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  #51  
Old 11-17-2008, 11:45 AM
Shark Sandwich Shark Sandwich is offline
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Originally Posted by Malthus View Post
I didn't see them as unrelated at all.

Different interactions between creators and creations of conciousness. The aliens (whoever they were) created us as much as we (humans) created HAL. Their whole set-up was in a way designed to prevent the sort of confrontation between Dave and HAL occurring between us and them ... whenever you enable true conciousness, you enable the possibility of madness, anger, suspicion, self-defence.
I also noticed the irony that the only death in the film that really contains any emotion is the "death" of HAL. When the humans die it's always in a cold, silent manner. The only death the viewer (well, at least THIS viewer) ever feels connected with is the death of a machine.
  #52  
Old 11-17-2008, 11:49 AM
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Count me among the detractors. I like the middle part with HAL but the rest of the film is a bloated and pretentious mess. A pity because if they expanded the middle section into a full movie and drop the bits about Destiny and Consciousness, 2001 could have been a really terrific space thriller. What kills the actual movie isn't so much the absence of plot but a lack of characters. This is why Solaris, which is equally slow but has genuine characters, is a better film.
  #53  
Old 11-17-2008, 11:59 AM
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Love this movie, and don't find it boring at all.

The interesting part of the "through the monolith" sequence toward the end is not the special effects, but all the cuts to Bowman's face as he tries to absorb it. Those reactions are what make the sequence interesting (to me).
  #54  
Old 11-17-2008, 12:03 PM
Malthus Malthus is offline
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Originally Posted by Shark Sandwich View Post
I also noticed the irony that the only death in the film that really contains any emotion is the "death" of HAL. When the humans die it's always in a cold, silent manner. The only death the viewer (well, at least THIS viewer) ever feels connected with is the death of a machine.
Heh, never thought of that. Interesting point.
  #55  
Old 11-17-2008, 01:21 PM
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There's something else that happens with this movie on TV, and it took me a long time to notice it.

For the first ~20 minutes, there is absolutely no camera movement. There are cuts from one shot to another, but the camera is always absolutely fixed. There's a scene where a large cat jumps down off an overhang and attacks one of the Australopethicines. Without letterboxing, the only way to show it is with pan-and-scan, and that introduces a movement that was never meant to be there.

I'm convinced that Kubrick shot it that way intentionally. It's a primitive world. Until the monolith shows up, there is not a smooth surface anywhere to be seen, or even imagined. Any sort of camera movement would have called attention to the mechanics of making the film.
That's an interesting take on it, but I think the real reason had to do with the front projection technology they used. The backgrounds were big slides taken in Africa, and moving the camera around would have messed up the illusion.
  #56  
Old 11-17-2008, 01:27 PM
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That's bugged me too and I never realised quite why. The whole thing is almost like an episode of Star Trek with it's A and B plots, coming together at the end with the minor and major threads twisting together again.
Actually, they hang together quite well. The first part was about how Moonwatcher and crew became human due to the invention of tools. The second part was about how Bowman became more than human after triumphing over his tools - HAL being a tool so sophisticated that it became self aware.
  #57  
Old 11-17-2008, 01:32 PM
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I also noticed the irony that the only death in the film that really contains any emotion is the "death" of HAL. When the humans die it's always in a cold, silent manner. The only death the viewer (well, at least THIS viewer) ever feels connected with is the death of a machine.
Quite right. The hominids were facing death from physical starvation, the humans in 2001 are facing death from emotional starvation. Consider Poole's emotionless reaction to his parents' birthday message. Bowman only starts to feel after HAL kills Poole. He starts to shout, he makes a gamble, and he extracts revenge. The most emotional we see him is him screaming (silently) during the trip through the stargate.
  #58  
Old 11-17-2008, 01:37 PM
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Yup, the special effect were advanced, but that's like raving about a film because it has great costume design.

If you notice the special effects, then, at some level, they have failed. And in 2001, they are just a cop out to hide the fact that Kubrick didn't really have anything to say.
I mentioned them because of the "ho hum, we've seen better" post. Good sf (the kind Clarke wrote) sets up a believable world, and that was what 2001 did. A cosmonaut told Clarke that 2001 really got the experience of being in space, which is quite a compliment.

Kubrick doesn't just do movies, he does art also. A lot of Barry Lyndon could be turned into paintings that would seem to come from the era. 2001 can be turned into sf art. That's not the major reason I love it, though.
  #59  
Old 11-17-2008, 01:45 PM
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Yup, the special effect were advanced, but that's like raving about a film because it has great costume design.

