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Old 10-31-2019, 07:38 PM
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Khadaji's Whatcha Reading Thread - November 2019 edition


November... only two more months left of our teens! Yes, yes, I know I am nearly 55 but I'm holding onto this thought with BOTH hands

So right now I am reading:

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann. I've been quite eager to read this...

I am about a third of the way through Twisted Ones by T. Kingfisher aka Ursula Vernon. It's not October without Ursula creepiness...

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Khadaji was one of the earlier members of SDMB, and he was well-known as a kindly person who always had something encouraging to say, particularly in the self improvement threads. He was also a voracious, omnivorous reader, who started these threads way back in the Stone Age of 2013. Consequently when he suddenly and quite unexpectedly passed away, we decided to rename this thread in his honor and to keep his memory, if not his ghost, alive.
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Old 10-31-2019, 07:41 PM
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Last month's thread: Save some candy for me!
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Old 11-01-2019, 09:51 AM
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I just finished The Twisted Ones and have The Seventh Bride on hold at the library.
And now for something completely different: The Way I Heard It, by Mike Rowe, of Dirty Jobs fame. So, this is already a pretty decent book just by virtue of having two pictures of Mike Rowe on the dust jacket. Other than that, it's all right. He's doing the kind of "the rest of the story" things that Paul Harvey did.
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Old 11-01-2019, 10:52 AM
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The Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story, Douglas Preston This is the true story of the search for what Hondurans refer to as Ciudad Blanca, or the White City, which, as legend has it, is a vast and advanced ancient city buried somewhere in the Mosquitia region of the country. This region is typically difficult to access, as is much of Central America: dense jungle, extremely rugged country, some of the more venomous and aggressive snakes in the world (fer de lance), and the usual nasty insects and diseases.

My favorite sort of book.
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Old 11-02-2019, 12:01 AM
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I recently finished two books: Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel, a post-global-pandemic novel, and Robert B. Parker's The Widening Gyre, in which the Boston PI Spenser is hired by a conservative U.S. Senate candidate who's being blackmailed. Both are good but not great, I'd say. Next up: a re-read of The Robots of Dawn, one of my favorite Isaac Asimov sf novels.
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Old 11-03-2019, 01:40 AM
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Finished The Wanted, by Robert Crais. Modern-day LA detective noir in the manner of Michael Connelly. As mentioned in last month's thread, I had never heard of Crais before despite his having authored more than 20 novels. The book was given to me by my neighbor, a fellow Connelly fan, who told me there's even some overlap. He said Elvis Cole, Crais' detective protagonist, will sometimes mention things like "the cop who lives over the hill" in reference to Connelly's Harry Bosch. I did not see that in this book but did note that Cole lives on "a narrow road off Woodrow Wilson Drive," Woodrow Wilson being the street Bosch lives on. In this book, a teenage burglary gang steals from the wrong house and find themselves being hunted by hitmen. I liked the novel well enough that I went and bought his first two, published in the late 1980s.

But before I start on those, I did pick up Michael Connelly's newest, The Night Fire, and will read that first.
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Old 11-03-2019, 07:13 AM
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Siam Sam: Thanks for reminding me the Connelly is available!

I hope you keep enjoying Crais. The Monkey's Raincoat is one of my favorites.
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Old 11-03-2019, 05:07 PM
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Finished Bite Club by Laurien Berenson. Meh.

Now I'm reading Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet, by Andrew Blum.
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Old 11-03-2019, 06:32 PM
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Siam Sam: Thanks for reminding me the Connelly is available!

I hope you keep enjoying Crais. The Monkey's Raincoat is one of my favorites.
The new Connelly came out last week, I think. I picked it up on Friday. As for Crais, The Monkey's Raincoat is one of the ones I picked up, his first, published in 1987.
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Old 11-04-2019, 02:12 PM
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Just finished In the Woods by Tana French. It's about a young boy who's the only survivor of the abduction of three children in 1984 (a case that was never solved), and who becomes a murder unit detective himself 20 years later. His first big assignment is another child murder that has just taken place in the same woods he was abducted from. The book is mostly about the extreme mental and emotional duress the situation imposes on the detective, and his slow breakdown during the investigation.

