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  #101  
Old 06-22-2018, 01:41 PM
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Hotel desk clerks do more than just check people in and out. You still need someone to answer guest questions, and take room service orders, and schedule wake-up calls, and so on. And then you might as well put that person's desk near the entrance, so they can also do check-in and check-out.
  #102  
Old 06-22-2018, 02:25 PM
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I saw this in Tempe this week.
Charitably, it is “deliberately” paced...
The special effects are still pretty darn good, but modern movies are better. I thought it was ironic that the Moon is a photographic image, while the Earth was a Matte.
Note to future directors: Don’t use front-projection with cats! (Causes their eyes to glow).
The computer graphics were about as good as could be expected for the time, but why would anyone display equations on the screen? Results, please!
Bowman seemed unnaturally calm and un-hurried when he went to rescue Poole. I think it would have helped to have a short scene where HAL mentions that Poole’s communications have been lost - nothing too serious, but something to get Bowman outside.
The whole end of the movie, from the space-tunnel to the Star child is incomprehensible. Or, rather, so understated that it’s unstated. I don’t remember if the book fleshes it out, but what the hell is going on? Where did Bowman go? What created the Star Child? Is it his DNA? What’s the Star Child doing at the end, looking at Earth?
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Old 06-22-2018, 03:46 PM
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...The whole end of the movie, from the space-tunnel to the Star child is incomprehensible. Or, rather, so understated that it’s unstated. I don’t remember if the book fleshes it out, but what the hell is going on? Where did Bowman go? What created the Star Child? Is it his DNA? What’s the Star Child doing at the end, looking at Earth?
The book does flesh it out, but tells the story a bit differently than the movie, and there are still many fan theories about exactly what happened.

My take on it: Bowman passed through the aliens' artificial wormhole-like passageway to another, far distant region of space - we don't know how far, exactly. Once there, he found living quarters designed by the aliens to put him at ease. He either dozed off there at the end of a single day, or lived out the rest of his life in those quarters. He was then transformed by the aliens into the Star Child, representing the next stage of human evolution (just as the aggressive, carnivorous apes millions of years earlier were another step, again guided by the aliens). They presumably did use his DNA. He then returned to Earth (if you accept 2010, book or movie, as canon, just nine or so years later), to go back to his homeworld, relive some formative memories and say his goodbyes, including to his dying mother.

Last edited by Elendil's Heir; 06-22-2018 at 03:47 PM.
  #104  
Old 06-22-2018, 04:11 PM
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My take on it: Bowman passed through the aliens' artificial wormhole-like passageway to another, far distant region of space - we don't know how far, exactly. Once there, he found living quarters designed by the aliens to put him at ease. He either dozed off there at the end of a single day, or lived out the rest of his life in those quarters.
I don't think he just lived out his natural lifespan in that room. As I recall, that sequence is very carefully shot; usually the camera is from Dave's POV when he sees another, older Dave, implying that both of them overlap for a few seconds. I think there is a shot, though, over the shoulder of Spacesuit Dave when he sees Eating-Dinner Dave, so they are both there, briefly. I think it's clear that the aliens are accelerating Dave through the stages of his life, and beyond.
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He was then transformed by the aliens into the Star Child, representing the next stage of human evolution (just as the aggressive, carnivorous apes millions of years earlier were another step, again guided by the aliens). They presumably did use his DNA. He then returned to Earth (if you accept 2010, book or movie, as canon, just nine or so years later), to go back to his homeworld, relive some formative memories and say his goodbyes, including to his dying mother.
If you remember the scene where he visits his wife, that's Mary Jo Deschanel, mother of Zooey and Emily.
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Old 06-22-2018, 04:38 PM
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That wasn't the desk clerk for the Hilton, but security for the entire station. I assume she does something else when no ships are expected..
I meant this guy, sitting behind the Hilton window.

