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Old 11-07-2019, 05:04 PM
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Older Dopers (45-65): What do you recall about 1993-1997


Just wondering.

What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?

Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?

How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?

Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?

Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?

Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?

When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?

Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?

Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?

Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?

Just try to give me a snapshot of what the mid 90s seemed like for someone who was between their mid 20s and early/mid 40s in 1993-1997. Am curious to hear different perspectives on the whole era.

Last edited by Kennedy1960; 11-07-2019 at 05:05 PM.
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Old 11-07-2019, 05:08 PM
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My daughters were preschoolers then, and I was working two jobs so their mother could stay home with them.
I was too busy to observe any cultural zeitgeist beyond Barney.

Sorry
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Old 11-07-2019, 05:21 PM
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My daughters were preschoolers then, and I was working two jobs so their mother could stay home with them.
I was too busy to observe any cultural zeitgeist beyond Barney.

Sorry
I'm 62. My daughters were a bit older, the eldest from tween to entering adolescence, the youngest kindergartener to almost tween. I too was too busy with work and life to notice much if any of that stuff the OP lists. Didn't care about those things in the least.

I remember that dial up message boards were interesting, and Compuserve was starting to provide internet access, so I installed my own 2400 baud modem on my DOS-based computer. And I liked classic rock. And still do.

Last edited by Qadgop the Mercotan; 11-07-2019 at 05:22 PM.
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Old 11-07-2019, 05:22 PM
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My daughters were preschoolers then, and I was working two jobs so their mother could stay home with them.
I was too busy to observe any cultural zeitgeist beyond Barney.

Sorry
Yeah, I had a kid in 1991 and one in 1994. The rest is a blur. I do remember Bill Clinton got elected. Although I was living in Seattle, I never really noticed the grunge movement.
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Old 11-07-2019, 05:17 PM
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I was in my 20s in the 1990s, so I would seem to be in your sweet spot, but I don’t really understand the question or what you’re trying to understand. Just like today, people in the 1990s felt their experiences individually. Those of us who were young livesnit because we were young and our lives were stretching out ahead of us, we had few of any obligations, and fewer disappointments and failures.

We were there for the rise of grunge. I remember well when popular music was Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, etc. But we are the wrong people to ask when it “fell off.” It never fell off for us.

What do you mean by “multimedia”? We had broadcast and cable television, CNN, AM/FM radio and newspapers and magazines and books. We read frequent stories about the coming “information revolution,” but as a practical matter we had no idea what that meant so we ignored it.

The economy seems bleak under the George H W. Bush administration, but Clinton’s election, government surplus, improving economy felt like improvement. And we were starting to think that long-needed reforms like universal health care and the end of discrimination on the basis of sexual preference were in reach.

But then came 1994, a backlash of angry white men, a group whose impact had last been felt in the Nixon age was in power and the looked like the worst kind of unscrupulous, authoritarian, reactionary animals. We had no idea how bad it was going to get.

I don’t recall a ’70s revival as such.
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Old 11-08-2019, 10:31 AM
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What do you mean by “multimedia”? We had broadcast and cable television, CNN, AM/FM radio and newspapers and magazines and books. We read frequent stories about the coming “information revolution,” but as a practical matter we had no idea what that meant so we ignored it.
I was in library school working on my MLS 1991-92 and looking for my first library job in 1993. We librarians talked about hypertext and the World Wide Web quite a lot, but hadn't really seen it and I don't think we fully appreciated the potential or what it would mean to our professional lives.

August 1994, I was a NASA contractor in a documents library, and saw Mozilla for the first time. It was like looking at the future.

1995, when that contract ended and I was out of a job, I was someone who knew what html was and could write simple code in Notepad. It made me suddenly very popular and altered the course of my whole career; instead of spending the last 25 years as a document archivist, I became a website manager.
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Old 11-07-2019, 05:24 PM
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Well, I worked as a social worker for exactly that time frame (93-97) as an elder abuse case worker. Probably not the kind of answer you're seeking ...

I was pretty into Jane's Addiction, listened to Hole when I was in the mood, loved my Tori Amos albums, but still as often as not cued up older material, especially Zeppelin and Floyd, Kansas, Styx, Heart, Alan Parsons Project, etc.

I could not have hummed the Macarena for you at the time. It was a "thing" much like that "gangnam style" video was in more recent times but who the fuck cares?

O J Simpson trial monopolized everyone's attention on a scale similar to the death of Diana.

Cell phones were in use but were a status symbol of the important business folks. Flip phones and whatnot, not iPhones of course.

The death of Apple Computer was predicted almost weekly, by the way.
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Old 11-07-2019, 06:14 PM
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Cell phones were in use but were a status symbol of the important business folks.
This is 1993, not 1983. By 1993 I, a poor college student, had a Motorola Microtac, bought for $0.01 at Best Buy with a service contract. When I got it, there was a line wrapped around the store to buy them.
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Old 11-07-2019, 06:03 PM
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I worked in IT with mainframe computers. Then when PCs came around I adapted - something new to learn.
My radio station had been considered AOR (album oriented rock) and I guess it changed to "Classic Rock" but it was playing the same music as before.
Around that time I had a period where I listened to country music, which was close to the pop music that I had listened to.
For the Cranberries. I missed them back then. I discovered them later and listen to them now.
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Old 11-07-2019, 06:17 PM
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Really? I was in the telecoms business at the time and cell phones were definitely a very niche item in 1993.

