Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-11-2020, 09:38 AM
Alpha Twit's Avatar
Alpha Twit is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Somewhere south of normal
Posts: 2,601

Does "MADE IN AMERICA" ever indicate a desirable product outside of the U.S.A.?


If you ask most citizens of the U.S.A. about imported, sometime exotic, consumer goods then certain stereotypes immediately come to mind. German cars are well engineered. Italian cars are exciting and sexy. Japanese cars are reliable and an excellent value for money. Swiss watches have an entirely mythology surrounding their legendary qualities. Chinese goods may give you a bit of cancer but are dirt cheap. The list goes on.

Is the opposite ever true? Does a non-U.S.A. resident ever look at something, see the "MADE IN U.S.A." label and think "Yes, I trust that. I know what I'm getting and it has (desirable trait X).) We ship our pop culture, movies and TV shows around the world and American farmers feed a fair number of people globally but as far as finished, manufactured goods, I'm not really thinking of any.

What say ye of the global Dope community? Do manufacturers in the U.S.A. do anything well?
__________________
There's plenty few problems in this life that can't be helped by a good day's work, a good night's sleep and a few swift kicks in the right asses.
  #2  
Old 02-11-2020, 09:40 AM
silenus's Avatar
silenus is offline
Isaiah 1:15/Screw the NRA
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 52,067
Weapons systems. Everybody loves our fighter planes.
  #3  
Old 02-11-2020, 10:46 AM
Jackmannii's Avatar
Jackmannii is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: the extreme center
Posts: 32,882
Bourbon, baseball and barbecue.
  #4  
Old 02-11-2020, 11:39 AM
scr4 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Alabama
Posts: 16,400
Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus View Post
Weapons systems. Everybody loves our fighter planes.
Well, not the Chinese or the Russians. Europe makes a lot of their own fighter jets. Japan and India are gearing up to do the same.
  #5  
Old 02-11-2020, 11:51 AM
Velocity is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 16,641
Quote:
Originally Posted by scr4 View Post
Well, not the Chinese or the Russians. Europe makes a lot of their own fighter jets. Japan and India are gearing up to do the same.
In addition, even when offered the option of American warplanes, many nations have opted for rival products instead.

Brazil was offered Super Hornet; they chose to buy Swedish Gripen instead.
India was offered F-16 or Super Hornet; they chose to go with French Rafale instead.
Hungary was offered the F-16; they went with Swedish Gripens.
Qatar looked into Strike Eagle, Super Hornet or F-35, decided to go Eurofighter and Rafale instead.
  #6  
Old 02-11-2020, 05:19 PM
bump is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 19,221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocity View Post
In addition, even when offered the option of American warplanes, many nations have opted for rival products instead.

Brazil was offered Super Hornet; they chose to buy Swedish Gripen instead.
India was offered F-16 or Super Hornet; they chose to go with French Rafale instead.
Hungary was offered the F-16; they went with Swedish Gripens.
Qatar looked into Strike Eagle, Super Hornet or F-35, decided to go Eurofighter and Rafale instead.
That's not necessarily an indication of quality, but all sorts of stuff like up front cost, technology transfer, maintenance cost, availability of spares, etc... go into those decisions.

25 nations use the F-16, for example, including wealthy ones like the UAE, Singapore and South Korea, and others with formidable air forces, like Israel.

I think that the US fighters tend to be more Cadillac than Chevy in a lot of ways, as they're made for the USAF and then sold for export.
  #7  
Old 02-12-2020, 04:01 PM
carnivorousplant is offline
KB not found. Press any key
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 59,752
Quote:
Originally Posted by scr4 View Post
Well, not the Chinese or the Russians. Europe makes a lot of their own fighter jets. Japan and India are gearing up to do the same.
I imagine the Russians and Chinese would love to get their hands on some USA aircraft.
__________________
You callous bastard! More of my illusions have just been shattered!!-G0sp3l
  #8  
Old 02-11-2020, 12:39 PM
BrotherCadfael is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 10,436
Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus View Post
Weapons systems. Everybody loves our fighter planes.
As long as Vincent Schiavelli is the salesperson.




Remember the old saw about the Japanese town which was renamed "Usa" so they could honestly put "Made in Usa" on their packaging? (Urban legend)
  #9  
Old 02-11-2020, 12:57 PM
Little Nemo is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 84,436
If my experience watching the Try Channel is anything to go by, America leads the world in the production of snack items.
  #10  
Old 02-11-2020, 01:41 PM
Alpha Twit's Avatar
Alpha Twit is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Somewhere south of normal
Posts: 2,601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
If my experience watching the Try Channel is anything to go by, America leads the world in the production of snack items.
Yeah but how many of them actually LIKE the foods they're sampling. Dermot and George really seem to be confused by our obsessions with peanut butter, corn syrup, "artificial flavors" and scary, industrial neon food colors.
__________________
There's plenty few problems in this life that can't be helped by a good day's work, a good night's sleep and a few swift kicks in the right asses.
  #11  
Old 02-11-2020, 10:48 AM
polar bear is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,141
Maybe, but as a consumer...nothing springs to mind. BBQ sauce maybe?

One could argue "entertainment", since American movies and TV dominate to the extent where it is assumed to be from the US, unless it is explicitly mentioned to be from elsewhere.

Verstuurd vanaf mijn moto g(6) met Tapatalk
  #12  
Old 02-11-2020, 10:55 AM
Doug K. is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Hutchinson, KS
Posts: 4,112
In the words of Dan Aykroyd:

Quote:
And that is, as you look around the world, you go to the Soviet Union or Great Britain or France, you name it, any country... Everybody is doing flips and twists just to get into a genuine pair of American blue jeans!
Of course most "genuine American blue jeans" aren't made in the US anymore.
  #13  
Old 02-11-2020, 10:58 AM
Colibri's Avatar
Colibri is offline
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 44,290
Here in Panama, US brands in supermarkets are often better quality than local brands. This goes for fresh produce of some kinds as well - sweet corn, celery, lettuce, potatoes, and others are better quality than that that is locally produced.