I agree with most of your other points, but I disagree with the velcro on the Aires. It was bigger than the Orion. Unknown is how long did it take to get to the moon? How fast was it? Can't keep paying passengers straped into their seats for three days, even in zero g.
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Old 06-22-2018, 04:48 PM
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I took the hotel room scene to be that the aliens were deprogramming him, as it were. Removing him of his accumulated human baggage. Cleansing him of his biases and emotional detritus. Only then he is ready to learn.*

And so, he becomes the Star Child, the next step in human evolution. I guess at that point the aliens left him alone.

It's a good thing HAL didn't kill everyone. Otherwise, the aliens' whole effort would have been put on hold for a while longer.

If more than just one went through, would the aliens have star childed all of them?

Do you think the aliens are still there? Or was this all automated processes, waiting for activation? In my opinion, I think they are not monitoring it any more.


*this sound suspiciously to me like I'm quoting Clarke. If it is from the novelization, then I guess it made an impression on me! If not, I claim full credit.
  #107  
Old 06-22-2018, 05:06 PM
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I meant this guy, sitting behind the Hilton window.

I agree with most of your other points, but I disagree with the velcro on the Aires. It was bigger than the Orion. Unknown is how long did it take to get to the moon? How fast was it? Can't keep paying passengers straped into their seats for three days, even in zero g.
Ah, that guy. Got it. I don't even know he is a desk clerk and not someone reading the paper. Or he might be the desk clerk/manager.
But it opens up a whole bunch of questions about how big that hotel is, which depends on how expensive it is to get to the station. I mean, how many people visit to use the zero-g *ahem* exercise *ahem* rooms in the hub of the station.
Oh, if Kubrick had made this after "Eyes Wide Shut."
And is the desk clerk's name Fawlty?

As for the Aries, we see Floyd standing in front of the bathroom reading instructions, so we know he isn't strapped in. I'd figure they still take three days or so to get there. Do they have cabins or do the seats go down like in first or business class on international flights? But you'd want to keep the passengers on the floor, and probably flight attendants too.
  #108  
Old 06-22-2018, 05:11 PM
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Do you think the aliens are still there? Or was this all automated processes, waiting for activation? In my opinion, I think they are not monitoring it any more.
The laughter and odd sounds from Ligeti's "Adventures" always has seemed to me to represent the aliens, who have moved beyond bodies. They are not on the moon or around Jupiter, those are indeed automated.

In 3001, though, Clarke screws everything up. Some works should not have sequels.
  #109  
Old 06-22-2018, 05:17 PM
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As for the Aries, we see Floyd standing in front of the bathroom reading instructions, so we know he isn't strapped in.
Which is purely for the audience.
I mean, how many trips has he made to the Moon already? Did he “hold it” all those times?
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Old 06-22-2018, 05:50 PM
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To me 2001 and the Opera the magic flute have something in common

Both are quite long, and both I tend to start watching rather late at night.

As a result both have a place I can't stay awake during, no matter how hard I try.

In the magic flute its the prelude to passing through the final trial and basically has two men standing on stage singing this duet that never seems to end. In 2001 it's the star gate sequence.

If these happened near the beginning I might be able to handle it. But after watching for over 2 hours, I've never been able to keep my eyes open through either of these.

Last edited by Buck Godot; 06-22-2018 at 05:53 PM.
  #111  
Old 06-22-2018, 06:03 PM
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Looks like they missed their April release target. According to Amazon, the 4K Ultra HD release of 2001: A Space Odyssey is currently due out on October 30th.
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  #112  
Old 06-22-2018, 09:42 PM
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...I think it's clear that the aliens are accelerating Dave through the stages of his life, and beyond....
Also quite possible, although who knows how they're just (perhaps entirely benignly) messing with his perception of reality?

