Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-06-2019, 08:51 AM
Dinsdale is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 18,896

How healthy is lentil pasta?


My wife and I have been moving towards a more plant-based, less processed diet. When we began this move some years ago we made the mistake (in our opinion) of adding more traditional flour pasta - as a base for our cooked veggies/sauces.

More recently, we've been eating more lentils and beans, and whole grain rice. Switching to those, we are able to eat as much as we wish - getting the feeling of satiation, and have lost weight while doing so. (We had both disliked the feeling of hunger or "going without" from many other "diets.")

Relatively recently we discovered lentil and chickpea pastas.. It seems like the best of both worlds. The ingredients/nutrition info seem to indicate it is essentially the same as the beans themselves. But we were wondering whether something is lost during the processing of the beans into flour, such that we ought not think this a "free ride." Don't want to end up like Kramer gobbling his "fat-free" yogurt!

Any thoughts/experience?
__________________
I used to be disgusted.
Now I try to be amused.
  #2  
Old 11-06-2019, 12:24 PM
QuickSilver is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 19,353
My only thought is that I'd certainly like to try the lentil one. I've had chickpea past in the past. Was underwhelmed. But for those with gluten issues, it's probably a godsend.

ETA: Was just informed that we have lentil pasta in the pantry. I'll get back to you.
__________________
St. QuickSilver: Patron Saint of Thermometers.

Last edited by QuickSilver; 11-06-2019 at 12:26 PM.
  #3  
Old 11-06-2019, 12:46 PM
TriPolar is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 41,125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dinsdale View Post
But we were wondering whether something is lost during the processing of the beans into flour, such that we ought not think this a "free ride." Don't want to end up like Kramer gobbling his "fat-free" yogurt!
What on earth did you imagine happening?

I saw something about lentil pasta a while back. Couldn't find that report but this article says about the same thing., it's good and healthy. You'll react to it the way you would react to eating lentils and chick peas in other forms.

ETA: The cost of manufacturing pasta is very low. Since the lentil and chickpea version is similarly priced it is likely almost identical to the process of making wheat pasta.

Last edited by TriPolar; 11-06-2019 at 12:51 PM.
  #4  
Old 11-06-2019, 12:55 PM
Telemark's Avatar
Telemark is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Just outside of Titletown
Posts: 23,092
https://www.fooducate.com/product/Ba...0-835B90C968A1
https://www.fooducate.com/product/Ba...2-FEFD45A4D471

More fiber, protein, and iron. Slightly fewer calories. Seems like a good choice, no obvious downsides.
  #5  
Old 11-06-2019, 03:44 PM
Dinsdale is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 18,896
Quote:
Originally Posted by TriPolar View Post
What on earth did you imagine happening?
...
My wife pays a lot more attention to nutrition science than I (and also has more health concerns than I).

But when we read The China Study and Forks over Knives, etc., we increased our pasta intake. Later, she came to understand that refined white flour is essentially sugar.

IMO, the lentil/chickpea pastas are a great substitute for regular pasta. Not sure why more folk don't eat them. But I wondered if somehow the act of grinding it into flour derived some of the nutrition, as flour compares to whole wheat.
__________________
I used to be disgusted.
Now I try to be amused.
  #6  
Old 11-06-2019, 04:14 PM
carrps is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 919
What about the taste? Does any dish made with lentil pasta have an extra -- for lack of a better word -- lentil-y taste?

I like lentils, but I wouldn't want a lentil flavor in certain dishes.
__________________
  #7  
Old 11-06-2019, 04:24 PM
Dinsdale is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 18,896
Quote:
Originally Posted by carrps View Post
What about the taste? Does any dish made with lentil pasta have an extra -- for lack of a better word -- lentil-y taste?

I like lentils, but I wouldn't want a lentil flavor in certain dishes.
To my palate, they are pretty bland. I'm sure I could tell one from the other in a blind test, but they certainly have less taste than - say - some of the spinach, tomato, etc flavored pastas. They are pretty cheap and widely available at basic supermarkets. Give them a try and let us know what you think!

A very good substitute for wheat pasta. To me, the biggest difference is the "tooth-feel." They are somewhat more "chewy." But I haven't noticed them significantly detracting from or adding to the flavor of whatever we serve with them.
__________________
I used to be disgusted.
Now I try to be amused.
  #8  
Old 11-06-2019, 04:39 PM
Staggerlee is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Bristol, UK
Posts: 2,005
I'd recommend pea pasta if you see it; though as it tastes quite strongly of pea it's not perhaps suitable for every dish. It's quite funny too, having a traditionally bland carb replaced with sweet green vegetable flavour.

Black bean pasta on the other hand, I found to be quite vile.
  #9  
Old 11-07-2019, 01:17 AM
RioRico is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: beyond cell service
Posts: 412
For a bland, guilt-free pasta, I hand-run zucchini or carrots through a spiralizer. Saute with whatever for flavor.
  #10  
Old 11-07-2019, 08:08 AM
Dinsdale is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 18,896
Quote:
Originally Posted by RioRico View Post
For a bland, guilt-free pasta, I hand-run zucchini or carrots through a spiralizer. Saute with whatever for flavor.
Yeah, and you can buy frozen. Or use spaghetti sauce. All good "bases" to fill you up, but I think it a stretch to call them "pasta."
__________________
I used to be disgusted.
Now I try to be amused.
  #11  
Old 11-07-2019, 08:11 AM
pulykamell is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 48,098
When I was dieting, I actually found the fresh shirataki noodles with tofu to work quite well in Asian style dishes. You do need to rinse them a bit and they have, for lack of better word, a sort of "fishiness" to them, but I found they went great with Chinese and Thai stir fry-type dishes. I'm not sure they'd make a great spaghetti substitute, though, or work really well for Italian-style pasta sauces, but I could be wrong.

(Note, that I'm talking about tofu shirataki, not the plain shirataki. Those are so-so, but much less satisfying, and less pasta-like.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 11-07-2019 at 08:11 AM.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:12 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2019 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017