Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-06-2019, 04:20 AM
psychonaut is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Europe
Posts: 6,001

English-language books with foreign-language titles


The title of Karl Marx's magnum opus, Das Kapital, is sometimes translated into English as Capital. However, the book is arguably better known to English speakers by its German title, and some English translations even retain the original title.

Victor Hugo's Les Misérables is another example. English translations abound but I can't think of any that translate the title. (Well, I'm sure there must have been some, but I don't recall seeing any of them in the shops.)

Maybe the same could be said of Albert Camus's L'Étranger. Though it's been published in English as The Stranger and The Outsider, some English editions also use the French title.

Are there any other English-language books that use a foreign-language title? Let's exclude titles consisting solely of proper names, so no Berlin Alexanderplatz or Madame Bovary. And bonus points if anyone can name a book that is not itself a translation into English.
  #2  
Old 11-06-2019, 05:40 AM
don't ask is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Australia
Posts: 18,348
Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
Mein Kampf by someone German I imagine.
  #3  
Old 11-06-2019, 05:50 AM
kitap is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 188
Toujours Provence by Peter Mayle
  #4  
Old 11-06-2019, 05:52 AM
Treppenwitz is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: UK
Posts: 1,026
Quote:
Originally Posted by don't ask View Post
......Mein Kampf by someone German I imagine.
Funny you should ask. Our copy (I say "our copy" - I bought it as a birthday present for Mrs Trep) is indeed entitled Mein Kampf. Published in the UK, November 1939 reprint(!).

j
  #5  
Old 11-06-2019, 06:24 AM
psychonaut is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Europe
Posts: 6,001
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitap View Post
Toujours Provence by Peter Mayle
I'd never heard of this one, but some web searchers suggest that it was originally written in the English language. If so, enjoy your bonus points!
  #6  
Old 11-06-2019, 07:16 AM
panache45's Avatar
panache45 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: NE Ohio (the 'burbs)
Posts: 48,859
Quo Vadis by Henryk Sienkiewicz.
  #7  
Old 11-06-2019, 07:32 AM
panache45's Avatar
panache45 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: NE Ohio (the 'burbs)
Posts: 48,859
I know this thread is about books, but many classical music pieces are never (or rarely) translated, like Eine Kleine Nachtmusik or La Bohème.

[/hijack]
  #8  
Old 11-06-2019, 07:50 AM
CalMeacham's Avatar
CalMeacham is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 44,832
Some foreign language books are known by their "foreign" titles because there is no easy translation, or they're better known by the original title.

Titus Lucretius Caro's philosophical book is still often called De Rerum Natura (literally "On the Nature of Things"), because the literal translation seems inadequate. Sometimes it's called "On the Nature of the Universe" or "The Way Things Are".

Jons-Karl Huysmans' À rebours is sometimes sold that way. The translations used ("Against the Grain" or "Against Nature") aren't the same as the literal (and misleading "Backwards".
__________________
The makers of the GoPro have to come out with a model called the "Quid"
  #9  
Old 11-06-2019, 07:54 AM
SanVito is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Bristol, UK
Posts: 4,824
Chocolat by Joanne Harris. Bonus points for being an english original.
  #10  
Old 11-06-2019, 08:13 AM
psychonaut is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Europe
Posts: 6,001
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
Titus Lucretius Caro's philosophical book is still often called De Rerum Natura (literally "On the Nature of Things"), because the literal translation seems inadequate.
I dunno; the title seemed to work for David Suzuki. (For anyone who finds that link cryptic, this is the title of a long-running science and nature documentary series on CBC, hosted by a famous zoologist-cum-media personality.)
  #11  
Old 11-06-2019, 08:55 AM
Hari Seldon is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Trantor
Posts: 13,173
Bonjour Tristesse (Hello--or Goodbye--sadness) by Francoise Sagan who was 18 at the time. It was an overnight sensation and pretty much a one shot success.
  #12  
Old 11-06-2019, 09:36 AM
RealityChuck's Avatar
RealityChuck is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Schenectady, NY, USA
Posts: 42,935
If we count musicals, there's La Cage aux Folles*


