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  #101  
Old 01-02-2019, 04:29 AM
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I just wanted to say that, recently reading Dracula for the first time, I was surprised by how much of the original book has made it into the generic accepted canon. All of the most garish elements are already there:

Not like Frankenstein, the rather slow book that owed some of it's original notoriety to the radical political / philosophical content poured into it by it's young female political / philosophical radical author.
  #102  
Old 01-02-2019, 04:55 AM
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The Jason Bourne films
Apart from copying the names of the books and the title character everything else seems to be totally new stories
  #103  
Old 01-02-2019, 06:24 AM
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Some others:
The Day of the Jackal by Frederick Forsyth (the 1973 movie not the 1997 one)
The 1997 version took an absolute shit on the entire book and the characters. Having read the book by my favorite author and loved Edward Fox in the '73 version I had high expectations for a modern version. I walked out of the theater absolutely enraged!
  #104  
Old 01-02-2019, 07:38 AM
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I think that Douglas Adams and Terry Pratchett adaptations struggle because the narration in the books is so much of the humor. I know they hired Stephen Fry to try to narrate the movie, but little bits here and there aren't enough.

Some things just have to be read.

I love the Dirk Gently show with Elijah Wood, but I have not read that book.
Fully agree to the Terry Pratchett part. I really love Pratchett's books and have read (and own) all of them. Those that were turned into film were as good and humorous as most of them for reading but apparently quite awkward for filming. The silly face mask of Death is one example, the Asian Tourist Twoflower being a plump white guy misses the whole Asian Tourist joke, and so on. Some but not all of those missteps could be accounted for by low Budgets.

On the other hand, a major part of the humour in Pratchett's writing is impossible to turn into pictures. I had fits of laughing over sentences like 'Swires and Rincewind's kneecap exchanged glances." from The Light Fantastic. How on Earth would you film that?

So in essence, I bought some of the Pratchett films but that was mainly a waste of money.
  #105  
Old 01-02-2019, 07:54 AM
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I'm going to guess that no one has listed "A Sound of Thunder" (2005) because they didn't know it exists. Or possibly it's because they don't want to admit that it exists because of how terribly bad it is, but more likely the first. $80 million budget, $11.7 million worldwide box office, with less than $2 million from the US. Probably the worst adaptation of a classic sci-fi story, not just ever, but possible.
No,no -- it's far from the worst SF adaptation possible. Heck, the already-discussed Starship Troopers and I, Robot are already much worse* I could name quite a few others that are, I think, much worse than his.

A Sound of Thunder is really a case of another defect in SF moviemaking -- taking a short story the telling of which wouldn't ill out the time for a feature-length movie and padding it outrageously. Lots of examples of that -- Mimic or The Space Frame (filmed as Invasion of the Saucer Men, We Can Remember it for you Wholesale (filmed as Total Recall), etc.

I wouldn't even say that it "took a dump on" its source material -- it was reasonably faithful to it as far as it could be within the limits of that padding. It's not a great adaptation, but that's light years away fro being contemptuous of its source.


*Yeah, I know they started out as independent works that got shoehorned into being "adaptations" when they bought the movie rights. It's still "taking a dump on" the source material, in my opinion.
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  #106  
Old 01-02-2019, 08:12 AM
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Practically all adaptations of the works of Jules Verne, Edgar Allen Poe, H.G. Wells, and H. P. Lovecraft are pretty appallingly bad, but in most case I think they're at least trying to be faithful to the source material to some degree.

Some cases where they practically tossed the book away, though, include:

The Mysterious Island (1929) -- Well, there's an island and a submarine, at least. Verne this ain't

From the Earth to the Moon -- not only do they completely change almost everything, but they manage to muck up the science even worse.

Master of the World -- actually based more on its prequel, Robur the Conqueror, but I guess they thought the sequel's title was cooler. The film manages to make a lot of Verne's book look silly

The Dunwich Horror -- Effects at the time the original version was made definitely weren't up to the task, but film was becoming more permissive, so this film doesn't give us a faithful glimpse of the titular monster, but does give us a glimpse of tits. I really would've rather had a shot of Wilbur's twin brother, all said and done. The remake only had the excuse that it was a low-budget flick.

