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  #51  
Old 12-31-2018, 05:32 PM
PastTense PastTense is offline
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"Car 54, Where Are You" was a 1994 movie remake of a fairly popular early 1960s TV series of that name. Here are the Rotten Tomatoes Reviews:
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/car_54_where_are_you

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I was going to begin by saying that it's only January and we already have a powerful candidate for worst film of the year. But after meditating on the painful 89 minutes I had just spent sitting through this cinematic abomination, I decided a revision was in order: It's only January of 1994 and we already have a powerful candidate for worst film of the decade. . . .'

If you're old enough to remember when Lyndon Johnson was president, chances are you remember the TV series on which this feature film is based. The original "Car 54, Where Are You?" created by Nat Hiken, was a warm and funny look at average Joes who happened to be New York City policemen. Joe E. Ross played the trouble-prone Gunther Toody, and sad-faced Fred Gwynne portrayed his partner, Francis Muldoon.
  #52  
Old 12-31-2018, 05:35 PM
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The first movie I thought of when I read the title was The Cat in the Hat live action movie with Mike Myers in the title role. I thought it was horrendous and Dr. Seuss' widow disliked it so much she refused any more attempts to make live action movies of his work.
  #53  
Old 12-31-2018, 05:49 PM
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As far as "Wild, Wild West" is concerned, I would bet Smith took next to no time even researching the original character of James West, and just did a carbon copy of his MiB character.
The strongest memory I have of Wild Wild West is seeing Kevin Klineís performance. Heís a terrific actor, always brings something interesting to every role, but Iíll be damned if it didnít look like he was only doing this movie because Phoebe Cates had been kidnapped by the producers.

Oh, and it had a giant mechanical spider. And a legless Kenneth Branagh. What a mess of a movie.
  #54  
Old 12-31-2018, 06:19 PM
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The strongest memory I have of Wild Wild West is seeing Kevin Kline’s performance. He’s a terrific actor, always brings something interesting to every role, but I’ll be damned if it didn’t look like he was only doing this movie because Phoebe Cates had been kidnapped by the producers.

Oh, and it had a giant mechanical spider. And a legless Kenneth Branagh. What a mess of a movie.
Branagh was Dr. Loveless's brother; apparently, the producers did know which character/actor was irreplaceable--Michael Dunn.

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Last edited by burpo the wonder mutt; 12-31-2018 at 06:19 PM.
  #55  
Old 12-31-2018, 06:57 PM
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I think this may be a little controversial, since I've discovered many fans of this movie who are completely unaware of the book it is based on.

I was really excited when I read on the cover of the sci-fi novel Logan's Run (published 1967) was "soon to be a major motion picture". The dystopian utopia in which everyone is euthanized on reaching the age of 21 is an odyssey though scenes and situations that scream for a cinematic treatment.

When the movie finally appeared in 1976, I was disappointed to find the age for termination was now 30 and instead of straightforward "you get killed to stabilize society", there was a strange religious subplot. The scenes crossing the entire globe had collapsed to the "enclosed city", the "wilderness" and the "Sanctuary", all amorphously defined. And finally, the dizzying odyssey through all strata of this weird underage society had become a long drawn out chase with all the standard "twists".

And don't get me started on Damnation Alley....
  #56  
Old 12-31-2018, 07:10 PM
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I think this may be a little controversial, since I've discovered many fans of this movie who are completely unaware of the book it is based on.

I was really excited when I read on the cover of the sci-fi novel Logan's Run (published 1967) was "soon to be a major motion picture". The dystopian utopia in which everyone is euthanized on reaching the age of 21 is an odyssey though scenes and situations that scream for a cinematic treatment.

When the movie finally appeared in 1976, I was disappointed to find the age for termination was now 30 and instead of straightforward "you get killed to stabilize society", there was a strange religious subplot. The scenes crossing the entire globe had collapsed to the "enclosed city", the "wilderness" and the "Sanctuary", all amorphously defined. And finally, the dizzying odyssey through all strata of this weird underage society had become a long drawn out chase with all the standard "twists".

And don't get me started on Damnation Alley....
After all this time, I still haven't seen Logan's Run, but, yes, I remember the book being just as you describe it. So, I'm still in no hurry to see the film. Let's not mention the TV show, mkay?