*Of course, the script of a musical is called a book, so it fits on a technicality.
__________________
"If a person saying he was something was all there was to it, this country'd be full of rich men and good-looking women. Too bad it isn't that easy.... In short, when someone else says you're a writer, that's when you're a writer... not before."
Purveyor of fine science fiction since 1982.
  #13  
Old 11-06-2019, 09:39 AM
Thudlow Boink's Avatar
Thudlow Boink is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Lincoln, IL
Posts: 27,778
It seems that English translations of Dante's Divine Comedy are usually given that English name, but the names of the three sections (Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso) are given in Italian.
  #14  
Old 11-06-2019, 09:47 AM
digs's Avatar
digs is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: West of Wauwatosa
Posts: 10,132
There are books I've read in French but never even seen the English versions. So not sure which title is more common to English speakers.

Le Petit Prince and À La Recherche du Temps Perdu come to mind.

Hmmm, first thing that comes up for Proust is a Wikipedia entry for "In Search of Lost Time", then the French, then an entry for "Remembrance of Things Past"... not quite the same sense as the French title... or the book.

Last edited by digs; 11-06-2019 at 09:48 AM.
  #15  
Old 11-06-2019, 09:55 AM
Annie-Xmas is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 57,236
Speaking of musicals: Odd that Les Miserables stays the same (except for the Spanish version, whic is LOS Miserables), but Phantom of the Opera gets translated.

When Mexico staged CATS, a newspaper ran a poll about whether it should be called CATS or GATOS. CATS won by a landslide.
  #16  
Old 11-06-2019, 10:00 AM
susan's Avatar
susan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Coastal USA
Posts: 9,666
Soie Sauvage (Poetry, Olga Broumas, in English).

Nox (Anne Carson, conceptual book thing, in English).
  #17  
Old 11-06-2019, 10:14 AM
CalMeacham's Avatar
CalMeacham is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 44,832
Quote:
Originally Posted by digs View Post
There are books I've read in French but never even seen the English versions. So not sure which title is more common to English speakers.

Le Petit Prince and À La Recherche du Temps Perdu come to mind.

Hmmm, first thing that comes up for Proust is a Wikipedia entry for "In Search of Lost Time", then the French, then an entry for "Remembrance of Things Past"... not quite the same sense as the French title... or the book.
Except in foreign-language bookstores, I've never seen these in the US without their translated titles The Little Prince and Remembrance of Things Past.
__________________
The makers of the GoPro have to come out with a model called the "Quid"
  #18  
Old 11-06-2019, 10:16 AM
CalMeacham's Avatar
CalMeacham is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 44,832
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychonaut View Post
I dunno; the title seemed to work for David Suzuki. (For anyone who finds that link cryptic, this is the title of a long-running science and nature documentary series on CBC, hosted by a famous zoologist-cum-media personality.)
I just checked , and now even Penguin has changed the title from On the Nature of the Universe to On the Nature of Things.


Things have changed.
__________________
The makers of the GoPro have to come out with a model called the "Quid"
  #19  
Old 11-06-2019, 10:21 AM
Nava is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Hey! I'm located! WOOOOW!
Posts: 42,955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
Speaking of musicals: Odd that Les Miserables stays the same (except for the Spanish version, whic is LOS Miserables), but Phantom of the Opera gets translated.

When Mexico staged CATS, a newspaper ran a poll about whether it should be called CATS or GATOS. CATS won by a landslide.
Different language pair, but speaking of musicals, We Will Rock You (the musical) remains We Will Rock You in Spanish but apparently some genius decided it was a good idea to translate everything else, including the lyrics. ^lots and lots and lots

Mamma Mia is called Mamma Mia in every language; its original language is English. Unlike WWRY, this one does work with Spanish lyrics, but that's because ABBA already did the translations

Last edited by Nava; 11-06-2019 at 10:23 AM.
  #20  
Old 11-06-2019, 10:24 AM
Little Nemo is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 82,851
Nicholson Baker's Vox is an example of a novel written in English with a foreign language title.