Die, Monster, Die -- wastes Nick adams and Boris Karloff (!!) in a really bad adaptation of Lovecraft's The Colour Out of Space.

The Raven -- Seriously, there's no way you could adapt Poe's famous poem into anything but a theatrical short, but they've made three -- three! -- movies with this title. Two of the starred Boris Karloff, as if his presence alone would make a spooky Poe film. The second one, made by Roger Corman, also has Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, and a young Jack Nicholson. It's a fun pseudo-horror comedy that's a hoot, as long as you're not expecting any Poe.

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court -- I've complained about this many times. There has been a slew of "adaptations" of this, none of which even approximate the real story and none of which have Twain's wit. Two adaptations were vehicles for stars (Will Rogers and Bing Crosby), most straightforwardly tell you that they're not doing the real story ("A Kid in King Arthur's court"). Even the made-for-PBS version throws most of Twain out. I want to see the Destruction of Merlin's Tower, and the Restoration of the Holy Fountain, and The Boss' rescue by knights mounted on bicycles. Yes, I know that the Catholic Church doesn't come out well in the book, and that the end gets grim. I think it can be handled well to avoid pitfalls, and even make the dark ending work.
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  #107  
Old 01-02-2019, 08:25 AM
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Northern Lights is another instance of a film the author was not happy with.
.
I forgot about that movie, but I did see it. Yeah, it basically was a loose version of a popular book, but cut out the core. I want to say they did not:

SPOILER:
have her friend die at the end. I mean, talk about an important point.


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As I remember, when the studios were competing to get the film rights to the Harry Potter books, Disney tried to get it, but J.K. Rowling insisted on a high level of creative control and they didn't want to give that up. For example, I heard they proposed using an American actor as Harry. So her involvement may have ensured a higher level of quality.
So perhaps Rick Riordan is partly to blame for not setting the same standards. Or perhaps film rights were not in his control.

I don't know how J.K. Rowling, a first-time author, managed to maintain or get such a level of influence. When the first movie came out, only the first four books had come out. When film-rights were settled, only the first three had probably come out.

People may nitpick, but the Harry Potter movies did a really good job adapting the books. The books grew into thick volumes and the movies cut a lot of that out, but even those last ones did fairly well.
  #108  
Old 01-02-2019, 08:52 AM
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...I don't know how J.K. Rowling, a first-time author, managed to maintain or get such a level of influence.
Well, owning the full author's rights might have helped...
  #109  
Old 01-02-2019, 09:33 AM
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The Raven -- Seriously, there's no way you could adapt Poe's famous poem into anything but a theatrical short, but they've made three -- three! -- movies with this title. Two of the starred Boris Karloff, as if his presence alone would make a spooky Poe film. The second one, made by Roger Corman, also has Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, and a young Jack Nicholson. It's a fun pseudo-horror comedy that's a hoot, as long as you're not expecting any Poe.
Interesting fact--this movie may have helped inspire Marvel's Dr. Strange, at least the look of him. Although Stan Lee said that his main inspiration was the radio/movie character Chandu The Magician, Vincent Price's character in The Raven is a benevolent sorcerer, and the movie came out only a couple months before the comic debuted. Dr. Strange, in some of his early appearances, looks a good deal like Vincent Price did in The Raven, and his middle name IS Vincent.

(Certainly, the character Price voiced in The 13 Ghosts Of Scooby-Doo was pretty much Dr. Strange with the serial numbers filed off.)
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  #110  
Old 01-02-2019, 09:40 AM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
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So perhaps Rick Riordan is partly to blame for not setting the same standards. Or perhaps film rights were not in his control.