If you notice the special effects, then, at some level, they have failed. And in 2001, they are just a cop out to hide the fact that Kubrick didn't really have anything to say.
You must never have read Childhood's End. Or The Sentinel. The theme and plot are pure Clarke, even if the expression of them is pure Kubrick. It is certainly true that a cowboy and ETs plot is simpler to grasp than this one, especially considering that it came out before an entire generation learned basic sf principles through Star Trek. 2001 is more purely visual than most movies, and doesn't hit you over the head with the meaning, or have characters explain it to each other. But that you didn't hear Kubrick doesn't mean that he wasn't talking.
  #60  
Old 11-17-2008, 03:32 PM
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It made perfect sense, especially if you're up on your Clarke. Remember, any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. 2001 is the first, and maybe only, movie which didn't chicken our in this regard. Kubrick's decision not to show the aliens was one of his best.
Here's why I downgrade the movie, although it is overall one of my favorites. The original premise, which was derived from a short story called The Sentinel, proposed that a civilization much more advanced than us once visited our planet. Maybe they even seeded it, but in any case, they saw the potential for life to evolve and theorized that one fine day waaaay in the future it would evolve enough to be in their class.

So the aliens would know when that day arrived, they put an object on the Moon which, when accessed by the Earth civilization, would send a signal to the originators. In 2001, this was the monolith which sent out the "We're here!" signal when it was uncovered.

The story progresses to the point where mankind is able to start exploring the Solar System, then gets sidetracked with a little computer jealousy.

So far, so good. Nothing up to now seems impossible -- no radically new technology is needed to get to this stage, just an extension of 1950's levels. Even a fear of computers taking over has been a common SciFi thread. And the possibility of aliens visiting us and setting up an alarm trigger, while fascinating, doesn't strike me as all that unlikely.

But starting at the light show and moving to the white room, time speeding up, etc. requires my mind to leap beyond likelihood into the total spiritual fantasy. Is it happening in Borman's mind, in real life, or what? Obviously you can't spiral into Jupiter and land unharmed in a 20th Century style house eating breakfast all alone then grow old. Even if it's a mind trip as he is being torn apart by gravity, what is the reason or meaning?

So when 2001 goes into pure fantasy, it changes gears from reasonable science fiction to ridiculous SciFi. Not my cup of tea. Makes no sense to me, and I'm not ashamed to admit it.

(I'm not fond of Star Trek, either, much for the same reasons. So sue me.)

BTW, you do know that the original story had the star child press a button to trigger a ring of nuclear bombs to blow up our planet at the end, don't you?
  #61  
Old 11-17-2008, 04:03 PM
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BTW, you do know that the original story had the star child press a button to trigger a ring of nuclear bombs to blow up our planet at the end, don't you?
I guess that's one interpretation. I always thought it meant he blew up the nuclear weapons orbiting the earth (but not the earth itself) so as to usher in a new era where mankind wasn't always on the brink of destroying itself.
  #62  
Old 11-17-2008, 04:05 PM
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BTW, you do know that the original story had the star child press a button to trigger a ring of nuclear bombs to blow up our planet at the end, don't you?
Ah, ah! Read those paragraphs again! What is described at the end of the book is that Starchild detects that orbital weapons platforms have been activated, and has them blow themselves up. Earth is left intact and Starchild "would think of something..."
  #63  
Old 11-17-2008, 04:09 PM
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Wait, is the book the "original" story? I thought they were written concurrently.
  #64  
Old 11-17-2008, 05:53 PM
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Wait, is the book the "original" story? I thought they were written concurrently.
Clarke and Kubrick wrote the outline of the book first, then Clarke finished it - clearly before Kubrick decided to abandon Saturn. Clarke was rather annoyed that the book had to wait until the movie was completed - he wasn't quite as rich as he would become after the movie came out.

Yes in the book the starchild idly detonates the bombs, because he wanted a cleaner sky. And the lines about wondering what to do next exactly paralleled Moonwatcher's final thoughts in the first part. BTW, in 2010 the consequences of this are recounted. Kubrick decided not to show it because it would be too much like the end of Dr. Strangelove.

