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Old 01-04-2019, 07:59 PM
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Beckdawrek Beckdawrek is online now
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I'm bored with food.

I need help. I'm bored to tears with what I eat. I need meal recommendations. Here's the rules: 1. No weird ingredients, I'm not gonna be able to get sea anemones or wagyu beef.
2. I'm T1 diabetic, so it has to conform to my diet or have a reasonable way around.
3. It's just me eating, so the giant roast beast ain't happening.
4.And I'm lazy as hell. Keep it kinda simple.

Any ideas?

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 01-04-2019 at 08:02 PM.
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Old 01-04-2019, 08:30 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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Do you like Italian? Pasta Puttanesca is dead simple and tastes great.

2 tablespoons olive oil
5 garlic cloves
2 15oz cans diced tomatoes
1 can anchovie filets
15 pitted kalamata olives
2 tablespoons capers, drained
1 teaspoon dry basil
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flake
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
Pasta of choice
Boiling salted water
Grated parmesan cheese

Mince the fresh garlic. Add the olive oil to a large hot frying pan, then add the minced garlic. Saute briefly, do not brown. Add the canned tomatoes. Drain the anchovies and mince small; add to tomatoes and garlic. Slice the olives and add to the tomatoes. Add the capers to the tomatoes. Add the red pepper flake and black pepper. Reduce heat to a simmer. Add pasta to boiling water for 10-12 minutes, or until al dente.

Serve tomato sauce on top of drained pasta, top with grated parmesan cheese


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Old 01-04-2019, 08:33 PM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is offline
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Aldi sells these sauces you add to chicken that are really good. Tikka Masala is only one kind, but they look like the picture I linked to.

You chop the chicken into bits, heat it up, drain it. Add the sauce, let that heat up. Eat it on rice.

Easy and really good.

You will have to check the sugar content or anything else that would impact your diabetes.
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Old 01-04-2019, 08:37 PM
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My mother has just been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Is what's good for Type 1 also good for Type 2?
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Old 01-04-2019, 08:56 PM
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Originally Posted by ekedolphin View Post
My mother has just been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Is what's good for Type 1 also good for Type 2?
I'd say,yes, generally. T2s sometimes have blood pressure issues which further restricts them.
My pancreas makes no insulin, so I'm insulin dependent. T2s pancreas' may just need help. There are oral meds they take for that. YMMV, of course.

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 01-04-2019 at 08:59 PM.
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Old 01-04-2019, 09:10 PM
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Julia Child once said, "garlic makes it French, wine makes it good."

Or maybe it was the other way around. Either way, the point is, use seasonings.
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Old 01-04-2019, 11:05 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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I am having a similar problem. Do you mind if I piggyback on your thread?

When I retired a couple of years ago, I was very excited about dinner plans. I told the Ukulele Lady we could have fascinating food EVERY night...cassoulet, seafood paella, Greek pastitsio, steamed lobsters, a standing rib roast, pheasant under glass, you name it!

She simultaneously decided to ramp up her Healthy Eating regimen. She wanted simple grilled fish or meat with a steamed vegetables or a salad, no starch. (I love potatoes, rice, and pasta. She will no longer eat white rice or white pasta. I refuse to eat the brown stuff, which my Asian and Italian friends confirm is only fit for pigs) I have been preparing two dinners every evening for the past year or two.

Lately she has been complaining that the food I serve her is not up to her standards...I’m not paying enough attention to preparing her meal... and has been fixing her own dinner when she gets home from work. Last night she had a beet salad with cucumbers, hard boiled egg, and a (light) sour cream dressing...tonight was broccoli rabe with butternut squash and chicken sausage.

My problem is that I don’t feel like making an elaborate dinner for myself alone. Tonight I had a bowl of homemade broccoli soup I defrosted from the freezer.

So, on my own, I could be eating whatever I want every night, and I am a good enough cook to whomp up anything. My problem is that I think “I don’t deserve to have veal Francesca with pasta aglio e olio ALL BY MYSELF” so I don’t do it.

Any brilliant ideas?
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Old 01-05-2019, 12:34 AM
Kimstu Kimstu is online now
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
My problem is that I don’t feel like making an elaborate dinner for myself alone. Tonight I had a bowl of homemade broccoli soup I defrosted from the freezer.