I still don't know exactly how I feel about the book. On the good side, French is an extremely skilled writer, and the conclusion to one of the book's mysteries is very well done and has an excellent ironic twist. On the other hand, the book is very long-winded and slow-paced, and I found myself hating the protagonist about halfway in. Also, in a very strange turn of events, the other mystery is never solved at all. That kinda seems like a huge flaw to me.
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Old 11-04-2019, 11:13 PM
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I still don't know exactly how I feel about the book. On the good side, French is an extremely skilled writer, and the conclusion to one of the book's mysteries is very well done and has an excellent ironic twist. On the other hand, the book is very long-winded and slow-paced, and I found myself hating the protagonist about halfway in. Also, in a very strange turn of events, the other mystery is never solved at all. That kinda seems like a huge flaw to me.
Pretty much sums up my feelings as well. I had the "kller" pegged early on.... And why on Earth waste the words and time on a mystery you never intended to solve?
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Old 11-07-2019, 02:29 PM
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Started today on Unfollow: a memoir of loving and leaving the Westboro Baptist Church, by Megan Phelps-Roper.
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Old 11-07-2019, 04:51 PM
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Finished Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet, by Andrew Blum, which was very interesting. It's about the physical workings of the Internet. Published in 2012, it may be somewhat outdated.

Now I'm reading Valiant Dust, which is the first book in the Breaker of Empires series by Richard Baker.
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Old 11-09-2019, 09:10 PM
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I have the sense that a lot of folks on this board don't much like Malcolm Gladwell. I've enjoyed most of the books of his I've read, some of them very much. But I recently finished his latest book, Talking to Strangers, and was underwhelmed to say the least.

The book deals, at least in theory, with what happens when strangers interact, and how and why things go haywire when they do. Examples: Sandra Bland's traffic stop, Chamberlain misjudging Hitler's intentions, double agents spying for Cuba in the US intelligence forces, how Bernie Madoff got away with it.

Gladwell remains an engaging and capable writer, and I always appreciate his interest in bringing disparate threads together to create a narrative. But this time it just doesn't work very well. A lot of what he's trying to argue ("we tend to assume the best in other people") seems obvious to the point of triviality--and he spends a lot of time arguing it anyway. He seems to my mind at least to be curiously uninterested in issues of race and gender and class in talking about why interactions between strangers may go south. The stories are also too disconnected to make for a compelling and cohesive storyline. And these are not always interactions among strangers by any means...but that's a story for another day.

Disappointing, I thought.

Now beginning Nevada Barr's novel What Rose Forgot, about a woman with dementia. I love Barr's work when she's at her best, and she often is, but it's also true that she wrote two utter stinkers of books a while back, so who knows. So far so okay.

Last edited by Ulf the Unwashed; 11-09-2019 at 09:11 PM.
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Old 11-10-2019, 08:06 AM
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I haven't kept up with Nevada Barr's latest work so tell me, Ulf, which ones I should think of skipping. And please review What Rose Forgot when you finish.
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Old 11-10-2019, 03:16 PM
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Finished The Night Fire, by Michael Connelly. "Retired" Los Angeles police detective Harry Bosch once again teams up with current detective Renee Ballard to investigate a cold case left behind by Bosch's mentor. At the same time, they each have their own other cases to work. Another great read from a true master. Connelly just gets better and better. The only bad thing is now I have to wait another full year for the next one.

Next up, it's back to Robert Crais and more LA noir with private detectives Elvis Cole and Joe Pike in The Monkey's Raincoat, Crais' first novel, published in 1987. I felt a twinge of nostalgia reading the blurbs of praise on the back cover, as one was from my beloved Tony Hillerman, who was still alive at the time.
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Old 11-10-2019, 04:28 PM
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I finished City in the Middle of the Night, by Charlie Jane Anders. I started off liking it better than her debut, but by the end I felt the same frustration. The plot revolved around two women with different philosophical takes, and the love/hate relationship between them. The problem is that Anders puts her thumb on the scale, such that one of them is clearly better than the other, and the bad one isn't written nearly as plausibly as she should have been. I doubt I'll read a third book by her.

I also finished Endling: the Last as a read-aloud to my first-grader. It's pretty good, a fantasy starring a critter that's the last of her species, a cross between a dog, a human, and a flying squirrel. Solid entry in the kid's fantasy genre, but nothing groundbreaking.

Now I'm reading Black Leopard, Red Wolf. A couple years ago I tried reading A Brief History of Seven Killings, but an early, brutal scene in 20th-century Jamaica was just too much for me, and I put it down. This book is every bit as brutal, but the fact that it's fantasy makes it easier for me to stomach, and I'm really enjoying it. James is a gorgeous writer.
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Old 11-10-2019, 04:54 PM
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Finished Valiant Dust, which is the first book in the Breaker of Empires series by Richard Baker. Meh.

