but nothing is as good as the punch from chilis.
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Old 01-14-2019, 02:24 PM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
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Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
Peppers are such a key ingredient in South Asian cuisine.

But peppers came from the New World in the Columbian Exchange.

So what was South Asian cuisine like before peppers arrived?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbian_exchange
Nitpick: chili peppers came from the New World. True peppers (piper nigrum) are native to India.
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Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
I once saw a play about Vasci Da Gama's influence on Indian cuisine that made these points

- No tea
- No chicken eggs (a type of chickens were native to India but for some reason this wasn't part of the cuisine until European influence)
- No chilis, including bell peppers (capsicum)
- No onions or garlic (?)
- No tomatoes
- No potatoes (my mom puts potatoes in everything, so I can't imagine Indian food without it)
- No corn (maize)

What else?
There's a lot of nonsense here, or at least it has nothing to do with the Columbian Exchange or Vasco de Gama. Tea wasn't popularized in India until the 18th century, and even then it was only as a byproduct of the East India Company growing it for British consumption.

Onions and garlic are native to the region, or at least they've been cultivated from Egypt to China (including the subcontinent) for several thousand years. Onions and garlic are disfavored in some Indian cuisine because Ayurvedic principles say they should be avoided (because they are "fiery" and thus bad for the body). In fact, garlic was popular with the Romans, and occasionally they traded it to Indians for pepper (which was even more popular with the Romans).

Maize, tomatoes and potatoes (and eggplants/aubergines) are all New World foods, but were not popular in Europe yet when de Gama traveled to India. Not sure about the egg thing.

Last edited by Really Not All That Bright; 01-14-2019 at 02:25 PM.
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Old 01-14-2019, 02:33 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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I perhaps put that badly. I didn’t mean that Vasci Da Gama literally caused the adoption of those foods. The point was the massive changes in Indian cuisine starting from the time of Vasco Da Gama’s voyage and the subsequent trade facilitated by a revival of European contacts and trade stretching to the Americas. The only point was the prior absence of those ingredients from Indian cuisine.

I wasn’t sure whether garlic and onions are among those, hence the question mark. I do know that many Indians look upon them suspiciously and “pure vegetarian” cookery means no garlic and onions.
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Old 01-14-2019, 02:49 PM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
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Oh, I see. That much is true, though it's also true of almost all cultures. Everyone's food has undergone massive transformations since ~1000 CE (even if you don't count modern innovations such as factory farming).
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Old 01-14-2019, 03:00 PM
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That's very true. Pick a recipe from whichever cuisine and go through the list of ingredients to separate those foods native to the area and those native to elsewhere. I suspect many recipes wouldn't work if you had to limit the ingredients to native foods.

Last edited by Dewey Finn; 01-14-2019 at 03:00 PM.
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Old 01-14-2019, 03:38 PM
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According to the Cambridge World History of Food, chili peppers were first described in India by a European in 1542; he considered these chilis to be native to India, a sign of how rapidly it had spread and how readily it was accepted.
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Old 01-14-2019, 04:35 PM
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Originally Posted by snowthx View Post
As far as what South Asian cuisine in general was like, maybe we'd have to get an idea of what spices and ingredients that are common today in these foods are originally from the Americas. Chilies are a good example, but what others? Sriracha sauce is a great example of this mish-mash (a Vietnamese sauce made with jalapeno peppers), and I know some Indian dishes contain potato, but what other classic Indian or SE Asian foods are dependent on ingredients from the Americas?
Peanuts are South American as well, so you can add satay and a whole bunch of other SE Asian foods.
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Old 01-14-2019, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
I once saw a play about Vasci [or Bosco to make the joke work (ed)] Da Gama's influence on Indian cuisine that made these points

- No tea
- No chicken eggs (a type of chickens were native to India but for some reason this wasn't part of the cuisine until European influence)
- No chilis, including bell peppers (capsicum)
- No onions or garlic (?)
- No tomatoes
- No potatoes (my mom puts potatoes in everything, so I can't imagine Indian food without it)
- No corn (maize)

What else?
What, no Bosco? (advertising slogan from 1964 for a chocolate syrup which came through the Columbian Exchange)

ETA: If I had to go to that length to explain a joke it probably wasn't worth it, I guess, so I will spare you a connected anecdote.