So, on my own, I could be eating whatever I want every night, and I am a good enough cook to whomp up anything. My problem is that I think “I don’t deserve to have veal Francesca with pasta aglio e olio ALL BY MYSELF” so I don’t do it.

Any brilliant ideas?
This attitude is sadly not uncommon, and is part of the reason why elderly widowers and divorced men often have nutrition problems. Lack of cooking skills is a far bigger contributor, of course, but even men who can cook are often resistant to cooking "just for themselves". Yes, you should try to fix this. Some suggestions:

1) Every other day or so, try to work into your dinner prep a simple side dish or starter that both you and your wife can enjoy. Scale up from there to chef-level menu planning where you use many of the same base ingredients for two different versions of the same meal: one simple and healthy, and one more elaborate and rich.

2) Ain't nothing wrong with homemade broccoli soup. If you are getting good nutrition overall, there is no problem with splitting your efforts between fancy one-shot meals and utilitarian "batch" cooking for simpler meals some of the time.


And for the OP: Batch cooking and freezing is your friend. It's often easier to get interested in making a big batch of soup or stew, or even that giant roast beast, and spreading out the consumption over a longer period of time than to maintain enthusiasm about cooking yourself something new from scratch every meal.

Last edited by Kimstu; 01-05-2019 at 12:38 AM.
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Old 01-05-2019, 12:49 AM
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I do do some batch cooking. I have a few faves. I freeze them in small quatities. I'm thinking I may look into some wraps or slider type sandwiches. Anyone got any recipes?
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Old 01-05-2019, 01:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Beckdawrek View Post
1. No weird ingredients, I'm not gonna be able to get sea anemones or wagyu beef.
Are you sure? If it's a matter of availability, there are probably many fruits & vegetables at your local supermarket that you haven't tried yet. And nowdays, even small cities have ethnic markets. Try visiting an Asian or Indian market some time.

Quote:
2. I'm T1 diabetic, so it has to conform to my diet or have a reasonable way around.
What exactly are your dietary restrictions? Low fat & sugar?
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Old 01-05-2019, 01:40 AM
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Originally Posted by scr4 View Post
Are you sure? If it's a matter of availability, there are probably many fruits & vegetables at your local supermarket that you haven't tried yet. And nowdays, even small cities have ethnic markets. Try visiting an Asian or Indian market some time.



What exactly are your dietary restrictions? Low fat & sugar?
I tend to be too skinny, so fats not a problem. Of course I monitor my sugar intake. I generally do ok with homemade sauces and the like. So much sugar in canned things. Its a problem I usually can work around if I'm careful.
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Old 01-05-2019, 02:14 AM
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Toss about two pounds of beef stew meat into a crockpot. Pour in two packets of taco seasoning. Slice an onion and throw that in. Cut a tomato in quarters and throw that in two. Pop the stems off two jalapenos and toss them in, and a clove of peeled garlic as well. Cover it with water and set the heat to low. Let it cook for about 12 hours, drain it, and shred it with two forks.

Boom! Easy carne guisada. Put it in a taco, or a burrito, or an enchilada, or on top of nachos, or whatever else you fancy.
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Old 01-05-2019, 08:22 AM
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Ukulele Ike, have you read Judith Jones' The Pleasures of Cooking for One? Excellent book, excellent food, good ideas, small portions. I'd recommend it to the OP, but it's definitely a cook's cookbook - it's not really written for quick/easy cooking.

As far as the OP:

- Frontera makes excellent Enchilada Sauces. I'm much more of a make-your-own-sauce kind of person, but I found these during my kitchen remodel when I didn't have the ability to cook much. I can't speak to the other sauces on that page, but both the green and red enchilada are worth keeping around. You can make a pan of however many enchiladas you want with a bag of store-bought corn tortillas, this sauce, some cheese, and whatever meat you have lying around. If you want to spice it up, add some dried chile or taco seasoning. Or chopped jalepenos, or salsa, or whatever. It's easy, fast, delicious. I tend to serve it with a salad of cherry tomatoes, cucumber, red onion with oil & vinegar.

- Omelets are dinner food. Throw in whatever you have lying around (ham, peppers, mushrooms, cheese, etc) and serve with a green salad.

