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Old 10-16-2019, 12:29 AM
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We're never going to see these books, are we?


Harlan Ellison
The Last Dangerous Visions
current status: Originally due in 1972. Ellison died in 2018. Some stories from the book have been published separately

David Gerrold
A Method For Madness and the rest of The War Against the Chtorr series
current status: The first four volumes were released in 1983, 1985, 1989, and 1993. There have been excerpts published since. Gerrold insists he is still working on this series.

Robert Jordan
The rest of The Wheel of Time series
current status: Jordan died in 2007. Some of the unfinished books in the series were finished by Brandon Sanderson. The main series is concluded but Jordan had planned on writing at least five other books in the same setting.

Donald Kingsbury
The Finger Pointing Solward, sequel to Courtship Rite (1982)
current status: Kingsbury says he has been revising it. Since 1982.

George R.R. Martin
The conclusion of A Song of Ice and Fire series.
current status: The first five volumes of the seven volume series were published between 1991 and 2011.

David R. Palmer
The final book in the To Halt Armageddon trilogy.
current status: The first book, Threshold, was published in 1985. It seemed like the series was dead. But then the second book, Special Education, was published this year. So who knows?

Melanie Rawn
The final book in the Exiles trilogy.
current status: The first two books were published in 1994 and 1997. But Rawn has moved on to other series and the third book, The Captal's Tower, was never written.

C.S. Forester
Hornblower and the Crisis
current status: Forester died in 1966 so this one is looking increasingly unlikely. His outline was published and some authors have written a full version but there's no official book.

George MacDonald Fraser
Flashman's Civil War book
current status: Fraser talked about Flashman's adventures during the American Civil War but he finally admitted he had no plans to write them out in a complete book. Then, to emphasize his point, he died in 2008.

Other examples are welcome.
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Old 10-16-2019, 12:42 AM
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My comments: Gerrold is never going to finish the Chtorr stories, and that's not a bad thing. They were getting worse as it continued anyway, and I've got no faith in his ability to turn the quality around now.

Martin's never going to finish a Song of Ice and Fire. I think he intends to, but the road to hell etc.

Wheel of Time: C'mon. Sanderson wrapped the series - do we need to go all Chris Tolkien and milk every footnote and mention related to it?
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Old 10-16-2019, 12:45 AM
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The last two volumes of The Historical Dictionary of American Slang. The first two volumes were published in 1994 and 1997. It's an awesome resource, as long as the word you're looking up starts with A - O.
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Old 10-16-2019, 02:49 AM
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Robert Jordan
The rest of The Wheel of Time series
current status: Jordan died in 2007. Some of the unfinished books in the series were finished by Brandon Sanderson. The main series is concluded but Jordan had planned on writing at least five other books in the same setting.
I hope not.

I love Brandon Sanderson, and he gave a great effort to fill some BIG fucking shoes, but the tone and voice of his contributions just didn't feel right. It doesn't help that A Memory of Light had too much jammed in one book. It feels like he was artificially constrained in the number of books to finish it out, and it ended up as a "Hey, tie up all the loose ends!" book.

I still bawled like a baby when I finished it; that series defined my formative years, read and reread from ages 10 to 30. Knowing I was at the end was rough.

But at least Amazon is going to be there to destroy my fond memories (I kid... Maybe the series won't suck, but thus far I'm worried...)

Last edited by krondys; 10-16-2019 at 02:51 AM. Reason: Auto-incorrect
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Old 10-16-2019, 03:38 AM
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Patrick Rothfuss
Final book in the Kingkiller Chronicles trilogy.
Current status: the first book came out in 2006, the second in 2011. It's obvious by now that he's lost focus and wandered off on side paths, and that he'll probably never figure out how to finish his story - or, for that matter, how to start it.

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I hope not.

I love Brandon Sanderson, and he gave a great effort to fill some BIG fucking shoes, but the tone and voice of his contributions just didn't feel right. It doesn't help that A Memory of Light had too much jammed in one book. It feels like he was artificially constrained in the number of books to finish it out, and it ended up as a "Hey, tie up all the loose ends!" book.
First of all, I prefer Sanderson's writing to Jordan's, so if there was a change in tone, it was for the better. Second of all, considering some of the preceding books, I'd much, MUCH rather read a book with too many things happening to a book with too few. "Too much jammed in one book" is something no Robert Jordan reader has said, ever.

