Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old 02-20-2017, 10:19 PM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: the Keystone State
Posts: 14,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Derleth View Post
...So Gloria's situation was old-fashioned even by the standards of her generation.
Mad Men even addressed this. Joan kept working to support her husband during his residency and in one episode they had his boss over for dinner. When Greg didn't get the promotion the boss's wife consoled Joan by telling that she spend years supporting her husband by teaching kindergarten during his medical school and residency.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir T-Cups View Post
"Some people like men, some people like women.

Some people like dogs and some people like cats, and frankly I'd rather have a lesbian in the house than a cat-person."

Truer words were never spoken.
"Unless the lesbian sheds, then I don't know."
__________________
No Gods, No Masters
  #52  
Old 02-20-2017, 10:22 PM
Loach's Avatar
Loach Loach is online now
The Central Scrutinizer
Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Pork Roll/Taylor Ham
Posts: 24,651
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSYoungEsq View Post
I would say that almost any 1970s or 1980s mention of homosexuality in an episode would not fly today. Even when the producers were trying for a sympathetic viewpoint, they tended to treat the subject with the usual stereotyping that we reject today. Case in point: Jodie Dallas of Soap. He goes through wanting a sex-change operation, then has a woman try to make him go straight, then agrees to a weekend with another woman (by whom he has a baby), etc. And most of the 70s and 80s programs that dealt with the subject consistently approach it from the viewpoint of the time: something was "wrong" with being homosexual, especially for a man.

I'm not sure you can use Soap as an example. The whole point of the show was to push the tropes of soap operas way past the point of absurdity. Despite all that you listed above Jody was still probably the most normal character on the show (other than Benson).

Quote:
Originally Posted by RivkahChaya View Post
The audience roared with laughter, because no one saw it coming. Probably a lot of people would anticipate the joke now. That's why it wouldn't sell. There was a black couple in the hospital at the same time. >YAWN< But when it first aired, black people on TV for any reason were pretty unusual, so bringing on a black couple to be "The Peters," people who have been omnipresent without being seen the whole episode, was daring, and that's why it was so surprising.
It was brilliantly done. Like so much of the show the writing and timing were perfect. The Peters (Greg Morris as Mr Peters) are portrayed as a nice middle class family like the Petries. Even more important to the scene is that the Peters are already aware of the outcome but show up just for the laugh. The reactions from Rob, The Peters and the audience all came together perfectly. They had to cut out several minutes of the audience reaction. What's sometimes forgotten is at the end Rob reveals that the Peters boy goes to school with theirs and gets straight As while their son is struggling. "I still think we got the wrong boy." It was an important moment in television and it happened a few years before a black man would be able to be a regular on a tv show. Now it would be passé.
  #53  
Old 02-20-2017, 10:34 PM
Derleth Derleth is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Missoula, Montana, USA
Posts: 20,891
Quote:
Originally Posted by alphaboi867 View Post
"Unless the lesbian sheds, then I don't know."
Lesbian sheds? So Subaru's finally making mobile homes.

  #54  
Old 02-20-2017, 10:43 PM
Asuka Asuka is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 967
There was an episode of Rugrats where Angelica is having the babies dig through a playground sandbox to find coins for her. She gives them a few coins but generally keeps all the found goods for herself. Eventually a rival kid the same age as Angelica recruits the babies to work for him, promising them equal pay under the motto "Fair is Fair". Eventually Angelica has nobody working for her while the rival kid has very motivated babies searching for coins for him but eventually the babies become unmotivated and start to slack off. The rival kid now shows his true colors and begins to threaten them and push them around and confiscates the money he promised to them so now they're under even worse working conditions than Angelica. Eventually Angelica saves them and gives them candy she bought with the money they found and they happily work under her again.

It was pretty obvious this was a tongue-in-cheek Cold War parody (Angelica represented the Capitalist West while the Rival kid was the Soviet Union with it's deceiving promises of equality under an actual harsh totalitarian regime) but I think people today would find it a defense of wage slavery as well as actual slavery since Angelica is the lesser of two evils and still withholds their hard earned coins from them only placating them with candy at the end.
  #55  
Old 02-20-2017, 10:47 PM
buddha_david buddha_david is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Beyond The Fringe
Posts: 28,183
This one's not a TV show, but deserves mentioning anyway.

