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  #1  
Old 10-30-2019, 02:35 PM
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I need a green chili recipe


Every work chili contest I've been in (all 3), my red chili has won the red chili category. Once it won overall and twice came in second to a green chili. Why did I lose? Partly because this is Colorado where green chili rules. So I'm going to fight them on their own terms. I need the best Colorado green chili recipe you got. Please and thank you.
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  #2  
Old 10-30-2019, 03:16 PM
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I like this one:

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...de-recipe.html

if you don't have a pressure cooker, you can still do it the low-n-slow way.
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Old 10-30-2019, 03:35 PM
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It's Colorado green chile. A grilled cheese sandwich can win.

All my recipes are for New Mexico green chile. Sorry I can't help you.
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Old 11-01-2019, 09:00 PM
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Originally Posted by jz78817 View Post
I like this one:

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...de-recipe.html

if you don't have a pressure cooker, you can still do it the low-n-slow way.
Tried that one before. Not even close to what I'm looking for.
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Old 11-02-2019, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by jz78817 View Post
if you don't have a pressure cooker, you can still do it the low-n-slow way.
No real advice to offer except for the fact that pressure cooked chili never quite pays off for me. Double that for pork based versions. I'm told that the very high heat a pressure cooker is capable of delivering can damage the collagen proteins and negatively change the texture and mouth-feel of the final dish. True or not, I do notice a difference.

Low-n-slow, after properly searing the meat, is the only way for a competition chili, IMHO.
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Last edited by Alpha Twit; 11-02-2019 at 09:05 AM.
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Old 11-02-2019, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Saint Cad View Post
Every work chili contest I've been in (all 3), my red chili has won the red chili category. Once it won overall and twice came in second to a green chili. Why did I lose? Partly because this is Colorado where green chili rules. So I'm going to fight them on their own terms. I need the best Colorado green chili recipe you got. Please and thank you.
America's Test Kitchen's recipe is at least going to be competent: https://www.splendidtable.org/recipe...do-green-chili

Though get Hatch chiles, if you can. I love the state on state violence in the thread.

EDIT: how hot was your winning red chili? New Mexican Red hot? If so, maybe make a NM version of CO green chili?

Last edited by Gray Ghost; 11-02-2019 at 10:16 AM.
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Old 11-02-2019, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Alpha Twit View Post
No real advice to offer except for the fact that pressure cooked chili never quite pays off for me. Double that for pork based versions. I'm told that the very high heat a pressure cooker is capable of delivering can damage the collagen proteins and negatively change the texture and mouth-feel of the final dish. True or not, I do notice a difference.

Low-n-slow, after properly searing the meat, is the only way for a competition chili, IMHO.
A pressure cooker cooks at around 250F. It’s not terribly high heat. What you do have to do with pressure cooker recipes is watch your cooking times, and use less liquid, as very little evaporates.

That said, there’s something about having a nice bowl of stew or chili or whatever simmering on your stove for hours, it’s wonderful aromas filling the house.
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Old 11-02-2019, 12:57 PM
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I've used this one a couple of times, and love it. I add hot peppers such as jalapeno to it, but it's a good start: https://iamafoodblog.com/this-new-me...e-ever-tasted/
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Old 11-02-2019, 01:07 PM
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Originally Posted by jz78817 View Post
I like this one:

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...de-recipe.html

if you don't have a pressure cooker, you can still do it the low-n-slow way.
That's a Kenji Lopez-Alt recipe, so I'll vouch for it without even making it. His carne adovada is amazing.
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Old 11-02-2019, 01:15 PM
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That's a Kenji Lopez-Alt recipe, so I'll vouch for it without even making it. His carne adovada is amazing.
I guess the question is what makes a green chile Colorado style as opposed to New Mexican or Mexican chile verde. My knowledge of New Mexican is that it uses Hatch chiles or similar New Mexican chiles, and usually doesn’t use tomatillo. Mexican versions usually have tomatillo. But I’m not sure what the Colorado style is like.