Last edited by TheMightyAtlas; 11-07-2019 at 06:19 PM.
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Old 11-08-2019, 12:44 PM
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Really? I was in the telecoms business at the time and cell phones were definitely a very niche item in 1993.
Beepers were more of a 1993 thing.
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Old 11-07-2019, 06:08 PM
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Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
No? If there was, I don't remember anything that I would describe that way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?
In that time period, multimedia went from almost nonexistent to merely highly rudimentary. The percentage of people with PCs increased only around 15% from 1993 to 1997--the very best of the PCs strained to show 320x240 video at 15 frames per second, and most computers were not the very best. I'd argue that the "multimedia revolution didn't really kick in until around 2000 or so, when DVD became available and high-end computers were powerful enough to play them.

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Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
I was 21 to 25 in that time frame--if I ever even heard of the existence of any of those groups even once back then, I don't remember it. I've only ever heard of them mentioned on the internet well into the 2000's (well--the first two--Papa Roach is new to me) and have never heard music from any of them.

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Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
Well, we thought that we had won the Cold War and the Gulf War, so there is that.

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Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?
Not really.

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Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
With the same raw contempt that I've always had for all dance crazes--they are for people with room-temperature IQs.
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Old 11-07-2019, 06:26 PM
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I realize that "older" is relative, but I don't expect to call myself "older" at least until sometime in my 50's, thankyouverymuch.

Fuck, though, 1993 to 1997, I was young, but not young and stupid. These years correspond largely with my Army service (1989 to 1991 reserves, 1991 to 1996 regular).

Culturally, the biggest things were the use of CGI for popular media. I remember returning from my assignment in Germany in 1993 and seeing high quality computer graphics used in video nearly everywhere! I seem to recall Exxon and gas pumps dancing for some reason.

Another was the acceptance of alternative music when I got back to the USA. I was simply a freak when I left in 1991, and a norm in 1993. Kind of the same thing happened to me and craft brew when I went to China in 2011 and returned in 2016. Everyone loved IPA's too, all of a sudden.

The biggest thing, though, was the economy. Even today people will tell me that I'm crazy when I say that the military pays enlisted people absolute crap. I ETS's as an E4 in 1996 and doubled my total compensation with my first job. Granted, I was technical, not a grunt, and under a five year contract due to that. I wasn't a Clinton supporter, and I'm not a Democrat, but even to this day, I'll say that Clinton's been the best president since Reagan because he didn't do anything. Nothing at all (except for some of the bad stuff that lead to the global economic crisis many years after he left), and nothing at all is what I think a good president does.
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Old 11-07-2019, 06:39 PM
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Just wondering.

What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?
I had recently married (in LA, during the riots to be precise). I was working for a biotech startup and it was horrendous. The OJ Simpson murders and trials were a huge deal in the media. I would say that the 24-hour news cycle continued its climb into permanence. It started with the Gulf War, but it really cemented its place in our reality during the OJ period. It moved from something that reported the news to a beast that also drove the news.

Quote:
Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
I vaguely recall bell bottoms making a brief re-appearance, but other than that, no.

Quote:
How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?
Generally, I think things were optimistic. The economy was doing well. New tech was emerging and the prospect of what that meant drove consumer confidence. Pharmaceuticals, biotech, computers. Housing prices were starting to climb, but in retrospect they seem laughably low.

Today, the "Great Recession" is a recent memory and economic prosperity doesn't feel safe or possible. People starting out have huge student loan debt already, housing is expensive, everyone has either been through a job loss or been directly impacted by someone else who has. It feels a bit like waiting for the other shoe to drop. An economic downturn seems inevitable and feels like nemesis stalking us all. I imagine that people who lived through the Depression felt like this. Yes, times are good now, but they may not always be.

Quote:
Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
Overall, I would say yes. But. There were large socio-economic gaps between groups. Racial inequality and systemic persecution was endemic. The social safety net was under attack (welfare reform, for example). It felt like a time where change was possible and even happening, but the problems were real.

Quote:
Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?
Yes. Compromise between groups was expected, not despised. People of the Left and the Right had a lot more in common with each than they do now. Of course, this is also the time period when Bill Clinton was harassed with endless investigations and eventually impeached. It definitely wasn't a golden era for politics, but I would say that at least things got done.

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When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?
No clue. I remember the movement starting in the late 80s, and it was still extremely popular in the late 90s. I can see direct lines between grunge and many bands that are popular now. I would think of it more as evolving than leaving.

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Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
Yes. It was never a song I pumped up in the car, but as a wedding song it was fun.

Quote:
Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?
yes
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Old 11-07-2019, 06:42 PM
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Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
Yep. I recall it peaking sometime in the late 1990s, which is when That 70s Show started its pilot (continued for another few years).

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How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?
I think a lot of the bitter cynicism and divisiveness that we see now probably had its roots in the late 1980s and early 1990s. A lot of shock jock commentators we see now - Hannity, Limbaugh, etc - were alive and well then, but the had less of a platform.

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Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?
The first multimedia I remember back then were CD-ROM and DVDs. The internet started introducing the concept of video uploads, but it was nothing like what we see now.

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Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
In some ways, yes, it was more optimistic. We had won the Cold War, and we had relative peace and prosperity. Incomes grew at that time. People got angry about politics but because there were fewer outlets to express it, and because our exposure to political information and misinformation was limited due to the times of day that the new came on. Information was received, not exchanged on platforms (Usenet and Compuserve don't count).

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Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?
The seeds of what we're seeing now started back then, and I attribute it to two things: one is the 24-hour news cycle and proliferation of media outlets (even before social media); the other is the growth of income inequality, which has created an elite class of uber wealthy on one end and half the nation in financial insecurity on the other. That trend started in the late 1980s, and really took off in the 1990s.