I don't know how J.K. Rowling, a first-time author, managed to maintain or get such a level of influence. When the first movie came out, only the first four books had come out. When film-rights were settled, only the first three had probably come out.
Three books in, it was clear that Harry Potter was a monster hit internationally. I think Percy Jackson sold when the first book was published and at that point the studios were looking for the next Harry Potter. There were several children's fantasy book series that were being adapted for the movies, almost as if the studios were going through the children's section of the bookstores.
  #111  
Old 01-02-2019, 10:42 AM
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For my money, the answer to this question is The Hobbit. I loved the Lord of the Rings films (though I acknowledge that there were some story changes, which I considered to be fairly minor). But, The Hobbit films were a travesty. I maintain that the credits for those films should have said, "Based on a story idea by J.R.R. Tolkien."
Lord of the rings was an over-the-top grandiose adaptation of Tolkien's books, but at least it followed the script and only exaggerated by a factor of 3 or so.

The Hobbit was..... I mean the movies were.. I mean..

Good grief, words fail me.
Shall we mention the several gigaton mountain of gold? Let's not.
Shall we mention how the dragon changes in size from scene to scene?
Shall we.. ugh. 'scuse me, gotta go puke.
  #112  
Old 01-02-2019, 12:46 PM
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The film based series of Jack Reacher, with Tom Cruise as the lead.

Tom Cruise - 5'7" 170 lbs.
Jack Reacher - 6'5" 250 lbs.

Yeah, not even close.
  #113  
Old 01-02-2019, 01:47 PM
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I expected dozens of posts about The Dark Tower, but it looks like I'm the first. Of course, the missteps could be seen from the beginning of production.
  #114  
Old 01-02-2019, 03:41 PM
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The film based series of Jack Reacher, with Tom Cruise as the lead.

Tom Cruise - 5'7" 170 lbs.
Jack Reacher - 6'5" 250 lbs.

Yeah, not even close.
As a closet jack Reacher fan, I expected to hate Tom Cruise. (Sort of like "What? Tim Burton's Batman is going to be Mr. Mom?!?")

But Cruise nailed the "barely contained righteous anger" schtick down, and I couldn't wait for the second film, which followed its book almost perfectly.


So, for me, add this to my whispered comment near the beginning of the first Harry Potter: "Whoa, this is... not sucking!"
  #115  
Old 01-02-2019, 04:11 PM
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As a closet jack Reacher fan, I expected to hate Tom Cruise. (Sort of like "What? Tim Burton's Batman is going to be Mr. Mom?!?")

But Cruise nailed the "barely contained righteous anger" schtick down, and I couldn't wait for the second film, which followed its book almost perfectly.


So, for me, add this to my whispered comment near the beginning of the first Harry Potter: "Whoa, this is... not sucking!"
Yep. And I am no fan of Tom. But his Reacher kinda works.
  #116  
Old 01-02-2019, 04:16 PM
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The animated adventure movie "The Guardians of Ga'hoole" was a sickly sweet taming down version of a couple of books that, in order to do justice, needed at minimum a PG-13 rating for the dark themes that should have been left in there. But no, Hollywood had to have its cute owls kiddie safe.
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  #117  
Old 01-02-2019, 04:17 PM
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As a closet jack Reacher fan, I expected to hate Tom Cruise. (Sort of like "What? Tim Burton's Batman is going to be Mr. Mom?!?")

But Cruise nailed the "barely contained righteous anger" schtick down, and I couldn't wait for the second film, which followed its book almost perfectly.


So, for me, add this to my whispered comment near the beginning of the first Harry Potter: "Whoa, this is... not sucking!"
They should have changed his character name to Jack Reach-around
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  #118  
Old 01-02-2019, 04:46 PM
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The film based series of Jack Reacher, with Tom Cruise as the lead.

Tom Cruise - 5'7" 170 lbs.
Jack Reacher - 6'5" 250 lbs.