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...If you remember the scene where he visits his wife, that's Mary Jo Deschanel, mother of Zooey and Emily.
Ah, I didn't know that!
  #113  
Old 06-23-2018, 03:02 AM
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Which is purely for the audience.
I mean, how many trips has he made to the Moon already? Did he “hold it” all those times?
Clarke said it was the only intentional joke in the movie.
Here are the instructions, by the way.
  #114  
Old 06-25-2018, 10:27 AM
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[QUOTE=Just Asking Questions;21039540What does the desk clerk for the Hilton do all day? It isn't like there are ships coming in every hour. He could be replaced with a computer terminal. "HIL, open the room door. HIL." "I'm sorry, Dr. Floyd, I can't do that."[/QUOTE]In Japan's Love Hotels you can select, pay for, enter, and depart a room without meeting anybody human. There is a reason for this. I would imagine there is someone on hand to take care of things if something goes worng... goes worng... (to say nothing of cleaning up afterward) but your typical client does not interact with them. Hell, they'd be embarrassed if they bumped into someone in the hallway whether they knew them or not.
  #115  
Old 06-29-2018, 11:52 PM
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The computer graphics were about as good as could be expected for the time, but why would anyone display equations on the screen? Results, please!
I'm reading Benson's book in 2001, and there are no computer graphics. Those things are animations done at record speed in the studio, with a lot of those diagrams taken from various books and journals. There were projectors behind the screens each of which had a film reel showing the screens. It was not easy to get them all at the same brightness. The first time they ran them while rotating the carousel all the film reels slipped out when sideways, and they had to figure out how to restrain them.
  #116  
Old 06-29-2018, 11:54 PM
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Since this thread got bumped anyway, I thought I would throw in a recommendation for Space Odyssey: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece by Michael Benson (this was published a couple of months ago, but last week I finally made it to the top of the library waiting list). I thought I knew a lot about 2001, but this book contains tons of surprises (surprises to me, anyway).

If you love 2001, I guarantee you will enjoy this book.
Halfway through now, and it is the best book on 2001 I've read, and I've read lots. Agel's book affected me more, but books on the making of movies were pretty rare back then, and even getting one was awesome.
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Old 06-29-2018, 11:57 PM
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The ferris wheel living bay is, however pretty cool. I think it's too small, though. You'd get motion sickness moving around because your feet are going at too great a different speed than your head.

Also, the Discovery sphere is obviously much bigger on the inside than the outside. There's no way that all fits.
You are right that the inside was too small, but that was not from an oversight by Kubrick. What they built was the biggest structure that would fit within the soundstage. Benson says as an aside that it would have been bigger if that was possible.
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Old 07-05-2018, 08:51 PM
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If you remember the scene where he visits his wife, that's Mary Jo Deschanel, mother of Zooey and Emily.
Boy, talk about giving an incredibly famous Cinematographer the short shrift. Their father is Caleb Deschanel.

Sheeesh.
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Old 07-05-2018, 10:17 PM
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Boy, talk about giving an incredibly famous Cinematographer the short shrift. Their father is Caleb Deschanel.

Sheeesh.
A very talented family, I know. But someone mentioned 2010 and he didn't work on that film, so I didn't mention him. It was a bit of a hijack just to mention Mary Jo.
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Old 07-22-2018, 09:14 AM
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Halfway through now, and it is the best book on 2001 I've read, and I've read lots. Agel's book affected me more, but books on the making of movies were pretty rare back then, and even getting one was awesome.
Bumping this, having just finished Benson's book and feeling it's also worth weighing in with a recommendation of it. To me, it was obvious even from a flick-through that most of the plentiful photos were previously unpublished and it's almost worth it for those alone.
The surprise is then still that there's still so much new that can be said about a topic that's already had a good few (and often good) books written on it. Okay, some of this is about the tensions and frequently bitter disputes that got passed over while the likes of Kubrick and Clarke were still alive, but much of it is just the wonderfully nerdy details.
If there's a key moment for me, it's the story amidst the long saga of the choice of music. Spending about a year or two talking himself into using existing pieces, there's the point where, struggling with the cheesiness of the "Blue Danube", Kubrick muses to an assistant about using it: "Would that be an act of genius or an act of folly?"
  #121  
Old 09-09-2018, 02:21 PM
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Bumped.