But the real disaster was the Great Recession of 2008. I don't think the country has recovered psychologically from that disaster. And I'm not sure we ever will.

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When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?

Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
The death of Kurt Kobain probably killed grunge with it - that's how I see it. Like disco it probably would have died anyway. I confess to listening to Limp Bizkit.

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What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?
Probably things they listened to in college, which would have been music from the early to mid 1960s.

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Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
Mild amusement.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?
I wouldn't say they were huge; I'm thinking that Stone Temple Pilots and Pearl Jam were bigger.

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Just try to give me a snapshot of what the mid 90s seemed like for someone who was between their mid 20s and early/mid 40s in 1993-1997. Am curious to hear different perspectives on the whole era.
I think if you were an ordinary average guy in your 20s and 30s, you were pretty optimistic that you'd have work and that the country was getting wealthier. The internet and its related technologies made the possibilities seem endless. I remember air travel without having to go through a ton of security.

9/11/01 changed all that.
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Old 11-07-2019, 06:47 PM
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None of the OP stuff was on my radar. Still love the music of my youth.

What's the multi-media revolution? The internet, you mean? Same as any other innovation; a wee bit of marveling, and then it's not new anymore.
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Old 11-08-2019, 02:10 PM
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None of the OP stuff was on my radar. Still love the music of my youth.

What's the multi-media revolution? The internet, you mean? Same as any other innovation; a wee bit of marveling, and then it's not new anymore.
The multimedia revolution, stuff like PCs becoming mainstream, Laserdisks, the new consoles that claimed to be as powerful as computers, the game Myst, etc.
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Old 11-07-2019, 06:48 PM
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I was working full time then, and looking back, I realize that I only got headline news, and not much of it. So I can understand why people who work full time, and only get news from Fox, can have no clue what a disaster Trump is.
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Old 11-07-2019, 07:03 PM
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Music? Who had time to listen to music?

I had kids 14 and 9 at the beginning of the period, was working at Bell Labs as AT&T fell apart, and spent some time taking the older kid to shoots and auditions.
Then I moved to California, where we bought a house which seemed absurdly expensive at the time but turned out to be a bargain. Then I worked 12 hour days at Intel for a doomed project and left.
I was a Republican back then but politics didn't seem very important, but the boom was just beginning in Silicon Valley which was fun.
I don't know if there was a '70s revival - I didn't much like the '70s culture when I lived through it the first time.
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Old 11-07-2019, 07:05 PM
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I turned 20 in 1994, and I was working at a bakery then and listening to Ace of Base on the radio while I made bread.

Clinton was the first election I voted in. Having lived under a Republican since I was six, I was elated by his victory. That turned sour pretty fast, though.

The culture war was alive and well. Pat Buchanan spoke at the 1992 Republican Convention and talked about how the homosexuals wanted to ruin America (spoiler: paraphrase, but not by much). There was a strong sense that being a homophobe was natural and acceptable, far more than today. In 1992, it became illegal for a man in North Carolina to rape his wife, and that was controversial. A bill to legalize oral sex failed, because of the difficulty cops would have in prosecuting homosexuals. In 1994, Gingrich's Contract On America swept Republicans into legislative power, and they fucked up the country good.

The War on Crime was in full tilt. Locking someone up for life for stealing $20 worth of pizza was considered acceptable by large swaths of the country. Clinton's reaching-across-the-aisle meant welfare reform, kicking lots of people off of assistance.

We knew about the Greenhouse Effect then, but nobody in power gave a shit.

I paid $200 to get 8 Mb of RAM for my computer, and it was a bargain.

I sent my first email in 1994, to my sister in France. It took me awhile to believe that she'd really get the message right away, and that it wouldn't cost me anything. I wrote some nonlinear fiction on the web for a college class, using the new "hyperlink" technology, and thought I was cutting-edge for it.

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Old 11-07-2019, 08:20 PM
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The War on Crime was in full tilt. Locking someone up for life for stealing $20 worth of pizza was considered acceptable by large swaths of the country. Clinton's reaching-across-the-aisle meant welfare reform, kicking lots of people off of assistance.
Yep. In the 1990s, it was all about locking people up.
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Old 11-08-2019, 12:48 PM
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Yep. In the 1990s, it was all about locking people up.
The first wave of the crack epidemic as I recall. All of a sudden young white girls were heading to the hood to get a fix and it drove the media and law enforcement bonkers. Oh, and of course they had beepers!

Last edited by Si Amigo; 11-08-2019 at 12:48 PM.
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Old 11-07-2019, 07:21 PM
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In 1993 we definitely were making fun of assholes with cellphones, which we often still thought of as “car phones.”
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Old 11-07-2019, 07:27 PM
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1993-97 is actually somewhat a blur for me. My BIL was on the downhill side of mental illness and lost the fight in 94. My wife went from being a big sister to an only child and just dealing with things (emotional and family) ---- well, we didn't really come up for air much. I want to say we went egocentric in a way but that isn't quite it; more dealing with the realization that what we expected as our lives and the reality of what would be became more clear to us.