(As an aside: I'm meeting Brandon Sanderson today! He's holding a book signing near my house, and I bought a first edition of The Final Empire just for the occasion).

Last edited by Alessan; 10-16-2019 at 03:38 AM.
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Old 10-16-2019, 03:39 AM
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Orson Scott Card - the last of the Alvin Maker series.

However, the books since Prentice Alvin have become increasingly weird, and OSC himself seems to have turned into a complete loon, so this may not be altogether a bad thing
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Old 10-16-2019, 03:46 AM
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I'll admit I would have put Irontown Blues in this thread up until recently. John Varley said he was planning on a three book series. Steel Beach was published in 1992 and The Golden Globe was published in 1998. Then he went off and started working on other books and it seemed like he was finished with his Eight Worlds work. So I was surprised when Irontown Blues was published last year.
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Old 10-16-2019, 05:36 AM
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Patrick Rothfuss
Final book in the Kingkiller Chronicles trilogy.
Current status: the first book came out in 2006, the second in 2011.
And the novella The Slow Regard of Silent Things came out in 2015.

I'd somewhat agree Rothfuss might be a bit sidetracked, but my impression has always been that, like Thomas Harris (Silence of the Lambs), he writes slowly.
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Old 10-16-2019, 06:20 AM
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Clive Barker's Third Book Of The Art.

The Great and Secret Show was in 1989, Everville came out in 1994.
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Old 10-16-2019, 06:42 AM
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I think we'll get the next GRRM book, but I'm not optimistic for the final one(s).
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Old 10-16-2019, 07:39 AM
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I read somewhere -askamanager.com, of all places, I think - that Melanie Rawn is finally starting on The Captal's Tower. How true that is I have no idea.
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Old 10-16-2019, 07:53 AM
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C.S. Forester
Hornblower and the Crisis
current status: Forester died in 1966 so this one is looking increasingly unlikely.
Would I be jumping the gun if I declared this the understatement of the day? LOL
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Old 10-16-2019, 08:19 AM
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C. J. Cherryh: another Morgaine novel. The last one [Exile's Gate]ended on a cliffhanger, and it's been almost 3 decades since it was released.
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Old 10-16-2019, 08:25 AM
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My comments: Gerrold is never going to finish the Chtorr stories, and that's not a bad thing. They were getting worse as it continued anyway, and I've got no faith in his ability to turn the quality around now.
Yeah, I've given up on that series as well. It'd be nice if he'd just come out and say it's dead in the water, though.
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Old 10-16-2019, 08:40 AM
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I'll admit I would have put Irontown Blues in this thread up until recently. John Varley said he was planning on a three book series. Steel Beach was published in 1992 and The Golden Globe was published in 1998. Then he went off and started working on other books and it seemed like he was finished with his Eight Worlds work. So I was surprised when Irontown Blues was published last year.
Eh, I kind of wish he had left it unpublished. It's a terrible end to what had been a very good duology. Incredibly short, mostly a retelling of the end of Steel Beach, boring main character.
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Old 10-16-2019, 08:50 AM
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Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone, the ninth Outlander novel. It was supposed to come out this year. Diana Gabaldon is so busy with the TV series, she probably won't finish it until she's under the gun for the script for the corresponding season.

Last edited by Rilchiam; 10-16-2019 at 08:52 AM.
  #17  
Old 10-16-2019, 09:22 AM
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C.S. Forester
Hornblower and the Crisis
current status: Forester died in 1966 so this one is looking increasingly unlikely. His outline was published and some authors have written a full version but there's no official book.

.
Who wrote "a full version" of this? The only person to try to flesh it out that I'm aware of was C. Northcote Parkinson in his The Life and Times of Horatio Hornblower, but his suggestion of the way that "adventure" ended (which differs from the notes in the published edition of Hornblower During the Crisis, and may well be the "twist" that Forestyer intended to throw into his book) isn't at all a "full version" of the story. Did other people publish "completed" versions?

By the way, Forester wrote three more Hornblower stories that aren't part of the "official canon", apparently because they aren't consistent with the official series of novels* -- "Hornblower and His Majesty", "Hornblower and the Hand of Destiny", and "Hornblower and the Charitable Offering", all published 1940-1.