For me, the best part of Damnation Alley was when the team is attacked by the man-eating cockroaches and my brother's best friend screamed at the top of his lungs, "Get 'em off me!" and started scratching his ass off, which made every single person in the movie house start scratching furiously, laughing all the way!
  #57  
Old 12-31-2018, 07:16 PM
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Is it possible to have a good version of, "I Am Legend"?
It seems not. I've read the Richard Matheson story many, many times, it's one of my favorites, and it grips me with every read. Although it was a low-budget production, I've always thought the 1964 Vincent Price version, "The Last Man on Earth," was the only version to somewhat capture the the darkness of the story and the methodical grimness of the narrator's every day existence. Perhaps it was because it was in black and white, and Price always made whatever he was in just a little bit better. "The Omega Man" with Heston was not memorable, and the one with Will Smith was nothing special either.

I saw "The Last Man on Earth" in a movie theater in 1964. Believe it or not, it was the Saturday afternoon kids matinee feature. (How many kids had nightmares that night!) For weeks, my friends and I went around saying "Morgan...come out!"
  #58  
Old 12-31-2018, 07:26 PM
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^ The only part of the Will Smith version that gripped me was
SPOILER:
Where he had to strangle his dog; I cried like a baby!
Did that have to be in there? Oh, $6/gallon gas hit close to home.

Re: "The Omega Man" -- when Anthony Zerbe in a cloak and sunglasses is the most compelling character, you've got a problem.

Winner: Vincent Price.

Last edited by burpo the wonder mutt; 12-31-2018 at 07:27 PM.
  #59  
Old 12-31-2018, 07:39 PM
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Wow! I'm the first one to say "World War Z."

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Yes, that movie was utter shit. Granted actually filming the book would produce something along the lines of a Ken Burns documentary; not really suitable for a theatrical release, but ideal for cable TV or streaming.
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  #60  
Old 12-31-2018, 08:02 PM
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The Lightning Thief

This is actually a really excellent book for young adults. The movie is a complete dump on it, so much that the author repeatedly begged them to not go forward with their script. They left him out entirely.


Things it changed that are inexcusable

- They aged up the kids to 17 from 12. This seems OK, except in the books, the kids age one year per book "harry potter style". A prophecy specifically is linked to his age and this made no sense.

- They eliminated the main quest from the book. No, I mean literally they changed his quest into some kind of "find these pearls" stuff that is not in the books.

- Most shocking, Percy leaves Grover to save his mother from Hades' Underworld. In the book, he makes a shocking decision to abandon his mother in the underworld. It's bold, surprising, and is a genuine moment of choice for a hero. So shocking they changed it in the movie.

There is more, but it is one of the worst book adaptations I've ever seen.
  #61  
Old 12-31-2018, 09:13 PM
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This is a known, calculated risk for authors. For example, Brian Aldiss claimed that the only reason he signed the contract for A.I. was because he thought it was going to be a Stanley Kubrick film.
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Old 01-01-2019, 01:05 AM
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I actually like the movie (or, at least I did when I was a kid), but I think it's fair to say that the producers of Dragnet had no reverence for the source material.
  #63  
Old 01-01-2019, 07:09 AM
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I actually like the movie (or, at least I did when I was a kid), but I think it's fair to say that the producers of Dragnet had no reverence for the source material.
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  #64  
Old 01-01-2019, 09:08 AM
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The Lightning Thief

This is actually a really excellent book for young adults. The movie is a complete dump on it, so much that the author repeatedly begged them to not go forward with their script. They left him out entirely.


Things it changed that are inexcusable

- They aged up the kids to 17 from 12. This seems OK, except in the books, the kids age one year per book "harry potter style". A prophecy specifically is linked to his age and this made no sense.

- They eliminated the main quest from the book. No, I mean literally they changed his quest into some kind of "find these pearls" stuff that is not in the books.

- Most shocking, Percy leaves Grover to save his mother from Hades' Underworld. In the book, he makes a shocking decision to abandon his mother in the underworld. It's bold, surprising, and is a genuine moment of choice for a hero. So shocking they changed it in the movie.