Lately I've been binge-listening to the archives of Casey Kasem's American Top 40 from the early 80's, and there was one Long Distance Dedication which seemed so inappropriate, I'm surprised it got airplay even back then. It was from a high school girl who dedicated a song to her "secret admirer", who for more than a year had been sending her flowers & love letters signed "Sergio". Eventually, Sergio wrote her a letter saying that he wouldn't be contacting her anymore, because he was in the military and was being shipped overseas. And he explained the reason why he never made direct contact with her was because it wouldn't be appropriate, due to the age difference -- you see, he was in his mid-twenties, whereas she was only 15.
  #56  
Old 02-20-2017, 11:23 PM
Richard John Marcej Richard John Marcej is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 870
Quote:
Originally Posted by RivkahChaya View Post

Albeit, IIRC, Gloria does get a job at some point in the series, but it's a good three years or so in.
Gloria had a job as a cashier for Ferguson's Department store starting in the first season. The set up was that she and Mike would live with the Bunkers until Mike graduated and started a teaching career and she would help the cost by working as a cashier.I'm not sure if she still worked after Joey was born.
  #57  
Old 02-21-2017, 06:17 AM
RivkahChaya's Avatar
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 9,924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard John Marcej View Post
Gloria had a job as a cashier for Ferguson's Department store starting in the first season. The set up was that she and Mike would live with the Bunkers until Mike graduated and started a teaching career and she would help the cost by working as a cashier.I'm not sure if she still worked after Joey was born.
I'm pretty sure Mike was graduated before Joey was born, because Mike and Gloria bought the house next door.
  #58  
Old 02-21-2017, 07:39 AM
PatrickLondon PatrickLondon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: London
Posts: 2,992
There are a fair few old sitcoms in the UK, very popular in their day, where the jokes revolved around all sorts of stereotypes, that are cited today as examples of exactly how not to do it. And that's not to mention the Black and White Minstrel Show that ran until 1978.

Another sort that wouldn't work now would be any plot that revolved around not being able to find a payphone, or not having the right money, to get a message through to someone.
  #59  
Old 02-21-2017, 01:59 PM
HipGnosis HipGnosis is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Dairyland 'burbs
Posts: 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Draper View Post
A couple of mentions of WKRP made me think of a particular episode that would at least draw ire nowadays:

The ep. has Andy, Mr. Carlson, and Herb going out of town to make a presentation to a prospective client (someone who they want to buy ad time on the station). While at the hotel, Herb encounters a woman who clearly recognizes him -- even though he can't seem to place her.

Later in the ep., Herb is making out with the woman - who reveals that (in her words): "I used to be a man!" and then it dawns on Herb that this was an old classmate of his whom he knew as a 'boy.'

I am fairly certain that a lot of transgender activists would take exception to the depiction, because 1) the character's line about "used to be a man" (transgender people assert that they've always known they were the 'opposite' sex and don't see it as "used to be a man") and, more importantly, 2) it perpetuates the nasty stereotype that transgenders are always out to 'fool' people -- that they hide their "true nature" until after they've had sex in order to get one over on the 'normal' people.
It was sorta done again in 2004; Two and a Half Men; episode "An Old Flame With a New Wick" Charlie met 'Bill' at his bar, and it turns out that Bill use to be Jill, who Charlie dated.
  #60  
Old 02-21-2017, 05:43 PM
notfrommensa notfrommensa is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 11,757
I remember seeing a Hollywood Squares repeat on the Game Show where the contestant pick George Gobel.

Peter Marshall asked him whether you can cross a Pumpkin with a Watermelon.

Gobel's one liner: "Yes, but what you get is a Jack-o-Lantern with an Afro."

I don't think I Dream of Jeannie would pass these days. A guy keeps a girl in a bottle and she calls him "Master".

Jeannie would be able to show her navel, without any problem these days.

And practically every show prior to the internet would get flamed by the continuity gestapo.