Wanna visit the alien hotel room from the end of the movie? Well, a replica of it at the Natl. Air and Space Museum, anyway:

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/2001-a-...h-anniversary/
https://airandspace.si.edu/exhibitio...ve-art-exhibit
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Old 09-09-2018, 04:19 PM
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And since it's now been bumped again, I'll draw peoples' attention to Sir Christopher Frayling's nice BBC Radio Four anniversary documentary on the film. Available here, though probably geographically restricted to the UK.


Best anecdote. Kubrick phoning Sylvia "Thunderbirds" Anderson and suggesting lunch. "You just want to poach all my special effects guys." To which Kubrick replies "Well in that case I don't see any reason for having lunch" and slams the phone down on her.
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Old 09-09-2018, 04:22 PM
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Cool! It looks like it starts next spring.
  #124  
Old 09-18-2018, 11:22 AM
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I just read and really enjoyed Space Odyssey: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece by Michael Benson, mentioned upthread. Any fan of 2001 should read it - lots of great behind-the-scenes stuff. Kubrick comes across as a very gifted asshole; Clarke, desperate for money to pay his debts and finalize his divorce at the end of a loveless marriage, put up with an awful lot.
  #125  
Old 10-08-2018, 04:18 PM
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I just read and really enjoyed Space Odyssey: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece by Michael Benson, mentioned upthread. Any fan of 2001 should read it - lots of great behind-the-scenes stuff. Kubrick comes across as a very gifted asshole; Clarke, desperate for money to pay his debts and finalize his divorce at the end of a loveless marriage, put up with an awful lot.
Some of my favorite bits, for those who are interested:
SPOILER:

In pre-production, Clarke and Kubrick consulted with a young Carl Sagan, who really irritated Kubrick.

Clarke and Kubrick saw a UFO over New York City that Clarke, despite calling around to several astronomer friends, could not explain.

Kubrick was very hard-nosed in contract negotiations with Clarke, and several of Clarke's advisors and friends thought he'd been taken advantage of. He didn't get an ownership stake in the film, for instance, only a salary. At times, with no other income, Clarke had to borrow money from Kubrick. Later, the director delayed approving the draft of Clarke's novelization until after the movie's release. Fortunately, the book was a best-seller and Clarke ended up making out very well from its sales.

Kubrick was good friends with the famous bandleader Artie Shaw and was happy to introduce him to Clarke.

Early drafts of the script had a robot named Socrates and, later, a ship's computer named Athena.

Clarke, a closeted gay man, came out to Kubrick relatively early on, and Kubrick was totally unconcerned.

Kubrick's family, traveling to the UK, needed 48 steamer trunks.

Kubrick said he didn't like the taste of the British water and insisted on bottled water imported from the U.S. After a few days, his British production assistant just refilled the bottles from the tap. Kubrick never noticed the change for the next year and a half of filming.

A plexiglas monolith was built but Kubrick thought it looked fake, hated it and ordered it scrapped. The cost? $400,000, very big money in those days, even for a movie studio.

The actors who played the hominids in the "Dawn of Man" scenes would sometimes watch the dailies in full makeup and costume, happily hooting when they liked a take and screaming in rage when they didn't.

IBM was consulted closely on computer issues and proved very helpful; both Kubrick and Clarke were later at pains to say that HAL's name was not a swipe at IBM (one letter "ahead" for each). You can see the IBM logo on Dave Bowman's spacesuit arm controls. Other product placements, a first for a Hollywood film, included Pan Am (the shuttle from Earth), Hilton Hotels and Bell Telephone (on the space station), and Whirlpool (the food machine aboard the Aries moon shuttle).