Now I'm reading the second book in that series, Restless Lightning. (My book club's discussing both of them next month.)
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Old 11-10-2019, 07:36 PM
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I haven't kept up with Nevada Barr's latest work so tell me, Ulf, which ones I should think of skipping. And please review What Rose Forgot when you finish.
Re: What Rose Forgot: Will do! assuming I don't, you know, forget

Of Barr's books, I really disliked Burn, which is an Anna Pigeon novel taking place in an urban area (New Orleans). The backdrop is a child sex ring run by some very powerful people. My issue was not the grim subject matter, but that there were too many places where I just couldn't suspend my disbelief about the whole situation--especially when Anna and her sidekick save the kids almost singlehandedly. Just rubbed me the wrong way.

I also disliked 13 1/2, which is a standalone novel following two brothers Then and Now. Then, when they were boys, one of them was convicted of murdering their parents and sister. Now, they are adults. There's a romance and a mystery and a sense of foreboding...and the plot relies on two twists, the first of which I saw coming from very early on and the second of which seemed completely implausible and out of left field. Highly unsatisfying.

Of course, if you've read either of these and liked them, more power to you!

Barr's more recent books have been better, though! And I have high hopes for this one. Thanks for asking.
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Old 11-10-2019, 08:21 PM
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I think the last one I read was Flashback so I haven't read either of those. Thanks for the info. I see there are several more Anna Pigeon books since 2003 so maybe I will give some of them a try. (I'll probably skip Burn though!)
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Old 11-11-2019, 01:52 PM
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The Body: A Guide For Occupants - Bill Bryson An interesting look at what we're made of. Also a very sobering discourse on resistant bacteria and the failure of the drug companies to engage in research for new antibiotics. We're all doomed.
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Old 11-12-2019, 02:37 PM
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I have the sense that a lot of folks on this board don't much like Malcolm Gladwell. I've enjoyed most of the books of his I've read, some of them very much. But I recently finished his latest book, Talking to Strangers, and was underwhelmed to say the least.

The book deals, at least in theory, with what happens when strangers interact, and how and why things go haywire when they do. Examples: Sandra Bland's traffic stop, Chamberlain misjudging Hitler's intentions, double agents spying for Cuba in the US intelligence forces, how Bernie Madoff got away with it.

Gladwell remains an engaging and capable writer, and I always appreciate his interest in bringing disparate threads together to create a narrative. But this time it just doesn't work very well. A lot of what he's trying to argue ("we tend to assume the best in other people") seems obvious to the point of triviality--and he spends a lot of time arguing it anyway. He seems to my mind at least to be curiously uninterested in issues of race and gender and class in talking about why interactions between strangers may go south. The stories are also too disconnected to make for a compelling and cohesive storyline. And these are not always interactions among strangers by any means...but that's a story for another day.

Disappointing, I thought.
Thanks for going into detail on this. I've had my eye on that book because it sounded like an interesting premise, but the only Gladwell book was a long time ago so I don't have a good idea of what to expect from him.

A couple weeks ago I finished reading Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst by Robert M. Sapolsky. That book was a treasure, and I first found out about it on this forum! He explores a lot of things that influence human behavior, including hormones, genetics, culture ... I forget everything, but it was a whole bunch of different things. Two ideas in particular jumped out at me.

One was the chapter on Us Vs. Them thinking, and how that's a biological construct. The author mentions several times in the book that the book was inspired by the concept of war. That he wanted to understand human behavior, to understand how horrible things like genocide happen, and also how we might be able to use our natural inclinations to become better as a species. And since it's generally considered pretty impolite to point out that someone is obviously of a different race or social class, it was interesting to read that this tendency to notice differences and group ourselves according to like characteristics is something innate to our biology. And then it talks about working within these biological constructs to change our behavior. For example, the author talks about the Christmas truce during World War 1, and how even though the soldiers were fighting on opposing sides, they were in such close quarters that they were able to see the similarities and humanity in one another.

