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Old 01-04-2019, 03:36 PM
Zyada Zyada is offline
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Loomw,ym,ad.Nbr. Can someone identify this poem?

My husband used the initial letters from a couple of lines from a poem he liked as the master password for his keepass. The above is the password he gave me to open his keepass, but it's not working. Either he dictated it to me, and I've got it wrong, or he changed it and didn't change my copy of his password.

If I can identify the poem, I can verify or fix the password. And maybe throw it to Cafe Society to identify other poems he might have used for his password.

Note: if you have an issue with me trying to get into his keepass file, I suggest you read this
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Last edited by Zyada; 01-04-2019 at 03:37 PM.
  #2  
Old 01-04-2019, 03:43 PM
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I'm very sorry for your loss.

Off the top of my head, I can't place the poem, but perhaps focusing on the Nbr. phrase will prove useful, since it seems to be a complete sentence with fewer possible combinations.

I'm not familiar with Keepass. Did you try it with and without punctuation? With and without capital letters?

Last edited by GreysonCarlisle; 01-04-2019 at 03:46 PM.
  #3  
Old 01-04-2019, 04:01 PM
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I'm going to move this to Cafe Society, partly because it has to do with a literary work and partly so that we can get more eyes on it. Hopefully between the two forums, someone will recognize the poem.

Moving thread from GQ to CS.
  #4  
Old 01-04-2019, 04:10 PM
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It's definitely Ozymandius. I think the problem is that you've got an extra "o" in there.

I met a traveller from an antique land,
Who said—“Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
And on the pedestal, these words appear:
My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings;

Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay


Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.”

Last edited by SpoilerVirgin; 01-04-2019 at 04:11 PM.
  #5  
Old 01-04-2019, 04:24 PM
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Woohoo!
  #6  
Old 01-04-2019, 04:35 PM
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Originally Posted by SpoilerVirgin View Post
It's definitely Ozymandius. I think the problem is that you've got an extra "o" in there.

I met a traveller from an antique land,
Who said—“Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
And on the pedestal, these words appear:
My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings;

Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay


Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.”
Ok, I have got to know how you did this. I was starting to think about how to write a python script to parse the punctuation possibilities, but hadn't even yet figured out where a good website/database of poems was. And you pull this out of nowhere!
  #7  
Old 01-04-2019, 04:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpoilerVirgin View Post
It's definitely Ozymandius. I think the problem is that you've got an extra "o" in there.

I met a traveller from an antique land,
Who said—“Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
And on the pedestal, these words appear:
My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings;

Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay


Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.”
Boom!
  #8  
Old 01-04-2019, 04:46 PM
SpoilerVirgin SpoilerVirgin is offline
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I was trying to figure out how the letters actually formed into the poem, so I started writing it out:

L--- o--- o--- m--- w---
y--- m---
a--- d---
N--- b--- r---

But that said nothing to me, so then I tried

L--- o--- o--- m--- w---, y--- m---, a--- d---
N--- b--- r---

After I considered and rejected some Shakespeare lines about love, "Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair," just popped out at me. I looked up Ozymandias (which I spelled wrong in my post), and saw that it had to be right.

No real trick, but I do like puzzles (and poetry), so the question fit the way my mind works.
  #9  
Old 01-04-2019, 04:58 PM
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I got stuck on Looking Over Our Morning Wood....
  #10  
Old 01-04-2019, 05:23 PM
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This is the most SDMB thread ever, and in the best way.
  #11  
Old 01-04-2019, 05:24 PM
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Wow. I love this board. Well done, SpoilerVirgin!!

Zyada, so very sorry for your loss.
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  #12  
Old 01-04-2019, 05:34 PM
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OP let us know if it works as a password. That was an amazing solve.
  #13  
Old 01-04-2019, 05:47 PM
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Damn SpoilerVirgin! Good work!
  #14  
Old 01-04-2019, 06:32 PM
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Another post in praise and support for SpoilerVirgin!
Even though that poem and the poet are among my favorites from high school days,
I'm close to certain I would never have hit on the solution you came up with!

