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  #51  
Old 11-05-2018, 09:09 AM
BrotherCadfael BrotherCadfael is offline
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Originally Posted by Athena View Post
Homemade mayo is worth the trouble and the mess, assuming you need more than a tablespoon or so of it. I make it for certain things - as a base for dips & sauces mostly.
No more mess than anything else you make in a blender or food processor. I use a food processor myself - mix the other ingredients for a few seconds, and then I take wax paper and make a deep well in the feed chute. Punch a pencil lead-sized hole in the bottom, start the processor, and fill the well with oil. The oil slowly drizzles into the mix, emulsifying it into very good mayonnaise. No muss, no fuss.
  #52  
Old 11-05-2018, 11:21 AM
Tinkers Dammer Tinkers Dammer is offline
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Hold the Mayo yuck.
  #53  
Old 11-05-2018, 11:38 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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It does.

I'm surprised, btw, about your comment on "tangy". After all, mayonnaise is vinegar and egg and oil, often with a little mustard to season it. Between vinegar and mustard, I'd be shocked that any mayonnaise isn't at least a little tangy.
And the acid component doesn't have to be vinegar. Lemon juice is quite common, too. Mayonnaise is supposed to have tang to it! It is pretty much a much more heavily emulsified and eggy salad dressing/vinaigrette. Or at least that's how I think of it.
  #54  
Old 11-05-2018, 12:26 PM
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I've tried them all, and I like Hains safflower mayo the best of all. I hate the taste of soybean and canola oils.
  #55  
Old 11-05-2018, 12:37 PM
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I'm surprised, btw, about your comment on "tangy". After all, mayonnaise is vinegar and egg and oil, often with a little mustard to season it.
Actually the mustard is there as an emulsification aid, as much as a flavor addition.

But yeah, mayonnaise should be tangy- the main ingredients with flavor are vinegar, egg yolks and mustard! (the oil is supposed to be neutral)
  #56  
Old 11-05-2018, 12:42 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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Is it possible to make mayonnaise with butter instead of oil, or would it solidify?
  #57  
Old 11-05-2018, 12:49 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Is it possible to make mayonnaise with butter instead of oil, or would it solidify?
You're basically going into Hollandaise territory there. But, yes, I think that is the problem you would run into. I'm looking online, and I do see recipes for "butter mayo," but they all seem to say "use immediately" or to put it into warm water to soften, so there does seem to be an issue with consistency.
  #58  
Old 11-05-2018, 09:49 PM
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I have a difficult time believing this is worth the trouble or the mess. But that's just me.
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Homemade mayo is worth the trouble and the mess...
OK, I'm willing to take your word for it. But I have to ask; isn't the clean-up all...oily??


mmm
  #59  
Old 11-06-2018, 08:52 AM
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No more mess than anything else you make in a blender or food processor.
To me, anything using a blender/food processor is a level of cleaning in itself. They have far too many parts to clean up compared to a bowl & a whisk.

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OK, I'm willing to take your word for it. But I have to ask; isn't the clean-up all...oily??
Depends on how messy you are!

I usually do some variation of throwing an egg yolk in a medium bowl with a couple teaspoons of lemon juice, a teaspoon or so of dijon mustard, a teaspoon or so of water, & a sprinkle of salt. You want the bowl big enough that when you whisk vigorously, the stuff stays in the bowl and not on the counter. Whisk that all together until it's mixed and a little frothy.

Now take ~3/4 of a cup of oil. The standard is a neutral oil, like canola, but sometimes I go half and half olive oil if I want that kind of flavor. All olive oil is a bit too much for me, but ymmv.

You want to sloooooowly dribble the oil in while whisking vigorously. This is where "technique" comes in; if you add the oil too fast, it won't emulsify, and you'll get a bowl of egg yolks & oil. So go slooooooow. It'll start to thicken in a minute or so, and once it starts, you can go a little faster, but you still can't just dump it in. Think a thin stream of oil, tops.