I do remember getting into computers more than I had been and my place in the economy being very good but I remember a lot of dissatisfaction among our friends. I also remember us coming to terms with all the "time saving devices" in our lives; that even with microwave ovens and everything else that we didn't seem to have the spare time and free time we had in say the 80s. The older we got (even to today) the more crowded and scheduled each day became and for friends our age as well. Gone were the days of "got anything on for tonight" and welcome to the years of "got any free time next week".
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Old 11-07-2019, 07:36 PM
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We were still reeling from the Bush reagan years, There was a Gulf war, rust belt cities were not hip, malls and Arena's were still economic drivers.

heroin chic and flannel was in.
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Old 11-07-2019, 07:46 PM
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That was the heyday of Seinfeld. Watch a few episodes and you'll get a good feel for the Urban Nineties.
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Old 11-07-2019, 08:43 PM
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I was born in '65, so I was 28 in '93, and just married. Selected answers to your questions:

> Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?

Not that I recall.

> Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?

Are you referring to online stuff with this? At the beginning of the time frame you're talking about, while there were a number of online services available (Compuserve, America Online, Prodigy, etc.), as well as things like Usenet and bulletin board services, the Web was in its infancy, and going online, for anything, was still a niche sort of thing.

By the mid '90s, people were getting online in larger numbers, but very few people had broadband, so it was slow dial-up, and "going online" was more about email, a little bit of web surfing, and browsing forums (like the original Straight Dope forum on AOL ); things like watching videos online were still way off, and most people still didn't trust using their credit cards for online shopping.

And, for people who were a bit older, like many Boomers were at that time, it was all a little confusing at first. There's a now-infamous clip from the Today show, from 1994, with Bryant Gumbel and Katie Couric being completely clueless about the internet, and email addresses.

> Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?

Sort of? We'd come out of a recession in the early '90s, and I remember, in '90 or '91, analysts talking about the '90s being a decade of austerity and restraint, after the excesses of the '80s. But, then, the US won a fast war in the Middle East, that made a lot of Americans very happy, and the economy boomed. I also recall reading articles in the mid '90s by economists who suggested that recessions might be a thing of the past. (They were wrong, of course.)

> Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?

Up until '94, maybe. (See comments from earlier posters about Newt Gingrich.)

When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?

> What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?

Most of them, if they were still listening to music, were probably listening to the music they had listened to when they were 20, which means they were listening to stuff from the '70s or before.

> Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?

Cheesy and was *way* overplayed for a short time, especially at wedding receptions.

> Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?

In the US, I'd say "reasonably popular," but definitely not "huge." Their first four albums all made the top 20 in the US, but they only had two songs make the top 40 ("Linger" and "Free to Decide").

Last edited by kenobi 65; 11-07-2019 at 08:46 PM.
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Old 11-08-2019, 01:04 PM
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> Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?

In the US, I'd say "reasonably popular," but definitely not "huge." Their first four albums all made the top 20 in the US, but they only had two songs make the top 40 ("Linger" and "Free to Decide").
Edited to say I'm not sure if I understand record charts

Last edited by SpeedwayRyan; 11-08-2019 at 01:06 PM.
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Old 11-08-2019, 01:10 PM
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Edited to say I'm not sure if I understand record charts
I was using the band's discography entry on Wikipedia. That chart shows that "Zombie" did not make it onto the US Billboard Top 100 chart, though it was a top 20 hit in a number of European countries. (Then again, I'm presuming that the Wikipedia entry is accurate.)

The Wikipedia entry for the song itself lists that it ranked in the top 40 on four different Billboard sub-charts, but not on their main "Hot 100" chart.

Last edited by kenobi 65; 11-08-2019 at 01:15 PM.
  #30  
Old 11-07-2019, 08:46 PM
Wesley Clark is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?
high school

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
Bell bottoms made a bit of a comeback. I remember asking my teacher and they said about 20 years after people stop being teenagers, they get nostalgic and want to bring back things from their youth. Its happening now with our generation wanting to bring back nintendo and other 90s things. [/QUOTE]

How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?[/QUOTE]

the war on terrorism hadn't started. Back then the fringe GOP members were still the fringe (now they're the mainstream). The debt was starting to be paid off.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?
Multimedia revolution was more late 90s. THats when people started burning their own CDs at home, that was a huge thing at first. You could make your own CDs with songs you downloaded via P2P. MP3 players didn't really exist until the mid aughts.

I remember we went from burning your own CDs, to burning CDs that stored the music as MP3s (so you could store more), to MP3 players, to cell phones to played MP3s you downloaded, to cell phones that streamed MP3s. It took about 20 years but it was a lot of advances.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
I think so. We weren't as dysfunctional. Climate change wasn't as scary. Poltiics wasn't as divided. Terrorism wasn't as big of a threat. White nationalism, fascism and racism were still fringe movements. Nobody really cared about North Korean nukes.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?
Yeah.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?
Don't remember


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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
Fondly

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?
Define huge. They were on the radio and were a popular band, but I wouldn't call them huge. Huge bands of the 90s were bands like nirvana, smashing pumpkins, pearl jam, etc.
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Last edited by Wesley Clark; 11-07-2019 at 08:48 PM.
  #31  
Old 11-07-2019, 11:28 PM
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I began hearing about "MP3" files a year after the timeframe you specified. For awhile I could not figure out what all the shouting was about—who the fuck cares what specific format your audio file is in? Then the light dawned: these suckers are 1/10th the size of AIFF or WAV files! And they still sound good! Napster was in its heyday in 1998. I downloaded all the albums I had previously owned on vinyl or cassette. First, that is. I admit I went on to pirate some I had never paid for. I later on made some post hoc purchases out of respect for the musicians, but that came later.

I had an external CD burner as of 1997, before most people did. And I had an audio line in from my choice of either a cassette player or a turntable and could digitize my friends' albums and give them their tracks on CDROM. I was popular for this. I made CD case album covers and printed labels for the CDROMs. (Later I bought white printable blanks and printed directly on the CDs, but that also came later on down the pike).