Asking when a book will be finished by an author or editor now dead is sort of like Beating a Dead Horse. By this logic, we're all going to be disappointed forevermore because Charles Dickens never finished The Mystery of Edwin Drood. Others have written extensions and completions of it, but they're not "official"





*Not that the complete set doesn't have inconsistencies, as well. In The Happy Return/Beat to Quarters (published in 1937) Captain Hornblower is said to have just met Mr. Bush when taking up command of the Lydia, whereas in Lieutenant Hornblower (published in 1952), they meet when they are both Lieutenants.
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Old 10-16-2019, 09:25 AM
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I hope not.

I love Brandon Sanderson, and he gave a great effort to fill some BIG fucking shoes, but the tone and voice of his contributions just didn't feel right. It doesn't help that A Memory of Light had too much jammed in one book. It feels like he was artificially constrained in the number of books to finish it out, and it ended up as a "Hey, tie up all the loose ends!" book.

I still bawled like a baby when I finished it; that series defined my formative years, read and reread from ages 10 to 30. Knowing I was at the end was rough.

But at least Amazon is going to be there to destroy my fond memories (I kid... Maybe the series won't suck, but thus far I'm worried...)
I loved the end of WoT. Actually, if pressed, I would say I enjoyed Sanderson's books more than Jordan's because he did a yeomen's effort to rein in plot lines that were all over the place and bring everything to a satisfying conclusion.

Add in the fact that he made Mat Cauthon even cooler than he was before and Sanderson wins in a route.
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Old 10-16-2019, 09:29 AM
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Ken Grimwood was supposedly working on a sequel to "Replay" when he died, so we won't be seeing that one, at least not in this timeline. However, Greg Benford's recent "Rewrite" and Blake Crouch's "Recursion", both recently published play in the same sandbox.
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Old 10-16-2019, 09:34 AM
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Patrick Rothfuss
Final book in the Kingkiller Chronicles trilogy.
Current status: the first book came out in 2006, the second in 2011. It's obvious by now that he's lost focus and wandered off on side paths, and that he'll probably never figure out how to finish his story - or, for that matter, how to start it.
Rothfuss wrote himself into a corner by saying that Kvothe's story would take exactly 3 days to tell then proceed to fill the first two books a lot of (highly entertaining) trivial stuff that didn't move the story forward very far or very fast. Now he has 1 more book left to conclude all of the plot lines that have been alluded to but not explored (he still hasn't discussed what's supposed to be the main plot line, his parents killers) and I don't think he knows how to do it.
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Old 10-16-2019, 09:39 AM
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Dean Koontz keeps mentioning the third book of his Moonlight Bay Trilogy, as if he's working on it. For the last twenty years.

The book that got me hooked on audiobooks was Fear Nothing. Keith Szarabajka's breathy, contemplative tone was perfect for Christopher Snow. "Forced to spend his life in the dark due to a rare genetic disorder that makes him vulnerable to light, Christopher Snow is thrown into an eerie thriller he seems hardly able to handle."

The second book, Seize The Night, paired Christopher with the same reader, and introduced some classic SciFi, including a dash of time travel.

The third book...? Well, Koontz recently claimed that he'll finish it when he's done with the 7th book of the Jane Hawk series. Ummm, Dean? You just published Book 5 and that wrapped up the Jane Hawk series. Time to get to work!

Although those first two books were so good, and read so well (I've still never heard such a perfect pairing of protagonist and narrator) that if it's not up to that standard, it's okay with me if Koontz just retires (or moves on to... whatever... preschool horror, canine cookbooks?).
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Old 10-16-2019, 09:51 AM
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*Not that the complete set doesn't have inconsistencies, as well. In The Happy Return/Beat to Quarters (published in 1937) Captain Hornblower is said to have just met Mr. Bush when taking up command of the Lydia, whereas in Lieutenant Hornblower (published in 1952), they meet when they are both Lieutenants.
Don’t forget the sword with a value of 25 guineas, which Hornblower was always supposed to have received as a reward for his heroic actions against the Spanish frigate Castilla, but the novels differ as to whether it occurred as he was a Lieutenant (as referenced in the original trilogy of novels) or as actually depicted in Hornblower and the Atropos, which came later and had him as a post-captain at the time.

I believe his age, when carefully scrutinized, was also inconsistent between the original trilogy and later written works (born July 4, 1776 according to later works). I believe, but cannot recall specifically why I believe this, he was supposed to be older in Beat to Quarters.