Rob and Laura had flashbacks to Richie's delivery while they were living in one house, and in another episode, they brought Richie home from the hospital to the house on Bonnie Meadow Road.
  #61  
Old 02-21-2017, 08:48 PM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: the Keystone State
Posts: 14,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard John Marcej View Post
Gloria had a job as a cashier for Ferguson's Department store starting in the first season. The set up was that she and Mike would live with the Bunkers until Mike graduated and started a teaching career and she would help the cost by working as a cashier.I'm not sure if she still worked after Joey was born.
I remember Gloria working at a department store. In one episode she was fired for getting pregnant. IIRC the department store rehired to work in their maternity department to avoid a boycott.
  #62  
Old 02-21-2017, 09:29 PM
RivkahChaya's Avatar
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 9,924
Quote:
Originally Posted by notfrommensa View Post
Rob and Laura had flashbacks to Richie's delivery while they were living in one house, and in another episode, they brought Richie home from the hospital to the house on Bonnie Meadow Road.
Ret-con: Rob moved while Laura was in the hospital. Since women stayed for like 10 days back then, it's possible.
  #63  
Old 02-21-2017, 09:32 PM
Mean Mr. Mustard's Avatar
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 10,521
Quote:
Originally Posted by notfrommensa View Post
...Rob and Laura had flashbacks to Richie's delivery while they were living in one house, and in another episode, they brought Richie home from the hospital to the house on Bonnie Meadow Road.
I love that you (like me) know which street the Petries lived on.


mmm
  #64  
Old 02-21-2017, 09:58 PM
Grrr!'s Avatar
Grrr! Grrr! is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 15,818
Is there a single episode of McHale's Navy the would pass today?
  #65  
Old 02-21-2017, 10:31 PM
Dale Sams Dale Sams is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 4,179
I find the vast majority of these picks have way overrated present day society's forward-thinking/sensitivity.
  #66  
Old 02-22-2017, 12:15 AM
TYphoonSignal8 TYphoonSignal8 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 309
Hogan's Heroes. Fun and goofy Nazis! Laid back POW camp! 1965.

The weirdest thing about it, as often noted, is that all of the German characters were in fact Jews (one of whom had been beaten by the Gestapo) and that the actor playing LeBeau, the token Frenchman, had in fact spent time in a POW camp.

Last edited by TYphoonSignal8; 02-22-2017 at 12:16 AM. Reason: addition of the words "the actor playing"
  #67  
Old 02-22-2017, 12:51 AM
pompeybear pompeybear is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by TYphoonSignal8 View Post
Hogan's Heroes. Fun and goofy Nazis! Laid back POW camp! 1965.

The weirdest thing about it, as often noted, is that all of the German characters were in fact Jews (one of whom had been beaten by the Gestapo) and that the actor playing LeBeau, the token Frenchman, had in fact spent time in a POW camp.
The real question is .... will the world ever be ready for Heil Honey I'm Home! ?

Last edited by pompeybear; 02-22-2017 at 12:53 AM.
  #68  
Old 02-22-2017, 01:45 AM
TYphoonSignal8 TYphoonSignal8 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by pompeybear View Post
The real question is .... will the world ever be ready for Heil Honey I'm Home! ?
Professor Google says it was British sitcom, cancelled after one show. Sounds ghastly.
  #69  
Old 02-22-2017, 09:41 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 50,882
Quote:
Originally Posted by HipGnosis View Post
It was sorta done again in 2004; Two and a Half Men; episode "An Old Flame With a New Wick" Charlie met 'Bill' at his bar, and it turns out that Bill use to be Jill, who Charlie dated.
And then Charlie's mother Evelyn had a one-night stand with Bill, not knowing he used to be Jill. The scene where Bill goes out on the balcony with Evelyn and explains his situation out of earshot, while Alan, Charlie and Berta watch from inside, is hysterical. It ends up with Evelyn fainting.
  #70  
Old 02-22-2017, 11:02 AM
Richard John Marcej Richard John Marcej is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 870
Quote:
Originally Posted by TYphoonSignal8 View Post
Hogan's Heroes. Fun and goofy Nazis! Laid back POW camp! 1965.

The weirdest thing about it, as often noted, is that all of the German characters were in fact Jews (one of whom had been beaten by the Gestapo) and that the actor playing LeBeau, the token Frenchman, had in fact spent time in a POW camp.
The more you think about it, Hogan's Heroes is an amazing success. It aired only 20 years after the end of the war. With the exception of children and teens the majority of the audience actually lived during the war, many having fought in it. You would think that would make it unwatchable.