Many people developed vertigo and dizziness on the curved floor of the space station set.

William Sylvester (Dr. Floyd) botched his lines so often in the Clavius Base conference-room scene that Kubrick sent a studio aide to say he'd be replaced if he couldn't get his act together. It worked.

Several takes of the scene where Dr. Floyd and the scientists visit the TMA-1 monolith, the first scene shot for the film, had to be dropped due to flies and a bat, which lived in the large soundstage, flying in-shot, attracted by the lights. Kubrick himself filmed the astronaut's-POV shot going down the ramp into the pit, using a handheld camera.

Kubrick, Keir Dullea (Bowman) and Gary Lockwood (Poole) all hated flying.

Kubrick was firmly in control of the movie as director, but was open to suggestions from others: Lockwood came up with the idea of the two astronauts climbing into one of the pods to avoid being heard by HAL; associate producer Victor Lyndon, weeks later, suggested having HAL read their lips; Dullea suggested the broken glass in the final alien hotel-room scene.

Kubrick shot 35 (!) takes of the spacepod discussion scene.

The Discovery sets were so brightly-lit that Dullea and Lockwood often wore sunglasses between takes.

The Discovery model was 55 feet long. When it was finally finished, Kubrick was vaguely dissatisfied with it, and told the crew to "do something" with it. The lead modelmaker couldn't think of what to do, so he did nothing, showed it Kubrick again a few days later, and the director said, "That's it! Perfect!"

Benson, the author, notes several parallels between Homer's Odyssey and Kubrick's: Odysseus overcomes a one-eyed monster, the Cyclops, just as Bowman defeats HAL; Bowman's name recalls Odysseus's stringing of a bow to shoot an arrow through twelve axe shafts, a feat of strength that proved his identity; Odysseus is the sole survivor of his ship, just as Bowman is; Bowman has a homecoming, greatly changed as the Star Child, just as Odysseus returns home to Ithaca at the end of his long journey, greatly changed by all he has experienced.

Douglas Rain, a Canadian actor whose voice Kubrick had noticed in an earlier space documentary, Universe, was eventually hired to do HAL's voice. He recorded his lines in just 8 1/2 hours over two days' time, including singing or saying the words of "Daisy" 51 times.

The same stuntman played both Bowman and Poole for the EVA scenes. The sound of their breathing was done by Kubrick himself, wearing one of the spacesuit helmets fitted with a microphone.

Kubrick struggled with the music of the movie, even briefly considering asking the Beatles to do the score, but eventually decided to go with classical music he liked. A score written by well-known film composer Frank Cordell was never used; Cordell had a nervous breakdown after the film came out.

Less than one-third of the movie has dialogue.

The film premiered in Washington, D.C. and there were many walkouts. The NYC premiere was just about as bad. Scathing reviews followed. Kubrick decided to cut the film by what turned out to be 12%, including a scene of Bowman exercising that he decided was duplicative of the Poole workout scene. Despite poor early reviews, the recut film became a hit, and was ultimately the highest-grossing film of 1968.

Kubrick put himself in for the Oscar nomination for the film's sfx, and won, shutting out those who'd done the actual work. Douglas Trumbull, among others on the sfx crew, was pissed.

Clarke was concerned that the movie would be too hard for most people to understand, but Kubrick encouraged the author to be just as clear and specific as he wanted to be in his novel.

Kubrick later said that the film was about "nothing less than the origins and destiny of Man."
  #126  
Old 10-28-2018, 03:13 PM
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...I'll draw peoples' attention to Sir Christopher Frayling's nice BBC Radio Four anniversary documentary on the film. Available here, though probably geographically restricted to the UK....
I just finished Frayling's The 2001 File: Harry Lange and the Design of the Landmark Science Fiction Film, a big, lavishly-illustrated coffeetable book about a key production designer on the film. Good stuff, and highly recommended.
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Old 10-28-2018, 06:16 PM
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Old 10-28-2018, 09:02 PM
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I just finished Frayling's The 2001 File: Harry Lange and the Design of the Landmark Science Fiction Film, a big, lavishly-illustrated coffeetable book about a key production designer on the film. Good stuff, and highly recommended.
Someone else using Benson as the lead on the bits of the 2001 literature one had hitherto missed? In the case of Frayling, I'm angling for it to be bought as a Xmas present this year.