Last edited by pulykamell; 11-02-2019 at 01:18 PM.
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Old 11-02-2019, 01:17 PM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
I guess the question is what makes a green chile Colorado style as opposed to New Mexican or Mexican chile verde. My knowledge of New Mexican is that it uses Hatch chiles or similar New Mexican chiles, and usually doesn’t use tomatillo. But I’m not sure what the Colorado style is like.
I lived in Colorado for 13 years and I have no clue what the OP means by "Colorado Style Green Chile." All the green chile I had when I lived in Colorado was pretty much New Mexico Green Chile.
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Old 11-02-2019, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Athena View Post
I lived in Colorado for 13 years and I have no clue what the OP means by "Colorado Style Green Chile." All the green chile I had when I lived in Colorado was pretty much New Mexico Green Chile.
I have actually heard multiple people refer to Colorado green chile, but I never quite figured out what was meant by it.
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Old 11-02-2019, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
I guess the question is what makes a green chile Colorado style as opposed to New Mexican or Mexican chile verde. My knowledge of New Mexican is that it uses Hatch chiles or similar New Mexican chiles, and usually doesn’t use tomatillo. Mexican versions usually have tomatillo. But I’m not sure what the Colorado style is like.
From what I can see from browsing "chili verde", "green chili", "Colorado green chili", and "hatch chile chili" recipes, most all of them include tomatillos in some form or another. The OP is short on ingredient information. I would also point out that he hasn't shared his award-winning red recipe.

Last edited by Chefguy; 11-02-2019 at 01:27 PM.
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Old 11-02-2019, 01:42 PM
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This, to me, is a pretty standard New Mexico green chile.
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Old 11-02-2019, 02:35 PM
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I lived in Colorado for 13 years and I have no clue what the OP means by "Colorado Style Green Chile." All the green chile I had when I lived in Colorado was pretty much New Mexico Green Chile.
Then I guess that's what I mean. As you can tell I'm a red-man.
I tried it once with tomatillos and it was gritty and I suspect I did not process them right. I'm pretty sure I mean hatch chile chili and it may be exactly the same as NM chili.
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  #16  
Old 11-02-2019, 04:29 PM
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Huh. I completely did not notice until re-read that that recipe says "Colorado Style" on it (on a recipe whose html page is titled Hatch New Mexico Green Chile With Pork Recipe.) So now I'm really confused as to what makes it specifically "Colorado style." Maybe it's Colorado that doesn't use the tomatillos as much? I dunno. The way I've been taught to do it by a Santa Fe native, it didn't include tomatillos, but I guess it's all over the place. The way I've had it, it was essentially a green chile sauce made of onions, Hatch (or similar) chiles, sometimes some jalapenos in addition, some cumin and oregano, and then cooked with a bit of flour & broth to thicken. You can then cook pork in it, or you can use it as a sauce on your enchiladas, smothered burritos, or whatnot. Here's another recipe that is calling itself New Mexico green chili stew that is what I'm familiar with. I'm not sure what makes it different than the "Colorado style" green chili above. ETA: Oh, and sometimes tomatoes in it as well.

Last edited by pulykamell; 11-02-2019 at 04:29 PM.
  #17  
Old 11-02-2019, 05:20 PM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Huh. I completely did not notice until re-read that that recipe says "Colorado Style" on it (on a recipe whose html page is titled Hatch New Mexico Green Chile With Pork Recipe.) So now I'm really confused as to what makes it specifically "Colorado style."
this of course reminded me of something from The Naked Gun 2-1/2:

Quote:
Lt. Frank Drebin: Hector Savage. From Detroit. Ex-boxer. His real name was Joey Chicago.
Ed Hocken: Oh, yeah. He fought under the name of Kid Minneapolis.
Nordberg: I saw Kid Minneapolis fight once. In Cincinnati.
Lt. Frank Drebin: No you're thinking of Kid New York. He fought out of Philly.
Ed Hocken: He was killed in the ring in Houston. By Tex Colorado. You know, the Arizona Assassin.
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Old 11-02-2019, 06:50 PM
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As a person who has spent a lamentably minuscule time in parts of America that have chili or chile, I need help understanding this thread. Basically, I'm confused about two things:

1) Is there a difference between chili and chile?
2) I can't tell when you are talking about a spicy meat stew that derived its heat from one or more variety of chili pepper, and when you are talking about the actual fruit. For example, the sentence: "I know you aren't suppose to put beans in chili but I have a great recipe that uses two pounds of beef, a cup of Anasazi beans, and half a Habanero chili" uses the word both ways.