- You mentioned wraps; the problem I have with most wraps is that wrap-sized tortillas are enormously carby (I, too, am a T1 diabetic). But you CAN get low-carb wraps that are reasonably tasty, or you can use a couple fajita-sized tortillas (15 carb each) and make quesadillas or small wraps. I don't really have recipes, other than "take meat, cheese, lettuce, onion, mayo/mustard/etc and wrap it up."

- You can make easy pork filling for wraps or enchiladas or tacos with a pork shoulder, Just buy one (whatever size you like), chop it into 1" chunks, throw it in a pot, cover with water. If you want to be fancy, add in a dried chile or two and some garlic or use beer instead of water, but you really don't need it. Allow to simmer for a couple hours until the pork shreds easily. Pull the meat out of the liquid, and then boil down the liquid until it's syrupy. Shred the pork, mix back in with the reduced liquid.

When you want to eat it, take as much pork as you want for the recipe, and fry it up in a pan until the outside gets crispy. Use as a filling in enchiladas/wraps/tacos/etc. You DO want a sauce or salsa with this - this technique of doing the meat gives you a nice rich meaty flavor and some texture from the fry, but it doesn't bring heat or sauciness per se. I like it that way, I want my flavors distinct. A good sauce will complete the dish.

Freeze whatever pork you don't use in individual portions.

- Sheet-pan meals are all the rage right now, and easy to convert to small portions. Once you learn the basic technique for, say, cooking chicken thighs sheet-pan style, you can customize in a bazillion ways. Melissa Clark's Harissa Chicken is one I've made multiple times; it's really good, and you can easily make just a couple pieces of chicken if that's all you want.

That's what I have off the top of my head, if I think of more I'll come back!
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Old 01-05-2019, 08:43 AM
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I'm gonna definitely look into the Frontera products. Those look great. Thx!
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Old 01-05-2019, 08:54 AM
Tapiotar Tapiotar is offline
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
I am having a similar problem. Do you mind if I piggyback on your thread?

When I retired a couple of years ago, I was very excited about dinner plans. I told the Ukulele Lady we could have fascinating food EVERY night...cassoulet, seafood paella, Greek pastitsio, steamed lobsters, a standing rib roast, pheasant under glass, you name it!

She simultaneously decided to ramp up her Healthy Eating regimen. She wanted simple grilled fish or meat with a steamed vegetables or a salad, no starch. (I love potatoes, rice, and pasta. She will no longer eat white rice or white pasta. I refuse to eat the brown stuff, which my Asian and Italian friends confirm is only fit for pigs) I have been preparing two dinners every evening for the past year or two.

Lately she has been complaining that the food I serve her is not up to her standards...I’m not paying enough attention to preparing her meal... and has been fixing her own dinner when she gets home from work. Last night she had a beet salad with cucumbers, hard boiled egg, and a (light) sour cream dressing...tonight was broccoli rabe with butternut squash and chicken sausage.

My problem is that I don’t feel like making an elaborate dinner for myself alone. Tonight I had a bowl of homemade broccoli soup I defrosted from the freezer.

So, on my own, I could be eating whatever I want every night, and I am a good enough cook to whomp up anything. My problem is that I think “I don’t deserve to have veal Francesca with pasta aglio e olio ALL BY MYSELF” so I don’t do it.

Any brilliant ideas?
First, you DO deserve to be able to make and eat a wonderful dinner for yourself.

Second, expose your wife to some other ideas about what constitutes healthy eating. Certainly, lobsters and paella are healthy foods! There are many doctors now who say brown rice is bad for you. Gundry, for example, struck me as a quack at first, but a friend who has suffered years of digestive issues, everything prescribed by various doctors did not help, but then another md said she should try Gundry's diet, and voila! her issues healed in lighting speed. I'm not saying she should follow any fads, but just realize that fat is not as bad as she might think it is, and white rice once a week or so might not be bad for her at all.