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Old 10-16-2019, 09:53 AM
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Rothfuss wrote himself into a corner by saying that Kvothe's story would take exactly 3 days to tell then proceed to fill the first two books a lot of (highly entertaining) trivial stuff that didn't move the story forward very far or very fast. Now he has 1 more book left to conclude all of the plot lines that have been alluded to but not explored (he still hasn't discussed what's supposed to be the main plot line, his parents killers) and I don't think he knows how to do it.
I agree completely. Reading his books is like reading the Lord of the Rings, except it's been two volumes out of three and Frodo hasn't reached Rivendell yet. I think it's telling that the name of the series is "The Kingkiller Chronicles", and yet not only has the hero not killed a king, the book hasn't even mentioned one yet.

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Old 10-16-2019, 09:55 AM
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Ed McBain always said his last 87th Precinct book would be "Exit." He had been writing a series of the book with one word alphabetical titles long before Sue Grafton, but he never got to finish it with Exit.

And speaking of Grafton, did she ever get to Z?
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Old 10-16-2019, 09:59 AM
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Until 5 minutes ago I would have added the final book in Jerry Pournelle's Janissaries saga to the list. But Amazon has Mamelukes down for a June 2020 publication. The story was finished by Jerry's son and David Weber, so there is a chance it will be good.

Annie - Sue Grafton never got to Z, and her estate has said that nobody will be writing the final book and that we should just get used to incompleteness.

Last edited by silenus; 10-16-2019 at 10:01 AM.
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Old 10-16-2019, 10:02 AM
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I'm going to add Jim Butcher's Dresden Files.

It seems like he's lost interest in the character now that he doesn't need Harry to boost his bottom line.
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Old 10-16-2019, 10:26 AM
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Well, if we're going to include dead authors, then I might as well come out and say that I'm not optimistic about ever seeing Love's Labours Found.
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Old 10-16-2019, 10:32 AM
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It might be too early to really say there won't be another one, but I'm starting to doubt that Jasper Fforde will be writing any more novels in his Shades of Grey series.

He published the original Shades of Grey novel (now retitled Shades of Grey 1: The Road to High Saffron) in 2009, and has, since then, made mention of possible sequels (or a possible prequel). So far, none of those have materialized, and he's published at least six other novels (either for his other series, or stand-alone) since then.
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Old 10-16-2019, 10:38 AM
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Well, if we're going to include dead authors, then I might as well come out and say that I'm not optimistic about ever seeing Love's Labours Found.
He already wrote that. It's not Shakespeare's fault that someone misplaced all the copies.
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Old 10-16-2019, 10:44 AM
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Jacques Futrelle’s last few detective stories featuring Professor Augustus S.F.X. Van Dusen, aka “The Thinking Machine.”

Along with Mr. Futrelle, they went down on the Titanic.
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Old 10-16-2019, 10:46 AM
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C.S. Forester
Hornblower and the Crisis
current status: Forester died in 1966 so this one is looking increasingly unlikely. His outline was published and some authors have written a full version but there's no official book.
Not sure if this counts exactly, but Patrick O'Brian died before he finished "21", his sequel to "Blue at the Mizzen", where Jack Aubrey finally gets his step to Admiral.

The reason I'm not sure if it counts exactly is that "Blue at the Mizzen" was the 20th Aubrey/Maturin novel, and ended at the point immediately after Jack gets promoted to Rear Admiral of the Blue, which was a fine end point for the actual published series.

Last edited by bump; 10-16-2019 at 10:46 AM.
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Old 10-16-2019, 10:46 AM
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Eh, I kind of wish he had left it unpublished. It's a terrible end to what had been a very good duology. Incredibly short, mostly a retelling of the end of Steel Beach, boring main character.
I can't argue with this. It was a disappointment even without the long wait.
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Old 10-16-2019, 10:53 AM
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It might be too early to really say there won't be another one, but I'm starting to doubt that Jasper Fforde will be writing any more novels in his Shades of Grey series.

He published the original Shades of Grey novel (now retitled Shades of Grey 1: The Road to High Saffron) in 2009, and has, since then, made mention of possible sequels (or a possible prequel). So far, none of those have materialized, and he's published at least six other novels (either for his other series, or stand-alone) since then.
Or another Nursery Crime book. Talented guy. His last Thursday Next novel was in 2012, per his wiki, so I don't have a lot of faith he'll return to that series either.