I had SoundEdit 16 in a house of musicians. It means I could stick a microphone, or a pair, in the room and record the musicians live and then edit the wave forms in SoundEdit. I knew what it meant but they kind of didn't. They didn't get it, and dismissed it as the same thing as MIDI files.

Last edited by AHunter3; 11-07-2019 at 11:29 PM.
  #32  
Old 11-08-2019, 12:38 AM
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I was a freshly minted MBA working for investment banks (UBS, Lehman Bros and Nikko Securities) in Tokyo and Hong Kong. Single for about half of that time period.

1970's revival? Are you fucking kidding me? The 70's were bland and only saving grace maybe was being the impetus for the punk/American Hardcore scene. Ain't nobody that grew up in the 70's was nostalgic for that decade.

"Multimedia Revolution" was CD's. Pretty huge in that they were portable vs 12" records.

Dunno about optimistic. There was a recession in 1991 that wasn't helped by the Iraqi invasion. As a newly minted MBA, it was a bleak time without many job opportunities.

Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically? There was still the 4th estate, and didn't have the interwebs propaganda masquerading as alternative facts.

Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc? Not sure. I was in my 30's
What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to? Not sure, people above 40 were old in 1995.

Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror? Fondly. Remember many an enjoyable late night in Hong Kong clubs where the house band played Macarena.

Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995? Musta been because even I heard of them at the time living in Hong Kong.

1997 was the Asian crisis. It sucked and impacted the global economy. You probably don't even know what I'm talking about....
  #33  
Old 11-08-2019, 02:59 AM
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I'm afraid my age disqualifies me from OP's survey.

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Well, we thought that we had won the Cold War and the Gulf War, so there is that.
It was the End of History, no less. The Final Triumph of Liberal Democracy. Those savvy prognostications would now seem like a Monty Python sketch.

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... 1997 was the Asian crisis. It sucked and impacted the global economy. You probably don't even know what I'm talking about....
I think the Asian crisis barely registered as a blip on New York stock markets. I remember being at the U.S. Consulate a few weeks before the baht was floated and hearing an American plead for help — all his savings were in Thai-baht bank accounts. I suggested buying gold, but he wasn't interested in that solution. The American consular official was even less helpful: "My salary is paid in American dollars. Ha ha ha!"
  #34  
Old 11-08-2019, 03:26 AM
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As I look back on the 90's, I remember one of the few good financial decisions I made during that decade was investing 100% of my 401K in the stock market.
  #35  
Old 11-08-2019, 04:11 AM
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I was in my 20s, so I'll play. Although mine is from a British perspective, so my cultural touchpoints will be different.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Just wondering.

What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?
Two words: Cool Britannia. After a sluggish economy that was just starting to recover in 93, to the height of pure positive joy at the election of Tony Blair's Labour government in 97, the mid 90s were pretty special.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
God no. It was all about Britpop.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?
Can't speak for the US, but the UK felt a tonne more optimistic than in today's Brexit world.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?
Not sure multimedia was a word which ever crossed our lips. We had mobile phones, and texting, had just about got email. The internet was just weird and useless.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
Yes, it really was.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
Never heard of these guys. We listened to more British stuff in those days - Pulp, Suede, Blur, Oasis. No idea what people in their 40s liked.


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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
It was as awful then as it is now.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?
They were huge when I was still in College in '93.
  #36  
Old 11-08-2019, 06:27 AM
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"Older", eh? Why you little...fuck. JK. Well, this one time back in '94 I needed a new heel for my shoe, so, I decided to go to Morganville, which is what they called Shelbyville in those days. So I tied an onion to my belt....

Born right smack in the middle of 1967. Enlisted in the Army 1992-1996. Honestly? I was in a pretty terrible and asocial place from about 1981 until 1995 or so, so most of the OP points don't ring any bells. Seems like in about 1994 the USA lost its conservative party to whatever it is the Republicans have become and it's been nonstop backbiting and decline ever since. You may want to look into Newt Gingrich if you're interested in what happened. I did like the Cranberries though, but I can't listen to them today because they take me right back in time. Then parenthood happened in 1996 and I became too busy with work and babies to stay relevant.

I think overall you can look at today and back then as being a pair of Thomas Kinkaid paintings: Technically not the same, but not strikingly different, either.
  #37  
Old 11-08-2019, 10:00 AM
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I'm too young to weigh in according to the OP, but I have fond memories of those years (I was 10-15) and I definitely remember the 70s nostalgia. Partly because my mom graduated high school in 1979, so she kept the dream of the 70s alive my whole childhood, but it was a thing in pop culture too. Dazed and Confused was one of my favorite movies back then. The Smashing Pumpkins song 1979 was a huge hit. I actually just watched that Woody Harrelson/Randy Quaid movie Kingpin again last night, from 1996, and the soundtrack was about 50/50 90s alternative and 70s classics. Quentin Tarantino was huge, and his movies were full of 70s music.

The Cranberries as I recall were big, but not huge. Second tier fame, I guess. They were on the radio and most people knew of them, but they were nowhere near as big as Pearl Jam or Counting Crows. Grunge started to die when Kurt Cobain died, but its reverberations were felt throughout the decade. Bush burst on the world in 94 and they were solidly grunge, and non-grunge bands like Counting Crows and Weezer both released very grungy second albums in 95-96. REM put out Monster in 94, and I got it for Christmas as REM was one of my favorite bands, and it was very grunge-inspired compared to their earlier work. In fact, while grunge as the edgy, underground, countercultural movement was dying by 1994 when Kurt died, grunge as solid mainstream bandwagon everyone had to jump on was at its peak in the 94-96 time frame.