As for the trip through the Stargate - remember that the aliens, who were advanced enough for interstellar travel when man was young, had advanced another couple of million years by the time Bowman found the monolith. While Clarke had chickened out by the time he wrote 3001, in 2001 it was very clear that this was an actual ftl trip to the stars. Clarke describes Bowman seeing various switching points, some of which can be related to things you see on the "trip". The Louis Quinze room is clearly a habitat like that in a zoo while the aliens study him (Ligetti's voices) and then transform him to be something like them. I suspect he is being trained like Moonwatcher was - the old Bowman points to the monolith with what I'd consider realization before the transformation. The whole process takes about 9 years, since he emerges from the monolith again in the middle of the 2010 story.

The brilliance of Kubrick leaving 2001 a bit open-ended is demonstrated by the sequels. Even in 2010, the best of them, the aliens transforming Europa is a bit prosaic compared to what has gone before. Bowman, the master of the world, sits around, deals with his dying mother, warns Floyd, and makes it up to HAL.

Sure neither Bowman nor we understand what we're seeing. How could we? Next time you're on a subway, underground, look out the window and imagine you're looking through the eyes of a cave dweller. Lights rush by, so does another train, so do pillars and walls, and sometimes you'll see a lot station with people in funny clothes. Pure fantasy, right?
  #65  
Old 11-17-2008, 06:24 PM
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I think the time is right for a really well-written sequel. (NOT a remake)

Yeah, the ones we've already seen were okay, and I know we won't have Kubrick to direct, but just consider what Peter Jackson did with The Lord of The Rings after Ralph Bakshi's version.

I would be interested in what y'all would think a good story line wsould be considering how far we have come not only with cinematogrophay, but with space travel in general?

Thanks

Q
  #66  
Old 11-17-2008, 08:38 PM
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I think the time is right for a really well-written sequel. (NOT a remake)

Yeah, the ones we've already seen were okay, and I know we won't have Kubrick to direct, but just consider what Peter Jackson did with The Lord of The Rings after Ralph Bakshi's version.

I would be interested in what y'all would think a good story line wsould be considering how far we have come not only with cinematogrophay, but with space travel in general?

Thanks

Q
Are you comparing Kubrick to Bakshi? His version of LOTR was crap from the beginning. Remaking a badly done adaptation is a lot different from remaking a classic.

The real issue is deciding what the aliens want. We know they have a goal of fostering intelligence, and the 2010 plot works to that. But do they have another goal of bringing intelligent species to the next level, the way they did Bowman? Perhaps his task would be shepherding humanity to become mature enough for the transformation, which they sure aren't in 2001, but are getting to in 3001. Interesting plot, but it sounds like crappy film.
  #67  
Old 11-17-2008, 09:17 PM
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I find the effects to be awesome and trippy in a way a lot of action oriented SF movies fail at.
I thoroughly enjoyed the sequel 2010 as well and consider it an example of how sequels should be made, taking the original concept and moving it in a different direction. They didn't try to make a cookie-cutter copy of the original but made an interesting, exciting and moving 'action' movie instead. Unlike a lot of science-fiction films it had a human side with characters you actually cared about, both artificial and human.

One of the most underrated movies ever in my opinion.
  #68  
Old 11-17-2008, 09:18 PM
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Are you comparing Kubrick to Bakshi?
You have got to be kidding me!

You really didn't understand my post?????

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  #69  
Old 11-17-2008, 10:17 PM
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That's an interesting take on it, but I think the real reason had to do with the front projection technology they used. The backgrounds were big slides taken in Africa, and moving the camera around would have messed up the illusion.
Hmm, that may be true.

Well, whatever the inspiration, the result is strangely primitive; until Moonwatcher throws the bone into the air and the camera pans up to follow it.
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Old 11-17-2008, 11:35 PM
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The brilliance of Kubrick leaving 2001 a bit open-ended is demonstrated by the sequels. Even in 2010, the best of them, the aliens transforming Europa is a bit prosaic compared to what has gone before. Bowman, the master of the world, sits around, deals with his dying mother, warns Floyd, and makes it up to HAL.
See, that's where I leave the Clarke bandwagon again. It reminds me of Contact, where the entirely respectable idea of inter-relations with an alien civilization is intermingled with spiritual fantasy, at least spiritual fantasy as it appears to us now.

I have no beef with the idea that a highly-highly-advanced civilization could "terraform" our Solar System into a multi-sun world, would plan it for our benefit, and trigger it at a beneficial time. I have considerable beef with the idea that paranormal contact with the dead or thru time travel really exists and someone can travel across space and time with impunity to warn their dead mother of coming events.
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Old 11-17-2008, 11:38 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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...Well, whatever the inspiration, the result is strangely primitive; until Moonwatcher throws the bone into the air and the camera pans up to follow it.
Often cited as the longest flash-forward in cinematic history.
  #72  
Old 11-18-2008, 03:05 AM
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You have got to be kidding me!