On GRRM, what do you all think about the rumor that GRRM's progress with GoT went into the toilet when his assistant/co-author Daniel Abraham jumped ship to do his own thing, starting 2002-ish? At least that's what Abraham's wiki suggests is when he started really cranking on short stories, and writing his own novels in 2006 onward. Along the way becoming one half of The Expanse writing team? Given GRRM very publicly went out and asked Amazon to keep funding The Expanse show, maybe Abraham will help GRRM get over the hump for the last two novels?

Obviously GRRM is extremely talented, and even more obviously, he's had no idea what to do with ASoIaF for the last decade or so. Depending on your like/dislike of A Feast for Crows, maybe even longer.

EDIT: Continuing with the theme, we won't see Larry & Jerry's new version of 'Smash the Earth with a big rock.' Or another Burning City story or Moties story.

Last edited by Gray Ghost; 10-16-2019 at 10:55 AM.
  #34  
Old 10-16-2019, 11:01 AM
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Asking when a book will be finished by an author or editor now dead is sort of like Beating a Dead Horse. By this logic, we're all going to be disappointed forevermore because Charles Dickens never finished The Mystery of Edwin Drood. Others have written extensions and completions of it, but they're not "official"
I'll admit to being unfair to Forester. All of the other books I mentioned had long periods when people were awaiting them and asking if the author was ever going to finish them.

That was not really the case with Forester. He had slowed his pace somewhat. His most recent completed book had been published in 1962 when he died in 1966. But there's every indication that if he had lived, Hornblower and the Crisis would have been completed and published within a year or two.

As for the unauthorized completions, there's one by John Mahon and one by R.W. Smith in addition to the Parkinson one you mentioned.
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Old 10-16-2019, 11:12 AM
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Obviously GRRM is extremely talented, and even more obviously, he's had no idea what to do with ASoIaF for the last decade or so.
Martin has openly acknowledge that he gets bored with his established series. He says his pattern is that he thinks of an idea for a series and writes the first works in it with that initial enthusiasm. But then that enthusiasm fades and he's left with the prospect of grinding the rest of the series out. Meanwhile, he's thought of a brand new idea for a different project and he's full of enthusiasm for getting started on that. So his pattern is he'll stop working on the old project and begin working on the new one.

It seems pretty clear this pattern would have held with A Song of Ice and Fire in normal circumstances and Martin would have abandoned it by now. But the popularity of the television series put too much money on the table for Martin to walk away from so he kept working away at it. The question is whether he will keep doing so now that the series has ended.
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Old 10-16-2019, 11:29 AM
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Martin has openly acknowledge that he gets bored with his established series. He says his pattern is that he thinks of an idea for a series and writes the first works in it with that initial enthusiasm. But then that enthusiasm fades and he's left with the prospect of grinding the rest of the series out. Meanwhile, he's thought of a brand new idea for a different project and he's full of enthusiasm for getting started on that. So his pattern is he'll stop working on the old project and begin working on the new one.

It seems pretty clear this pattern would have held with A Song of Ice and Fire in normal circumstances and Martin would have abandoned it by now. But the popularity of the television series put too much money on the table for Martin to walk away from so he kept working away at it. The question is whether he will keep doing so now that the series has ended.
If Abraham was the lubricant that kept that particular authorial machinery moving, and if Abraham feels obligated to help GRRM out since Martin went to bat to keep Abraham's TV show on the air, I can see the last two books getting cranked out.

Largely following how the TV show was plotted, and holding true to the endings for all of the characters---since I think Martin had those in mind from the beginning of the TV show.
SPOILER:
Arya killing the Night King isn't jarring, if the setup had been better shown. Similarly for Bran being King, Jamie running back to Cersei
, and so on.

It's just that Season 8 was so obviously quickly cranked out onto the counter, like unsold prime steaks being turned into ground beef, because D&D wanted out of this job so they could go fuck up Star Wars even more than Rian Johnson. And make a titanic amount of money in doing so. But I think a more talented writing team could get to the same end state of GoT, and do so without making the audience go, "Huh? I followed this show for ten years for this shit?"

Hunger helps keep artists from getting bored (and discipline gets them to work even when they are). GRRM doesn't look like he's been hungry for a long time.

Last edited by Chronos; 10-16-2019 at 02:26 PM. Reason: Added spoiler tags
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Old 10-16-2019, 11:54 AM
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Orson Scott Card - the last of the Alvin Maker series.
Or the two remaining space monkey books.
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Old 10-16-2019, 12:22 PM
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I'd really like to think GRRM will finish ASoIaF, but I put the odds at ~50/50. It's at least possible. I doubt we'll see any new Hornblower books though.