There is more, but it is one of the worst book adaptations I've ever seen.
I never read the book, saw the movie and liked it. Now that I know these things I'll find the book. It's kind of disappointing, isn't it?
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Old 01-01-2019, 09:28 AM
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With regards to Lord of the Rings, the only major flaw I see with the LOTR trilogy is that it leaves out the Scouring, which doesn't complete the character arc of Merry and Pippin and thus leaves them as mere comic relief, but more importantly taking-a-dump-wise, lets the Shire stay untouched by global events. The Scouring and the invasion that led to it were key insights into Tolkien's philosophy, showing how every community is affected by this global struggle and also highlighting the strength of the common man and their successful struggle against modernization.

The only flaws I have with the Hobbit, besides the cinematography which was too blurry, is the overly-long fight scenes. That does come close to taking a dump on the source material since I always imagined the fights to be more like an adventurer's quest type fights rather than the epic battles of LotR. I actually liked the addition of the Council and Gandalf's side quests: the crypt/shaft was completely amazing, and the council debate area looked pretty good too. On the other hand, Radagast and his rascally Rosgobel Rabbits were pretty pointless and silly.
  #66  
Old 01-01-2019, 10:32 AM
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It's easier to list the book that wasn't dumped on : "The Maltese Falcon", starring Bogart.
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  #67  
Old 01-01-2019, 10:40 AM
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This is a known, calculated risk for authors. For example, Brian Aldiss claimed that the only reason he signed the contract for A.I. was because he thought it was going to be a Stanley Kubrick film.
It's interesting to me that Harry Potter was so well handled while Lightning Thief was totally bungled.

- Both initial movies were directed by Chris Columbus
- Both have kids that age up year-by-year to reach a goal in their final year

I'm surprised they didn't put the effort into Percy Jackson that Warner Bros. put into Harry Potter. It wouldn't have been as big, but could have been a decent hit.

I should also point out that I forgot to mention that the Lightning Thief movie includes swearing, while the book does not. Weird.
  #68  
Old 01-01-2019, 10:54 AM
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"How the Grinch Stole Christmas" - As much as I love the story/the Karloff TV version, there is just enough material there to cover 25 minutes (with some outstanding musical interludes thrown in). Stretching it to 90+ mins seems foolhardy at best. I tried, I really tried to slog through the Jim Carrey version and bailed after 10 minutes. Just the clips and commercials I'd seen convinced me I wouldn't be able to tolerate JC as the green one. The recent animated version I haven't seen, but, again, how much can you successfully pad out a Dr. Seuss fable?
  #69  
Old 01-01-2019, 11:35 AM
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It's interesting to me that Harry Potter was so well handled
If you mean the American version of the novel. I saw the first movie without having read the books and halfway through it I'm like "wait, the Sorceror's Stone is actually the Philosopher's Stone? Why didn't they SAY that at the begining? The "Sorcerer's Stone" means nothing to me!" So the American novel and movies take a dump on the original print version because they condescend to an American audience.
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Old 01-01-2019, 11:44 AM
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What bugged me about LOTR (as a massive Tolkien fan) is they did clearly get the source material and spent most of the film trying to stay true to the spirit of it. Then in the last act they were just like "screw it let's have a skateboarding elf", and it went downhill from there.

They *almost* did a really good job of making an unfilmable classic into a good film, but messed it all up at the end. I would have preferred a horrible cheesey Hollywood version.
  #71  
Old 01-01-2019, 11:59 AM
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Hell of an essay-I thoroughly enjoyed it.
Thanks very much
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  #72  
Old 01-01-2019, 12:17 PM
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I'm talking about movies that take popular characters/concepts and ignore what makes those characters/concepts so popular in the first place, like Ferrell's "Land Of The Lost" and (more recently) "Holmes And Watson", or maybe "CHiPS" or "The Green Hornet". The rights to the name is bought, and someone decides that all they need are popular stars(whether they fit the character or not), some action scenes and some slapstick, and they've got a blockbuster.
I think these movies (along with Baywatch, The Brady Bunch Movie, Charlie's Angels, Starsky and Hutch, and 21 Jump Street) were more intended as parodies of the originals rather than remakes.
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Old 01-01-2019, 12:28 PM
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It's easier to list the book that wasn't dumped on : "The Maltese Falcon", starring Bogart.
Some others:
The Day of the Jackal by Frederick Forsyth (the 1973 movie not the 1997 one)
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (although many disagree and feel the movie sanitized the book's political message)
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris
To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  #74  
Old 01-01-2019, 12:50 PM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is offline
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If you mean the American version of the novel. I saw the first movie without having read the books and halfway through it I'm like "wait, the Sorceror's Stone is actually the Philosopher's Stone? Why didn't they SAY that at the begining? The "Sorcerer's Stone" means nothing to me!" So the American novel and movies take a dump on the original print version because they condescend to an American audience.
I am lost. I am aware the books call it Sorcerer Stone in America and Philosopher Stone in England....but so do the movies. They recorded each line both ways.