The other one was the chapter on genetics. This was a pretty technical chapter, and I didn't follow the whole conversation, but I will try my best to explain the key thing that stood out to me: you have certain traits in your DNA. But your DNA does not only include traits, it also includes genetic markers that are turned on by different environmental variables. The author used the analogy of a plant. Say a plant has some genetic variant that allows it to grow 1.5 times taller than the average plant of its species. Well, put a plant with that genetic variant in the rainforest, and it might grow way more than 1.5 times taller because it has such great access to light and water and nutrients. Put that same plant in the desert, and it might be a stubby little thing in spite of its genetics, because it doesn't have the environment to stimulate growth. The author than acknowledged that this was a weird analogy, because not many plants can grow in both the desert and the rainforest, they're typically unique to certain types of environmental conditions. But then the author points out that humans are reared in a huge variety of geographic locations, and, perhaps even more importantly, a huge variety of economic circumstances. The book cited one study that showed a correlation between a certain genotype and your IQ -- provided you were raised in an affluent household. Anyways, this chapter got longer than I intended, but the point is that even those traits that are determined by your genes are often still influenced by your environment, since your environment affects your gene expression. I found that concept fascinating.

The other book I recently finished is Petals in the Wind by V.C. Andrews, the sequel to Flowers in the Attic. It was a disappointment. I know some people like to call that whole series garbage, but the first book in the series had me hooked. Since I knew the second book in the series was wildly popular as well, I was hoping it'd be a strong second offering, but it wasn't. So I think I'm done with the series now.

Last edited by The wind of my soul; 11-12-2019 at 02:37 PM.
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Old 11-12-2019, 04:51 PM
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Finished Restless Lightning by Richard Baker. Not bad, and definitely better than the first book in the series, Valiant Dust.

Now I'm reading The Hundred Penny Box, by Sharon Bell Mathis.
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Old 11-13-2019, 12:57 AM
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I just finished The Robots of Dawn, previously one of my favorite Isaac Asimov sf novels, and it just didn't hold up all that well. Poor characterization and plodding dialogue; several times the supposedly-brilliant detective hero just seemed like a clumsy fool.

Next up: There There by Tommy Orange, a novel about Native Americans in contemporary society, wrestling with prejudice, crime and unwanted assimilation.

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...A couple weeks ago I finished reading Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst by Robert M. Sapolsky. That book was a treasure, and I first found out about it on this forum! He explores a lot of things that influence human behavior, including hormones, genetics, culture ....
You might enjoy Yuval Harari's Sapiens, about how humanity came to dominate the globe. Anthropology and longterm history at the gallop, and very interesting.
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Old 11-13-2019, 01:15 AM
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I just finished The Robots of Dawn, previously one of my favorite Isaac Asimov sf novels, and it just didn't hold up all that well. Poor characterization and plodding dialogue; several times the supposedly-brilliant detective hero just seemed like a clumsy fool.

.
I enjoyed it in my 20s but reading it again at 47ish, my take away impression was that it was just an excuse for Asimov to talk about sex for 300 or so pages...
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Old 11-13-2019, 08:59 AM
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I enjoyed it in my 20s but reading it again at 47ish, my take away impression was that it was just an excuse for Asimov to talk about sex for 300 or so pages...
It certainly has more sex (although still not all that much) than any of his previous books - or his later ones, as I recall. Asimov in his 1950s sf would certainly never write about masturbation, orgasm or human-robot sex.
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Old 11-13-2019, 10:01 AM
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You might enjoy Yuval Harari's Sapiens, about how humanity came to dominate the globe. Anthropology and longterm history at the gallop, and very interesting.
Thanks!
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Old 11-13-2019, 01:57 PM
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You're welcome! Let me know how you like it.

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...Next up: There There by Tommy Orange, a novel about Native Americans in contemporary society, wrestling with prejudice, crime and unwanted assimilation....
Gave up on this after my customary 50 pages. Depressing and not interestingly-enough written to make it worthwhile.

I've now started an audiobook of Joe Haldeman's military sf classic The Forever War, about a centuries-long interstellar war in which Earth's soldiers become more and more disconnected from human society as they're away for decades at a time due to time dilation. Good stuff.
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Old 11-13-2019, 02:12 PM
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Gave up on this after my customary 50 pages. Depressing and not interestingly-enough written to make it worthwhile.
Oh if we're also mentioning the books in those category, I attempted The Couple Next Door earlier in the week. Gave up after 50 pages because the writing style irritated me. The author deliberately describes the scene without actually showing the main characters' thoughts, because we as readers are supposed to be suspicious of them and wonder what they're hiding. But it makes for an unfortunate writing style where I just can't bring myself to care about the story or the outcome.
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Old 11-13-2019, 03:36 PM
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Finished The Hundred Penny Box, by Sharon Bell Mathis, which was okay.