Not specific books, but J.D. Salinger was a recluse for 50 years, and when he died I heard all about how the books he wrote during that time as a hermit were going to be edited and finally published by his family. But that was 2010, and I haven't heard anything since. Does anybody have the inside scoop? Or has that project died on the vine?
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Old 10-16-2019, 12:44 PM
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I doubt we'll see any new Hornblower books though.
Even if another author picked up Hornblower, there's not a lot of room left- Forester had pretty much mined out the entire period of his career already; this new author would have to find little interstitial spaces in the existing narrative, write fun adventures within them, and all without messing up the existing Forester canon.

That's a tall order- I can't really see too many cool adventures that could be written that wouldn't have changed Hornblower's subsequent career trajectory and thereby clash with the existing canon.
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Old 10-16-2019, 12:54 PM
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In the spirit of is memoirs Boy and Flying Solo, I wish Roald Dahl had written another memoir about his later life.
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Old 10-16-2019, 01:07 PM
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I'll admit to being unfair to Forester. All of the other books I mentioned had long periods when people were awaiting them and asking if the author was ever going to finish them.

That was not really the case with Forester. He had slowed his pace somewhat. His most recent completed book had been published in 1962 when he died in 1966. But there's every indication that if he had lived, Hornblower and the Crisis would have been completed and published within a year or two.

As for the unauthorized completions, there's one by John Mahon and one by R.W. Smith in addition to the Parkinson one you mentioned.
Hmm. e-books both, from the looks of things (I can't find print copies). No wonder I missed them.
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Old 10-16-2019, 01:29 PM
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Even if another author picked up Hornblower, there's not a lot of room left- Forester had pretty much mined out the entire period of his career already; this new author would have to find little interstitial spaces in the existing narrative, write fun adventures within them, and all without messing up the existing Forester canon.

That's a tall order- I can't really see too many cool adventures that could be written that wouldn't have changed Hornblower's subsequent career trajectory and thereby clash with the existing canon.
I would dearly love to read some more Hornblower, providing they were any good, but maybe they could fit some more short stories in while Hornblower was a midshipman and lieutenant on the Indefatigable or while he was on the Renown before Captain Sawyer becomes paranoid and before Bush joins the ship.

Or just pretend that the Lydia went off on some missions before being sent to foment rebellion with El Supremo.

I can forgive messing with the timeline if the stories are good enough, and in the spirit of the original. Which is, of course, a big If.
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Not that the complete set doesn't have inconsistencies, as well. In The Happy Return/Beat to Quarters (published in 1937) Captain Hornblower is said to have just met Mr. Bush when taking up command of the Lydia, whereas in Lieutenant Hornblower (published in 1952), they meet when they are both Lieutenants.
And not just that it messed with the time line - the hero worship that Bush had for Hornblower is not psychologically realistic if Bush had ever been Hornblower's superior officer.

It's not that Bush was jealous - Bush was a born second-in-command, and he admired Hornblower tremendously. But he and Hornblower were friends when they served together - they even went out and got drunk and blew their prize money together at one point. Bush loved Hornblower, but it was the love of a superior, not a peer.

Bush would not have spoken of Hornblower as he did when discussing him with Lady Barbara in the first novel. Bush knew Hornblower's strengths and discerned his weaknesses, but the speech makes it sound like he knew the weaknesses from observing Hornblower as the captain hiding his feelings under a mask of immobility.

Lady Barbara comes to understand Hornblower in the same way, by observing him from the same level. But she loves Hornblower without hero worship, because she was never superior to Hornblower as Bush was.

Plus she falls in love with him because of the evenings spent by the taffrail discussing literature.

A beautiful, rich woman who likes to talk about books. One of my hopes as an adolescent.

Quote:
By the way, Forester wrote three more Hornblower stories that aren't part of the "official canon", apparently because they aren't consistent with the official series of novels* -- "Hornblower and His Majesty", "Hornblower and the Hand of Destiny", and "Hornblower and the Charitable Offering", all published 1940-1.
Remind me not to eat or rest until I have tracked these stories down.

Regards,
Shodan
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Old 10-16-2019, 02:04 PM
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Hmm. e-books both, from the looks of things (I can't find print copies). No wonder I missed them.
That's why I didn't count that as a real part of the series. But I knew if I didn't at least mention them, someone else would.

For what it's worth, there have also been unofficial versions of Flashman's Civil War adventures by other authors.