Yeah, not even close.
They went with a different actor for the new television series (or was it cancelled?)
  #119  
Old 01-02-2019, 04:59 PM
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They went with a different actor for the new television series (or was it cancelled?)
Still in development, with no actors named, nor which studio would produce or where it would be distributed (network, streaming, etc.) I.e., still be shopped around.
  #120  
Old 01-02-2019, 08:45 PM
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I'd like to suggest a book that was worse than the movie.

Anyone read the book Jaws? It was a very ordinary summer potboiler of a novel.
The Godfather is another example of a movie that greatly improved upon the book it was based on.
  #121  
Old 01-02-2019, 09:19 PM
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It's been forever since I watched both the original Japanese version and the Hollywood movie but I distinctly remember leaving the theater after seeing Ghost in the Shell INCREDIBLY angry that they completely rewrote the plot and seemingly went against the message of the original film.
  #122  
Old 01-02-2019, 10:28 PM
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Most of the obvious projects have been named and discussed but one that I found most disturbing was The High Crusade. Although a little juvenile, the original book was enjoyable enough for me to get excited about seeing it on film.

Yeah, as soon as I heard about Rick Overton's involvement, I wrote it off.
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  #123  
Old 01-02-2019, 10:42 PM
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Most of the obvious projects have been named and discussed but one that I found most disturbing was The High Crusade. Although a little juvenile, the original book was enjoyable enough for me to get excited about seeing it on film.

Yeah, as soon as I heard about Rick Overton's involvement, I wrote it off.
I loved the book, but I had never even heard there was a film.
  #124  
Old 01-02-2019, 10:50 PM
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I loved the book, but I had never even heard there was a film.
I'm fairly certain it was a direct to DVD release and quietly forgotten by everyone involved. It does have a certain charm in a "it's so bad, it's good" way but if you do hunt it down, please go in with the lowest of expectations.
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  #125  
Old 01-02-2019, 10:55 PM
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When the movie version of "The Firm" came out, all the reviewers were saying, "If you read the book, you won't like the movie, and if you haven't, you'll love it." I had read it, and saw it with a friend who hadn't. She thought it was one of the best movies she'd ever seen, whereas I said "That's not in the book!" so many times, a man in front of me turned around and told me to shut up.
  #126  
Old 01-03-2019, 12:56 AM
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When the movie version of "The Firm" came out, all the reviewers were saying, "If you read the book, you won't like the movie, and if you haven't, you'll love it." I had read it, and saw it with a friend who hadn't. She thought it was one of the best movies she'd ever seen, whereas I said "That's not in the book!" so many times, a man in front of me turned around and told me to shut up.
This. Also The Chamber, another movie inspired by a Grisham novel.

The book was riveting, making you feel all kinds of emotions from page to page. The movie was a cheap substitute. Capturing Rollie Wedge at the end changed the dynamic of the story and made it fall apart.
  #127  
Old 01-03-2019, 01:28 AM
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Doom the video game is about a Marine stationed on Mars who is the lone survivor of an unfortunate experiment where the military base he was on accidentally opens a portal to hell and now all of Hell's demons are running around murdering everyone and transforming the rest into vile hellspawn. The second game ends with you literally killing Satan.

Doom the movie for some reason goes the route of the novels (yes there were novels) where the demons are actually just ancient aliens and most of the people infected just become normal zombie type creatures.

It may sound minor but making the Doom bad guys aliens just made it a generic Sci-Fi movie.
  #128  
Old 01-03-2019, 08:36 AM
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Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
When the movie version of "The Firm" came out, all the reviewers were saying, "If you read the book, you won't like the movie, and if you haven't, you'll love it." I had read it, and saw it with a friend who hadn't. She thought it was one of the best movies she'd ever seen, whereas I said "That's not in the book!" so many times, a man in front of me turned around and told me to shut up.
My impression, when I first saw The Firm (having read the book) was "it looks as if the studio lawyers got hold of the screenplay."
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  #129  
Old 01-03-2019, 08:42 AM
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I haven't seen it, but I've heard about the horror that is the 1995 adaptation of Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter:

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The Scarlet Letter is a 1995 American romantic drama film. It is a film adaptation of the Nathaniel Hawthorne novel of the same name. It was directed by Roland Joffé and stars Demi Moore, Gary Oldman, and Robert Duvall. This version was "freely adapted" from Hawthorne[2] and deviated from the original story. A critical and box office failure, it was nominated for seven Golden Raspberry Awards at the 1995 ceremony, winning "Worst Remake or Sequel."