You really didn't understand my post?????
Not really, since you asked about a sequel, then gave as an example a remake. But the part you quoted was actually a joke.
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Old 11-18-2008, 03:08 AM
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I have no beef with the idea that a highly-highly-advanced civilization could "terraform" our Solar System into a multi-sun world, would plan it for our benefit, and trigger it at a beneficial time. I have considerable beef with the idea that paranormal contact with the dead or thru time travel really exists and someone can travel across space and time with impunity to warn their dead mother of coming events.
Huh? Bowman wasn't dead, and he never traveled through time. And his mother wasn't dead - she was terminal, and Bowman pulled the plug.

He warned Floyd, but he still wasn't dead.
  #74  
Old 11-18-2008, 03:10 AM
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Hmm, that may be true.

Well, whatever the inspiration, the result is strangely primitive; until Moonwatcher throws the bone into the air and the camera pans up to follow it.
And that wasn't filmed in front of the slides - it was filmed in the parking lot with a hand held camera. Kubrick threw the bone in the air and filmed it. I think it was done right after the shooting on the apes wrapped, or at least I think that's what Dan Richter said in his memoir.
  #75  
Old 11-18-2008, 08:45 AM
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Huh? Bowman wasn't dead, and he never traveled through time. And his mother wasn't dead - she was terminal, and Bowman pulled the plug.

He warned Floyd, but he still wasn't dead.
Never mind the details. The plot requires events we might characterize as paranormal -- space travel without regard to time or space, and time travel itself. A long ways from extrapolating Pan Am to run a space station since they are already an airline.
  #76  
Old 04-28-2016, 11:59 AM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Bumped.

Just saw these foot-tall 2001: A Space Odyssey astronaut figures for sale - need one for your shelf?:

http://www.historicaviation.com/2001...ctinfo/700959/
http://www.historicaviation.com/2001...ctinfo/700958/
  #77  
Old 04-28-2016, 01:41 PM
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Wow -- a Zombie thread from a film that was, when this thread was new, not only a zombie, but the year it was set in was also a zombie. It's hard to get zombie than that.



I don't need models of guys in space suits. I have a model of the Orion Space Shuttle up in my living room right now

https://images.search.yahoo.com/sear...g&action=click

I bought band assembled the Aurora model when the movie first came out

https://images.search.yahoo.com/sear...g&action=click





I just noticed that, if you want your own, you can download a copy of a paper model here:

http://www.papercraftsquare.com/2001...-download.html




BTW, for the record, I still LOVE this movie.
https://images.search.yahoo.com/sear...g&action=click

Last edited by CalMeacham; 04-28-2016 at 01:43 PM.
  #78  
Old 04-28-2016, 05:00 PM
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Bumped.

Just saw these foot-tall 2001: A Space Odyssey astronaut figures for sale - need one for your shelf?:

http://www.historicaviation.com/2001...ctinfo/700959/
http://www.historicaviation.com/2001...ctinfo/700958/
Now that's worth reviving the thread for. Too rich for my blood, but awesome.

I had a model of the moon bus. Long gone, alas, but I still have the program from the roadshow version.

ETA: That Orion is an imposter! NASA logo, not PanAm!
(1st image, not second. And here is the moon bus)

Last edited by Voyager; 04-28-2016 at 05:04 PM.
  #79  
Old 04-28-2016, 08:16 PM
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Heh... I still have my Moon Bus model, but the Space Clipper has gone to the great plastic graveyard.

I do have the paper model cut-out pieces for Discovery, but am not skilled enough to cut them and glue them properly.
  #80  
Old 06-10-2018, 02:43 PM
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Bumped for some more 2001 swag.

http://www.historicaviation.com/2001...ctinfo/703320/
http://www.historicaviation.com/2001...ctinfo/703598/
  #81  
Old 06-10-2018, 04:58 PM
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Heh. I have a HAL T-shirt, which I wore when I went to a Terry Pratchett book signing. He remarked on it. (Monstrous Regiment was the book.)
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Old 06-11-2018, 05:33 PM
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Frankly, I'm surprised it hasn't been released in 4K Ultra-HD yet.
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Old 06-11-2018, 08:33 PM
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Since this thread got bumped anyway, I thought I would throw in a recommendation for Space Odyssey: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece by Michael Benson (this was published a couple of months ago, but last week I finally made it to the top of the library waiting list). I thought I knew a lot about 2001, but this book contains tons of surprises (surprises to me, anyway).