Maybe once a week for a wonderful gourmet dinner for the both of you, and then she can go back to her austerity diet. And you can make special meals for yourself several days a week. If you make a larger amount, you can divide it into freezer portions, so that even when you don't feel like cooking for "just" yourself, you'll still have a lovely food option.
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Old 01-05-2019, 09:08 AM
Tapiotar Tapiotar is offline
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Originally Posted by Beckdawrek View Post
I need help. I'm bored to tears with what I eat. I need meal recommendations. Here's the rules: 1. No weird ingredients, I'm not gonna be able to get sea anemones or wagyu beef.
2. I'm T1 diabetic, so it has to conform to my diet or have a reasonable way around.
3. It's just me eating, so the giant roast beast ain't happening.
4.And I'm lazy as hell. Keep it kinda simple.

Any ideas?
Here are two easy ideas that fit into a diabetic's diet, and that can varied a great deal so you don't get bored.

Deviled eggs have an infinite number of variations. Besides the usual mayo-mustard-onion versions, you can mash the yolks with avocado. Or even store-bought guacamole, if you really don't feel like cooking. Or curry. Or add chopped bacon bits. Or whatever strikes your fancy. Chopped water chestnuts would give a nice crunch.

I recently stuffed mushrooms with chopped roasted artichoke hearts (you can use canned or frozen ones if roasted are not available), a little pancetta (or chopped bacon bits), onions, shredded parmesan, a small amount of panic bread crumbs, finely chopped almonds, a little white wine, a garlic hot pepper spice blend, because I love those things, but ymmv. Rubbed the mushroom caps with olive oil, stuffed them with the stuffing, topped them with more parmesan, and baked at 375 for half an hour. I loved them. But you can vary this according to your preferences any number of ways.

Mushrooms -- or eggs, for that matter -- or giant artichokes -- can be stuffed with shrimp, or crab, or sausage, as well as vegetables. You don't need a lot for the stuffing to give a lot of flavor.
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Old 01-05-2019, 09:19 AM
Athena Athena is offline
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Another one - tortilla pizza. Easy & really good.
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Old 01-05-2019, 09:34 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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Originally Posted by Smapti View Post
Toss about two pounds of beef stew meat into a crockpot. Pour in two packets of taco seasoning. Slice an onion and throw that in. Cut a tomato in quarters and throw that in two. Pop the stems off two jalapenos and toss them in, and a clove of peeled garlic as well. Cover it with water and set the heat to low. Let it cook for about 12 hours, drain it, and shred it with two forks.

Boom! Easy carne guisada. Put it in a taco, or a burrito, or an enchilada, or on top of nachos, or whatever else you fancy.
That sounds great. I'll be making beef barley soup today.

To the OP - I get bored at what I eat at work. I do have my own small refer in my office so I can mix it up a bit.

I've come up with a little bit of a different sandwich that is quite tasty and very easy - Toasted dark rye bread, sliced roast beef (just from the deli) cream cheese, sliced tomato.
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Old 01-05-2019, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Fear Itself View Post
Do you like Italian? Pasta Puttanesca is dead simple and tastes great.

2 tablespoons olive oil
5 garlic cloves
2 15oz cans diced tomatoes
1 can anchovie filets
15 pitted kalamata olives
2 tablespoons capers, drained
1 teaspoon dry basil
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flake
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
Pasta of choice
Boiling salted water
Grated parmesan cheese

Mince the fresh garlic. Add the olive oil to a large hot frying pan, then add the minced garlic. Saute briefly, do not brown. Add the canned tomatoes. Drain the anchovies and mince small; add to tomatoes and garlic. Slice the olives and add to the tomatoes. Add the capers to the tomatoes. Add the red pepper flake and black pepper. Reduce heat to a simmer. Add pasta to boiling water for 10-12 minutes, or until al dente.

Serve tomato sauce on top of drained pasta, top with grated parmesan cheese


.
Pasta isn't a great choice for people with diabetes. The whole wheat stuff is better but tastes so wheaty it overwhelms the sauce.
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Old 01-05-2019, 09:44 AM
WernhamHogg WernhamHogg is offline
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I do lots of soups that I make in advance, lean meats and salads, and street taco-type meals with corn tortillas. Ban Mi salad, sushi salad. You can find recipes all over so I won't post one here. I don't have diabetes but do have blood sugar issues, some people call it prediabetes, like whatch yourself bub.
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Old 01-05-2019, 09:57 AM
Athena Athena is offline
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Pasta isn't a great choice for people with diabetes. The whole wheat stuff is better but tastes so wheaty it overwhelms the sauce.
This T1 diabetic eats pasta, including Puttanesca, all the time. It's entirely possible for many diabetics to have a reasonable portion size of pasta and a side veggy and keep their blood sugar in line.