And... that's it. Voila. Mayo. Assuming the bowl is big enough, there's no mess other than to throw the bowl & whisk in the dishwasher.
  #60  
Old 11-06-2018, 09:04 AM
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Is it possible to make mayonnaise with butter instead of oil, or would it solidify?
Yes, that's Hollandaise sauce, and it does solidify when cold.
  #61  
Old 11-06-2018, 10:20 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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I have a difficult time believing this is worth the trouble or the mess. But that's just me.


mmm
With a stick blender, it's not all that messy at all. However, I actually prefer commercial mayo to homemade mayo for my most common use (sandwiches.)
  #62  
Old 11-06-2018, 10:40 AM
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See, that's the key. If I'm making some dish for company that I want to impress/awe, then I might make my own mayo. But for a sandwich? Duke's in the fridge is just fine.
  #63  
Old 11-06-2018, 03:50 PM
BrotherCadfael BrotherCadfael is offline
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To me, anything using a blender/food processor is a level of cleaning in itself. They have far too many parts to clean up compared to a bowl & a whisk.
That's what dishwashers are for.
  #64  
Old 11-08-2018, 12:33 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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I did a taste test

This thread inspired me to do some searching, so I called the local hipster Streets Market — http://streetsmarketcafe.com —and asked if they had Japanese mayonnaise, and they said no.

But yesterday I just happened to be passing by, and I saw that they in fact did have Kewpie mayonnaise. Whomever I had asked just didn't know it was Japanese, I guess.

So I grabbed a bottle, and the smallest jars of Hellmann's and Kraft Mayo I could find (I already had Duke's at home) and a couple packets of those little King's Hawaiian original Hawaiian sweet rolls (because that's the smallest packet of bread I could find).

Just sat down now to do a taste test of Kewpie, Duke's, Hellmann's, and Kraft Mayo.

Results—

They're actually all very similar.

Kewpie has the most distinctive sweet/tangy flavor. Duke's is the next most distinctive. Kraft and Hellmann's are the closest to each other. Tasting them side-by-side, I can taste the differences, but honestly, in the wild, put them in a sandwich, and I doubt very much I would be able to tell which mayonnaise was being used.

They're all good, really. I'm not sure I would judge a sandwich based on what mayo was on it.

But now I've got all this mayo and I don't each very much bread at all, so I have to figure out what to do with it.

Maybe the next taste test should be deviled eggs!!
  #65  
Old 11-08-2018, 12:47 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Kewpie has the most distinctive sweet/tangy flavor.
Interesting. My Kewpie isn't sweet at all, and there's no sugar on the ingredients. I do see, however, that there is an American version which has a different set of ingredients.

See here.

Mine is not sweet at all and has what I find to be a very obvious umami aftertaste. To me, it's the most identifiable of the mayos for that reason: it has the taste of Accent (MSG) to it, which makes it taste a lot richer and fuller to me. Looks like the new American formulation has glutamates, too, via yeast extract, but also adds sugar to the mix. The tasting notes between the two, though, don't seem to mention sweetness in either version.

Last edited by pulykamell; 11-08-2018 at 12:49 PM.
  #66  
Old 11-08-2018, 02:08 PM
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For those who have never seen Duke's in your store, it's because it's a regional brand localized to the South.
Not anymore, apparently:
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By 2017, in the centennial year of its original recipe, Duke's mayonnaise became available throughout the United States and also in New Zealand, Australia and the Middle East. In 2017 Sauer announced that it was also starting sales to Latin America.
I went to the Wikipedia page, because I hadn't heard of this Duke's, but the picture reminded me that I just saw it at the grocery store last time I went! I thought it was just a new kind of mayo, and I guess it is, to me.