...


The Scarlet Letter was thoroughly panned by critics.[3][4] Based on 38 reviews collected by aggregator site Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds a 13% approval rating, with an average score of 3/10.[5] In Entertainment Weekly, Owen Gleiberman referred to a "clunky, dawdlingly literal-minded Scarlet Letter, a movie that doesn't so much adapt the book as give it an expensive makeover."[6] Kevin Williams of National Review, in a retrospective appraisal, declared it "the worst film ever made", adding: "With its combination of awfulness and inexplicability, it's the 'MacArthur Park' of cinema."[7] The film won Worst Remake or Sequel at the 1995 Golden Raspberry Awards, receiving further nominations for Worst Actress (Moore), Worst Supporting Actor (Duvall), Worst Screen Couple (Moore and either Duvall or Oldman), Worst Director, Worst Picture, and Worst Screenplay. It grossed $10.3 million against a production budget of $46 million.[8]

In response to the criticism, and to the new ending, Moore said that the story the filmmakers were trying to tell differed out of necessity with that of the book, which she said was "very dense and not cinematic".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sc...ter_(1995_film)




Quote:

Listed among The 100 Most Amusingly Bad Movies Ever Made in "The Official Razzie® Movie Guide".




Demi Moore reportedly said she was fine with changing the ending, because not many people have read the book.
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0114345...ef_=tt_trv_trv
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  #130  
Old 01-03-2019, 11:43 AM
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As long as we're on Grisham, I didn't expect, "Christmas With The Kranks," to be any good (it wasn't), but I didn't expect it to mostly jettison the flavor of, "Skipping Christmas," which is an excellent little tale (I blame the screenwriter). I read it every holiday season.

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  #131  
Old 01-03-2019, 01:00 PM
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As long as we're on Grisham, I didn't expect, "Christmas With The Kranks," to be any good (it wasn't), but I didn't expect it to mostly jettison the flavor of, "Skipping Christmas," which is an excellent little tale (I blame the screenwriter). I read it every holiday season.
Grisham was all for a "Skipping Christmas" movie, but when he saw what Hollywood did to it, he wanted not only his name taken off it, but the title changed as well.
  #132  
Old 01-03-2019, 01:03 PM
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^ And rightfully so. Thanks, digs. Merry Xmas.

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  #133  
Old 01-03-2019, 02:07 PM
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As I noted upthread (and in other threads here about Starship Troopers), #3 is really the answer. The script was originally called "Bug Hunt at Outpost Nine," and was written with no apparent intent to adapt the Heinlein novel. When it was realized that the script bore some similarities to the novel, the studio licensed the rights to the book, and made superficial tweaks to the script to incorporate names and plot points from the book.

The director, Paul Verhoeven, read only the beginning of the novel, and is reported to have hated it, as he felt it to be "very right-wing."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starsh...lm)#Background
Actually, I think that Starship Troopers is the best example of a movie that deliberately "took a dump" on its source material. Unlike I, Robot which just used an unrelated script, Verhoeven didn't just add names and details from the book, but made explicit references to Nazism and fascism. He hated the book, and so made the society hateful - the opposite of Heinlein's intent.

Something like this makes no sense to me in terms of marketing. The whole reason to use a title from a popular source is to attract fans of that source. The changes Verhoeven made guaranteed that Heinlein fans would not just dislike the film but would loathe it.

The film can be enjoyed mainly by those who are either unfamiliar with the book, or who like Verhoeven disliked it. So what's the sense of using the title? The movie I think would be much better liked if no connection had been made to the Heinlein work.
  #134  
Old 01-03-2019, 05:34 PM
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^ And rightfully so. Thanks, digs. Merry Xmas.
Sorry, skipped that holiday. ;~)
  #135  
Old 01-03-2019, 05:44 PM
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After reading this thread, I really want to take a beloved book, steal the title and film whatever I want.