Last edited by dropzone; 01-14-2019 at 04:53 PM.
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Old 01-15-2019, 05:21 AM
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Peanuts are South American as well, so you can add satay and a whole bunch of other SE Asian foods.
Satay is just grilled meat on a stick, it doesn't have to have the peanut sauce. Although it does originate only in the 18th C.
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Old 01-15-2019, 07:38 AM
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Satay is just grilled meat on a stick, it doesn't have to have the peanut sauce. Although it does originate only in the 18th C.
In the UK at least, satay is used to refer to the sauce separately as well as the meat onna stick. In fact, you can buy stuff like 'Authentic satay noodles' which contain neither meat not sticks, but do include peanut sauce, because we don't have another name for the sauce, other than 'South East Asian peanut sauce' which looks stupid on a jar.


Yeah, it's not the original use, but what do you expect from English?
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Old 01-15-2019, 10:06 AM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
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According to the Cambridge World History of Food, chili peppers were first described in India by a European in 1542; he considered these chilis to be native to India, a sign of how rapidly it had spread and how readily it was accepted.
There's some evidence that chilis had already reached Asia before de Gama (though there seems to be no explanation of how they got there).
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Old 01-15-2019, 10:22 AM
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There's a double meaning to the statement "Indians season their food with pepper". Before Columbus, Europeans were familiar with Indians as being the people of India, and with pepper as the spice that's now ubiquitous in shakers or grinders on tables. When Columbus reached the Americas and thought he was in Asia, he assumed that the people he met were natives of the Indies, and so called them Indians, and likewise assumed that the fiery plants in the food were related to black pepper, and so called them peppers.
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Old 01-15-2019, 11:11 AM
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Have you ever had Hare Krishna food? It tends, IME, not to be as spicy as modern Indian food. Or rather, not as "hot" spicy, as it's plentifully-spiced.
When I lived in St. Louis, the local ISKCON temple was blessed with an excellent cook, who was renowned throughout the organization, and who attracted tons of customers and guests. When I tried ISKCON food in other cities, it was never half as good as in St. Louis.

The St. Louis chef liked it hot. That was the place that trained me to eat hot. I took cooking classes there as well.
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Old 01-15-2019, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Oh, cool, thanks for reminding me. I just ordered some online. I know I've heard of it before, but I've never had the opportunity to try it. I'm curious to find out what it tastes like. The descriptions seem to be that of black pepper mixed with undertones of fragrant spices like ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon, etc.
I got some long pepper once. The flavor cloyed before long. The undertone was sickly sweet. You can only use a little. Now the only thing I ever use it for is adding small amounts to berbere blends.

Tellicherry black pepper is a Piper nigrum cultivar distinguished by extra hotness. I don't know if it had yet been developed in the old days, but with Tellicherry pepper you could have a pretty hot curry made of all native Asian ingredients.
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Old 01-15-2019, 11:19 AM
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Sriracha sauce is a great example of this mish-mash (a Vietnamese sauce made with jalapeno peppers)
That's true! (Except for it being a Thai sauce made with cayenne peppers.)
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Old 01-15-2019, 11:31 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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That's true! (Except for it being a Thai sauce made with cayenne peppers.)
I thought it was red jalapeños and/or red fresnos. Never heard of cayenne being used in at least the Huy Fong brand (which is the usual Sriracha for most Americans). ETA: Wikipedia says red jalapeños.

Quote:
Huy Fong Foods' chili sauces are made from fresh red jalapeño chili peppers and contain no added water or artificial colors.
For the color, strength of the pepper flavor and the heat level, it doesn't seem anywhere near hot enough to be cayenne peppers unless those cayennes were cut with red bell peppers or something.