Now I'm reading School Days, edited by Clancy Strock. It's a collection of people's anecdotes of going to school (or teaching school) in the first half of the twentieth century. I'm enjoying it a lot.
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Old 11-13-2019, 03:38 PM
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Oh if we're also mentioning the books in [that] category....
Sure - this thread isn't just for books you absolutely loved.
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Old 11-13-2019, 10:43 PM
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Sure - this thread isn't just for books you absolutely loved.
Absolutely! We appreciate fair warnings...
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Old 11-14-2019, 04:50 AM
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At the moment, I'm reading both fiction and non-fiction.

Fiction: Saul Bellow's Humboldt's Gift. Just began a couple of days back when I heard Philip Roth described Bellow as a "heavy, heavy drinker" in an interview, and I thought I just had to read some of his works. Strangely enough, it matters to me whether or not a writer uses. As for the book, it is terrific so far. Reminds me--just a little--of The Great Gatsby.
Non-Fiction: Gwartney, Stroup, et al's Macroeconomics: Private and Public Choice. It deals with questions such as privatization and nationalization, and also asks if certain services and entitlements should be provided by the state only. Also focuses on positive economics, a section I am yet to begin.
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Old 11-14-2019, 08:13 AM
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The Body: A Guide For Occupants - Bill Bryson An interesting look at what we're made of. Also a very sobering discourse on resistant bacteria and the failure of the drug companies to engage in research for new antibiotics. We're all doomed.
I'm currently fiddling with this one. I won't finish it, not because it isn't interesting, but I've read enough non-fiction lately and I just want to hear a story.

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The other book I recently finished is Petals in the Wind by V.C. Andrews, the sequel to Flowers in the Attic. It was a disappointment. I know some people like to call that whole series garbage, but the first book in the series had me hooked. Since I knew the second book in the series was wildly popular as well, I was hoping it'd be a strong second offering, but it wasn't. So I think I'm done with the series now.
Oh yes, that series is just awful. I should know, I read it over and over as a teenager. I hear there's a prequel out now...
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Old 11-14-2019, 10:09 PM
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Recently finished:
If I Were You, The Swoop! and "The Military Invasion of America" -- all by P G Wodehouse. In The Swoop! (published in 1909), Britain is invaded by nine countries -- not a coalition; it was pure coincidence that all nine decided to invade on the same day. "The Military Invasion of America", published in 1915, is a much shorter rewrite in which Germany and Japan invade the US. The Boy Scouts save the day in both versions.

Now reading:
The Day of Their Return -- SF, by Poul Anderson; part of his future history.

Coming soon:
The Girl Who Heard Dragons -- short stories (mainly, I think, SF) by Anne McCaffrey.
Daybreak Zero -- post-apocalyptic SF, by John Barnes.
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Old 11-14-2019, 11:53 PM
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Finished Nevada Barr's What Rose Forgot. Not part of the Anna Pigeon series, and not in the same vein at all. Rose Dennis, a recent widow in her sixties, has been committed to a memory care unit because of early- and sudden-onset dementia. Turns out that she may be getting drugged in a way that imitates the features of dementia. Rose has just enough awareness to stop taking her meds and breaks out of the MCU. With the help of her granddaughter, her sister the computer hacker, a friendly Lyft driver, a hit man, and a few other miscellaneous people, Rose tries to figure out what's going on before the bad guys, whoever they are, show up again.

On the whole, I liked it. Rose certainly has a good deal of grit, and it's interesting to see her questioning her sanity, which she does at intervals throughout the book--if you're in a memory care facility doesn't that mean you must be demented? The book's well written and gets quite gripping toward the end. There are also some very funny parts, mostly involving the hit man. On the other hand, for someone who can barely walk at the beginning of the book, Rose is way too physically active (not to say acrobatic); and the granddaughter is entirely too good, smart, and compassionate for age 13. Not a great novel by any means, but a fun potato chip book.
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Old 11-15-2019, 08:54 AM
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Finished School Days, edited by Clancy Strock, which was a lot of fun.

Now I'm reading a science fiction novel, Autonomous, by Annalee Newitz, which is excellent so far.
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Old 11-15-2019, 02:57 PM
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I survived my reading of The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins. A very well-written book, but it just wasn't for me. The plot is extremely depressing and none of the characters are sympathetic. In fact, they're all raging sociopaths except for the protagonist, who's a miserable pathetic drunk.

I never should have read this directly after finishing In the Woods.
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Old 11-15-2019, 10:27 PM
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I survived my reading of The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins. A very well-written book, but it just wasn't for me. The plot is extremely depressing and none of the characters are sympathetic. In fact, they're all raging sociopaths except for the protagonist, who's a miserable pathetic drunk.