Even today, 50 years after the show premiered it's still very popular. It's been a solid hour block, weeknights at 10:00 (EST) on METV for years.
  #71  
Old 02-22-2017, 11:52 AM
Asuka Asuka is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 967
People at the time didn't think Hogan's Heroes would work either. Bob Crane didn't want to star in the show unless they did a table-read of a script in front of WW2 veterans to get their approval, and even after the show got a favorable response from them there was a letter-writing campaign against the show by some other veterans.
  #72  
Old 02-22-2017, 12:04 PM
MrAtoz MrAtoz is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 1,467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
I love that you (like me) know which street the Petries lived on.
And I love that notfrommensa (like me) has noticed and been bugged by that discrepancy!
  #73  
Old 02-22-2017, 12:19 PM
Richard John Marcej Richard John Marcej is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 870
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAtoz View Post
And I love that notfrommensa (like me) has noticed and been bugged by that discrepancy!
That reminds me that when I first drove out to the address to look at the house I was thinking of buying (and I did eventually buy it, living here for 15+ years) and read the street number, #704, I immediately thought, "Hey, that's the same as the Bunkers, #704 Hauser St."
  #74  
Old 02-22-2017, 12:20 PM
Intergalactic Gladiator's Avatar
Intergalactic Gladiator Intergalactic Gladiator is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 10,183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Draper View Post
A couple of mentions of WKRP made me think of a particular episode that would at least draw ire nowadays:

The ep. has Andy, Mr. Carlson, and Herb going out of town to make a presentation to a prospective client (someone who they want to buy ad time on the station). While at the hotel, Herb encounters a woman who clearly recognizes him -- even though he can't seem to place her.

Later in the ep., Herb is making out with the woman - who reveals that (in her words): "I used to be a man!" and then it dawns on Herb that this was an old classmate of his whom he knew as a 'boy.'

I am fairly certain that a lot of transgender activists would take exception to the depiction, because 1) the character's line about "used to be a man" (transgender people assert that they've always known they were the 'opposite' sex and don't see it as "used to be a man") and, more importantly, 2) it perpetuates the nasty stereotype that transgenders are always out to 'fool' people -- that they hide their "true nature" until after they've had sex in order to get one over on the 'normal' people.
There was a similar Night Court episode where lothario Dan Feilding meets up with a former classmate who has transitioned from male to female. Of course he has issues with it and to add to it, they cast a blond bombshell for the part.

Dan overreacts and can't believe that his best bud is now a woman. At some point, he grabs a friend and says "Can you believe that she used to be a man?"

The friend's answer was "so?"

Which is a very nice and progressive point, especially for 80s TV, I think. I believe most of the jokes were at Dan's expense but I think the actor who played her was a bit of a stretch.
  #75  
Old 02-22-2017, 02:38 PM
Uosdwis R. Dewoh Uosdwis R. Dewoh is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Finland
Posts: 1,892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Draper View Post
.
Then there's the ep. where Counselor Troi gets impregnated by a miracle child (she was essentially used as an incubator and allowed no consent in the process.)
The Child

I have to defend this episode a little bit even though it's one of those very clumsy early season episodes. The crew take the impregnation of Troi very seriously and considered it a violation of her rights. There's also a scene where they discuss if they should abort the pregnancy and Troi objects wanting to keep it. Picard treats Troi's decision as law and any talk of abortion is stopped then and there. Even Worf, who considered the pregnancy a potential security risk, respects her choice and doesn't object.
  #76  
Old 02-22-2017, 03:17 PM
Corry El Corry El is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 3,362
The Seinfeld episode "The Puerto Rican Day" is usually omitted from the rotation in reruns, Kramer accidentally lighting then stomping on a Puerto Rican flag. Though actually that was controversial right then. I see Wiki says it 'started to appear' in 2002 but I've never seen it only read about it, and I've seen every other episode.

"All in the Family" is a very dated show all around. I don't see it as that relevant to give shows which were very much of their time and just point out they don't work anymore. Especially a 'message' show like that. But it's even true of Western TV series' of the 50's-60's. They show them on classic TV channels but nobody would make a Western like that now, clear good and bad guys, the good guys win, in the some of the old ones there are even bad Indians against good white guys. Nobody would present a vision of the Old West like that today, even like the later of those shows ('Bonanza' often tried to be PC, for its time, as it progressed into the 60's). The vision would be like 'Deadwood', or they wouldn't make a Western TV show. And besides 'Deadwood' they basically haven't (or a few lesser shows, 'Hell on Wheels' for example, with a basically similar vision).