So be sure to come see my "Wind in the Willows", without many... well, actually with so few animals that I really must say "Sorry, no animals...didn't the marketing mention that? Oh, sorry. Well, the trailer should have done... oh, that's right, it was just a voiceover".

Well, anyhow, I'm afraid it's just Simon Pegg, Nick Frost, Stephen Fry, Hugh Laurie, Amy Sedaris and Dick Van Dyke starring in a Python-esque caper movie. And no, not "suitable for all audiences" like the posters said. The language is as filthy as it is punny.
  #136  
Old 01-03-2019, 06:44 PM
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Some others:
The Day of the Jackal by Frederick Forsyth (the 1973 movie not the 1997 one)
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (although many disagree and feel the movie sanitized the book's political message)
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris
To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Just dropping in to add 1984 by George Orwell (the 1984 movie version) to this list.
  #137  
Old 01-03-2019, 06:55 PM
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burpo the wonder mutt burpo the wonder mutt is offline
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Sorry, skipped that holiday. ;~)
*chortle*
  #138  
Old 01-04-2019, 01:05 AM
The_Peyote_Coyote The_Peyote_Coyote is offline
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CalMeacham: I didn't think The Dunwich Horror was that bad. It was certainly better than The Unnameable. However, I agree with you in general about adaptations of Poe and Lovecraft.
  #139  
Old 01-04-2019, 05:26 AM
Capn Carl Capn Carl is offline
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Well, everyone is entitled to their own opinion. Yours, of course, is wrong. :-)

I'm typing this on my phone, so I can't go into as much detail as I would like, but here are just a few of the more egregious failures of the films. these are just the ones I can remember. I only saw the film's once many years ago.

1. Gandalf sending Frodo and Sam running off alone when (in the film's story) he knows that there are Black Riders hot on their heels. My jaw literally dropped when he yelled "Run Frodo!"

2. In the passage into Mordor, Frodo actually turning against Sam after Gollum's trick. The relationship between Sam and Frodo was a key part of the book, and the idea that Frodo would reject Sam is ... well I don't even have a word for it. Ludicrous is way too weak.

3. The complete subversion of Faramir's character. The contrast between the characters of Boromir and his brother is completely lost in the movie, and makes the character of Faramir pretty pointless.

4. Denethor's character is seriously weakened in the movie, and his pride and devotion to Gondor are removed or made to look silly. That Pippin had to go and light the beacons himself is ridiculous.

5. The duel between Gandalf and Saruman. I believe Jackson said in the movie's commentary that he didn't really like the concept of wizards and overt magic, or something like that. Then why the hell did he take a very interesting and revealing argument between Gandalf and Saruman, and turn it into a goddamn video game.

6. All the dwarf jokes, and in general making Gimli a comic character. That was just disgusting.

I'm sure I could come up with dozens more if I rewatched the movies. None of this has anything to do with the book's plot being difficult to film. It's just contempt for the source material. there were some good scenes in the movies, and the CGI was superb. That makes it all the more sad.
Well said. Two more:
7. The Council of Elrond is depicted as petty bickering by the best and brightest of Middle Earth.

8. Gandalf the White defeated by the Witch King.
  #140  
Old 01-04-2019, 08:23 AM
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CalMeacham: I didn't think The Dunwich Horror was that bad. It was certainly better than The Unnameable. However, I agree with you in general about adaptations of Poe and Lovecraft.
Well, tweech his own.


I thought it was an example of the let's throw a buncha stuff together and hope it works. And it wouldn't have been hard, even with a low budget and circa 1970 effects, to craft a compelling (and more comprehensible) movie out of Lovecraft's actual story.
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  #141  
Old 01-04-2019, 12:18 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Well, everyone is entitled to their own opinion. Yours, of course, is wrong. :-)

I'm typing this on my phone, so I can't go into as much detail as I would like, but here are just a few of the more egregious failures of the films. these are just the ones I can remember. I only saw the film's once many years ago.