Last edited by pulykamell; 01-15-2019 at 11:36 AM.
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Old 01-15-2019, 12:38 PM
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I think what Johanna was saying is that sriracha (small 's' generic term for the sauce) is a Thai-originating type of sauce, as opposed to the branded Sriracha (big 'S' product from Huy Fong foods in California). The former may be made with cayenne while the latter is made with jalapenos.
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Old 01-15-2019, 03:19 PM
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Originally Posted by snowthx View Post
I think what Johanna was saying is that sriracha (small 's' generic term for the sauce) is a Thai-originating type of sauce, as opposed to the branded Sriracha (big 'S' product from Huy Fong foods in California). The former may be made with cayenne while the latter is made with jalapenos.
In that case, I would assume they would use one of their local chiles. Perhaps one of those is cayenne, but I don't know. The differences between various cultivars can get difficult to ascertain.
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Old 01-16-2019, 12:09 AM
Northern Piper Northern Piper is online now
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Thanks for the comments, all.

Was not aware that black pepper was different from the capsicum New World varieties.

Just curious - do any old pre-1500 South Asian recipes survive, that could give some indication of the changes in cuisine? I know there are pre-1500 recipes in some European sources.
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Old 01-16-2019, 01:20 AM
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Was not aware that black pepper was different from the capsicum New World varieties.
Naming capsicum as "pepper" is another one of those Old World/New World errors that are all too common. That is, someone named something in the New World after something it resembled in the Old World, but which was actually unrelated or only distantly related. And of course this caused lots of confusion. Other examples are calling skunks polecats and the American robin.

And BTW, cayenne is capsicum, so not used in pre-1500 Thai food.
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Old 01-16-2019, 08:32 AM
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Just curious - do any old pre-1500 South Asian recipes survive, that could give some indication of the changes in cuisine?
Sure.
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Old 01-16-2019, 10:02 AM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
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Thanks, MrDibble. That's fascinating. *looks up other ancient cookbooks*
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Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
Was not aware that black pepper was different from the capsicum New World varieties.
Not just black pepper - green and white pepper also come from the same plant. In many ways, the history of pepper is the history of the modern word; both de Gama and (to a lesser extent) Columbus were looking for a way to reach India by sea and thus purchase pepper directly.

There are also other Old World peppers, such as Sichuan.

Last edited by Really Not All That Bright; 01-16-2019 at 10:03 AM.
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Old 01-16-2019, 10:06 AM
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While we're at it, all of the capsicums fall into only a handful of species. Most (including the bell pepper, jalapeno, serrano, poblano, Hungarian wax, and cayenne) are Capsicum annuum. The "superpeppers" (habanero, bhut jolokia, Carolina reaper, etc.) are Capsicum chinense. Of the other three species, the only varietal I've even heard of is the Tabasco pepper, which is a Capsicum frutescens, except that there's some dispute as to whether that's even a separate species from C. annuum.
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Old 01-16-2019, 11:30 AM
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Thanks, MrDibble. That's fascinating. *looks up other ancient cookbooks*
There's a rather good Roman one, I've cooked several dishes from it. The roast peaches with honey, cumin and fish sauce is particularly delicious.
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Old 01-16-2019, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
Thanks for the comments, all.

Was not aware that black pepper was different from the capsicum New World varieties.

Just curious - do any old pre-1500 South Asian recipes survive, that could give some indication of the changes in cuisine? I know there are pre-1500 recipes in some European sources.
In addition to the above notes on green and white peppercorns, note that pink peppercorns are from yet another, unrelated plant, Schinus molle. There is, though, such a thing as red peppercorns, which come from the same plant as the white/black/green pepper. These are not very common. (I don't think I've ever seen true red peppercorns for sale myself, but Googling suggests there may be some places that sell it (though I can't tell if they're truly red peppercorns, or just pink peppercorns.) When you buy those four-pepper blends, you usually get white, green, black, and pink, for instance, with the pink being the odd peppercorn out, not being of the Piper genus.