Last edited by Corry El; 02-22-2017 at 03:21 PM.
  #77  
Old 02-22-2017, 03:29 PM
Rick Kitchen's Avatar
Rick Kitchen Rick Kitchen is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Citrus Heights, CA, USA
Posts: 16,217
I saw an episode of "Wanted, Dead or Alive" where Steve McQueen rode up to a house and tied his horse up to a black jockey figure out in front of the house. That immediately brought me up and out of the story.

There was an episode of "Daniel Boone" on MeTV the other day that was just outrageously ridiculous in their treatment of Indians. Kentucky Indians living in teepees was just the beginning of it. The whole Indian culture was just laughable.
  #78  
Old 02-22-2017, 06:34 PM
Dale Sams Dale Sams is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 4,179
For all this TNG Federation talk about 'how advanced we are now"...you will very shortly see Jack mincing about in the new Will and Grace...and it occured to me today, for the stupid flack Leslie Jones got (of all people) for her acting in Ghostbusters....Ernie Hudson mostly avoided those tropes in the original Ghostbusters. And that was over thirty years ago.
  #79  
Old 02-22-2017, 09:19 PM
Jim's Son Jim's Son is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 3,246
An episode from the second season of the original "Hawaii Five-O" called "Bored, She Hung Herself" has never been rebroadcast or released on video apparently because a woman tried it, apparently a form of yoga, and died.
  #80  
Old 02-23-2017, 12:42 AM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 11,740
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddha_david View Post
This one's not a TV show, but deserves mentioning anyway.

Lately I've been binge-listening to the archives of Casey Kasem's American Top 40 from the early 80's, and there was one Long Distance Dedication which seemed so inappropriate, I'm surprised it got airplay even back then. It was from a high school girl who dedicated a song to her "secret admirer", who for more than a year had been sending her flowers & love letters signed "Sergio". Eventually, Sergio wrote her a letter saying that he wouldn't be contacting her anymore, because he was in the military and was being shipped overseas. And he explained the reason why he never made direct contact with her was because it wouldn't be appropriate, due to the age difference -- you see, he was in his mid-twenties, whereas she was only 15.
Girls in their mid-teens dating men a decade older was actually not that uncommon when I was that age. No, the families generally didn't approve, and the relationships almost always ended very badly. However, it generally wasn't illegal.

A decade or two before that, these couples often got married, and not necessarily because she was pregnant.

Last edited by nearwildheaven; 02-23-2017 at 12:43 AM.
  #81  
Old 02-23-2017, 01:52 AM
Derleth Derleth is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Missoula, Montana, USA
Posts: 20,891
Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
Girls in their mid-teens dating men a decade older was actually not that uncommon when I was that age. No, the families generally didn't approve, and the relationships almost always ended very badly. However, it generally wasn't illegal.
Still isn't. The age of consent in most states is 16, with California being a notable exception.
  #82  
Old 02-23-2017, 02:15 AM
Asuka Asuka is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 967
There was an episode of Captain Planet called "If It's Doomsday This Must Be Belfast" where the Planeteers go to the then late 80's political hotsports of Northern Ireland, the West Bank, and Apartheid South Africa and convince everyone involved through peace and understanding their conflicts could be solved.

If a show attempted that story-line now it would be ripped apart for being so clueless in dealing with it.
  #83  
Old 02-23-2017, 06:40 AM
TCMF-2L TCMF-2L is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 555
Quote:
Originally Posted by TYphoonSignal8 View Post
Hogan's Heroes. Fun and goofy Nazis! Laid back POW camp! 1965.

The weirdest thing about it, as often noted, is that all of the German characters were in fact Jews (one of whom had been beaten by the Gestapo) and that the actor playing LeBeau, the token Frenchman, had in fact spent time in a POW camp.
The UK had a comedy show called Dad's Army concerning the Home Guard. During the second world war the Home Guard consisted of men unsuitable for the regular army (usually too old hence the Dad's Army nickname) who were ready to fight any German invasion of mainland Britain.

Although ultimately a success there were concerns, in 1968 when the show first went out, it was too insulting to the real Home Guard.

Similar concerns still existed in 1982 when the comedy Allo, Allo concerning the French Resistance went out. All the characters, including Nazis, were portrayed comically.

It has been reported that a plan for a remake of Allo, Allo was abandoned last year (2016) because of 'political correctness' and a general fear of the basic premise offending people.