I'll pick up a jar of Duke's next time I'm out of Hellmann's. I was never the hugest fan of mayo, but I've been baking a lot of sourdough bread lately and eating a lot of sandwiches, and I'm gaining a new appreciation for the stuff.
  #67  
Old 11-08-2018, 04:46 PM
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For those who have never seen Duke's in your store, it's because it's a regional brand localized to the South. Thank goodness Amazon allows those of you who aren't blessed with it on your store shelves to obtain it anyway.
Same with White Lily flour.
  #68  
Old 11-08-2018, 05:12 PM
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Just sat down now to do a taste test of Kewpie, Duke's, Hellmann's, and Kraft Mayo.

Results—

They're actually all very similar.
This doesn't surprise me. I'm loyal to Dukes, but I think this is some of my overcompensating-for-being-so-pissed-at-the-South-so-much schtick, like my stubborn insistence that NC barbecue is the objective best barbecue out there. My region sucks in so many ways, but by God do we know how to do mayonnaise right.
  #69  
Old 11-08-2018, 06:56 PM
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Let's just get something straight...Miracle Whip is not a brand of mayonnaise. It is it's on concoction, as vile as it is.
  #70  
Old 11-08-2018, 07:05 PM
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This doesn't surprise me. I'm loyal to Dukes, but I think this is some of my overcompensating-for-being-so-pissed-at-the-South-so-much schtick, like my stubborn insistence that NC barbecue is the objective best barbecue out there. My region sucks in so many ways, but by God do we know how to do mayonnaise right.
You are also right on NC BBQ. Although I subscribe to the Western Heresy (Lexington #1!), both styles are objectively superior to all other BBQ (unless I have a plate of something else in front of me, of course.)
  #71  
Old 11-08-2018, 10:13 PM
DSYoungEsq DSYoungEsq is offline
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Maybe the next taste test should be deviled eggs!!
I would move on to this without a second thought. Really good deviled eggs are a treat not to be spurned!

Also, I would whip up some macaroni salad with each.
  #72  
Old 11-08-2018, 10:25 PM
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Yeah, Eastern North Carolina BBQ is the best.

Although I wouldn’t turn down a plate of the real South Carolina stuff, with the mustard-based BBQ sauce. I think they also do the “hash,” which is every other part of the pig boiled into a delicious gray mush. Or perhaps that’s a Georgia thing.
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  #73  
Old 11-08-2018, 10:47 PM
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I shall defend Miracle Whip. It is NOT supposed to taste like mayonnaise. See that "salad dressing" label? The stuff's supposed to be a shortcut to what mayo tastes like after sweet pickle relish and other things are added when making egg, chicken, or ham salads. I grew up with it and LIKE it, particularly on Hoosier-style tenderloin sandwiches, BLTs, and leftover turkey thigh meat sandwiches on Thanksgiving and Christmas.

That being said, mayo's a lousy condiment. It can be a fine ingredient in the aforementioned salads and other things, however. I will confess to liking mayo on Chik-Fil-A spicy chicken sandwiches, though. Had one today.

Last edited by california jobcase; 11-08-2018 at 10:50 PM.
  #74  
Old 11-08-2018, 11:33 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by california jobcase View Post
I shall defend Miracle Whip. It is NOT supposed to taste like mayonnaise. See that "salad dressing" label? The stuff's supposed to be a shortcut to what mayo tastes like after sweet pickle relish and other things are added when making egg, chicken, or ham salads.
I agree. I actually do see the appeal to it, though I think I've maybe bought two jars in my life. I just think of it as a sandwich spread. It's doctored-up and somewhat watered-down mayo, with a bunch of sugar and pickle flavors added to it.

Quote:
That being said, mayo's a lousy condiment.
But how do you do a BLT without mayo?

I love it on sandwiches. I think it's perfect. As a kid, my favorite (open-faced) sandwich was a slice of Polish rye bread, a spread of mayo, and a slice of Swiss/Emmentaler cheese. Just perfect. It's a perfectly good condiment. It's basically an emulsified salad dressing that you can spread, so if you've got a sandwich with lettuce, tomatoes, red onions, and that kind of stuff and you want to add your typical salad dressing flavors to, mayo works a charm. I also like cooked asparagus spears served with mayo (with perhaps a bit of fresh lemon squeezed and mixed into it.) It's a solid condiment. Often, it helps to work it in with other condiments, too. Like mustard for tartness, or mix it with mustard, ketchup, and relish for a hamburger spread. But it's great.