1. Gandalf sending Frodo and Sam running off alone when (in the film's story) he knows that there are Black Riders hot on their heels. My jaw literally dropped when he yelled "Run Frodo!"

2. In the passage into Mordor, Frodo actually turning against Sam after Gollum's trick. The relationship between Sam and Frodo was a key part of the book, and the idea that Frodo would reject Sam is ... well I don't even have a word for it. Ludicrous is way too weak.
...
5. The duel between Gandalf and Saruman. I believe Jackson said in the movie's commentary that he didn't really like the concept of wizards and overt magic, or something like that. Then why the hell did he take a very interesting and revealing argument between Gandalf and Saruman, and turn it into a goddamn video game.

....
1. When was this? Gandalf never did that in the film, iirc.

2. That was sorta in the book.

5. The books are unclear what happened, but are you saying Gandalf would have just shrugged and said "OK, sure, send me to Sauron."
  #142  
Old 01-04-2019, 12:20 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Well said. Two more:
7. The Council of Elrond is depicted as petty bickering by the best and brightest of Middle Earth.

8. Gandalf the White defeated by the Witch King.
7. There was bickering.

8. Gandalf was confronted by the Witch King in the books, and things looked bad- until Angmar was called off by the Rohirrim arrival. Angmar was even gloating.
  #143  
Old 01-04-2019, 12:40 PM
Noelq Noelq is offline
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You know, "Ready Player One" is one of my favorite books, showing a great deal of love and care for its source material. Its a shame they've never made a movie about it.

I SAID ITS A SHAME THEY'VE NEVER MADE A MOVIE ABOUT IT!
  #144  
Old 01-04-2019, 01:56 PM
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I would like to throw M. Night Shyamalan's The Last Airbender into the ring. It is supposedly based on an absolutely fantastic cartoon series that aired on Nickelodeon Avatar: The Last Airbender but I am not sure how they could have seen the series and then produced the crap that was the movie.

The series has great, deep characters that learn, grow and develop overtime. It features the challenges of being a young boy, thrown into a world you don't understand and being expected to save it. It explores a world at war by first painting the instigators as evil and then showing how it is wrong to think of your enemies that way. They show all the shades of grey of humanity. I cannot recommend the series enough.

The movie, however, is bad. The characters are paper thin, the element bending mechanics are all changed for no good reason, its weirdly racist without any of the greys that were explored in the series. All of the humor the series had, which was necessary because the characters are young teens, is gone. It's nearly unwatchable.

ETA: Also, the acting was terrible. SOOOOO TERRIBLE!

Last edited by slalexan; 01-04-2019 at 01:57 PM.
  #145  
Old 01-04-2019, 04:25 PM
Capn Carl Capn Carl is offline
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7. There was bickering.

8. Gandalf was confronted by the Witch King in the books, and things looked bad- until Angmar was called off by the Rohirrim arrival. Angmar was even gloating.
As Gandalf the Gray he fought the Witch King, and his 8 Morgul-Bros, simultaneously, on Weathertop. Score: 0:0. He also fought the 2nd most powerful Middle Earth baddie after Sauron, the Balrog. Score: 1:1.
As Gandalf the White, he blocked the WK at the gates of Minas Tirith. When the WK left to deal with the Rohirrim, GtW made to chase him down, until Pippin stopped him.
  #146  
Old 01-04-2019, 04:48 PM
AHunter3 AHunter3 is offline
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One that's annoyed me since childhood: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.

The book was a love poem to a car. A car chock-full of over-the-top incredible little gadgets but also a roaring snarling high-performance roadster, albeit one from an earlier time. It was a car that would get impatient with traffic and blink an instruction at the driver to pull the knob. (And when Mr. Potts was slow to comply, it changed to "pull, IDIOT!") He does so and the radiator cooling fan pokes out the front, the mudguards swing out on the side, and it flies over the traffic.