Note "reasonable portion size." That's really the key for me. It obviously depends on the person, but for me, I cook 6-8 ounces of dry pasta (depending on how hearty the sauce is) for Mr. Athena and I, he eats a little more than I do, and we end up with one serving left over of most pasta. And honestly, that's more than enough - I'm full and don't want any more to eat.

Last edited by Athena; 01-05-2019 at 09:57 AM.
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Old 01-05-2019, 10:19 AM
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I eat pasta regularly. Just gotta manage it. Like anything I eat. It's something you learn to live with as a T1.
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Old 01-05-2019, 10:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Kimstu View Post
This attitude is sadly not uncommon, and is part of the reason why elderly widowers and divorced men often have nutrition problems. Lack of cooking skills is a far bigger contributor, of course, but even men who can cook are often resistant to cooking "just for themselves".
I have the opposite problem. When I was single I became a pretty good cook if I do say so myself ('Though I never quite mastered sauces) to the point that when we were married, I did the cooking and DesertWife did the laundry.* I had my dozen easy staples of course, but tackled something more ambitious regularly.

However now I'm living with DesertRoomie who is pretty much meat and potatoes and can't stand leftovers so I stick to the basics in small batches and can't be assed in fixing something simple for her while I nosh on another thing more interesting for myself.

*We both thought we got the better part of the deal.
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Old 01-05-2019, 10:40 AM
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I love SkinnyTaste - it has a great variety of lighter foods and most of them do not taste "diet-y". We especially love the chicken Shwarma and I just made some outstanding broccoli cheese soup that freezes well. The set up of the site is very user friendly- you can look up recipes easily by ingredient, diet style, cooking implement (i.e slow cooker, skillet, air fryer, etc). The cookbooks she has are also very good.
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Old 01-05-2019, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Beckdawrek View Post
I need help. I'm bored to tears with what I eat. I need meal recommendations. Here's the rules: 1. No weird ingredients, I'm not gonna be able to get sea anemones or wagyu beef.
2. I'm T1 diabetic, so it has to conform to my diet or have a reasonable way around.
3. It's just me eating, so the giant roast beast ain't happening.
4.And I'm lazy as hell. Keep it kinda simple.

Any ideas?
"Garbage Casserole", or "Shepherd's Pie" or Leftover casserole. The scare quotes are because some will dispute the terminology.

You need a casserole dish. I have some that make just two servings, I also have a family size one as well.

You need an assortment of vegetables. You can obtain this by purchasing a bag of mixed frozen vegetables at your local supermarket. I usually use whatever is in the fridge.

You need a protein - browned ground beef/chicken/turkey. Vegetarian "crumbles" that might be Quorn or soy or a mix of stuff. Lentils. Whatever.

Gravy or sauce of some sort. I'm terrible at making gravy so I buy mine in a jar, just have to open it up and it's ready to go, no mixing required. It could be beef/chicken/whatever gravy. It could be tomato sauce. It could be alfredo sauce. Doesn't really matter.

Dump vegees and protein into casserole dish. I try for either a 2:1 vegee:protein or a 1:1 depending on my mood. Pour gravy/sauce on top and mix. Smoosh it all level in dish. Pop in oven for about 30-40 minutes at around 350 (although 325 or 375 will also work).

I usually whip up some instant potatoes to top the whole thing, but you're worried about carbs so I left that out. You could also use mashed sweet potato, or breadcrumbs, or crushed chips/crisps, in a thin layer. You could use shredded cheese. Or not.

At the table add condiments to taste - salt, pepper, hot sauce, whatever.

You may notice that this is not, actually, a set recipe. That's because I'll use whatever stuff I have on hand to make this. You can come up with whatever variation you like. Or mix it up - one week it's shredded rotisserie chicken leftovers in alfredo, after Thanksgiving it's shredded turkey with whatever vegee bits are left over in turkey gravy served with leftover cranberry relish. Ground chicken in cream sauce another time then ground beef mixed with whatever leftover peppers I have from tacos two nights previous and some onion. Back when I could still eat lentils I'd use them instead of ground beef sometimes.