Last edited by Little Nemo; 10-16-2019 at 02:05 PM.
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Old 10-16-2019, 02:18 PM
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I would dearly love to read some more Hornblower, providing they were any good, but maybe they could fit some more short stories in while Hornblower was a midshipman and lieutenant on the Indefatigable or while he was on the Renown before Captain Sawyer becomes paranoid and before Bush joins the ship.

Or just pretend that the Lydia went off on some missions before being sent to foment rebellion with El Supremo.

I can forgive messing with the timeline if the stories are good enough, and in the spirit of the original. Which is, of course, a big If. And not just that it messed with the time line - the hero worship that Bush had for Hornblower is not psychologically realistic if Bush had ever been Hornblower's superior officer.

It's not that Bush was jealous - Bush was a born second-in-command, and he admired Hornblower tremendously. But he and Hornblower were friends when they served together - they even went out and got drunk and blew their prize money together at one point. Bush loved Hornblower, but it was the love of a superior, not a peer.

Bush would not have spoken of Hornblower as he did when discussing him with Lady Barbara in the first novel. Bush knew Hornblower's strengths and discerned his weaknesses, but the speech makes it sound like he knew the weaknesses from observing Hornblower as the captain hiding his feelings under a mask of immobility.

Lady Barbara comes to understand Hornblower in the same way, by observing him from the same level. But she loves Hornblower without hero worship, because she was never superior to Hornblower as Bush was.

Plus she falls in love with him because of the evenings spent by the taffrail discussing literature.

A beautiful, rich woman who likes to talk about books. One of my hopes as an adolescent.

Remind me not to eat or rest until I have tracked these stories down.

Regards,
Shodan

Two were published in Colliers, the third in Argosy. I tracked down the Colliers stories in the Boston Public Library. I've since learned that the three have been republished in anthologies.

Have a look here

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horatio_Hornblower

You can find the others stories here (an e-book again! Although I know they've been republished in print, as well):

https://www.amazon.com/Hornblower-Ad.../dp/B0053YAZ58


Here they are in print:"

https://www.historicnavalfiction.com...-one-more-time


This only has one, but is more accessible:

https://www.historicnavalfiction.com...-hearts-of-oak
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Last edited by CalMeacham; 10-16-2019 at 02:22 PM.
  #45  
Old 10-16-2019, 02:28 PM
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Gray Ghost, I know that it's been a while since the TV show ended, but let's still avoid spoilers, shall we?
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Old 10-16-2019, 03:34 PM
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[Moderating]

Gray Ghost, I know that it's been a while since the TV show ended, but let's still avoid spoilers, shall we?
It's five months since the show ended, with possibly millions of webpages detailing what happened in Season 8. You'd have to be the Geico 'guy under a rock' to not know what happened at this point.

I mean, thanks for the edit, I didn't realize I'd committed a faux pas. So I don't do it again, how long in the past must something have occurred before we can discuss it sans spoiler tags? Is saying what "Rosebud" means, OK?
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Old 10-16-2019, 03:45 PM
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Don't open that box!

There are people around here who scream bloody murder if anybody posts anything that even remotely spoils something they haven't gotten around to reading/watching/eating. Even if said something was completed decades, nay centuries ago. Best to just spoiler your whole post and leave them guessing!
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Old 10-16-2019, 04:41 PM
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It might be too early to really say there won't be another one, but I'm starting to doubt that Jasper Fforde will be writing any more novels in his Shades of Grey series.
There is a chronicly overdo Last Dragonslayer book, too.
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Old 10-16-2019, 04:53 PM
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It's five months since the show ended, with possibly millions of webpages detailing what happened in Season 8. You'd have to be the Geico 'guy under a rock' to not know what happened at this point.

I mean, thanks for the edit, I didn't realize I'd committed a faux pas. So I don't do it again, how long in the past must something have occurred before we can discuss it sans spoiler tags? Is saying what "Rosebud" means, OK?
A reasonable amount of time must pass. More than five months. Less than seventy-eight years.
  #50  
Old 10-16-2019, 06:28 PM
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George R.R. Martin
The conclusion of A Song of Ice and Fire series.
current status: The first five volumes of the seven volume series were published between 1991 and 2011.
First one was only published in 1996, actually. Gaps between books:

1-2: 2 years
2-3: 2 years
3-4: 5 years
4-5: 6 years
5-6: Unkown, currently at 8 years with no date set
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