This was already in existence well before the movie.

  #75  
Old 01-01-2019, 12:56 PM
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Some others:
The Day of the Jackal by Frederick Forsyth (the 1973 movie not the 1997 one)
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (although many disagree and feel the movie sanitized the book's political message)
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris
To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
No Country for Old Men, too, appears to be almost a page-by-page adaptation.
  #76  
Old 01-01-2019, 01:04 PM
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Two other movies in which Johnny Depp was part of a film which took a dump on their original source:

Alice in Wonderland
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
? - IMO, the Depp movie was a lot more faithful to the book than the Wilder one.

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There's a book with that title?
Yes, there is - sort of; paperback versions of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? printed after the film's release are titled "Blade Runner."

Movies that I can think of:
Hair
Can-Can - the entire "B plot," and two main characters, were removed...and IIRC, revivals of the musical use the movie plot.
Also, a lot of movies based on older TV shows - Bilko and McHale's Navy (the Tom Arnold one, not the 1964 one with the original) come to mind. It's just too hard to fit everything that made the shows what they were into two hours.
  #77  
Old 01-01-2019, 01:17 PM
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IMO to really "take a dump" on the source material the film doesn't just have to be very different to the book, but actually go against the implied or explicit point the author was making in the book.....
Ahhh, you mean "Contact". Sagan wrote it as an exploration of what a scientific, evidentiary search for God would take and what sorts of evidence a scientist would accept as proof of a creator, the movie was given a 180-degree twist from its message, saying instead that the search for truth lies with faith.
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Old 01-01-2019, 01:36 PM
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It's interesting to me that Harry Potter was so well handled while Lightning Thief was totally bungled.

- Both initial movies were directed by Chris Columbus
- Both have kids that age up year-by-year to reach a goal in their final year

I'm surprised they didn't put the effort into Percy Jackson that Warner Bros. put into Harry Potter. It wouldn't have been as big, but could have been a decent hit.

I should also point out that I forgot to mention that the Lightning Thief movie includes swearing, while the book does not. Weird.
Northern Lights is another instance of a film the author was not happy with.

I wonder how much money the authors get in exchange for their work. I mean actually receive, not have dangled in front of them only to get screwed out of later.

Last edited by DPRK; 01-01-2019 at 01:39 PM.
  #79  
Old 01-01-2019, 01:37 PM
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That's something I've always wondered about Mary Poppins. It's relatively well known the troubles Disney had getting the rights from the author of the books, P. L. Travers, and the objections she had about the direction he took with the film. Her nanny wasn't a flying, singing, dancing nanny. Disney should have just made up a story and he could have done his own thing. It wasn't until years after I saw the film that I even knew there were books about Mary Poppins anyway. I imagine anyone at the time who knew the books would have been disappointed with the movie since they are so different. So if tying it to original source material is going to piss off pretty much everyone who knows the source material, why bother?
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Old 01-01-2019, 02:44 PM
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Continuing in that vein, Blade Runner. The only thing is has in common with the book of the same title is... the title. The movie is actually based on a totally different tale, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep.
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There's a book with that title?
The one I meant is the Alan E. Nourse book, Blade Runner. I've been a Nourse fan since childhood and when I first heard about this movie I assumed it was this book turned into a movie.

It's not. As with I, Robot, they just glued the title from one book onto a movie script that had nothing whatsoever to do with it.
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Old 01-01-2019, 02:49 PM
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That's something I've always wondered about Mary Poppins. It's relatively well known the troubles Disney had getting the rights from the author of the books, P. L. Travers, and the objections she had about the direction he took with the film. Her nanny wasn't a flying, singing, dancing nanny. Disney should have just made up a story and he could have done his own thing. It wasn't until years after I saw the film that I even knew there were books about Mary Poppins anyway. I imagine anyone at the time who knew the books would have been disappointed with the movie since they are so different. So if tying it to original source material is going to piss off pretty much everyone who knows the source material, why bother?
This was the theme of Saving Mr. Banks. Which implies, contrary to the experiences of some of the other authors mentioned in this thread, that some of the time authors manage to negotiate a contract that gives them the power to put their foot down and say "no". Disney had to woo her / con her (Travers, I mean) into going along with what he wanted to do with Mary Poppins; or at least that's how it was portrayed in Saving Mr. Banks. If he could have just told her "this is how it's gonna be and you're just going to have to live with it", I assume he would have instead of having to sweet-talk her into allowing him to do it his way.
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Old 01-01-2019, 03:18 PM
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It's interesting to me that Harry Potter was so well handled while Lightning Thief was totally bungled.