TCMF-2L
  #84  
Old 02-23-2017, 07:03 AM
TCMF-2L TCMF-2L is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 555
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickLondon View Post
There are a fair few old sitcoms in the UK, very popular in their day, where the jokes revolved around all sorts of stereotypes, that are cited today as examples of exactly how not to do it. And that's not to mention the Black and White Minstrel Show that ran until 1978.
Vast chunks of what were prime time family light entertainment in the 1970s Britain are - even if it is only unofficially - banned today. Comedy racism such as Love Thy Neighbour, socio-political commentary racism with Til Death Us Do Part and the well meaning social inclusiveness comedy of Mind Your Language. Then there was the Apartheid episode of The Goodies.

However a special mention must go to The Professionals. A TV show about a pair of tough guys, something between police officers and secret agents, solving various crimes. Although the general sexism is breathtakingly crass these days the show once tackled racism head on with a 1977 episode called The Klansmen. A home grown version of the Ku Klux Klan is operating in Britain.

In the episode the Klan are defeated but not before, initially, one of the Professionals is portrayed as casually racist himself - before his colleagues set him straight.

However the episode proved so controversial, even in 1977, it was never broadcast at the time. In fact various Internet sources suggest it has never been properly broadcast on a main channel in the UK.

TCMF-2L
  #85  
Old 02-23-2017, 07:19 AM
TCMF-2L TCMF-2L is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 555
For literally decades from the 1960s the most important TV show for pop music on British TV was the weekly Top of the Pops. Hit songs of the day would be 'performed' (mimed) in the studio, or played over some female dancers or promotional videos would be shown.

Old episodes are regularly shown as repeats these days however there is an unfortunately increasing amount of episodes which are now taboo since the show format had BBC radio disc jockeys as hosts introducing the songs and several of them (notably Jimmy Saville) have since been outed as sex offenders.

Plus some of the acts themselves have been outed as sex offenders. Prolific hit maker Gary Glitter alone eliminated most of the shows from the first half of the 1970s. It appears no one has the will to edit the shows to eliminate the bad people. Instead more and more episodes just disappear.

TCMF-2L
  #86  
Old 01-11-2019, 08:00 PM
Wheelz Wheelz is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 5,301
I’m resurrecting this thread to mention Cheers, season 1, episode 16, “The Boys in the Bar.”

I’ve been rewatching the series and it’s mostly as funny as I remember; but this episode - hoo boy.

Sam’s old friend and Red Sox teammate Tom has a book release party/press conference at the bar. In the book, he has come out as gay. But of course, Sam hasn’t read the book. When he publicly finds out Tom is gay, he is shocked and upset and storms out of the room.
Diane convinces him that his friend is the same person he always was, and needs his support now more than ever.
Sam goes back out, apologizes to Tom, and they embrace, as reporters’ flashbulbs pop.

This was all fine. Trouble is, it took up only about the first 7 minutes or so. Everything that happened after it was cringeworthy.

Norm, Cliff, and the other regulars are convinced that this incident is sure to turn Cheers into a gay bar. Sure enough, the next day some guys who look somewhat stereotypically gay come in, and everybody FREAKS OUT. Norm and Cliff throw around terms such as “Tinkerbell” and “patty cake.” Carla is worried she will lose her job, because Sam will have to hire “male waitresses.” The regulars demand that Sam throw the offending parties out or they will take their business elsewhere. Sam agrees, but to his credit, he doesn’t go through with it.

But then Norm cooks up a plan to trick the guys into thinking the bar is closed. They leave, and the day is saved!
Then comes the punchline to the whole episode. It turns out those guys weren’t gay! These two other guys that look straight are the gay ones! Ha ha ha!!!
The end.

Like I said, cringeworthy.

I was surprised to find out that this episode actually won an award from GLAAD (Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation). I guess this is what passed for forward-thinking in 1983.
  #87  
Old 01-11-2019, 11:44 PM
Odesio Odesio is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 11,399
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheelz View Post
I was surprised to find out that this episode actually won an award from GLAAD (Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation). I guess this is what passed for forward-thinking in 1983.
I think comedy tends to show it's age much sooner than other forms of entertainment and when looking at media from the past it's important to place it within the context of the time it was produced. This was 1983 and you had a character from a prime time sitcom refuse to treat gay people with dignity and respect.

Sam Malone: "Hey, listen. Those guys are staying. If anyone else wants to leave, that's fine."

Norm Peterson: "OK, Sammy, you know what kind of bar this is going to turn into."

Sam Malone: "It's not going to turn into the kind of bar that I have to throw people out of."