If you love 2001, I guarantee you will enjoy this book.
  #84  
Old 06-11-2018, 11:17 PM
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How does it compare with Clarke's The Lost Worlds of 2001?
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Old 06-12-2018, 12:52 AM
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How does it compare with Clarke's The Lost Worlds of 2001?
That's an interesting question. Benson's book has a much broader scope; he describes a lot of things that Clarke didn't know much about because he wasn't directly involved. And the things Clarke was involved in are discussed much more thoroughly, because Benson interviewed Clarke and got a lot more detail out of him.

Of course, Lost Worlds has Clarke's story material that didn't make it into the film or the novel, so it's still well worth having.
  #86  
Old 06-12-2018, 10:40 AM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Since this thread got bumped anyway, I thought I would throw in a recommendation for Space Odyssey: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece by Michael Benson (this was published a couple of months ago, but last week I finally made it to the top of the library waiting list). I thought I knew a lot about 2001, but this book contains tons of surprises (surprises to me, anyway).

If you love 2001, I guarantee you will enjoy this book.
Looks great - thanks!
  #87  
Old 06-12-2018, 12:11 PM
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Harkins theaters in Phoenix are showing it on the big screen this week.

I still think it's glacially paced, but I'm in! Never saw it on the big screen before.
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Old 06-12-2018, 02:30 PM
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Often cited as the longest flash-forward in cinematic history.
Regarded in the film business as "The 10-Million Year Edit".

Great story. Kubrick shot the bone turning over and over in the air, hand-held, walking back to the studio building one day. He had someone throw it into the air, and kept doing takes as it entered the frame, rolled, etc etc until he thought he had it.

Of course, if he didn't, it was simple to re-shoot. Here's the moments leading up to the edit and the cut..

Talk about visual economy......
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  #89  
Old 06-12-2018, 02:58 PM
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Here's my earlier thread on meeting Keir Dullea (who played Bowman in 2001), in which he said, "From the very first weapon to maybe the last... only Stanley would think of that."

https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb...d.php?t=616628
  #90  
Old 06-14-2018, 01:17 AM
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Frankly, I'm surprised it hasn't been released in 4K Ultra-HD yet.
http://www.thedigitalbits.com/column...ts/012918-1800
  #91  
Old 06-21-2018, 05:15 PM
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For once I was able to get out of the house and to the cinema to catch it again last week. It held up well, much more enjoyable on the big screen too.
  #92  
Old 06-21-2018, 09:03 PM
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Since this thread got bumped anyway, I thought I would throw in a recommendation for Space Odyssey: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece by Michael Benson (this was published a couple of months ago, but last week I finally made it to the top of the library waiting list). I thought I knew a lot about 2001, but this book contains tons of surprises (surprises to me, anyway).

If you love 2001, I guarantee you will enjoy this book.
Thanks for reminding me. I heard him interviewed on Science Friday, and was impressed.

BTW, I went to the Stanley Kubrick exhibit at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, and they had a great 2001 section, including interviews providing info I didn't know before. If it is touring and winds up in your area, go.
For instance, the woman who played the stewardess on the Pan Am shuttle to the space station was interviewed. When she auditioned she had a heavy cold and took cold medicine which made her wobbly. The actresses were asked to walk down a carpet for their audition. She wobbled all over the place, which was exactly what Kubrick was looking for in a zero-G environment, so she got the part.
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Old 06-21-2018, 09:07 PM
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BTW, I read a book of his on vintage sf films up to 1949. The guy has seen everything. Recommended for trivia buffs - also well written.
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Old 06-21-2018, 09:47 PM
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BTW, I went to the Stanley Kubrick exhibit at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, and they had a great 2001 section, including interviews providing info I didn't know before. If it is touring and winds up in your area, go.
One of the neatest things in that exhibition was a scale model of the maze from The Shining...made by Adam Savage (Mythbusters).
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Old 06-21-2018, 11:56 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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One of the neatest things in that exhibition was a scale model of the maze from The Shining...made by Adam Savage (Mythbusters).
Did it mention this bizarre documentary?: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Room_237
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Old 06-22-2018, 02:05 AM
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Did it mention this bizarre documentary?: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Room_237
I think maybe in one of the labels, but I'm not sure. I'm familiar with that but haven't seen it. It's not my favorite Kubrick movie.

