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  #851  
Old 11-04-2019, 12:49 PM
Wrenching Spanners is offline
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Originally Posted by Ryan_Liam View Post
You've got it wrong, Farage was never going to be in a pact with Boris, the offer was always designed to fail.
Farage’s offer to cooperate with the Tories was designed to be a win-win arrangement. If the Tories agreed not to contest strong Leave voting seats in traditional Labour areas, then it would improve the Brexit Party’s chances of getting those seats. All they would have to give up would be to not run in traditional Tory strongholds – seats they’re probably not going to win anyway. But since his offer was turned down, now Farage can state that leaving the EU is his first priority, and if the Tories were serious about leaving, they would have shown it by working with the Brexit Party. Basically it’s an indirect appeal to hard-Leave voters who may be leaning towards Johnson. I don’t think it will gain the Brexit Party any seats, but it will probably get them a few extra votes. Not to mention it got Farage’s face on the TV, which was his other motive.
  #852  
Old 11-04-2019, 01:29 PM
DrDeth is offline
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Are most of the parties pro-brexit?
  #853  
Old 11-04-2019, 02:00 PM
PatrickLondon is offline
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Depends how you want to slice it.

LibDems, Greens, and the Scottish and Welsh Nationalists are anti-Brexit. The Northern Ireland DUP are pro-Brexit, although Northern Ireland as a whole voted to remain (the other Northern Ireland parties aren't in parliament). Of the two main parties, Conservatives are mostly either pro-Brexit or, if at heart remainers, feel they have to go along with the referendum result. Labour is mostly pro-remain but is trying to offer a compromise position, because so many of their heartland constituencies voted to leave.
  #854  
Old 11-04-2019, 02:14 PM
Steophan is online now
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Most Labour MPs may be pro-Remain, but their campaign promise seems to be they will negotiate a new deal then ask the public to approve it, with the intention of leaving.

I say "seems to be" because, as always with Corbyn, it's vague and subject to change on a daily basis.
  #855  
Old 11-04-2019, 02:17 PM
DrDeth is offline
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Originally Posted by PatrickLondon View Post
Depends how you want to slice it.

LibDems, Greens, and the Scottish and Welsh Nationalists are anti-Brexit. The Northern Ireland DUP are pro-Brexit, although Northern Ireland as a whole voted to remain (the other Northern Ireland parties aren't in parliament). Of the two main parties, Conservatives are mostly either pro-Brexit or, if at heart remainers, feel they have to go along with the referendum result. Labour is mostly pro-remain but is trying to offer a compromise position, because so many of their heartland constituencies voted to leave.
Right, there's really only two parties in terms of numbers. So, even the Liberal party is sorta-kinda pro-Brexit? But only 51% voted Brexit.
  #856  
Old 11-04-2019, 02:41 PM
Steophan is online now
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So, even the Liberal party is sorta-kinda pro-Brexit?
No, the Lib Dems are by far the strongest Remain party in England. Labour (not a Liberal party) are effectively trying to be both at once, as they fear a lot of their long-term voters will vote Brexit party, and because there's a significant split between factions.
  #857  
Old 11-04-2019, 02:44 PM
DrDeth is offline
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No, the Lib Dems are by far the strongest Remain party in England. Labour (not a Liberal party) are effectively trying to be both at once, as they fear a lot of their long-term voters will vote Brexit party, and because there's a significant split between factions.
Right, I meant Labor.

But again, we have the two biggest parties, who represent like 80%, kowtowing to a 51% Brexit vote, which now might even be less than 50%.
  #858  
Old 11-04-2019, 02:51 PM
Steophan is online now
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80% of seats, yes, but more like 60% of the vote. Labour, especially, will struggle if they lose votes to another party as they are already polling well below the Tories. And that's ignoring Scotland and Northern Ireland, where the local parties could well get enough seats to hold the balance of power, and could potentially be majority remain.

The problem is that Leave/Remain isn't neatly split across party lines, and yet is the biggest issue at this election, despite the claims of some parties.
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