Then you also have your oddball peppers, like Tasmanian pepper, Japanese Sansho pepper (related to Sichuan pepper), which are also not of the Piper genus.
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Old 01-16-2019, 11:59 AM
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While we're at it, all of the capsicums fall into only a handful of species. Most (including the bell pepper, jalapeno, serrano, poblano, Hungarian wax, and cayenne) are Capsicum annuum. The "superpeppers" (habanero, bhut jolokia, Carolina reaper, etc.) are Capsicum chinense. Of the other three species, the only varietal I've even heard of is the Tabasco pepper, which is a Capsicum frutescens, except that there's some dispute as to whether that's even a separate species from C. annuum.
Capsicum baccatum has some peppers some of our readers may be familiar with. If you've had Peruvian or Bolivian cuisine, you probably have encountered aji amarillo at some point. There's also the lemon drop/aji limon, but the aji amarillo is the one I'm most familiar with. Goya makes a paste that you can buy at supermarkets at least around here. I grew a few plants from seed a few years ago, and they are distinct from the C. annuums and C. chinense. I would describe them somewhat similar to the C. chinense in terms of their fruitiness, but without anywhere near the heat. (They are about as hot as Tabasco or cayenne peppers, in the 30K-50K Scoville range.) However, there is something a little different about the fruitiness that separates it from the C. chinense peppers. I can't quite put my finger on it, but it's a bit of a different fruit profile.

Nice little write-up on aji amarillo here.
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Old 01-16-2019, 12:26 PM
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I come from a South Indian Brahmin family (this will become important in a bit) and while growing up in India have been a witness to the annual ceremonies to honor a dead grandparent. The ceremony is held on the death anniversary and basically involves an elaborate lunch served to a bunch of priests. As the years went on, with pressure from the younger generation, the lunch became simpler and we started to spend more money either as donations to charities or actually paying to feed the less deserving.

Back to that elaborate lunch. The rules governing the food are extremely stringent and super old and has led me to believe that it predates the "Columbian Exchange" mentioned in the OP. There are no green chillies, tomatoes, onions, potatoes etc. The only heat is from black pepper and the vegetables are indigenous (as far as I can make out). Unripe plantains, various type of yams and root vegetables, turnips and gourds, coconut etc. Many of these vegetables were very hard to find when we lived in the north of the country. Other spices that were used were sesame seeds, cardamom, long pepper.

The food was simply amazing! It burst with fresh flavor and was very healthy if you did not pile on the rice.
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Old Yesterday, 12:59 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Oh, cool, thanks for reminding me. I just ordered some online. I know I've heard of it before, but I've never had the opportunity to try it. I'm curious to find out what it tastes like. The descriptions seem to be that of black pepper mixed with undertones of fragrant spices like ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon, etc.
Got my long peppercorns in today from Spice House. Place of origin: Cambodia.

These are interesting. They are described on the pouch as "Earthy and hot like black pepper, but more complex with hints of ginger, nutmeg, and cinnamon."

Each peppercorn is about two inches in length, with a pinecone-like texture. The smell is earthy and spicy. To me, it's like a mix of that sort of musty earthiness you get with turmeric, with accents of perhaps cardamom, maybe some cinnamon.

I cut off a black peppercorn sized piece and tasted: first three seconds, I'm getting nothing but maybe cloves, nutmeg, tempered with some earthiness and then, BAMMMM, just a blast of black pepper type of heat. Pungent, strong, peppery. This is seriously strong for black pepper. That pepperiness just lingers.
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Old Yesterday, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Got my long peppercorns in today from Spice House. Place of origin: Cambodia.

These are interesting. They are described on the pouch as "Earthy and hot like black pepper, but more complex with hints of ginger, nutmeg, and cinnamon."

Each peppercorn is about two inches in length, with a pinecone-like texture. The smell is earthy and spicy. To me, it's like a mix of that sort of musty earthiness you get with turmeric, with accents of perhaps cardamom, maybe some cinnamon.