The cheaper one I've picked up via Benson is Frewin's Are We Alone?: The Stanley Kubrick Extraterrestrial-Intelligence Interviews, which was reissued this year for the anniversary. Granted this really is one for completists only. It's the set of transcripts of the interviews that were filmed with a view to preceding the film with a "talking heads" prologue of eminent scientists flagging up the issues involved as important. Universally seen as one of Kubrick's dumbest ideas, it was rightly ditched.

Bits of the interviews have appeared in the likes of Agel, but this is the full set of transcripts. (The footage hasn't been found, which is a bit weird given Kubrick's archival hoarding.) Nothing terribly revelatory - it's essentially a set of the obvious authorities trotting out the received opinions of the day about alien life and the possibilities of AI.
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Old 11-06-2018, 03:46 PM
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Here's the 1960 Canadian astronomy documentary Universe, narrated by an uncredited Douglas Rain. Kubrick watched it several times, was impressed by the sfx, and later cast Rain as HAL.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48gIN4hGOdI
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universe_(1960_film)
  #130  
Old 11-06-2018, 03:52 PM
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Which is purely for the audience.
I mean, how many trips has he made to the Moon already? Did he “hold it” all those times?
"Please read carefully as our options have changed recently." (more seriously, since a mistake might cause a real mess, a passenger is wise to doublecheck that he hasn't forgotten a step)
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Old 11-09-2018, 03:45 PM
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I just read and really enjoyed Space Odyssey: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece by Michael Benson, mentioned upthread. Any fan of 2001 should read it - lots of great behind-the-scenes stuff. Kubrick comes across as a very gifted asshole; Clarke, desperate for money to pay his debts and finalize his divorce at the end of a loveless marriage, put up with an awful lot.
Pg 115 in my edition, Borehamwood:

Earlier in the year, they'd decided that astronaut Frank Poole, Bowman's sidekick, would need to die in an accident. ...the finality of his death was sometimes in question; one Clarke journal entry had him "fighting hard to stop Stan from bringing Dr. Poole back from the dead. I'm afraid his obsession with immortality has overcome his artistic instincts."

What does that say about you and 3001: The Final Odyssey, Arthur?
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Old 11-09-2018, 03:55 PM
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I think this a classic example of judging something from a bygone era by the standards of the present era. These days, plots involving evil super computers are ho-hum. We've had a ton of movies reworking that same theme.

Back in 1970, however, that plot and story line were very compelling, and the slowly developing story line was designed so that the super computer slowly revealed its quirks and, eventually, its psychosis.

A great movie in its time, it's simply not going to deeply impress people in the year 2018.

Last edited by Jasmine; 11-09-2018 at 03:56 PM.
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Old 11-09-2018, 04:34 PM
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In early drafts of the script, Athena the ship's computer was wise and helpful. As Kubrick and Clarke gradually decided that the computer would go seriously awry as part of the plot, they assured IBM, which was very helpful throughout the production of the film, that the computer would clearly not be an IBM product. You can still see the IBM logo on the forearm control panel of Bowman's spacesuit, though, and on his and Poole's flatscreen computer tablets.
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Old 11-09-2018, 06:19 PM
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A great movie in its time, it's simply not going to deeply impress people in the year 2018.
It impresses me every time I see it!
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Old 11-09-2018, 06:37 PM
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I think this a classic example of judging something from a bygone era by the standards of the present era. These days, plots involving evil super computers are ho-hum. We've had a ton of movies reworking that same theme.