- Both initial movies were directed by Chris Columbus
- Both have kids that age up year-by-year to reach a goal in their final year

I'm surprised they didn't put the effort into Percy Jackson that Warner Bros. put into Harry Potter. It wouldn't have been as big, but could have been a decent hit.

I should also point out that I forgot to mention that the Lightning Thief movie includes swearing, while the book does not. Weird.
As I remember, when the studios were competing to get the film rights to the Harry Potter books, Disney tried to get it, but J.K. Rowling insisted on a high level of creative control and they didn't want to give that up. For example, I heard they proposed using an American actor as Harry. So her involvement may have ensured a higher level of quality.
  #83  
Old 01-01-2019, 03:26 PM
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IMO to really "take a dump" on the source material the film doesn't just have to be very different to the book, but actually go against the implied or explicit point the author was making in the book.
Right, which is why, even if you dont really like the way the Filmmaker went (personally I think Peter jackson made the best film of the century with LotR, and the first Hobbit was fine... the mistake was the executives ordering him to make it three films) that is NOT "taking a dump".

Taking a dump includes MI (where he isnt even part of a team) and Maleficent , where all the Good guys are "really" bad guys and the evil Fey is just misunderstood. That was due to catering to the star, Angelina Jolie. Same with MI- catering to Tom Cruse. He wanted it to be a solo act.

Starship Troopers is a odd case. Parody? Steaming pile of Crap? Ok film if you pretend it has nothing whatsoever to do with the book? I vote #3, along with the two Conan films.

The Seeker almost ignored the books- The Dark is rising, likely one of the best YA fantasy series ever.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Seeker_(film)
The film adaptation drew strong negative reaction from fans of the book series[2][3] for its disregard of the source material.

However, is that taking a crap or just going your own way? In either case, the film was horrible.

However, even tho they Hollywooded up The House with a Clock in it's Walls, it's not bad. Fun film.
  #84  
Old 01-01-2019, 03:32 PM
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It's easier to list the book that wasn't dumped on : "The Maltese Falcon", starring Bogart.
No, see, i disagree strongly. Look, books tend to be talky,with explanations, and you can do that and make a good film. Making it Hollywood is Ok. I expect that. But totally changing the theme and plot is what most of us mean by "crapping on it". Adding some action, a love interest, etc- that is just part of making a film.

Holes, however, was pretty much true to that fine YA book.
  #85  
Old 01-01-2019, 03:32 PM
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It's easier to list the book that wasn't dumped on : "The Maltese Falcon", starring Bogart.
Ah, but they DIUD dump on that book. The Huston/Bogart version was the third movie adaptation. The first version, with Richard Cortese from 1931, isn't as good as the Bogart version. It actually includes some stuff from the book that didn't make the 1841 version. But its conception of San Spade, with his huge expensive office, is way off the mark. But at least it didn't dump on the book.

The second version, though, did. The 1836 Satan Met a Lady (what does that title even mean?) turned it into a comedy, changed the falcon into a horn, and c-starred an unwilling Bette Davis. Warren Williams stars as detective "Ted Shane" Some people claim to like it, but it's an unfunny bore, and especially galling if you know how good the Huston version would be only five years later.
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  #86  
Old 01-01-2019, 03:36 PM
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I imagine anyone at the time who knew the books would have been disappointed with the movie since they are so different.
I strongly doubt it. Walt himself, of course, knew the books, as they were favorites of his daughters. So that's just one example.

But the books were very well known in general. So if your supposition were true, the film would not have garnered the praise that it did.

Of course, maybe people in the 60s were more accepting of deviations from the source material when it comes to adaptations than modern audiences are.