Help me. This is food-related, so I want to understand.
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Old 11-02-2019, 07:28 PM
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Originally Posted by CairoCarol View Post
As a person who has spent a lamentably minuscule time in parts of America that have chili or chile, I need help understanding this thread. Basically, I'm confused about two things:

1) Is there a difference between chili and chile?
2) I can't tell when you are talking about a spicy meat stew that derived its heat from one or more variety of chili pepper, and when you are talking about the actual fruit. For example, the sentence: "I know you aren't suppose to put beans in chili but I have a great recipe that uses two pounds of beef, a cup of Anasazi beans, and half a Habanero chili" uses the word both ways.

Help me. This is food-related, so I want to understand.
There's really not a hard-and-fast rule. Typically, the dish is usually spelled "chili" and the pepper can be chili, chile, or even chilli. "Chili" is the more standard spelling for all uses of the word, but there has been a shift in spelling over the last, I don't know, decade or two for "chile" to be the spelling of the pepper.

Actually, read through here.

I know I have not been totally consistent myself with the spellings here. With "Chile verde," I always spell it as "chile" there, but Green Chili I usually (though, as I see I have strayed in this thread) spell "chili" the American English way.

So, in the end, it could be either.

Quote:
2) I can't tell when you are talking about a spicy meat stew that derived its heat from one or more variety of chili pepper, and when you are talking about the actual fruit. For example, the sentence: "I know you aren't suppose to put beans in chili but I have a great recipe that uses two pounds of beef, a cup of Anasazi beans, and half a Habanero chili" uses the word both ways.
That would be the correct way to spell "chili" for both uses according to most style guides I'm familiar with. I would spell "Habanero chili" as "Habenero chile," but context makes it clear whether the fruit or stew is meant.

Last edited by pulykamell; 11-02-2019 at 07:28 PM.
  #20  
Old 11-02-2019, 07:36 PM
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And I don't think the spelling difference is really that necessary to avoid confusion. Are there places in this thread where it's unclear which is meant? I'm just curious. I mean, there are other words or phrases in English in which context dictates whether a final dish or an ingredient are meant. Like, for example, "pot roast" can be a cut of meat used to make pot roast, or the dish itself. "Hamburger" in many parts of the US can refer to raw ground beef, or the final sandwich. And I'm sure there are others, but those are the ones that immediately came to mind.
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Old 11-02-2019, 08:11 PM
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\Are there places in this thread where it's unclear which is meant? I'm just curious..
Sure - "Hatch chili" could be a variety of chili pepper or a particular dish. I wouldn't know.

"It's Colorado green chile." - Is there a variety of chili pepper called Colorado? I dunno, I just learned that there is a type of pepper called Fresno so why not one called Colorado?

"All my recipes are for New Mexico green chile." - Could be the same as saying "all my pie recipes are for Macintosh apples."

And so on. If you read the text with a prior knowledge of chili cuisine in Colorado and New Mexico, sure, it's probably obvious. But not to me!
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Old 11-02-2019, 09:11 PM
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Ah, I see. There can be ambiguous situations, but generally you look at whether the word is being used as a countable noun or not, and whether it's plural or not. Using your example, "All my recipes are for New Mexico green chile" would be analogous to "all my pie recipes are for Macintosh apple" without the "s" at the end, which doesn't really make sense.

But, anyhow, a rundown:

Hatch chiles: A group of New Mexico chili pepper cultivars grown in the Hatch Valley of New Mexico. They are often referred to generally as "Hatch chiles," but there are a variety of them with a range of spice levels. Big Jims are probably the most common, but other varieties include Sandia, 1904, and Barker. They are typically marketed simply as "Hatch chiles," at least around here, and sometimes with a spice level.

New Mexico chiles: A type of chili pepper related to Anaheims, which is a banana-pepper-shaped type of pepper, with a greener skin (whereas banana peppers tend to be a pale greeenish-yellow.)