And, yeah, I like the mayo and fries thing, too.

Last edited by pulykamell; 11-08-2018 at 11:35 PM.
  #75  
Old 11-09-2018, 12:16 AM
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This is a divisive issue asked at a time, and in a country that is already so polarized. But the correct answer is Hellman's. Kraft is just gross & Dukes, while excellent in potato salad, just doesn't cut it on a sandwich for me. For one thing, the color is off. Plus it doesn't blend well with mustards. It doesn't work on hamburgers either-too acidic. But I'll concede that it does work well in potato salad.
  #76  
Old 11-09-2018, 05:13 AM
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Originally Posted by california jobcase View Post
I shall defend Miracle Whip. It is NOT supposed to taste like mayonnaise. See that "salad dressing" label? The stuff's supposed to be a shortcut to what mayo tastes like after sweet pickle relish and other things are added when making egg, chicken, or ham salads. I grew up with it and LIKE it, particularly on Hoosier-style tenderloin sandwiches, BLTs, and leftover turkey thigh meat sandwiches on Thanksgiving and Christmas.

That being said, mayo's a lousy condiment. It can be a fine ingredient in the aforementioned salads and other things, however. I will confess to liking mayo on Chik-Fil-A spicy chicken sandwiches, though. Had one today.
Yup. I like Miracle Whip. It has flavor while all of the store bought mayos mentioned hear only provide a flavorless layer of fat to,act like a gasket on their sandwiches.
  #77  
Old 11-09-2018, 07:30 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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[QUOTE=pulykamell;21313012]

But how do you do a BLT without mayo?/QUOTE]

Oh, I'm an idiot. You say following the part of your post I quoted that you use Miracle Whip on a BLT. Huh.
  #78  
Old 11-09-2018, 08:00 AM
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Originally Posted by california jobcase View Post
I shall defend Miracle Whip. It is NOT supposed to taste like mayonnaise. See that "salad dressing" label? The stuff's supposed to be a shortcut to what mayo tastes like after sweet pickle relish and other things are added when making egg, chicken, or ham salads. I grew up with it and LIKE it, particularly on Hoosier-style tenderloin sandwiches, BLTs, and leftover turkey thigh meat sandwiches on Thanksgiving and Christmas.

That being said, mayo's a lousy condiment. It can be a fine ingredient in the aforementioned salads and other things, however. I will confess to liking mayo on Chik-Fil-A spicy chicken sandwiches, though. Had one today.
We've had jerks on this board, and trolls and racists and misogynists, and even people who admitted to being pedophiles.

But someone who likes Miracle Whip? Is any stronger justification for banning even conceivable?



But seriously, folks, we just moved to Georgia a few months ago, and I've noticed Duke's on the supermarket shelves, but as a lifelong Hellmann's/Best Foods consumer I didn't give it any consideration. After reading this thread, I'll have to pick up a small jar next time I'm at the store.

And Acsenray, thanks for pointing out the double N in Hellmann's. I'm a professional copy editor and I'm stunned and chagrined that I've never noticed that before.

Last edited by commasense; 11-09-2018 at 08:02 AM.
  #79  
Old 11-09-2018, 08:19 AM
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This is a divisive issue asked at a time, and in a country that is already so polarized. But the correct answer is Hellman's. Kraft is just gross & Dukes, while excellent in potato salad, just doesn't cut it on a sandwich for me. For one thing, the color is off. Plus it doesn't blend well with mustards. It doesn't work on hamburgers either-too acidic. But I'll concede that it does work well in potato salad.
1. How do you notice the color of a condiment on a sandwich?