You have a new fan over here! Bravo!!
  #15  
Old 01-04-2019, 09:01 PM
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As an aside, since we're in CS now and all, Asimov used something very much like this as the plot of one of his Black Widowers mysteries. It was very important for the guest to figure out the password of a fellow who was now dead, but various clues indicated that the password consisted of 14 letters, from which Henry guessed that it was the initial letters of the lines of a sonnet, and then it was just a matter of guessing what the dead guy's favorite sonnet was from various other clues.
  #16  
Old 01-05-2019, 02:15 AM
The_Peyote_Coyote The_Peyote_Coyote is offline
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I, too, must congratulate SpoilerVirgin. Amazing job. My condolences on your loss, Zyada.
  #17  
Old 01-05-2019, 10:43 AM
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Condolences to Zyada. And very big congrats to SpoilerVirgin. Impressive! I hope the password works now.
  #18  
Old 01-05-2019, 10:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
As an aside, since we're in CS now and all, Asimov used something very much like this as the plot of one of his Black Widowers mysteries. It was very important for the guest to figure out the password of a fellow who was now dead, but various clues indicated that the password consisted of 14 letters, from which Henry guessed that it was the initial letters of the lines of a sonnet, and then it was just a matter of guessing what the dead guy's favorite sonnet was from various other clues.
The one that ends "They also serve who only stand and wait" as I recall.
  #19  
Old 01-05-2019, 07:49 PM
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The one that ends "They also serve who only stand and wait" as I recall.
I loved The Black Widower stories. I'm going to have to find that one.
  #20  
Old 01-05-2019, 08:22 PM
Zyada Zyada is offline
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That was it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maserschmidt View Post
This is the most SDMB thread ever, and in the best way.
Bob would have been so proud.
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  #21  
Old 01-05-2019, 08:57 PM
SpoilerVirgin SpoilerVirgin is offline
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Thank you for letting us know. So did the password work when you left out the extra "o"?

I'm sorry it was under such sad circumstances, but I'm glad I was able to help. I admit it was pretty thrilling to realize that I had the answer.

This community has been very important to me, and I'm glad I could give something back.
  #22  
Old 01-05-2019, 09:02 PM
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Amazing!
  #23  
Old 01-05-2019, 09:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
As an aside, since we're in CS now and all, Asimov used something very much like this as the plot of one of his Black Widowers mysteries. It was very important for the guest to figure out the password of a fellow who was now dead, but various clues indicated that the password consisted of 14 letters, from which Henry guessed that it was the initial letters of the lines of a sonnet, and then it was just a matter of guessing what the dead guy's favorite sonnet was from various other clues.
Are you sure that it was letters and not 14 k of g?
  #24  
Old 01-05-2019, 09:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Sage Rat View Post
Are you sure that it was letters and not 14 k of g?
Sounds like it was 14 keystrokes of guesswork in a favorite poem design.
  #25  
Old 01-05-2019, 09:45 PM
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Big deal, SpoilerVirgin. See if you can solve this one (hint: it's a line from a song by the Baha Men):

W.L.TheD.O.

Now we'll see if you really got skillz.


mmm

Last edited by Mean Mr. Mustard; 01-05-2019 at 09:45 PM.
  #26  
Old 01-05-2019, 09:59 PM
SpoilerVirgin SpoilerVirgin is offline
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Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
Big deal, SpoilerVirgin. See if you can solve this one (hint: it's a line from a song by the Baha Men):

W.L.TheD.O.

Now we'll see if you really got skillz.


mmm
Who let you out?
  #27  
Old 01-05-2019, 10:49 PM
Sir T-Cups Sir T-Cups is offline
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Why lick the damaged orange?
  #28  
Old 01-05-2019, 11:19 PM
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If you really want to impress us:
14 k of g in a f p d
  #29  
Old 01-05-2019, 11:40 PM
Zeldar Zeldar is offline
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Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
If you really want to impress us:
14 k of g in a f p d

I'm 99% sure we found the answer to this one -- after the thread had been closed!

Now if I can just remember the thread where we put the answer...


IIRC it was a thread devoted to some of the "highlights" of SDMB over several years worth of flashbacks -- a fun thread in and of itself.
  #30  
Old 01-06-2019, 12:00 AM
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This is an incredibly brilliant solution to that puzzle.
  #31  
Old 01-06-2019, 12:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Zeldar View Post
I'm 99% sure we found the answer to this one -- after the thread had been closed!