Although I see some dictionaries now list vox as a word in the English language.
  #21  
Old 11-06-2019, 10:43 AM
Annie-Xmas is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 57,236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nava View Post
Different language pair, but speaking of musicals, We Will Rock You (the musical) remains We Will Rock You in Spanish but apparently some genius decided it was a good idea to translate everything else, including the lyrics. ^lots and lots and lots

Mamma Mia is called Mamma Mia in every language; its original language is English. Unlike WWRY, this one does work with Spanish lyrics, but that's because ABBA already did the translations
What? It is traditional to stage the show in the language of whatever country it is in. Some musicals in Quebec alternate English and Quebec French shows. And the amazing people who can translate a song's language into another language and make it rhyme, all t he while keeping the ideas and the music's cadence make beaucoup bucks.

For a listen of Les Mis's 17 Jean Valjeans singing Do You Hear The People Sing in their own different language, click here
  #22  
Old 11-06-2019, 10:49 AM
EinsteinsHund's Avatar
EinsteinsHund is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NRW, Germany
Posts: 3,166
Quote:
Originally Posted by don't ask View Post
Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
Mein Kampf by someone German I imagine.
Nah, Austrian...
__________________
And if my thought-dreams could be seen
They’d probably put my head in a guillotine
  #23  
Old 11-06-2019, 10:52 AM
PatrickLondon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: London
Posts: 3,640
Quote:
Originally Posted by digs View Post
Hmmm, first thing that comes up for Proust is a Wikipedia entry for "In Search of Lost Time", then the French, then an entry for "Remembrance of Things Past"... not quite the same sense as the French title... or the book.
No, indeed and I seem to remember being told that Proust was not happy about the latter. Whether he was reassured on being given the whole context of the source for Remembrance, I don't know.
  #24  
Old 11-06-2019, 11:06 AM
Thudlow Boink's Avatar
Thudlow Boink is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Lincoln, IL
Posts: 27,778
How about album titles? The band Daniel Amos released three consecutive (English language) albums titled ¡Alarma!, Doppelgänger, and Vox Humana.

Last edited by Thudlow Boink; 11-06-2019 at 11:07 AM.
  #25  
Old 11-06-2019, 11:32 AM
EinsteinsHund's Avatar
EinsteinsHund is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NRW, Germany
Posts: 3,166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
How about album titles? The band Daniel Amos released three consecutive (English language) albums titled ¡Alarma!, Doppelgänger, and Vox Humana.
U2 - Achtung Baby
__________________
And if my thought-dreams could be seen
They’d probably put my head in a guillotine
  #26  
Old 11-06-2019, 11:46 AM
doreen is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Woodhaven,Queens, NY
Posts: 6,649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
What? It is traditional to stage the show in the language of whatever country it is in. Some musicals in Quebec alternate English and Quebec French shows. And the amazing people who can translate a song's language into another language and make it rhyme, all t he while keeping the ideas and the music's cadence make beaucoup bucks.

For a listen of Les Mis's 17 Jean Valjeans singing Do You Hear The People Sing in their own different language, click here

I'm sure it's normal to stage most shows ( including musicals) in the language of whatever country they are in. But I think a jukebox musical is different - those shows are based on pre-existing popular music which most likely wasn't recorded in multiple languages.


For example, "We Will Rock you" is based on the music of Queen, " Moving Out" is based on Billy Joel's music, and "Million Dollar Quartet" is based on the music of Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Elvis Presley. Most people attending those shows will be familiar with those songs in English. It's possibly that some songs from Les Mis or another non-jukebox musical might become popular, but WWRY premiered in 2002 - 27 years after some of those songs were first released and they had been heard on the radio and in concerts throughout all the years.