Sam was willing to put his livelihood at risk by refusing to give in to the demands of his regular customers who insisted he throw the gay couple out. I'm not surprised GLAAD recognized that episode.

"Homer's Phobia" from 1997 is an episode of The Simpsons that hasn't aged well in some circles. It too received a GLAAD media award but there are many who now find the episode cringe worthy.
__________________
I can be found in history's unmarked grave of discarded ideologies.
  #88  
Old 01-12-2019, 01:16 AM
lingyi lingyi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 1,282
Any episode of Three's Company with Mr. Roper and Mr. Furley's homophobia, Jack having to play gay and his constant leering and remarks at anything in a skirt.

I've heard on these forums that Battle of the Network Stars made a comeback, but I can't imagine how it could ever beat the see-through T&A of the original. Ahh...I guess I did live in some good times!
  #89  
Old 01-12-2019, 02:59 AM
Dale Sams Dale Sams is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 4,179
That Cheers ep seems cringey even for 1983. Didn't All in the Family (or maybe it was the Bar Follow-up) do a similar ep but handled better?

Last edited by Dale Sams; 01-12-2019 at 03:00 AM.
  #90  
Old 01-12-2019, 03:03 AM
NDP's Avatar
NDP NDP is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: PNW USA
Posts: 9,035
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odesio View Post
I think comedy tends to show it's age much sooner than other forms of entertainment and when looking at media from the past it's important to place it within the context of the time it was produced. This was 1983 and you had a character from a prime time sitcom refuse to treat gay people with dignity and respect.

Sam Malone: "Hey, listen. Those guys are staying. If anyone else wants to leave, that's fine."

Norm Peterson: "OK, Sammy, you know what kind of bar this is going to turn into."

Sam Malone: "It's not going to turn into the kind of bar that I have to throw people out of."

Sam was willing to put his livelihood at risk by refusing to give in to the demands of his regular customers who insisted he throw the gay couple out. I'm not surprised GLAAD recognized that episode.
True. As you said, this was 1983 and even though the 70s had seen a number of socially groundbreaking sitcoms by the likes of Norman Lear, that era was quickly receding into the past. Reagan's election in 1980 resulted in the country becoming a lot more conservative and the networks panicked at the possibility that Jerry Falwell or some other leader of the religious right would lead a massive boycott of their shows' sponsors at any mere hint of any pro-gay sentiments. I suspect "Cheers" only got away with it then because it was a low-rated show at the time and NBC figured the bible thumpers were all watching something else.
__________________
Can also be seen at:

Last FM Library Thing
  #91  
Old 01-12-2019, 03:14 AM
Catsie Catsie is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 215
Laugh-In. Just about everything they did. LOL.
  #92  
Old 01-12-2019, 03:22 AM
Dale Sams Dale Sams is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 4,179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catsie View Post
Laugh-In. Just about everything they did. LOL.
"Sock it to me baby!"

REEEEE Problematic. Domestic abuse isn't funny!


Also, I'd LOVE to see AV Club reviews for Hee-Haw.
  #93  
Old 01-12-2019, 03:33 AM
Horatio Hellpop Horatio Hellpop is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Seoul, S. Korea
Posts: 9,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Draper View Post
A couple of mentions of WKRP made me think of a particular episode that would at least draw ire nowadays:

The ep. has Andy, Mr. Carlson, and Herb going out of town to make a presentation to a prospective client (someone who they want to buy ad time on the station). While at the hotel, Herb encounters a woman who clearly recognizes him -- even though he can't seem to place her.

Later in the ep., Herb is making out with the woman - who reveals that (in her words): "I used to be a man!" and then it dawns on Herb that this was an old classmate of his whom he knew as a 'boy.'
Not only would it fly today, it was very similar to an ep. of NCIS. Tony, undercover, makes out with a woman who mysteriously orders a LOT of specialty skin cream through the mail. Yep, she's trans--and a KILLER! Tony gets ribbed for it afterwards, a LOT. Okay, maybe it flew 15 years ago.