The point is, there are no "weird ingredients". Buy the vegetables, protein, and sauce YOU like and that conform to your diet. You can make it as low carb as you like. You can use stuff that doesn't really require prep, just mixing in the dish and popping it in the oven.
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Old 01-05-2019, 11:03 AM
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Someone upthread mentioned cassoulet. This is a version that I invented while on an RV trip out of what was left in the fridge. It's actually pretty darn good. Rule of thumb is about 4 oz of each main ingredient for every person being served, so the recipe makes enough for about four servings.

Olive oil
1 large chicken breast, cut into bite-sized pieces
salt & pepper
1-2 Italian sausages, mild or hot or both, skinned (I prefer the latter)
3 cloves garlic, diced
1 15 oz. can white beans, undrained
1 15 oz can diced tomatoes, undrained
A few sprigs of fresh rosemary, stripped from the stalk

Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Brown it in the oil and remove. Add the broken up sausage to the pan and brown well. Return the chicken to the pan and add the garlic. Cook for about a minute, then add the beans, tomatoes and rosemary. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes or so. Add additional salt/pepper to taste.

I've learned to put the rosemary in either an herb bag or to create a makeshift bag out of cheesecloth, as not everyone likes the herb leaves in the dish.
  #27  
Old 01-05-2019, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by kunilou View Post
Julia Child once said, "garlic makes it French, wine makes it good."

Or maybe it was the other way around. Either way, the point is, use seasonings.
You're probably crediting Child with a similar quote made by Alice May Brock:

"Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian; wine and tarragon make it French. Sour cream makes it Russian; lemon and cinnamon make it Greek. Soy sauce makes it Chinese. Garlic makes it good.”
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Old 01-05-2019, 12:40 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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I do a similar thing with chicken and white beans: brown the bone-in meat in a little olive oil, add a sliced onion, a couple whole cloves of garlic,and two sprigs of rosemary. Pour in a big glug of vermouth and deglaze the pot. Add one or two cans of drained cannellini beans and a half cup of chicken broth and simmer for about an hour, until the chicken is tender and liquid has thickened. Remove rosemary sprigs, which should not have dropped leaves.

We never thought of calling it cassoulet...we call it “Greek chicken with white beans.”
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Old 01-05-2019, 12:44 PM
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Do you like to cook with spices? https://www.penzeys.com/ has an awesome collection of spice blends. I can eat pasta with veggies and olive oil several nights in a row, I just change up the spice blend I sprinkle over it.

I too have the cooking for one issue (but not the diabetic, I have the opposite problem) so I also use the spice blends to change up the flavor of the leftovers so I don't get bored.
  #30  
Old 01-05-2019, 12:46 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Athena:. Thank you for the tip; just ordered a copy.
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Old 01-05-2019, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
I do a similar thing with chicken and white beans: brown the bone-in meat in a little olive oil, add a sliced onion, a couple whole cloves of garlic,and two sprigs of rosemary. Pour in a big glug of vermouth and deglaze the pot. Add one or two cans of drained cannellini beans and a half cup of chicken broth and simmer for about an hour, until the chicken is tender and liquid has thickened. Remove rosemary sprigs, which should not have dropped leaves.

We never thought of calling it cassoulet...we call it “Greek chicken with white beans.”
Had to call it something for my cookbook document so I could find it again, and that's what came to mind. I get my rosemary off the bush out front, and it always sheds the leaves. Maybe if it dried a bit first, that wouldn't happen.
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Old 01-05-2019, 02:21 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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Every recipe that we inherited from the Ukulele Lady‘s Mother gets called “Greek” whatever....even if she got it from the back of a box of crackers. She was just that Greek.

Remember the Greek Chicago family from My Big Fat Greek Wedding? My mother-in-law was even Greeker than that.
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Last edited by Ukulele Ike; 01-05-2019 at 02:25 PM.
  #33  
Old 01-05-2019, 03:09 PM
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The really simple solution for both Beck and Ike is to get thee hence to the intarwebz and google "keto recipes." Keto cooking satisfies both the needs of diabetics and those who're into healthy eating (and it sounds like Mrs Ike is doing low carb/keto eating already.) Get good at keto cooking and all your food problems will basically be solved.