New Mexico chili/chile: A pork stew made from these chili peppers. It can be spelled either way.

Chile verde: Literally, Spanish for "green chili pepper." In English contexts, this usually means a stew made with green chilis, pork, and often tomatillos, cilantro, and other green goodness. In a Mexican grocery, it usually just means "green chili peppers."

Colorado green chili/chile: Apparently some sort of pork chili stew that is similar to the above two stews. This does not refer a type of chili pepper.

Chile/chili colorado: A type of beef stew made with red chili peppers ("colorado" means "red" in this context.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 11-02-2019 at 09:15 PM.
  #23  
Old 11-02-2019, 09:28 PM
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Originally Posted by jz78817 View Post
this of course reminded me of something from The Naked Gun 2-1/2:
Looking into this a little bit more, there does seem to be a bit of a green chile rivalry between New Mexico and Colorado. So far as I can tell, perhaps the main difference is that New Mexico chili uses Hatches and Colorado green chile uses Pueblo chiles?

There is a bit of a discussion here on Reddit about New Mexico vs Colorado Green Chili, and I can't find anything other than NM is proud of the Hatch and Colorado is proud of their Pueblo chilis. I don't see any definitive distinction, and there are a number of other New Mexico vs Colorado green chili arguments on that board, none of which elucidate the matter for me.

(And to further confuse things, one New Mexican insists the stew be spelled "chile" as "chili" refers to the Texas dish, so the spelling of the stew isn't agreed upon, either.)
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Old 11-02-2019, 10:28 PM
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It looks like from the research everyone has done that Colorado-style means no tomatillos and using some regular tomatoes. I think I'll try that style with half Pueblo (it is Colorado style), half hatch and half Anaheim.
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Old 11-02-2019, 10:52 PM
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It looks like from the research everyone has done that Colorado-style means no tomatillos and using some regular tomatoes. I think I'll try that style with half Pueblo (it is Colorado style), half hatch and half Anaheim.
Yeah, I did eventually find this, which says:

Quote:
New Mexico Green Chili: Usually made with pork, lots of New Mexico green chiles, no thickeners, no tomatoes, sometimes with tomatillos (but there are many exceptions that use tomatoes and thickeners) New Mexican chefs tend to use fresh ingredients and strive to prepare green chili that showcases that fresh roasted Azteca Taqueria's Green Chiligreen chili taste.
So with the "many exceptions" it seems like they're not didactic about it.

For Colorado, it says:

Quote:
ade with pork, typically hot, with lots of green chiles + jalapenos or serranos, tomatoes, and thickened with flour or corn masa. In Colorado, we like our green chili hot and packed with flavor. While a New Mexican may see the tomatoes and thickener as smothering the green chile flavor, the Colorado chef is making the dish more robust with a rounder, fuller flavor.
This is from a Denver chili site, though, so they're boostering their chili a bit. So it seems like New Mexico green chili has a wider varieties (may or may not have tomatoes, may or may not have tomatillos, may or may not have thickeners), while Colorado is thickened and uses tomatoes, but not tomatillos, so far as I can see. Like I said, I'm used to tomatillo-less New Mexico green chili that sometimes includes tomatoes. Here's a recipe from a Santa Fe restaurant, the Pink Adobo, and theirs is flour-thickened, with tomatoes, and broth. This is the style that I learned to cook from my Santa Fe friend (though she didn't use tomatoes herself.) So I expect something like that recipe would go fine a\s a Colorado green chili.