Powers &8^]

Last edited by Powers; 01-01-2019 at 03:36 PM.
  #87  
Old 01-01-2019, 03:44 PM
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I just saw the 1980s version of Journey to the Center of the Earth today. Seems the only thing they took from the Jules Verne story was the title and the subterranean setting. The rest of the movie's atrocities I cover in oscarhopper's Worst movie you have seen in 2018 thread.
  #88  
Old 01-01-2019, 03:46 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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That's something I've always wondered about Mary Poppins. It's relatively well known the troubles Disney had getting the rights from the author of the books, P. L. Travers, and the objections she had about the direction he took with the film. Her nanny wasn't a flying, singing, dancing nanny. Disney should have just made up a story and he could have done his own thing. It wasn't until years after I saw the film that I even knew there were books about Mary Poppins anyway. I imagine anyone at the time who knew the books would have been disappointed with the movie since they are so different. So if tying it to original source material is going to piss off pretty much everyone who knows the source material, why bother?
In the Book, MP flies in on the wind, there's a tea party with her Uncle, and she flies away again at the end. So, pretty much, yeah there is flying.
  #89  
Old 01-01-2019, 04:14 PM
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A bit obscure but I'd give the The Postman an honorable mention. The book spends a long time discussing how society collapsed and turned into a post-apocalyptic dystopia, rather than just jump straight into its post-apocalyptic warfare. Its based on idea that it was the "survivalists" (cold war era doomsday prepers, who were a phenomenon at the time the book was written) themselves who tipped society over the edge, and caused it to collapse after WW3.

All of that was totally lost in the god-awful Kevin Costner film, which surely enough jumped straight into post-apocalyptic warfare.

Last edited by griffin1977; 01-01-2019 at 04:16 PM.
  #90  
Old 01-01-2019, 04:15 PM
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Highlander I: "We're a bunch of mystical, superpowered people who have always been around; we take each others' powers when we kill them and whoever takes the last other ones' head will be all-powerful! There can be only one!"

Highlander II: "Nah, we're just aliens, and there's lots more of us."
  #91  
Old 01-01-2019, 04:21 PM
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Starship Troopers is a odd case. Parody? Steaming pile of Crap? Ok film if you pretend it has nothing whatsoever to do with the book? I vote #3, along with the two Conan films.
As I noted upthread (and in other threads here about Starship Troopers), #3 is really the answer. The script was originally called "Bug Hunt at Outpost Nine," and was written with no apparent intent to adapt the Heinlein novel. When it was realized that the script bore some similarities to the novel, the studio licensed the rights to the book, and made superficial tweaks to the script to incorporate names and plot points from the book.

The director, Paul Verhoeven, read only the beginning of the novel, and is reported to have hated it, as he felt it to be "very right-wing."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starsh...lm)#Background

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  #92  
Old 01-01-2019, 04:26 PM
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Some others:
The Day of the Jackal by Frederick Forsyth (the 1973 movie not the 1997 one)
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (although many disagree and feel the movie sanitized the book's political message)
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris
To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
I agree with all of the above.

I'd like to suggest a book that was worse than the movie.

Anyone read the book Jaws? It was a very ordinary summer potboiler of a novel.

But the movie was a classic. It had characters with the same names, but totally changed them. Spielberg, at the age of 26, made a movie that was scary as hell without being overly gross. The dialogue was better too, and the suspense. They left out the stupid subplot of an affair between Hooper and Mrs. Brody(she was younger in the book). Oh, and in the book Hooper also died, the only survivor was Brody himself.
  #93  
Old 01-01-2019, 04:27 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Highlander I: "We're a bunch of mystical, superpowered people who have always been around; we take each others' powers when we kill them and whoever takes the last other ones' head will be all-powerful! There can be only one!"

Highlander II: "Nah, we're just aliens, and there's lots more of us."
The Directors cut fixed that.
  #94  
Old 01-01-2019, 04:51 PM
Pardel-Lux Pardel-Lux is offline
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Breakfast at Tiffany's. The movie went along just fine and I really loved Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly at first, but then it went soppy until all collapsed in a happy ending. I was so disappointed. Or as Wikipedia puts it: "The movie was transposed to 1960 rather than the 1940s, the period of the novella. In addition to this, at the end of the film the protagonist and Holly fall in love and stay together, whereas in the novella there is no love affair whatsoever—Holly just leaves the United States and the narrator has no idea what happened to her since then, except for a photograph of a wood carving found years later in Africa which bears a striking resemblance to Holly. In addition, there are many other changes, including major omissions, to the plot and main character in the film from the novella."
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  #95  
Old 01-01-2019, 05:08 PM
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I can't believe nobody has mentioned the current crop of Star Trek movies. Clearly made by a cast and crew who have no idea what Trek is really about.
  #96  
Old 01-01-2019, 06:26 PM
Hilarity N. Suze Hilarity N. Suze is offline
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1956 noir (maybe) titled Wicked As They Come. A poor but beautiful woman will do anything to get and stay rich. Now this isn't a bad movie. Sure, she screws everybody over, but in the end, she had a good reason to distrust men, and she paid for her crimes.