I didn't have a computer until 1999 but some of my friends did, and I remember playing Oregon Trail and getting on AOL chatrooms during these years. To me it all seemed like a novelty, and I didn't quite understand why everybody was saying this stuff was going to change the world.

Oh, and you didn't mention it, but the biggest cultural influence on kids my age during that entire era was Beavis and Butthead. It's hard to explain how freaking hilarious and influential it was to a 12 year old in 1994. I had a teacher who would lecture us on how horrible the show was, and she would call them "Beavis and his brother" so as not to speak Butthead's name out loud. That made the show all the more hilarious.
  #38  
Old 11-08-2019, 10:04 AM
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Just wondering.

...What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?

...
Grand Funk Railroad LPs.
  #39  
Old 11-08-2019, 11:14 AM
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Ok; I'll bite.

Quote:

What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?
I had gotten back from deployment for Desert Storm (my National Guard unit was activated) and finished undergrad in December of 1992. The subsequent 3 years or so was finishing a grad school program which I absolutely loved. I was very socially and academically engaged and had a blast. Those years were some of the best of my life.

Quote:
Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
Not in my experience

Quote:
How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?
Most of the folks I ran with felt things were pretty good.

Quote:
Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?
I didn't discover the internet until 1999; my TV was square; and getting a CD player in my Jeep was the tops. I was not aware of any "Multimedia Revolution"

Quote:
Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
For me it was.

Quote:
Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?
Most here would disagree, but I was (am) a conservative Republican, so this was like the golden age.

Quote:
When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?
I was completely unaware of "grunge" or "post-grunge." Still pretty much am.

Quote:
Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
I've never heard of these three bands. All I listened to at the time was country and '50s oldies. At parties, fellow students would of course have more contemporary CDs to play, but it was just background noise to me.

Quote:
Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
Well, I'd heard of it. A line dance, right? But I can't say I'm familiar with the dance or the tune. (I actually did my share of line dancing and two-stepping at the local big-huge country venue. That was a HUGE thing at that time, at least in my neck of the woods. I had the hat, the boots, the rope belt, etc.)

Quote:
Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?
I've never heard of the Cranberries.
  #40  
Old 11-08-2019, 01:16 PM
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Quote:
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Just try to give me a snapshot of what the mid 90s seemed like for someone who was between their mid 20s and early/mid 40s in 1993-1997. Am curious to hear different perspectives on the whole era.
I'm a bit out of your age group at 68, but that still puts me at my early/mid 40's in 93-97. So I'll bite, for what that's worth, which isn't much:

>>>Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?

I've no idea. Certainly not with me.

>>>How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?

General feeling? I'm not sure there is, or was, any such thing.

>>>Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?

It's my impression that few Boomers were paying any attention to it; but my impression might be wrong. IME most people still didn't have computers, though it had gotten more common to be using them at work. I'm pretty sure it was during this stretch of time when the town planning board put out a survey asking, among other things, what the area needed and somebody responded that we needed an ISP; and none of us had more than the vaguest notion of what they were talking about.

>>>Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?

More optimistic than now, I think; but I doubt that any time was as optimistic (or as pessimistic) as it looks in hindsight.

>>>Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?

In some ways, yes. In others, possibly not. I think there was somewhat less splitting off into groups that were only talking within themselves, but also I think there were more voices that weren't being heard.

>>>When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?

I have no idea either when it fell off or when it started. (Well, some idea, I suppose, as I wouldn't have placed it in say 1930.)

>>>Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?

I don't know.

>>>What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?

I was listening to Celtic, when I could find it; to what is now I think called "classic rock" though I can't remember when it started to be called that; and some range of other things. Can't speak to anybody else.

>>>Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?

Neither. I vaguely recall people talking about it, and my equally vague impression is that the whole thing was silly, but also that it was often intended that way.

>>>Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?

I have no idea. Not with me, anyway.

Last edited by thorny locust; 11-08-2019 at 01:18 PM. Reason: correct a tense
  #41  
Old 11-08-2019, 02:23 PM
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The reason I ask is because I'm interested in history, mainly social history. The time in which one is coming up, but can barely remember is interesting. I can remember moments from say 1995 and 1996 very well and easily, but being only 5 say, I had no context for the events surrounding them.

It almost seems like a distant, alien time to me - still an analog age of VCRs, housephones with long cords, cassettes and video games having cartridges. I sometimes will watch news reports from this time period and everything seems so much more rectangular, hair is so much bigger (even though it wasn't the 80s anymore), everything just seems much less...streamlined than today, in terms of look, feel, design. Women had these layered haircuts on the news and such I don't see anymore. There weren't beards everywhere as there is today.

I remember using a cell phone for the first time in the summer of 1996, and it was one my grandparents had loaned my dad as we left for a trip from NY to Virginia. The service cut out just as we passed over the Verrazano Bridge. My parents were both born in 1954 and my dad in this period seemed to be really into things - collecting a set of porcelain dolls, buying art pieces, etc. He was a massive fan of the Cranberries in 1995/1996. He began joining a bunch of enviromental and animal societies - Audobon, NYZT and quite a few others. He got a subscription to The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction and he got me a subscription to something like a kid's version of National Geographic. We got our first PC in 1995 and parents seemed really into it. It seemed for me as a kid like a gateway into another world.