Last edited by pulykamell; 11-02-2019 at 10:52 PM.
  #26  
Old 11-03-2019, 12:34 AM
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Thank you pulykamell. I realize another reason for my confusion is that I tend to use "chili," meaning the fruit, as an indefinite noun - so I'll say, "this dish has chili in it" rather than "this dish has chilis in it." (Same as you might say, "This dish has lemon in it" rather than "lemons"). Makes it even more likely I won't be sure of the meaning from context.
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Last edited by CairoCarol; 11-03-2019 at 12:34 AM.
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Old 11-03-2019, 01:07 AM
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Ingredients

1 lb ground beef (at least 80% lean) Save $
1 cup chopped onions
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped, or 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon chili powder
2 teaspoons chopped fresh or 1 teaspoon dried oregano leaves Save $
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon red pepper sauce
1 can (14.5 oz) Muir Glen™ organic diced tomatoes, undrained
1 can (19 oz) Progresso™ red kidney beans, undrained

Steps
1. In 3-quart saucepan, cook beef, onions and garlic over medium heat 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until beef is thoroughly cooked; drain.
2. Stir in chili powder, oregano, cumin, salt, pepper sauce and tomatoes.
3. Heat to boiling over high heat. Reduce heat just enough so mixture bubbles gently. Cover; cook 1 hour, stirring occasionally.
4. Stir in kidney beans. Heat to boiling over high heat. Reduce heat just enough so mixture bubbles gently. Cook uncovered about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, until desired thickness.

Last edited by Czarcasm; 11-03-2019 at 01:12 AM.
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Old 11-03-2019, 03:41 AM
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I've never made it, but I have this recipe bookmarked which looks good to me and which I've been meaning to try for awhile. It's a Pueblo-style green chili intended for a dish called a "slopper", which apparently consists of a plain hamburger assembled in a bowl, with shredded cheese heaped onto the top, and then smothered in the chili.
  #29  
Old 11-03-2019, 04:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Czarcasm View Post
Ingredients

1 lb ground beef (at least 80% lean) Save $
1 cup chopped onions
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped, or 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon chili powder
2 teaspoons chopped fresh or 1 teaspoon dried oregano leaves Save $
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon red pepper sauce
1 can (14.5 oz) Muir Glen™ organic diced tomatoes, undrained
1 can (19 oz) Progresso™ red kidney beans, undrained

Steps
1. In 3-quart saucepan, cook beef, onions and garlic over medium heat 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until beef is thoroughly cooked; drain.
2. Stir in chili powder, oregano, cumin, salt, pepper sauce and tomatoes.
3. Heat to boiling over high heat. Reduce heat just enough so mixture bubbles gently. Cover; cook 1 hour, stirring occasionally.
4. Stir in kidney beans. Heat to boiling over high heat. Reduce heat just enough so mixture bubbles gently. Cook uncovered about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, until desired thickness.
Took me a second or two.
  #30  
Old 11-03-2019, 09:41 AM
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The recipes pulykamell posted are pretty much what I think of as Green Chile - pork shoulder, roasted green chiles, onions, potatoes, etc. Sometimes I throw a can of tomatoes in. Never tomatillos. The original recipe I used 30 years ago and have long since lost came from a hole-in-the-wall bar in northern New Mexico.

Hatch chiles are great if you can get them, but living in the far north I most often end up with Anaheims. Really, any hottish green chile will work. Maybe not authentic and the chile purists would scoff, but when you don't live in a place where Hatch chiles are common you use what you can.

I lived for years on black bean burritos covered with green chile. Have not thought about that in a long time - so easy & so good. Now I want green chile.
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Old 11-03-2019, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Czarcasm View Post
Ingredients

1 lb ground beef (at least 80% lean) Save $
1 cup chopped onions
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped, or 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon chili powder
2 teaspoons chopped fresh or 1 teaspoon dried oregano leaves Save $
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon red pepper sauce
1 can (14.5 oz) Muir Glen™ organic diced tomatoes, undrained
1 can (19 oz) Progresso™ red kidney beans, undrained

Steps
1. In 3-quart saucepan, cook beef, onions and garlic over medium heat 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until beef is thoroughly cooked; drain.
2. Stir in chili powder, oregano, cumin, salt, pepper sauce and tomatoes.
3. Heat to boiling over high heat. Reduce heat just enough so mixture bubbles gently. Cover; cook 1 hour, stirring occasionally.
4. Stir in kidney beans. Heat to boiling over high heat. Reduce heat just enough so mixture bubbles gently. Cook uncovered about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, until desired thickness.
grooooan
  #32  
Old 11-03-2019, 11:09 AM
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Originally Posted by CairoCarol View Post
Thank you pulykamell. I realize another reason for my confusion is that I tend to use "chili," meaning the fruit, as an indefinite noun - so I'll say, "this dish has chili in it" rather than "this dish has chilis in it." (Same as you might say, "This dish has lemon in it" rather than "lemons"). Makes it even more likely I won't be sure of the meaning from context.
[usage side discussion]