2. Why do condiments need to blend?

3. I think the bigger problem here is you put mayo on your hamburgers!
  #80  
Old 11-09-2018, 08:49 AM
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3. I think the bigger problem here is you put mayo on your hamburgers!
Hold on to your britches...
Mayo on hotdogs is delicious!
See Sonoran Dog: https://www.tripstodiscover.com/sono...gs-in-arizona/
  #81  
Old 11-09-2018, 08:52 AM
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Dukes is the thickest, therefore the best.
  #82  
Old 11-09-2018, 10:35 AM
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1. How do you notice the color of a condiment on a sandwich?

2. Why do condiments need to blend?

3. I think the bigger problem here is you put mayo on your hamburgers!
1. I prepare my own sandwiches & am quite observant of the color of my condiments.

2. Every ingredient in a sandwich must blend.

3. You, sir, are missing out on one of the finer things in life. Mayo on hamburger is like Bearnaise sauce on filet minon. A perfect pair.

4. You're probably a Miracle Whip aficionado
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Old 11-09-2018, 11:36 AM
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Mayonnaise (hold the "mayo", unless you're really wanting to talk about a former Chinese Communist leader ) is a perfect accompaniment to a number of things, including hamburgers, hot dogs (and many, though not all of the similar sausages found between a bun), fried bologna, french fries (mayonnaise mixed with mustard ftw!), cold pizza, cold macaroni and cheese, ...

It's a pretty endless list. Needless to say (but I'm saying it anyway), there's always a jar of mayonnaise in my refrigerator, unless I've run out and am in the car on the way to the store to buy more.

I even will eat a spoonful of it at times plain, just to remind myself of the creamy goodness that is mayonnaise. We owe so much to the people of Port Mahon!
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Old 11-09-2018, 11:44 AM
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I’ve heard about people frying things on mayonnaise instead of butter. Has anyone here tried that?
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Old 11-09-2018, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by california jobcase View Post
I shall defend Miracle Whip. It is NOT supposed to taste like mayonnaise. See that "salad dressing" label? The stuff's supposed to be a shortcut to what mayo tastes like after sweet pickle relish and other things are added when making egg, chicken, or ham salads. I grew up with it and LIKE it, particularly on Hoosier-style tenderloin sandwiches, BLTs, and leftover turkey thigh meat sandwiches on Thanksgiving and Christmas.
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Originally Posted by madmonk28 View Post
Yup. I like Miracle Whip. It has flavor while all of the store bought mayos mentioned hear only provide a flavorless layer of fat to,act like a gasket on their sandwiches.
As I said above, Miracle Whip is my last choice of the brands we are discussing here, but honestly if you like mayo, I don’t see how you can hate Miracle Whip.
  #86  
Old 11-09-2018, 11:48 AM
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1. I prepare my own sandwiches & am quite observant of the color of my condiments.

2. Every ingredient in a sandwich must blend.

3. You, sir, are missing out on one of the finer things in life. Mayo on hamburger is like Bearnaise sauce on filet minon. A perfect pair.

4. You're probably a Miracle Whip aficionado
a. To each his own, I guess.

b. On the contrary. There must be contrast for the proper appreciation of the various ingredients. Crispy vs smooth. Savory vs sweet. Tangy vs bland.

c. A properly cooked steak (not filet mignon!) requires little more than salt & pepper.