THE CLOSER had two episodes about trans issues. One featured Beau Bridges as a trans woman who had been a tough-as-nails LA detective a few years earlier, and needed to butch it up as a dude to credibly testify in court against a murderer. It was mostly played for laughs. Much later, a very young trans girl was found murdered. The investigation centered on the immediate family. Dad was the initial suspect, but it turned out that the older brother killed her and Mom helped bury the body in a park. The child's growing demands for puberty blockers and new clothes were bankrupting the family and no end was in sight. The older brother confessed at the end, closing his confession to his father with the line "He sure didn't run like a girl." The episode was sensitive to, but not uncritical of, TG issues.
  #94  
Old 01-12-2019, 06:12 AM
Mijin's Avatar
Mijin Mijin is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 8,682
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Draper View Post
I am fairly certain that a lot of transgender activists would take exception to the depiction, because 1) the character's line about "used to be a man" (transgender people assert that they've always known they were the 'opposite' sex and don't see it as "used to be a man") and, more importantly, 2) it perpetuates the nasty stereotype that transgenders are always out to 'fool' people -- that they hide their "true nature" until after they've had sex in order to get one over on the 'normal' people.
Slight hijack but there were a lot of rap / r&b songs in the 90s that described the situation of going home with a sexy woman only to find...yeah it's a transgender woman, who has opted to keep the penis, and spring it as a surprise on straight men because reasons.
Even as an immature teenager I can remember doubting that this is a thing that happens.

(And of course the serious side is that in many parts of the world homosexuality and transgender are treated the same as witchcraft: they're hiding in plain sight, plotting to do wicked things to straight men and children, so you have to proactively attack them)
  #95  
Old 01-12-2019, 08:25 AM
psychobunny psychobunny is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 2,594
The Honeymooners has always bothered me. I never understood why threatening domestic violence was considered funny. (“One of these days Alice-right in the kisser!”) I would hope that wouldn’t be acceptable today.
__________________
I'm not really an insane rabbit, but I play one on the net.
  #96  
Old 01-12-2019, 08:29 AM
Eclipse Chaser Eclipse Chaser is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Kitchen View Post
Wasn't there an episode of I Love Lucy where Ricky spanked Lucy?
I seem to remember a John Wayne movie (possibly McLintock) where he spanked his estranged wife played by Maureen O'Hara.

And of course there is almost everything about Gone with the Wind.
  #97  
Old 01-12-2019, 08:53 AM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dale Sams View Post
That Cheers ep seems cringey even for 1983. Didn't All in the Family (or maybe it was the Bar Follow-up) do a similar ep but handled better?
Yes - in fact, it was done quite early in the All in the Family series - in the fifth episode, Archie assumes that Mike's friend is gay, but in fact, Archie's friend, the former professional football player is gay (as I recall, the bartender at Archie's bar tells Mike that he (the bartender) is concerned about the people that Archie and Mike have brought to the bar - but Kelsy means the football player, not Mike's friend).

Last edited by Andy L; 01-12-2019 at 08:53 AM.
  #98  
Old 01-12-2019, 10:03 AM
Grrr!'s Avatar
Grrr! Grrr! is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 15,818
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychobunny View Post
The Honeymooners has always bothered me. I never understood why threatening domestic violence was considered funny. (“One of these days Alice-right in the kisser!”) I would hope that wouldn’t be acceptable today.
I'd hope so too, but I always felt that the Honeymooners were kind of progressive for it's time, in that it's very clear to the viewers that Alice was the one in charge of that relationship.

Were there any other 50s shows where the wife was the "boss"?
  #99  
Old 01-12-2019, 10:12 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 50,882
An episode of Room 222 where a male student is suspected of being gay (but he isn't). The principal asks "Are we dealing with one or two problems here? Is the student homosexual of not?)

Referring to being gay as a "problem" would NOT fly today.

ETA: When I caught that episode in reruns in the early 2000's, that line was cut.

Last edited by Annie-Xmas; 01-12-2019 at 10:13 AM.
  #100  
Old 01-12-2019, 11:02 AM
Wheelz Wheelz is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 5,301
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychobunny View Post
The Honeymooners has always bothered me. I never understood why threatening domestic violence was considered funny. (“One of these days Alice-right in the kisser!”) I would hope that wouldn’t be acceptable today.
But Ralph never did hit Alice, and more importantly, Alice knows he’s not going to hit her. I think it stays funny for that reason.

I’ve been watching some old Dick van Dyke episodes, and some of those have not aged well either. Don’t remember the particular episode, but there was one where Rob and Laura were having an argument. Buddy advises Rob to “slap her around a little.” Toward the end of the episode, after Laura has gotten the better of him, Rob turns to Buddy and says, “I should have slapped her around.” Big laugh from the audience.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:20 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017