Everyone on a May 1995 home movie is commenting on my mother wearing "the teenage look" as my dad put it - she's wearing one of those classic mid 90s floral dresses. My sisters and their boyfriends are variously joking she looked 13 again, etc. I remember one of the first days of first grade the teacher had a question for us about the upcoming election between Bill Clinton and Bob Dole - the question being who was running against Bill Clinton. I remember my dad coaching me beforehand, as if he had an idea what we were gonna be asked, but I don't remember what he said. I remember raising my hand and saying "Bill Clinton!" and the teacher (a literally demented woman upwards of 80) said "Wrong!" and I said, "That's what my dad told me...." "Well then your father's wrong too!"

Renting movies every week or so from the local video store was a delight and fun.

As far as the 70s influence, I mean like, there's pictures of my sister who was born in 1980 in 1995 and 1996 and she's wearing very 70s kinda clothes - floral shirts, things like that. I remember a 20-something friend of my other sister selling my dad and I this bracelet made out of beads and there just seemed this vibe in the air that in hindsight seemed very much 70s.


He had a secondary corded phone which as a kid I thought looked futuristic.

It's just I wish I knew what people thought of this era - and a little bit after - as it evolved. Like, I remember my parents watched Howard Stern's brief TV show and I was mortified - I somehow KNEW, at like 7, that it was trashy and didn't like that my parents were into it. I'd love to be able to go back to 1998 and hear my parents thoughts on Clinton proceedings or even our now current President. Or to go back to say, 1994 and hear my parents, sisters' and their husbands' perspectives on the times and what they felt 20 years from then would be like.

It'd be interesting to go back to say, 1995 and see various' peoples reactions if I told them that in 22 years, Donald Trump would be President of the US and if I described the current political/social scene. Especially since I'm from NYC.

Last edited by Kennedy1960; 11-08-2019 at 02:27 PM.
  #42  
Old 11-08-2019, 03:05 PM
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I'd just crawled into my 40s; moved to a hilltop territorial-style house that survived Loma Prieta; acquired new dogs and cat; built monstrous multi-PC and synthesizer systems; watched some MTV; endured two "100-year floods" in three months; moderated conspiracy fora; got more seriously into mandolin; and still tent-camped. The house overflowed with books, records, analog electronics, and neighbors BBQing abalone as needed.

What do I remember of that period a quarter-century ago? As little as possible.
  #43  
Old 11-08-2019, 03:13 PM
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I remember around this period my dad always bitching that the TV was the "idiot box." He didn't want me watching much TV as such. He seemed a lot more passionate about things back then...But I guess age takes that away? He named the Bronco he bought in 1995 after the song "Touch of Grey" and used to sing "Rock N' Roll Hootchie Koo" as me and him drove (A lot of my childhood was just my dad and me since my mother worked full time and he part time). I never wore a seat belt - not until I was around 10 or so. When he'd made wide turns he'd hum the Batman theme.

Yet his father who was in his 60s used to love watching TV and playing video games with us kids back at the same time- he had his own Nintendo console and we used to take turns playing Duck Hunt with him. And didn't speak nearly as much.

Last edited by Kennedy1960; 11-08-2019 at 03:16 PM.
  #44  
Old 11-08-2019, 04:04 PM
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Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
I remember there was a resurgence of Swing and Ska after Punk ebbed. Anything having to do with Disco I avoided like the plague.

How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?
The whackos were more fringe and not in actual positions of power. The old school racists were starting to die out, but the new racism was in its infancy.

Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?
Not really. It was more of an underground devotion that required some work on our part. We were having to upgrade computers and modems pretty frequently, and to get multiple phone lines to do both voice and data. Nowadays it's too easy and automated.

Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
Ebbs and flows. Technology gave us new stuff to play with, even before 3D modeling.

Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?
Slightly. The Clintons were also polarizing, but not as bad as Trump. The Democrats were in charge and eventually voters got sick of them.

When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?
There's still elements of Grunge in today's music, I think. Just as there's still elements of Disco, Folk, Latin, and just about any other music genre.

Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
I remember those artists were frequently played on the radio, then their presence eventually faded. They've been resurfacing in classic rock stations.

What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?
The same music that classic rock stations still play today.

Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
Not nearly as much horror as Disco.

Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?
I don't recall them selling out arenas and stadiums. They had that one hit with Zombie, but they weren't exactly Pearl Jam.
  #45  
Old 11-08-2019, 04:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knowed Out View Post
Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
I remember there was a resurgence of Swing and Ska after Punk ebbed. Anything having to do with Disco I avoided like the plague.

How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?
The whackos were more fringe and not in actual positions of power. The old school racists were starting to die out, but the new racism was in its infancy.

Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?
Not really. It was more of an underground devotion that required some work on our part. We were having to upgrade computers and modems pretty frequently, and to get multiple phone lines to do both voice and data. Nowadays it's too easy and automated.

Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
Ebbs and flows. Technology gave us new stuff to play with, even before 3D modeling.

Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?
Slightly. The Clintons were also polarizing, but not as bad as Trump. The Democrats were in charge and eventually voters got sick of them.

When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?
There's still elements of Grunge in today's music, I think. Just as there's still elements of Disco, Folk, Latin, and just about any other music genre.

Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
I remember those artists were frequently played on the radio, then their presence eventually faded. They've been resurfacing in classic rock stations.

What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?
The same music that classic rock stations still play today.

Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
Not nearly as much horror as Disco.

Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?
I don't recall them selling out arenas and stadiums. They had that one hit with Zombie, but they weren't exactly Pearl Jam.
I'll never understand your generations' utter hatred of Disco. I love rock music - The Stones are probably my favorite group of all time and Jumpin' Jack Flash is probably my favorite song of all time - but if I was alive in 1975 or 1976 you can bet your sweet ass I'd be at Studio 54 as much as I could be. My father was born in 1954 as I mentioned. Got himself cracked in the head with a beer bottle for wearing a big "DISCO SUCKS" pin circa 1978.
  #46  
Old 11-08-2019, 07:42 PM
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I'll never understand your generations' utter hatred of Disco.
I was never cool--it was all just radio to me. I suspect a synthetic marketing war dreamed up by Megavinyl to make both genres relevant and, thus, stimulate buzz and sales all around. Or maybe it was stoners vs. cokeheads? I'm just glad Punk came along as the neglected red-headed stepchild.
  #47  
Old 11-08-2019, 08:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
I'll never understand your generations' utter hatred of Disco. I love rock music - The Stones are probably my favorite group of all time and Jumpin' Jack Flash is probably my favorite song of all time - but if I was alive in 1975 or 1976 you can bet your sweet ass I'd be at Studio 54 as much as I could be. My father was born in 1954 as I mentioned. Got himself cracked in the head with a beer bottle for wearing a big "DISCO SUCKS" pin circa 1978.
I wasn't speaking for my whole generation when I said I hated disco. I had several friends who were into it. They dressed in polyester, platform shoes, and wore the coke spoon chains. Then their tastes got better. :-) "Miss You" by the Stones is probably what you're thinking of. Even though they did it disco style, the Stones aren't considered a disco band. They used a lot of styles, including Delta Blues, Soul, R&B, etc.
  #48  
Old 11-08-2019, 04:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Just wondering.

What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?

Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
Not really. The Black Crowes tried to bring bell bottoms back. Didn't take.

Quote:
Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
No. Most times seem pessimistic when you're in it, and optimistic later.

Quote:
When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?
Grunge died very quickly; it was quite a transient thing. I'd say by 1997 or 1998. The 90s had three major musical things going on, if you were in the USA; grunge, hip hop, and female singer-songwriters doing mostly soft rock. Only hip hop lasted.

Quote:
Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?
Define "huge." I mean, they were a famous band; "huge" suggests a level of dominance they didn't have. Nirvana was huge. Hootie and the Blowfish were huge. The Cranberries had maybe two big charting hits.

What is big then is not necessarily what lasts. In 1994, Ace of Base had three of the top ten songs in the USA, according to Billboard. Those songs were EVERYWHERE. They were an international sensation, just bigger than big. They had one more hit in 1996, and within a few years were forgotten, and are now little more than a trivia question. The Grammy winner for Best New Artist for 1994 was a band called All-4-One, who had several huge hits and are today even more forgotten than Ace of Base. Maybe the single most memorable song of the year was by Lisa Loeb, the one with the glasses, whose career foundered in five or six years and she mostly switched to making children's music, which in fairness she's been very successful at but you won't be hearing "The Disappointing Pancake" at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony next year. You aren't hearing much from Boys II Men, Tony Braxton, Big Mountain, or Enigma anymore, either, but they were all damn big in 1994. 1994 was not a fluke either; every year is like that.

(I'm not trying to confuse quality with longetivity; Lisa Loeb's big hit is legitimately great. Tracy Chapman only had two hits but she was FANTASTIC. Worse acts have lasted longer.)

Don't go by what people REMEMBER. People don't remember things right at all. Look at the contemporaneous evidence.
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Last edited by RickJay; 11-08-2019 at 04:35 PM.
  #49  
Old 11-08-2019, 04:31 PM
Little Nemo is offline
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What do you remember of the mid 90s in general - the period say starting January 1993 to the end of 1997?
I was in my thirties so I remember it pretty well.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Was there a strong 70s revival vibe? If so, when?
I don't think so. I feel seventies nostalgia hits its peak a decade later.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
How did the general feeling in the US differ from today?
I think there was a strong sense of optimism. The Cold War was over and the world seemed to be moving in the direction of peace and democracy. And we had what appeared to be a growing economy.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Was the "Multimedia Revolution" actually a huge thing, especially amongst Boomers?
I'm not familiar with that term so I certainly don't see it as a huge thing. If you're talking about the development of personal computers and online communication that hit the mainstream in the nineties. It was a time when a lot of people were buying their first computer. If you're talking about stuff like home video, that started back in the eighties.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Was it really as optimistic a time as it seems in hindsight?
In my opinion, yes. People generally felt the world had been getting better and would continue to do so.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Would you say the US was healthier in some ways politically?
Yes.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
When did Grunge/Post Grunge/etc fall off?

Did people in their early/mid 20s in the 90s like Korn, Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach, etc?
What music did people above 40 in say 1995 listen to?
I'm probably not the best judge of what was cool during that period. I was at least ten years too old to be in the middle of pop culture.

Around 1990, there was a recognized genre of alternative rock. It was seen as something distinct from mainstream rock and you had performers in alternative rock stations who never appeared on mainstream rock stations. Nirvana was the big cross over; they became famous enough that mainstream rock stations played their music and when the door was opened, other performers followed and alternative rock became the mainstream. What had been mainstream rock became a new form of classic rock.

The country genre was strong in the nineties and a lot of people who were looking for an alternative to rock listened to country.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Do you recall the Macarena fondly or with horror?
I saw it as a fad.

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Originally Posted by Kennedy1960 View Post
Were the Cranberries a huge band in 1994-1995?
They were mid-level. Somebody you had heard of but not a top tier act.
  #50  
Old 11-08-2019, 04:50 PM
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Good grief. 1993 was like 15 minutes ago.
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