View Poll Results: Does "West End Girls" contain rapping?
Yes 52 74.29%
No 18 25.71%
Voters: 70. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old 01-04-2019, 01:37 AM
Gerald II Gerald II is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell
A lot of rap, especially earlier pre-90s rap, exhibits none of those characteristics. I mean, look at something as seminal as De La Soul's "Three Feet High and Rising," for instance.
I like "Me, Myself and I," but for some reason De La Soul doesn't seem to get the same level of respect from mainstream hip-hop fans that their contemporaries do.
"...looking like Larry Holmes, flabby and sick (Look at De La Soul!)..."
-2pac

Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
This thread is talking squarely about 80s music, and the music station quoted by monstro was a 70s-80s-90s station that wholesale said "no rap," even though there was plenty of rap in that time period (and now, too) that qualified as "music for nice people."
My local 70s/80s/early 90s radio station played mainstream stuff. Michael Jackson, Prince, Madonna, Pet Shop Boys, David Bowie, Phil Collins, Eurythmics, Duran Duran etc.
Everyone I know, young and old, knows most of those songs like "West End Girls," "Billy Jean," "Girls Just Wanna Have Fun."
That station doesn't play the slightly lesser known 80s stuff though.

I'm guessing the same goes for hip-hop music. Most mainstream listeners seem to be familiar with "Nuthin' but a G Thang," and "California Love," but not so much for "Raising Hell" by Run DMC. Strangely enough, while "Billy Jean" always gets love, I don't think I've heard anyone seriously play "Can't Touch This" or "Ice, Ice Baby," after 1991.

If a station plays "Gin and Juice," I'll keep it on. If "Raising Hell" comes on I'm changing the station. And I grew up on hip-hop.

My point is, that the hip-hop songs that are as fondly remembered as "When Doves Cry," or "Everybody Wants to Rule the World," seem mostly to be stuff like "Shook Ones Pt II," "Juicy," and "It Was a Good Day."

In fact, even on hip-hop/R&B stations, since the mid-90s, it was extremely rare to hear 80s hip-hop songs. Once in a blue moon they might play Slick Rick's "Children's Story," and Whodini's "Friends."
I never heard 80s LL Cool J, Run DMC, Big Daddy Kane, Vanilla Ice, MC Hammer on local Hip-Hop stations.

With that said, I think it's stupid to generalize an entire genre of music as not being for "nice people."
  #52  
Old 01-11-2019, 08:37 PM
JohnT's Avatar
JohnT JohnT is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 21,140
Quote:
Originally Posted by rat avatar View Post
Note by "playing" they mean playing the keyboard on the Emulator it seems.

https://youtu.be/TK1P93r9xes?t=4897

Note, I am not making a value judgement, but it is interesting being one of the first pure sample based albums.
Just want to say thanks - this was a helluva documentary. Got any more?
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:52 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017