But...

The source material was a novella by Bill S. Ballinger, Portrait in Smoke, and if they'd followed this faithfully it would have been much, much better. The woman in this one was, in fact, wicked as they come. She did not have any more reason to mistrust men than the average 1950s dame (which is to say, some reason) but she used them at every step, beyond all proportion to anything they had done to her--wicked as they come describes her perfectly--and she did not get caught. And the guy she screwed over in the end, who was no peach himself, didn't get caught either, but he's running scared.

I'm assuming that the code at the time meant the character had to be punished and had to have redemption of some sort. I wish someone would remake this one now that they don't have to do that.

It is still worth seeing, if you can find it. But the book is even more worth reading, if you can find it.

Re: Silence of the Lambs, this one disappointed me a couple of times. For one thing, and I guess many people wouldn't notice this, but in the book Lecter was listening to Glenn Gould's Goldberg Variations, which is almost a separate title than anybody else's Goldberg variations. The movie played somebody else's version of the Goldberg variations.

Also, fava beans and a nice Chianti? Chianti? Really? In the book he had the liver with a nice wine that I had never heard of, which fit perfectly with his character. I have heard of chianti. Everybody has. Therefore it does not fit his character. This is a guy with very specific tastes, not common ones. Not just anybody's version of a piano piece and not just anybody's vin ordinaire.

Of course the author himself stomped all over his own books with the sequels.

And Disney. Screwed up everything in an inimitable Disney way. Bambi, The Jungle Book, Winnie the Pooh.

Also very disappointed in The Wizard of Oz as, in the books, Oz was a real place, the inhabitants were not people from the farm in dreams, and there were more witches. I got over that though and actually liked it better after my kids watched it 143 times.

As long as I'm on a rant here, Postcards From the Edge. IMO they left out some of the very best bits from Carrie Fisher's book, although I will admit that I may be influenced by the fact that I am not a big Meryl Streep fan and I went into that movie probably looking for something to criticize, and it was actually not Streep's performance. I know they can't put everything in but jeez, people.
  #97  
Old 01-01-2019, 06:53 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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I can't believe nobody has mentioned the current crop of Star Trek movies. Clearly made by a cast and crew who have no idea what Trek is really about.
So true.
  #98  
Old 01-01-2019, 09:20 PM
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I just look at the current Star Trek franchise as "The Movies That Galaxy Quest Parodied".

They work in that respect, if you imagine Chris Pine decades later as Tim Allen's burnt out Starship Captain Actor.



Capt. James T. "Jason Nesmith" Kirk: Never Give Up, Never Fuckin Surrender... Am I too late for Pegg's panic attack?
[Simon Pegg hides his face in despair] Apparently not.

Last edited by digs; 01-01-2019 at 09:25 PM.
  #99  
Old 01-01-2019, 09:22 PM
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I'm going to guess that no one has listed "A Sound of Thunder" (2005) because they didn't know it exists. Or possibly it's because they don't want to admit that it exists because of how terribly bad it is, but more likely the first. $80 million budget, $11.7 million worldwide box office, with less than $2 million from the US. Probably the worst adaptation of a classic sci-fi story, not just ever, but possible.
  #100  
Old 01-01-2019, 10:31 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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I'm going to guess that no one has listed "A Sound of Thunder" (2005) because they didn't know it exists. Or possibly it's because they don't want to admit that it exists because of how terribly bad it is, but more likely the first. $80 million budget, $11.7 million worldwide box office, with less than $2 million from the US. Probably the worst adaptation of a classic sci-fi story, not just ever, but possible.
Terribly, terribly bad.

But honestly, it really wasnt that far off from the original. Just it was bad, and the original short was great.
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