I cut off a black peppercorn sized piece and tasted: first three seconds, I'm getting nothing but maybe cloves, nutmeg, tempered with some earthiness and then, BAMMMM, just a blast of black pepper type of heat. Pungent, strong, peppery. This is seriously strong for black pepper. That pepperiness just lingers.
Interesting. How to you expect to use it? Grind-up a chunk? Toss it in whole? Or cut-off a piece and throw that in? The latter two I would expect you fish it out of whatever sauce you are making before serving, like a bay leaf.
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Old Yesterday, 01:54 PM
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Other "peppers" to try(only some are Piper species), if you could get hold of them, include cubebs, grains of paradise, alligator pepper, Ashanti pepper and grains of Selim. The first two should be in any decent spice shop, the other three one'd likely have to get from West African food specialists or online.

Cubebs and grains of paradise show up quite a bit in medieval recipes, so were well-known in the West at one time. Part of West Africa was known as the Pepper Coast or Grain Coast for its spices (it's to the South of Negroland).

Last edited by MrDibble; Yesterday at 01:58 PM.
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Old Yesterday, 05:33 PM
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The only way I ever used P. longum was toasted and ground up in blends like berbere, garam masala, or bumbu. It's a cluster of tiny berries, like pulykamell observed, like a pinecone. Or a very tightly packed catalpa.

Last edited by Johanna; Yesterday at 05:34 PM.
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Old Yesterday, 05:49 PM
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Originally Posted by ashtayk View Post
I come from a South Indian Brahmin family (this will become important in a bit) and while growing up in India have been a witness to the annual ceremonies to honor a dead grandparent. The ceremony is held on the death anniversary and basically involves an elaborate lunch served to a bunch of priests. As the years went on, with pressure from the younger generation, the lunch became simpler and we started to spend more money either as donations to charities or actually paying to feed the less deserving.

Back to that elaborate lunch. The rules governing the food are extremely stringent and super old and has led me to believe that it predates the "Columbian Exchange" mentioned in the OP. There are no green chillies, tomatoes, onions, potatoes etc. The only heat is from black pepper and the vegetables are indigenous (as far as I can make out). Unripe plantains, various type of yams and root vegetables, turnips and gourds, coconut etc. Many of these vegetables were very hard to find when we lived in the north of the country. Other spices that were used were sesame seeds, cardamom, long pepper.

The food was simply amazing! It burst with fresh flavor and was very healthy if you did not pile on the rice.
This is the definitive answer to the OP.

The closest thing to what you describe I've found in America must be the Udupi restaurants. I've been to Udupi Palace in Maryland and Woodlands in Chicago. I enjoyed magnificent dosa thalis there. The strangest thing to my taste was a side of spice powder, a large proportion of which was toasted and ground tuvar dal. Miḷaku poḍi, I think it was called, literally 'pepper powder'.
  #47  
Old Yesterday, 06:31 PM
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Originally Posted by snowthx View Post
Interesting. How to you expect to use it? Grind-up a chunk? Toss it in whole? Or cut-off a piece and throw that in? The latter two I would expect you fish it out of whatever sauce you are making before serving, like a bay leaf.
I expect to grind it up, but it would work as a whole spice, too. Basically, I'll use it in the same places I would use black peppercorns. I suspect it would be good in something like a Keralan dry pork curry, something like this recipe, which is rather black pepper forward (at least the versions I've had here from Keralan families have been very black peppery.) Or, if I want to be more pure about tasting the long pepper, I may try it a la something like an Italian peposo. or possibly even a stir fry with oyster sauce, garlic, ginger, and beef. I'll probably start by halving the usual amounts used, because this pepper seems to be a good deal more pungent than most black peppers (though I got some Lampong black peppercorns in with my shipment today, and those are probably close in heat level to the long peppercorns, too. My next shipment has Kampot black peppercorns coming in, so I'm excited to try all these varieties of Piper nigrum and Piper longum [in the case of the long pepper] besides the Tellicherry I usually buy.)

Last edited by pulykamell; Yesterday at 06:33 PM.
  #48  
Old Yesterday, 06:58 PM
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Udupi Palace in Maryland
Sadly, it shut down a few years ago.
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