d. I come from a multi-condimental family. Dad's family was Miracle Whip. Mom's side was Duke's. We somehow got along.
  #87  
Old 11-09-2018, 12:01 PM
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I never knew there was so many types of mayo. My wife is going to kill me when she sees the fridge. I just got done buying half the Beaver mustard product line (and now realize they have a hickory bacon mustard).
  #88  
Old 11-09-2018, 12:05 PM
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As I said above, Miracle Whip is my last choice of the brands we are discussing here, but honestly if you like mayo, I don’t see how you can hate Miracle Whip.
It's salad dressing that tries to taste like weird sweet pickles
  #89  
Old 11-09-2018, 12:10 PM
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I’ve heard about people frying things on mayonnaise instead of butter. Has anyone here tried that?
I've only done it when I was out of butter and REALLY wanted a grilled cheese sandwich, but yeah, it works.
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Old 11-09-2018, 12:16 PM
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I've only done it when I was out of butter and REALLY wanted a grilled cheese sandwich, but yeah, it works.
I'd say it more than works. I think it really is a lot better. It spreads easier on the bread and gives you a really nice, even, crisp brown. If you're a grilled cheese fan, it's worth giving it a shot.
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Old 11-09-2018, 12:23 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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I'd say it more than works. I think it really is a lot better. It spreads easier on the bread and gives you a really nice, even, crisp brown. If you're a grilled cheese fan, it's worth giving it a shot.
I've done it several times, but I don't think it's better at all. I don't bother with this spread butter on bread stuff anyhow, though. Just melt the darn butter in the pan and throw the grilled cheese on top of it once it melts. I really don't understand why people insist on spreading the outside of the bread with butter. You get a nice soak, perfectly even browning, and all the butter goodness that mayo lacks. I like mayo, but it's a "shit, I'm out of butter" situation if I'm using it for grilled cheese.
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Old 11-09-2018, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
I've done it several times, but I don't think it's better at all. I don't bother with this spread butter on bread stuff anyhow, though. Just melt the darn butter in the pan and throw the grilled cheese on top of it once it melts. I really don't understand why people insist on spreading the outside of the bread with butter. You get a nice soak, perfectly even browning, and all the butter goodness that mayo lacks. I like mayo, but it's a "shit, I'm out of butter" situation if I'm using it for grilled cheese.
What do you do for the other side?
  #93  
Old 11-09-2018, 12:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sitchensis View Post
What do you do for the other side?
MOAR BUTTER

of course!
  #94  
Old 11-09-2018, 12:46 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sitchensis View Post
What do you do for the other side?
Um, more butter (if necessary--you might have enough to coat the bottom of the pan left, depending on the size of your pan and how much butter you added initially), what else? Just lift up the sandwich, stick some more butter in the pan, flip when enough is melted (which usually takes about 5-10 seconds). I mean, this is just like frying and browning anything else. It's not like you butter each side of your steak or vegetables typically and then throw it into a dry pan, so I don't get why this has become the method for doing grilled cheese.

I don't know, it just seems so weird to me to see people fumbling with buttering the outside of the bread, because in my family and my friend's families, they never did that. They just used butter in the pan. And the great thing is, you don't need spreadable butter to do this. Right out of the fridge (if that's how you store it), it's fine.

Last edited by pulykamell; 11-09-2018 at 12:49 PM.
  #95  
Old 11-09-2018, 04:47 PM
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For browning the outside of a grilled cheese sandwich, nothing works better than schmaltz (rendered chicken fat).
  #96  
Old 11-09-2018, 05:48 PM
Balthisar Balthisar is offline
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I will admit to another unconventional use of mayo: it makes awesome garlic toast. Throw some minced garlic into a bit of mayo, spread it on some good, crusty bread. Feel free to top with some Pecorino-Romano (optional, just a dusting), and throw under the broiler (or "roast" mode).
  #97  
Old 11-10-2018, 08:59 AM
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I spread the outside of the bread with mayo and melt butter in the pan – gives the sandwich something of a ‘french toast’ effect.
  #98  
Old 11-10-2018, 05:47 PM
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Neither--I'm supposed to limit my soy intake and both have soy oil as the first ingredient. Sir Kensington's is my current go-to.
  #99  
Old 11-10-2018, 06:04 PM
nightshadea nightshadea is offline
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actually all miracle whip is …kraft mayo with powdered ranch dressing/flavoring mixed in ……
kraft used to be the biggest non home consumer of the hidden valley ranch powder they sold …..
  #100  
Old 11-10-2018, 07:24 PM
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Really? Do you have a cite for that because it tastes nothing like ranch and it doesn't have all the flecks in ranch powder.
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