Now if I can just remember the thread where we put the answer...


IIRC it was a thread devoted to some of the "highlights" of SDMB over several years worth of flashbacks -- a fun thread in and of itself.

This may be the one:

https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb...&postcount=149
  #32  
Old 01-06-2019, 12:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeldar View Post

The key to the post(s) is:

To lay this puzzle to rest, it's 14 karats of gold in a Florentine pietra dura (an art piece made of highly polished and inlaid colored stones).
  #33  
Old 01-06-2019, 01:47 AM
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Originally Posted by SpoilerVirgin View Post
But that said nothing to me, so then I tried

L--- o--- o--- m--- w---, y--- m---, a--- d---
N--- b--- r---

After I considered and rejected some Shakespeare lines about love, "Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair," just popped out at me. I looked up Ozymandias (which I spelled wrong in my post), and saw that it had to be right.

No real trick, but I do like puzzles (and poetry), so the question fit the way my mind works.
Brilliant!
  #34  
Old 01-06-2019, 02:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Zeldar View Post
The key to the post(s) is:

To lay this puzzle to rest, it's 14 karats of gold in a Florentine pietra dura (an art piece made of highly polished and inlaid colored stones).
I see that Chessic Sense supplied the answer, but didn't give any evidence. I'm curious how he (she?) worked it out.

(Some of those art pieces are pretty spectacular, too, ranging from rings to coffee tables to altars to entire walls.)
  #35  
Old 01-06-2019, 02:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Morgyn View Post
I see that Chessic Sense supplied the answer, but didn't give any evidence. I'm curious how he (she?) worked it out.

(Some of those art pieces are pretty spectacular, too, ranging from rings to coffee tables to altars to entire walls.)
But more to the point: some of them contain no gold at all, right? I mean, granted, there could be 14 karats of gold in one or another; but it seems like this should be more along the lines of how 14 karats of gold always refers to 14 karats of gold in a fineness purity determination, or something.
  #36  
Old 01-06-2019, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by SpoilerVirgin View Post
Who let you out?
Ouch, that stang.


mmm

Last edited by Mean Mr. Mustard; 01-06-2019 at 08:50 AM.
  #37  
Old 01-06-2019, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Morgyn View Post
I see that Chessic Sense supplied the answer, but didn't give any evidence. I'm curious how he (she?) worked it out.

(Some of those art pieces are pretty spectacular, too, ranging from rings to coffee tables to altars to entire walls.)
That was obviously not the intended answer of the original puzzle. Yes, it fits the format but those things are something that most people should know. Like 100 y in a ff would be 100 yards in a football field. Very clearly there was a typo in the original question or maybe it was something that would have been known to the original group.
  #38  
Old 01-06-2019, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by SpoilerVirgin View Post
Thank you for letting us know. So did the password work when you left out the extra "o"?

I'm sorry it was under such sad circumstances, but I'm glad I was able to help. I admit it was pretty thrilling to realize that I had the answer.

This community has been very important to me, and I'm glad I could give something back.

It was indeed the extra "o". And thank you so much. You're a doper god
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Old 01-06-2019, 11:56 AM
SpoilerVirgin SpoilerVirgin is offline
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Originally Posted by Zyada View Post
It was indeed the extra "o". And thank you so much.
You're very welcome.
Quote:
You're a doper god
Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!
  #40  
Old 01-06-2019, 01:53 PM
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I'm so glad I didn't see this thread until it was solved because I wouldn't have cracked it even given ten years. Well done, SpoilerVirgin. Brilliant. And my condolences, Zyada.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeldar View Post
The key to the post(s) is:

To lay this puzzle to rest, it's 14 karats of gold in a Florentine pietra dura (an art piece made of highly polished and inlaid colored stones).
Ah, such a tease. Does it really put it to rest for you, Zeldar? For me, it makes as much sense as fourteen kilos of grass in a Ford parked downtown. In other words, none at all.
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Old 01-06-2019, 07:00 PM
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I would never have gotten that which is why I always say that SpoilerVirgin is the smarter sister. Just make sure you change the password now since everybody who reads this thread now knows it.
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  #42  
Old 01-06-2019, 07:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
As an aside, since we're in CS now and all, Asimov used something very much like this as the plot of one of his Black Widowers mysteries. It was very important for the guest to figure out the password of a fellow who was now dead, but various clues indicated that the password consisted of 14 letters, from which Henry guessed that it was the initial letters of the lines of a sonnet, and then it was just a matter of guessing what the dead guy's favorite sonnet was from various other clues.
ACK-shually, the guy was alive, and was equally sure that both his password was unguessable and that a colleague stole some of his password protected work. The question was which of those two premises was false.

(“On His Blindness” by John Milton, BTW.)
  #43  
Old 01-06-2019, 08:56 PM
SpoilerVirgin SpoilerVirgin is offline
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Here's the Wikipedia entry on the Asimov story, for anyone else who is interested.
  #44  
Old 01-07-2019, 10:52 AM
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I think I might have been getting it conflated with a different Black Widowers story, involving the combination to a safe (which previously, I think, belonged to a guy working on fusion power?). But I don't remember what the gimmick to that one was.
  #45  
Old 01-07-2019, 10:58 AM
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I think I might have been getting it conflated with a different Black Widowers story, involving the combination to a safe (which previously, I think, belonged to a guy working on fusion power?). But I don't remember what the gimmick to that one was.
Possibly this one http://www.asimovreviews.net/Stories/Story095.html ("Getting the Combination" aka" Playing the Numbers"
  #46  
Old 01-07-2019, 02:57 PM
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Nominating SpoilerVirgin for "Simultaneously Most Nerdy and Most Awesome Post of 2019".

And I don't think there will be any serious competition for the rest of the year.

We grovel before your geeky glory.

Regards,
Shodan
  #47  
Old 01-07-2019, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by The Other Waldo Pepper View Post
But more to the point: some of them contain no gold at all, right? I mean, granted, there could be 14 karats of gold in one or another; but it seems like this should be more along the lines of how 14 karats of gold always refers to 14 karats of gold in a fineness purity determination, or something.
The other thing is that "karats" refers to the purity of gold, with 24 karat gold being pure. Saying "14 karats of gold" suggests you're referring to the quantity, which makes no sense.
  #48  
Old 01-07-2019, 04:31 PM
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Zyada, I am so sorry for your loss. I remember well the first time I read the story of you two meeting through the SDMB. His photograph and gleeful quote on the portrait page speak so beautifully of his character and your happy marriage.
https://www.nouilles.info/sdpix/1956.html

SV - Great work! It's not often we get the chance to actually do something useful to help a grieving friend. I am so glad you were here to respond.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Borborygmi View Post
Sounds like it was 14 keystrokes of guesswork in a favorite poem design.
I hate you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sage Rat View Post
Are you sure that it was letters and not 14 k of g?
. . . and I hate you too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
If you really want to impress us:
14 k of g in a f p d
Seriously, just all the hate, you guys.
.
.
.
.
.

.
.
.
  #49  
Old 01-07-2019, 06:29 PM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is offline
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The other thing is that "karats" refers to the purity of gold, with 24 karat gold being pure. Saying "14 karats of gold" suggests you're referring to the quantity, which makes no sense.
But googling “14 karats of gold” produces any number of results; “karats of gold” is even in the Congressional Record (because, apparently, that’s how people talk even after they get elected to high office, as well as a phrase that pops up in the occasional article they want printed in said record) and at FTC.gov (because, apparently, that’s also how folks talk if they work near said people who get elected, or some such).

Is there a point where description counts enough to win out over prescription?

Last edited by The Other Waldo Pepper; 01-07-2019 at 06:32 PM.
  #50  
Old 01-08-2019, 06:35 AM
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Yes, 14k gold is not pure; 24k is. It's not even the 'better' of the gold alloys commonly used for jewelry, that would be 18k. From there you drop to 10k, mostly used in cheap-ass high school rings. So 14k is not that impressive.

Last edited by DesertDog; 01-08-2019 at 06:37 AM.
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