Last edited by doreen; 11-06-2019 at 11:46 AM.
  #27  
Old 11-06-2019, 11:55 AM
Annie-Xmas is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 57,236
ABBA's songs are well known in English, but all productions of Mamma Mia! are done in the foreign languages, including the songs. And Swedish theatre goers begged for a Swedish version of Chess (musical by Benny & Bjorn; lyric by Tim Rice) long before "Chess pa svenska" was released.
  #28  
Old 11-06-2019, 11:59 AM
Quercus is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: temperate forest
Posts: 7,198
I just did a quick check of my local library's catalog, and found both Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, and Newton's Principia as titles. So this one is a 'sometimes foreign, sometimes translated'


I'm sure there are lots of books written in English with a latin phrase as a title. Though the poem "Dulce et Decorum est" is the only one I can think of offhand. (Hmm.. the title should be in quotes, as the title of a shorter work, but should it also be italicized, as foreign-language words?)
  #29  
Old 11-06-2019, 12:05 PM
MrAtoz is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 1,634
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
Except in foreign-language bookstores, I've never seen these in the US without their translated titles The Little Prince and Remembrance of Things Past.
When I was younger, Remembrance of Things Past seemed to be the usual English title for Proust's novel. These days, I usually see it titled In Search of Last Time, a more literal rendering of the French title À la recherche du temps perdu. I have the sense that there has been a critical consensus to start using the latter English title. Even newer editions of the Scott Moncrieff translation, which originated the "Remembrance..." title, now seem to use "In Search..." instead.
  #30  
Old 11-06-2019, 12:15 PM
Colibri's Avatar
Colibri is online now
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 43,412
Xenophon's Anabasis pretty much invariably appears under its Greek title, rather than "The March Up" or other less direct translations.

Oscar Wilde's De Profundis ("From the Depths"), originally written as a letter rather than a book, is always published under that title. It counts as a work in English with a foreign language name.

Last edited by Colibri; 11-06-2019 at 02:33 PM.
  #31  
Old 11-06-2019, 01:41 PM
Treppenwitz is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: UK
Posts: 1,026
Songs are allowed? Well:

Amoureuse by Kiki Dee.

Two links, huh?*

j

* - you get the original as a bonus.
  #32  
Old 11-06-2019, 02:39 PM
EinsteinsHund's Avatar
EinsteinsHund is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NRW, Germany
Posts: 3,166
I just donated my annual €5 to wikipedia and thought about the Encyclopedia Britannica, and came to mind that it's an example for this thread.
__________________
And if my thought-dreams could be seen
They’d probably put my head in a guillotine

Last edited by EinsteinsHund; 11-06-2019 at 02:41 PM.
  #33  
Old 11-06-2019, 03:12 PM
bonzer is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: NW5
Posts: 3,200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quercus View Post
I just did a quick check of my local library's catalog, and found both Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, and Newton's Principia as titles. So this one is a 'sometimes foreign, sometimes translated'
Whereas Russell and Whitehead's Principia Mathematica is always referred to by that Latin title, though it's written in (perhaps something akin to) English. Similarly with Wittgenstein's Tractatus (though the main text of that started in German) and Moore's Principia Ethica.
  #34  
Old 11-07-2019, 05:33 AM
APB is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 2,127
Although he wrote more than his fair share of books in Latin with Latin titles, Milton was fond of using foreign language titles for works written in English, such as L'Allegro and Il Penseroso, Areopagitica, Eikonoklastes and Samson Agonistes.

Another work in English with a foreign title (by someone with rather different religious views) would be Newman’s Apologia Pro Vita Sua.