They did have some clips from his first feature on a fighter and his first movie, which are is now available on Netflix DVD. That also includes an industrial he did for the Seaman's union, which was amusing in that he lingered on some pinups far more than the approved script probably called for.
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Old 06-22-2018, 10:36 AM
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The reason I said "most" is because of the bit toward the end with the "alien" landscapes. See the last three images in this 2001 gallery. I don't know what it took to produce those effects at the time, but it's something a kid could do with Photoshop today.
w of the video toasters today would make it easier. Back then, this is how it was done: One frame at a time.
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Old 06-22-2018, 10:43 AM
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Dang it. It was supposed to say, Not Photoshop but the use of video toasters at the beginniing there.
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Old 06-22-2018, 12:24 PM
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Saw it in Phoenix. it was a 70mm print. They had the full road show effect. Overture music, intermission music.

Observations: the images of the moon look amazing, they look like photographs; the images of the earth look like...paintings. A limitation of being made before good quality cameras made it into space. Jupiter isn't bad, but it lacks all the detail we now know is there.

The space based scenes are still amazing. Tumbling Poole still looks real.

The star gate sequence is still boring, unintelligible at any speed, and interminable.

After seeing all the footage from life on the ISS, having the 2001 space ship designers go to all the trouble to simulate gravity with Velcro slippers seems so silly. Everyone loves to fly in space. No one would "walk". (I know - it was because you couldn't film in zero-g. But it looks silly.) No one would use the ladder from the Discovery bridge to the pod bay - they'd just float.

The ferris wheel living bay is, however pretty cool. I think it's too small, though. You'd get motion sickness moving around because your feet are going at too great a different speed than your head.

Also, the Discovery sphere is obviously much bigger on the inside than the outside. There's no way that all fits.

The moonbase suffers from the "UFO" problem. It just isn't smart to land or launch fully fueled interplanetary spacecraft right on top of the inhabited parts of the space station!

What does the desk clerk for the Hilton do all day? It isn't like there are ships coming in every hour. He could be replaced with a computer terminal. "HIL, open the room door. HIL." "I'm sorry, Dr. Floyd, I can't do that."

Speaking of Dr. Floyd, what a government asshole. "We're going to maintain the stupid cover story for the indefinite future. Your families will just have to worry that you're all dying of some horrible space disease in the meantime. Oh, and you all have to sign loyalty oaths. In ink. have a nice day."

Last edited by Just Asking Questions; 06-22-2018 at 12:27 PM.
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Old 06-22-2018, 01:04 PM
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After seeing all the footage from life on the ISS, having the 2001 space ship designers go to all the trouble to simulate gravity with Velcro slippers seems so silly. Everyone loves to fly in space. No one would "walk". (I know - it was because you couldn't film in zero-g. But it looks silly.) No one would use the ladder from the Discovery bridge to the pod bay - they'd just float.
The ISS is designed to be in space all the time. Both the Orion shuttle from Earth to the Station and the Aries ship to the moon spend a good bit of their time in gravity, and have to be serviced in gravity. So they wouldn't have serviceable parts on the ceiling. The Orion is also too small for a flight attendant to be soaring over the heads of passengers, throwing food at them or something. And the passengers for the most part are not going to be trusted floating around weightless on the way to the john. Grip shoes just make everything easier.

Quote:
The moonbase suffers from the "UFO" problem. It just isn't smart to land or launch fully fueled interplanetary spacecraft right on top of the inhabited parts of the space station!
The space station is a bigger problem. Why deign the docking area so you have to rotate the Orion at just the right speed to enter it. In the book the station is designed more logically. But it sure looks great.
Quote:
What does the desk clerk for the Hilton do all day? It isn't like there are ships coming in every hour. He could be replaced with a computer terminal. "HIL, open the room door. HIL." "I'm sorry, Dr. Floyd, I can't do that."
That wasn't the desk clerk for the Hilton, but security for the entire station. I assume she does something else when no ships are expected. I've worked at plenty of big companies with guards at every door, and most of them do nothing all day. But she doesn't have to worry about unexpected visitors dropping in.
Quote:
Speaking of Dr. Floyd, what a government asshole. "We're going to maintain the stupid cover story for the indefinite future. Your families will just have to worry that you're all dying of some horrible space disease in the meantime. Oh, and you all have to sign loyalty oaths. In ink. have a nice day."
That was kind of the point. Remember Kubrick's previous movie was Dr. Strangelove. Floyd was not nearly this much of a jerk in the book, and maybe Clarke made him the hero of 2010 as a reaction.
Remember also that it was the fixation on secrecy that made HAL go crazy.
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