To tell you the truth, I don't typically use the word "chile" to refer to hot peppers. In my dialect (Great Lakes), it is most typical to simply say "peppers" or "hot peppers." So, it would be a jalapeño pepper, a habanero pepper, and Anaheim pepper, etc. Oddly, though, Hatch peppers I instinctively call "Hatch chiles," I assume because they are marketed that way. (When you buy them, either fresh, frozen, or in cans, they are typically labeled as "Hatch chiles.")

And another interesting thing I noticed is that in the example sentence you gave, I would use the singular, "this dish has hot pepper in it" if I were using dried pepper powder in it, and "this dish has hot peppers in it" if I were using fresh or maybe whole dried hot peppers in it. (Much in the same way you might say "this dish has lemon" in it vs "this dish has lemons in it.")

The one usage where it can be especially problematic and confusing if you don't know your culinary terms and how they are used in American cookbooks is "chili powder." Typically, in US cookbooks, this refers to a spice mix of dried hot pepper powder(s), cumin, garlic, and perhaps some other ingredients. It usually does not refer to plain powdered chiles. In other English language cookbooks, I've found that it typically refers to plain powdered chiles.



[/usage side discussion]

Last edited by pulykamell; 11-03-2019 at 11:12 AM.
  #33  
Old 11-03-2019, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
[usage side discussion]

To tell you the truth, I don't typically use the word "chile" to refer to hot peppers. In my dialect (Great Lakes), it is most typical to simply say "peppers" or "hot peppers." So, it would be a jalapeño pepper, a habanero pepper, and Anaheim pepper, etc. Oddly, though, Hatch peppers I instinctively call "Hatch chiles," I assume because they are marketed that way. (When you buy them, either fresh, frozen, or in cans, they are typically labeled as "Hatch chiles.")

And another interesting thing I noticed is that in the example sentence you gave, I would use the singular, "this dish has hot pepper in it" if I were using dried pepper powder in it, and "this dish has hot peppers in it" if I were using fresh or maybe whole dried hot peppers in it. (Much in the same way you might say "this dish has lemon" in it vs "this dish has lemons in it.")

The one usage where it can be especially problematic and confusing if you don't know your culinary terms and how they are used in American cookbooks is "chili powder." Typically, in US cookbooks, this refers to a spice mix of dried hot pepper powder(s), cumin, garlic, and perhaps some other ingredients. It usually does not refer to plain powdered chiles. In other English language cookbooks, I've found that it typically refers to plain powdered chiles.



[/usage side discussion]
Yeah, it's a location thing. If you are in a predominately Hispanic area, you'll see "chile" as in chiles rellenos, whereas in whitebread America, it's generally "chili" or even "chilli" to refer to both the peppers and the dish.
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Old 11-03-2019, 03:21 PM
Ukulele Ike is offline
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I’ve only seen “chilli” used to mean a chile (a pepper) in British books. Or really old American books.

My take is that a chile is a pepper and that chili is a bowl o’ red (finished dish).

I call chile verde that because it’s a dish of meat with chiles. “Chili” is reserved for the red chile dish. And I’ve never put tomatillo in chile verde, and my attempts have all been New Mexico style.
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  #35  
Old 11-03-2019, 06:58 PM
pulykamell is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
Yeah, it's a location thing. If you are in a predominately Hispanic area, you'll see "chile" as in chiles rellenos, whereas in whitebread America, it's generally "chili" or even "chilli" to refer to both the peppers and the dish.
Sure, I live in a 75-80% Hispanic area. I would expect chiles rellenos to be spelled as such, since that's a Spanish name of a dish, not an English one, just as "chile verde" or "chiles en nogada," etc., are. But the hot peppers, when labeled in English, are still generally labeled as "peppers" here.

Last edited by pulykamell; 11-03-2019 at 07:01 PM.
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