French works whose titles are rarely translated also include Zola’s Germinal and Pascal’s Pensées. The former is pretty much untranslatable, because the month has no direct equivalent in the Gregorian calendar, while ‘Thoughts’ is presumably considered insufficiently pretentious for the latter.
  #35  
Old 11-07-2019, 06:26 AM
Horatio Hellpop is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Jeju-si, S. Korea
Posts: 9,811
Aren't there a lot of legal thrillers with titles like Habeas Corpus and In Flagrante Delicto? I don't follow the genre closely, but it seems to me there might be a bunch of them.
  #36  
Old 11-07-2019, 06:31 AM
Banksiaman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,042
Borderline compliance with the OP's requirements - James Clavell, writer of big fat airport action novels had an Asian series, with some having titles such as Tai-Pan, Shogun and Gai-jin. The first two are ranks of office but the third is just a Japanese term for westerners.
  #37  
Old 11-07-2019, 06:45 AM
Nava is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Hey! I'm located! WOOOOW!
Posts: 42,955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
What? It is traditional to stage the show in the language of whatever country it is in.
Yes, but We Will Rock You is a singalong play. Half the fun (heck, 95% of it) is belting the songs along with the cast. I understand that Spanish audiences would just sing them in English (or, for those whose English sucks, in their asereje-equivalent) because damnit the one thing you don't do in such a play is Just Watch It. It's not a musical written as such, it's a rock concert with some spoken bits in between.



I'm drawing a blank on its name, but I once watched a play that El Tricicle had obtained permission to adapt from a Norwegian one. The play takes place in a retirement home for musicians; the only character who hasn't had a life of sex, drugs, rock'n'roll and many decades is the nurse. Both in the Norwegian original and in the Spanish version, most of the songs were international hard rock hits in English. The main exceptions in the Spanish version were an edulcorated lullaby sang by the nurse (also the only new song, and the only one where the audience wasn't singing along) and... a disco hit?

Gloria Gaynor's "I will survive" (in the original a song about surviving a bad relationship and breakup) transmuted after just a few bars in English, into its best known Spanish version: Celia Cruz' "Sobreviviré" (musicians never die as long as their songs live), at which point the audience didn't just sing along, the only people who didn't stand up were my mother (who was asking "what's happening, what's going on") and a guy in a wheelchair. The volume at which we belted out the final ASÚUUUUCA (Doña Celia's signature) showed that Teatro Gayarre is a very solid building: it didn't come down.

Could they have chosen Spanish metal hits instead? Yeah, but it would have made the story more limited and that ASÚUUUUCA less poignant.

Last edited by Nava; 11-07-2019 at 06:46 AM.
  #38  
Old 11-07-2019, 10:14 AM
Thudlow Boink's Avatar
Thudlow Boink is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Lincoln, IL
Posts: 27,778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banksiaman View Post
Borderline compliance with the OP's requirements - James Clavell, writer of big fat airport action novels had an Asian series, with some having titles such as Tai-Pan, Shogun and Gai-jin. The first two are ranks of office but the third is just a Japanese term for westerners.
If those count, probably so does Mario Puzo's novel Omertà.
  #39  
Old 11-07-2019, 01:34 PM
bibliophage is offline
Charter Member
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Maine
Posts: 10,711
Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. Text originally in English but derived partially from French sources.

Sophocles' Oedipus Rex. Text originally in Greek. Rex is the Latin word for King.

Several books of the Bible have titles that are Greek, either direct transliterations or by way of Latin: Genesis ('origin'), Exodus 'departure', Ecclesiastes ('the speaker' or 'the preacher'), Apocalypse ('uncovering'), and the apocryphal book of Ecclesiasticus ('the church'). One more is only slightly Anglicized: Deuteronomy, ('second law').
  #40  
Old 11-07-2019, 01:45 PM
Thudlow Boink's Avatar
Thudlow Boink is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Lincoln, IL
Posts: 27,778
Quote:
Originally Posted by bibliophage View Post
Sophocles' Oedipus Rex. Text originally in Greek. Rex is the Latin word for King.
Good one, although Oedipus the King and Oedipus Rex are both commonly used as the title.