Here's my favorite item of the moment--keto friendly pecan/cherry muffins.

Cream 1 1/3 sticks of butter, 2 eggs and whatever is the 1 cup equivalent of non-sugar sweetener--I use Truvia brown sugar substitute that's sweetened with erythritol and just a smidgen of actual brown sugar but there are some good all erythritol brown sugar substitutes out there. Add a splash of vanilla extract. Beat in 3/4 cup of almond flour, 1/2-1 cup of roughly chopped pecans and however many dried cherries as makes you happy. Fill paper cups (you gotta use the paper cups, this is a sticky recipe!) about as full as you want them to be (recipe makes about a dozen standard sized muffins) because this is not a recipe that will rise much. Bake at 350-375 (depends on your oven, mine is slow) for about 20 minutes. Cool and nom. This is what I make when I'm craving ALL THE CARBS.
  #34  
Old 01-05-2019, 04:12 PM
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Taco Bell.
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Old 01-05-2019, 04:29 PM
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Ukulele Lady
If you like a Ukulele Lady, Ukulele Lady like-ah you.
If you like to linger where it's shady. Ukulele Lady lingers too.
If you kiss a Ukulele Lady and you promise ever to be true,
And she sees another Ukulele Lady fooling 'round with you,
Maybe she'll cry (an awful lot),
Maybe she'll sigh (but maybe not),
Maybe she'll find somebody else, by and by,
To sing to when it's cool and shady,
When it's really wiki-waki-woo,
If you like a Ukulele Lady, Ukulele Lady like-ah you.


Copyright 1925 by Gus Kahn and Richard A. Whiting, so it's two years from the Public Domain, so I only quoted the chorus.

Um, er, we were talking food, weren't we? Beck, what with you exiled thirty miles from nowhere, do you even have Aldi stores? I'm bored with food, too, so I eat a lot of Bag-O-Salad with little tomatoes. And sandwiches.
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Old 01-05-2019, 04:31 PM
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Taco Bell.
Before I had my gall bladder exorcised it was like the only thing I could eat, believe it or not.
  #37  
Old 01-05-2019, 04:41 PM
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No Aldi store. Wal-Mart is as good as it gets. Someone upthread said go to an Asian market. None of those closer than Little Rock. Not convenient to drive that far for spring rolls or something. I'm pretty much stuck with what I can concoct on my own.
ETA
Ukulele lady song makes me want spam.

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 01-05-2019 at 04:44 PM.
  #38  
Old 01-05-2019, 04:48 PM
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Taco Bell.
You kill me. ( taco bell would kill me faster)
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Old 01-05-2019, 05:30 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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dropzone:. Yeah, Eve dubbed th’ missus “Ukulele Lady” way back in the days when Eve was a thing around here. Who knew she listened to jug band music?

She also re-named my daughter and son “Little Pianola” and “Little Banjo.” They are now 28 and 23, respectively.
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Last edited by Ukulele Ike; 01-05-2019 at 05:35 PM.
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Old 01-05-2019, 06:10 PM
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Jeeze, I miss her. I don't even know if I have her current email. Probably doesn't remember me, anyway. Finding Eve and Opal here told me I might like the joint because I knew of them. And Bad Astronomer. The web was a smaller place in 2000.

Last edited by dropzone; 01-05-2019 at 06:12 PM.
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Old 01-05-2019, 10:29 PM
Ukulele Ike Ukulele Ike is offline
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So tonight I steamed some Asian greens with lemon and olive oil and broiled a pair of boneless chicken thighs for the Ukulele Lady. I had a takeout burrito because I couldn’t be arsed to go out in the cold and rain to buy myself fresh food to cook.

It was mediocre.
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Old 01-05-2019, 10:58 PM
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I made chicken quesadillas. I have my own picante sauce I made last summer. It was pretty good. I have to say my picante is pretty good this year.
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Old 01-06-2019, 05:11 AM
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Okay, Beck, you have to share your picante recipe.