Looking like this, dammit, not like this. That latter piece of crap is a goddam parade float!

Aside from that, there's virtually no relationship between the plot of the book and the plot of the movie other than

a) the invention of a popular candy makes Mr. Pott rich enough to buy a car;

b) the car can fly; and

c) has the same title


His wife has been disappeared, a host of new characters inserted, they never go to France, never defeat any dangerous criminals, and the other fancy capabilities of the car are omitted.

But mostly it's just not the car it's supposed to be. The movie Chitty looks more like that jalopy that Archie Andrews used to drive around Riverdale.

Last edited by AHunter3; 01-04-2019 at 04:50 PM.
  #147  
Old 01-04-2019, 04:55 PM
Jet Jaguar Jet Jaguar is offline
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The Godfather is another example of a movie that greatly improved upon the book it was based on.
Goldfinger also improved on the book, or at least fixed a major plot error. In the book, Goldfinger's plan was to steal all of the gold from Fort Knox. But as Bond explains in the movie, that would be logistically impossible.

I suppose The Spy Who Loved Me is also worth a mention, as the book is terrible but the film only used the title - the story itself is completely original and uses nothing from the book. Although this was by design. Reception of the book was so poor that Fleming himself stipulated that no plot elements from the book could be used, only the name.
  #148  
Old 01-04-2019, 04:55 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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As Gandalf the Gray he fought the Witch King, and his 8 Morgul-Bros, simultaneously, on Weathertop. Score: 0:0. He also fought the 2nd most powerful Middle Earth baddie after Sauron, the Balrog. Score: 1:1.
As Gandalf the White, he blocked the WK at the gates of Minas Tirith. When the WK left to deal with the Rohirrim, GtW made to chase him down, until Pippin stopped him.
He did hold them off at weathertop, but how many? and then in his own words- he "escaped".

Gandalf stood in his way but the Witch King just laughed at him. "Old Fool! This is my hour. Do you not know Death when you see it? Die now and curse in vain!"

After Angmar left, Gandalf just sat motionless for a bit, the started to ride thru the gate. After Angmar? if so, why just sit there for a while?
  #149  
Old 01-04-2019, 05:07 PM
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CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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Goldfinger also improved on the book, or at least fixed a major plot error. In the book, Goldfinger's plan was to steal all of the gold from Fort Knox. But as Bond explains in the movie, that would be logistically impossible.

I suppose The Spy Who Loved Me is also worth a mention, as the book is terrible but the film only used the title - the story itself is completely original and uses nothing from the book. Although this was by design. Reception of the book was so poor that Fleming himself stipulated that no plot elements from the book could be used, only the name.

Not only did the movie Goldfinger fix that logistical hole, it also considerably improved Bond's role. In the novel, he ends up as -- I kid you not -- a glorified secretary, helping out with Goldfinger's paperwork. Reading it made me picture Bond in the back room while Rob Schneider sits there, doing his 25-year-old SNL routine:

"Bond. James Bond. The Bondster. Double Oh Seven. Makin' copies."

Fleming must have realized what a mistake that was (or had it pointed out to him), because in his last published work, The Man with the Golden Gun, when he wants Bond to get close to Scaramanga, he has him become Scaramanga's bodyguard, which is infinitely cooler.


(Speaking of which, The Man with the Golden Gun is definitely a case of dumping on your source material. )


I could understand The Spy who Loved Me coming up with a new plot -- they had to, both because of Fleming's stipulations and because the original was pretty dull. But did they have to steal the plot from their own movie version of You Only Live Twice!

And You Only Live Twice was another case of dumping on your source material.
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  #150  
Old 01-04-2019, 05:44 PM
malbuff malbuff is offline
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It's easier to list the book that wasn't dumped on : "The Maltese Falcon", starring Bogart.
Unfortunately, they made up for it with "The Big Sleep."
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