Quote:
Several books of the Bible have titles that are Greek, either direct transliterations or by way of Latin: Genesis ('origin'), Exodus 'departure', Ecclesiastes ('the speaker' or 'the preacher')...
Good examples.
Quote:
... Apocalypse ('uncovering')
Wait, what? If you mean the last book of the Bible, I've only ever seen it titled Revelation in English Bibles.
  #41  
Old 11-07-2019, 02:24 PM
Les Espaces Du Sommeil's Avatar
Les Espaces Du Sommeil is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,781
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
...
Jons-Karl Huysmans' À rebours is sometimes sold that way. The translations used ("Against the Grain" or "Against Nature") aren't the same as the literal (and misleading "Backwards".
I've seen English translations of this book with the original French title, indeed. And kudos to you mentioning this lesser-known but great writer (that's the real reason why I posted ). Anyways, he's one of my very favourite 19th-century writers.

There's another novel (even better than À rebours IMHO) of his whose original title, Là-Bas, is sometimes kept in English. Literally : "Over There", sometimes translated as The Damned or Down There. La Cathédrale is less satisfying, but still worth reading, a sort of Catholic rewriting of À rebours . And for once, the English title is easy to find.
__________________
Mais je porte accroché au plus haut des entrailles
À la place où la foudre a frappé trop souvent
Un cœur où chaque mot a laissé son entaille
Et d’où ma vie s’égoutte au moindre mouvement

Last edited by Les Espaces Du Sommeil; 11-07-2019 at 02:24 PM.
  #42  
Old 11-07-2019, 02:30 PM
Les Espaces Du Sommeil's Avatar
Les Espaces Du Sommeil is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,781
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hari Seldon View Post
Bonjour Tristesse (Hello--or Goodbye--sadness)...

Er... "Good Morning Sadness" you mean ? Definitely not "Goodbye".
__________________
Mais je porte accroché au plus haut des entrailles
À la place où la foudre a frappé trop souvent
Un cœur où chaque mot a laissé son entaille
Et d’où ma vie s’égoutte au moindre mouvement
  #43  
Old 11-11-2019, 11:58 AM
HeyHomie's Avatar
HeyHomie is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Viburnum, MO
Posts: 10,003
As an inverse to this, I watch a YouTube channel by an American woman living in Germany. Her book, in German, has an English title, You Go Me On The Cookie (I don't get it either). Her publisher has no plans to release it in English.
  #44  
Old 11-11-2019, 12:16 PM
EinsteinsHund's Avatar
EinsteinsHund is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NRW, Germany
Posts: 3,166
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeyHomie View Post
As an inverse to this, I watch a YouTube channel by an American woman living in Germany. Her book, in German, has an English title, You Go Me On The Cookie (I don't get it either). Her publisher has no plans to release it in English.
That must be Dana Newman, isn't it? I really like her videos. The explanation for the title: there's a German phrase "Du gehst mir auf den Keks", meaning "You grate on my nerves". "You go me on the cookie" is the very literal word for word translation of the phrase which of course doesn't make any sense at all, but it's funny (at least for this German).
__________________
And if my thought-dreams could be seen
They’d probably put my head in a guillotine

Last edited by EinsteinsHund; 11-11-2019 at 12:19 PM.
  #45  
Old 11-11-2019, 01:42 PM
HeyHomie's Avatar
HeyHomie is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Viburnum, MO
Posts: 10,003
Quote:
Originally Posted by EinsteinsHund View Post
That must be Dana Newman, isn't it? I really like her videos. The explanation for the title: there's a German phrase "Du gehst mir auf den Keks", meaning "You grate on my nerves". "You go me on the cookie" is the very literal word for word translation of the phrase which of course doesn't make any sense at all, but it's funny (at least for this German).
It is indeed Dana! I had no idea what the title meant, I always figured it was her own translation of a German phrase that she'd mangled, or something. Really wish her publisher would publish it in English, FFS.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:31 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2019 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017