.
I got news for you Evil Supercomputers were pretty much par for the course in 1968. Star Trek had already featured an episode with that in it. It provides the climax of the 1957 movie The Invisible Boy. The wonderful Gold Key comic Magnus Robot Fighter was filled with Evil Robots (If it weren't, Magnus wouldn't have anybody to fight), including computers. D.F. Jones' novel Colossus and its sequels were about an Evil Computer taking over the world (It would be turned into a movie, too, but not until 1970). Heck, one reason Asimov and Campbell came up with the Three Laws of Robotics was to have an excuse to move robot (and computer) stories away from the Robot Takeover (Asimov called it "The Frankenstein Complex") and on towards fresh ground -- not because they thought this was How Things Would Work Out.

In short, Evil Supercomputers weren't exactly some zippo clever new twist in 1968. It was Old Hat. Ho Hum, even. Have a look at Ambrose Bierce's Moxon's Master. from 1899
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Old 11-09-2018, 09:37 PM
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Of course, that said, Hal was an evil supercomputer that was done really well.
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Old 11-09-2018, 11:45 PM
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Must find, purchase, absorb!!
I'm Sorry, Cartoon, I'm afraid I can't allow that.
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Old 11-10-2018, 06:40 AM
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Never mind the details. The plot requires events we might characterize as paranormal -- space travel without regard to time or space, and time travel itself. A long ways from extrapolating Pan Am to run a space station since they are already an airline.
There is no time travel in 2001: A Space Odyssey. There is FTL travel, but only through wormholes, and that can avoid temporal paradox if done correctly (which I'm sure Clarke knew). None of this is paranormal; just speculative science fiction that hasn't been ruled out yet as a possibility.
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Old 11-10-2018, 09:31 AM
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There is no time travel in 2001: A Space Odyssey.
No time travel? How do you explain the multiple changes in phase of the Earth during the landing on the Moon and again later on the "bus" to Clavius and in the monolith hole?
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Old 11-10-2018, 11:29 AM
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Unexpected delays on route. perhaps.
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Old 11-10-2018, 02:38 PM
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Unexpected delays on route. perhaps.
That was a very long meeting.
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Old 11-10-2018, 02:42 PM
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Hey, HAL wasn't evil, he was just trying to do the job he had been assigned. A very important job. Sometimes you have to take drastic measures when a job that important is threatened.
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Old 11-10-2018, 03:07 PM
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hey, hal wasn't evil, he was just trying to do the job he had been assigned. A very important job. Sometimes you have to take drastic measures when a job that important is threatened.
Code:
priority one
insure return of organism
for analysis.
All other considerations secondary.
Crew expendable.

Last edited by DPRK; 11-10-2018 at 03:10 PM.
  #144  
Old 11-10-2018, 03:38 PM
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I recently watched it on the big screen in 70mm. A great experience, and my appreciation for it has gone up a notch which I didn't think was possible.
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Old 11-10-2018, 04:01 PM
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Hey, HAL wasn't evil, he was just trying to do the job he had been assigned. A very important job. Sometimes you have to take drastic measures when a job that important is threatened.
I've still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission.
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Old 11-10-2018, 04:02 PM
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That was a very long meeting.
Note: before and after the meeting each had their own separate issues regarding the Earth in the sky.
  #147  
Old 11-10-2018, 05:38 PM
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I've still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission.
Circulate the minutes of the meeting, HAL.
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Old 11-11-2018, 05:17 PM
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Speaking of HAL, mystratfordnow.com is reporting that Douglas Rain has passed away at the age of 90.
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Old 11-12-2018, 01:23 PM
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The BBC confirms it: https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-46178930
  #150  
Old 01-07-2019, 01:11 PM
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Excerpts from the Alex North score which Kubrick decided not to use in 2001:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekDscvvYOFg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=256NgMW4tQw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuCqfvbxsJs

I think he made the right call.
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