I never should have read this directly after finishing In the Woods.
You did better than I did; I gave up on that girl on that train after about 75 pages. I didn't think it was all that well written either, but maybe that's because I got too depressed by it.
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Old 11-16-2019, 01:16 PM
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The Body: A Guide For Occupants - Bill Bryson An interesting look at what we're made of. Also a very sobering discourse on resistant bacteria and the failure of the drug companies to engage in research for new antibiotics. We're all doomed.
I recently read "A Walk in the Woods" about Bill Bryson and his friend Katz's attempt to walk the Appalachian Trail. It was funny, interesting, and sent me to the dictionary more times that any other book I've read recently. I swear there seems to be at least two words in there that Bryson may have just made up!

I''l check later and see if I still have my notes on that book.
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  #41  
Old 11-16-2019, 01:18 PM
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Now I'm reading Black Leopard, Red Wolf. A couple years ago I tried reading A Brief History of Seven Killings, but an early, brutal scene in 20th-century Jamaica was just too much for me, and I put it down. This book is every bit as brutal, but the fact that it's fantasy makes it easier for me to stomach, and I'm really enjoying it. James is a gorgeous writer.
Finished this one a little after midnight. Damn, this is a good book, but it leaves no horror unturned. There's a Neil Gaiman blurb on the back where he says he can't wait for the next installation (although the book ends satisfyingly, it certainly leaves the door open for a series). I can't agree: I'm happy to wait a few years before diving back into this horrorshow world.
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Old 11-16-2019, 01:46 PM
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I've been on a binge after not reading any books for far too long.

I just finished "River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey" by Candice Millard.

This book is about T. Roosevelt, his son Kermit, and Brazilian explorer Candido Rondon's and others harrowing exploration of a large, uncharted tributary of the Amazon River now called Rio Roosevelt. A bit of bad planning, brutal conditions, and the continued loss of supplies and men led to the near death of Roosevelt himself, and it seems he never recovered his health fully after this trip. After returning, some even doubted the truth of this trip but everything was well documented.

Great story, well written!
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Old Yesterday, 03:45 PM
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Oops! I somehow manged to put the following post in last month's thread by mistake :

Finished The Monkey's Raincoat, the first of a string of novels by Robert Crais featuring private detectives Elvis Cole and Joe Pike. Murder, kidnapping and drug deals in 1987 Los Angeles. Very good. The title is a reference to the 17th-century Japanese poet Matsuo Basho, who wrote: "Winter downpour; even the monkey needs a raincoat." The novel won the 1988 Anthony Award for "Best Paperback Original" at Bouchercon XIX and the 1988 Mystery Readers International Macavity Award for "Best First Novel" and has since been named one of the 100 Favorite Mysteries of the Century by the Independent Mystery Booksellers Association. A little strange though in that I read Crais' 2017 novel first and then this 1987 one -- written 30 years apart, mind you -- and he has the same cat in both. Definitely the same cat, an old street cat he lets live with him and which had once been shot in the head with a .22. This is one tough cat.

Next up is Crais' second novel, Stalking the Angel.
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Last edited by Siam Sam; Yesterday at 03:46 PM.
  #44  
Old Yesterday, 03:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Ca3799 View Post
I recently read "A Walk in the Woods" about Bill Bryson and his friend Katz's attempt to walk the Appalachian Trail. It was funny, interesting, and sent me to the dictionary more times that any other book I've read recently. I swear there seems to be at least two words in there that Bryson may have just made up!

I''l check later and see if I still have my notes on that book.
I've read several of his books, including that one. They're all engaging, if not always accurate.
  #45  
Old Today, 08:54 AM
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Started today on A House of Ghosts, by W.C. Ryan. A group of people gather at an island mansion during the first world war to hold a seance. Then somebody gets murdered. Oh HELL YEAH.
  #46  
Old Today, 09:13 AM
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I finished Joe Haldeman's The Forever War, a great military sf novel about a millennia-long interstellar conflict. It holds up pretty well and has a perfect ending.

Just started Jack Vance's 1968 sf novel City of the Chasch, which so far isn't really wowing me, but I'll keep at it.

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I've been on a binge after not reading any books for far too long.

I just finished "River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey" by Candice Millard....
TR fan that I am, I was underwhelmed by River of Doubt. I think Edmund Morris tells the story much more engagingly in Colonel Roosevelt, the last of his TR biographical trilogy.
  #47  
Old Today, 09:15 AM
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I must've gone to the wrong preschool - I don't ever remember reading these: https://society6.com/product/siniste..._content=lower
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