As for something to offer, here's my "Godfather Pasta Sauce." It is based upon the recipe given in the Godfather movies, and very basic (meaning even a kitchen klutz like me can make it), but also simply brought together from everyday ingredients, available at any supermarket--and it is very tasty:

28 oz can diced tomatoes
Good dollop of olive oil
3 cloves of garlic, crushed
13 oz can tomato paste
1 teaspoon basil
1 teaspoon oregano
1 lb sausage meat
Good dollop of red wine (but not that good a dollop; you need some wine to drink with your meal)
1 tablespoon sugar (If you are diabetic, you can adjust this, of course.)

I use a slow cooker, so I just add everything but the meat and oil to that.

Then, I put a skillet over a medium heat and put the olive oil in the skillet. I cook the meat in the skillet until it is fully cooked, then drain it and add it to the slow cooker. Slow cook on "Low" for about three hours, and it will be ready anytime after that. I've used it with spaghetti and penne, and it works well with each, but I'm sure that it would go great with any pasta cooked al dente.

This makes more than one person can eat, but it will feed maybe four at a single sitting. However, it freezes well, and can be thawed and used subsequently.
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Old 01-06-2019, 09:31 AM
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Cheese Soufflé!

Make a bechamel, add in five egg yolks, then 250gr to 300gr of cheese (cheddar, whatever else, but key: a good blue) and spices (cayenne, maybe some oregano, black pepper, maybe a little salt (I've found I don't need it, the cheese is enough)), add croutons, whip up the whites and fold into the cheese sauce. Bake in oven at 220 C for 35 - 40 mins. Poof! A gigantic cheesy wonder.

Serve with a nice salad.
  #45  
Old 01-06-2019, 09:36 AM
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I think I'm having the same problem. The doctor is pretty sure I have celiac disease, probably with a side of lactose intolerance.
  #46  
Old 01-06-2019, 10:50 AM
CairoCarol CairoCarol is offline
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I refuse to eat the brown stuff, which my Asian and Italian friends confirm is only fit for pigs)
There is so much out there besides basic white and brown rice - black rice has always been popular in SE Asia, and red rice is gaining ground as people become more health conscious.

Both black and red rice are at least as nutritious as brown rice (black probably more so) and they are delicious. I am partial to this: https://www.amazon.com/Dragonfly-DFT...words=red+rice

Black rice is used in desserts in Indonesia and Thailand, but it's also delicious as part of a savory meal. Generally speaking, black rice tends to be sticky, so if you prefer very separate rice grains it may not appeal, even though it has a wonderful taste and texture.

For red rice, I use 1/3 to 1/2 cup red rice, with 2/3 to 1/2 cup jasmine rice so I have 1 cup rice in total, and 2 cups water in the rice cooker. That cooks up into a pretty sticky mess, but I'm sure the package will tell you how to get a dryer result if you prefer.
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Old 01-07-2019, 12:24 AM
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You kill me.
Nah. Mr. Wrecker didn't have the cash, and I don't fly.
  #48  
Old 01-07-2019, 12:50 AM
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Nah. Mr. Wrecker didn't have the cash, and I don't fly.
'Preciate your second thoughts there, friend. For whatever reason.
  #49  
Old 01-08-2019, 09:14 AM
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Dolores Reborn Dolores Reborn is offline
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Last night I made a quick stroganoff.

1 lb lean ground beef (or turkey)
1/2 lb mushrooms, sliced
1/2 onion, diced
2 tbs butter
2 tbs flour
1 can consomme soup
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup sour cream, or plain Greek yogurt
Chopped parsley for garnish
Cooked noodles or rice

Brown the meat, onions, and mushrooms. (I like to do the mushrooms separately, to get maximum browning, then add them back in.) In a separate pan, make the sauce. Melt the butter, then add flour to make a roux. Cook for a couple of minutes, then whisk in the consomme. Turn off heat and whisk in Dijon and sour cream. Salt and pepper to taste. (Watch out for the salt content in the consomme.) Pour over the meat mixture. Garnish with parsley.
  #50  
Old 01-08-2019, 10:00 AM
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Check out TheFresh20. Basically it is a menu/shopping list service, they provide you 5 dinner recipes and a shopping list. The ingredients focus on fresh/organic items. We have used them on-and-off for years when we are trying to eat more healthy and bring back variety. In one 12 month span, we never had the same dinner twice. They do have meal plans for singles so you're not shopping or cooking for 4.
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