This doesn't go for cars, where Japanese makes overwhelmingly dominate the market.
  #14  
Old 02-11-2020, 10:51 AM
Colibri's Avatar
Colibri is offline
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 44,290
Since opinions on this may differ, let's move it to IMHO.

Colibri
General Questions Moderator
  #15  
Old 02-11-2020, 10:51 AM
bob++ is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Worcestershire UK
Posts: 7,012
This UK citizen differentiates between high-tech stuff like computers and fighter planes and ordinary everyday stuff like cars, white goods, clothes and food.

For the former - yes. Most of the Silicon Valley products are well made and desirable and we do quite like the weapons. For the latter - not so much. American cars are too big, too thirsty and mostly poorly engineered. Based partly on what I read on this forum, white goods in the USA are behind Europe's in almost every respect, clothing looks old fashioned (apart from haute couture) and there is a general distrust of American produce, partly fueled by the anti-GM lobby. From my personal experience, American cheese is pretty vile and chocolate is disgusting - oh! and bread is over-sweet to the point of being inedible.

So - you make good weapon systems and high-tech stuff (Is any of it still actually made in the USA?) but for the man in the street, "Made in America" is not a good sales point.
  #16  
Old 02-11-2020, 10:54 AM
Velocity is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 16,641
Many Chinese tourists will load up on American-made vitamins, medicines and supplements when they're visiting the United States, because the meds back home in China are known to often be substandard or problematic. But that may be less an indication of high U.S. quality than low Chinese quality.
  #17  
Old 02-11-2020, 01:39 PM
Kovitlac is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocity View Post
Many Chinese tourists will load up on American-made vitamins, medicines and supplements when they're visiting the United States, because the meds back home in China are known to often be substandard or problematic. But that may be less an indication of high U.S. quality than low Chinese quality.
Weirdly enough, they also get electronics like phones and tablets from the US, too. Just like it's cheaper for us to get them when they're made there there, it's often cheaper for them to get those same electronics from us, taking into account the currency exchange. I have a Chinese coworker who takes requests from friends and family about what to pick up when she visits. Apparently it's quite common.
  #18  
Old 02-11-2020, 04:48 PM
Jet Jaguar is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Monster Island
Posts: 1,589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kovitlac View Post
Weirdly enough, they also get electronics like phones and tablets from the US, too. Just like it's cheaper for us to get them when they're made there there, it's often cheaper for them to get those same electronics from us, taking into account the currency exchange. I have a Chinese coworker who takes requests from friends and family about what to pick up when she visits. Apparently it's quite common.
My wife is from China and her parents live with us here in the U.S. They are constantly buying stuff for their friends in China, mostly vitamins, medicines, and cosmetics. The main reason isn't that they are made in America, but that fakes are so common and hard to spot in China that buying stuff from overseas is a way to make sure you're getting the real thing.
  #19  
Old 02-11-2020, 11:50 AM
Oredigger77 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Back at 5,280
Posts: 5,322
Whiskey. American Bourbon and spirits in general are in high demand.
  #20  
Old 02-11-2020, 11:55 AM
Hermitian's Avatar
Hermitian is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 2,731
Commercial aircraft. Well, before the 737 MAX happened.
  #21  
Old 02-11-2020, 11:51 AM
scr4 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Alabama
Posts: 16,400
As someone who grew up in Japan, I can't think of any American consumer products that are actually made in the USA and valued in Japan for it.

If we include non-consumer goods, I hear American cotton is prized for being the best quality. A lot of cotton is exported from the US and go through several countries before coming back to the US as clothing.
  #22  
Old 02-11-2020, 12:08 PM
Die Capacitrix's Avatar
Die Capacitrix is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 346
Jack Daniels / Jim Bean

Ford Mustangs and other American muscle cars

Martin Guitars and other guitar manufacturers

Zildjian cymbals

Fun fact: Paiste, the other main cymbal manufacturer is not far from where I live. The first time we drove past it, we said, "Was that really Paiste?"
  #23  
Old 02-11-2020, 04:37 PM
F. U. Shakespeare is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Baltimore or less
Posts: 4,315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Die Capacitrix View Post
(snip) Martin Guitars and other guitar manufacturers (snip)
That's what I came here to post.

Other acoustic guitar manufacturers would definitely include Taylor.

Also, National, Scheerhorn, and Beard, who specialize in resophonic (aka resonator) guitars.

Interestingly (to me anyway), the resonator guitar (often seen played lap-style in bluegrass bands and sometimes referred to as a Dobro) is the only of the five common instruments in bluegrass bands originating in the U.S. (the others being the guitar, fiddle, mandolin (Europe) and banjo (Africa)).
  #24  
Old 02-14-2020, 03:21 PM
Kropotkin is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: North
Posts: 905
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. U. Shakespeare View Post
That's what I came here to post.

Other acoustic guitar manufacturers would definitely include Taylor.

Also, National, Scheerhorn, and Beard, who specialize in resophonic (aka resonator) guitars.

Interestingly (to me anyway), the resonator guitar (often seen played lap-style in bluegrass bands and sometimes referred to as a Dobro) is the only of the five common instruments in bluegrass bands originating in the U.S. (the others being the guitar, fiddle, mandolin (Europe) and banjo (Africa)).
Resonator guitar, maybe, but “lap steel guitar” is usually credited as Hawaiian, circa 1890s, so arguably not American....
  #25  
Old 02-11-2020, 12:16 PM
WildaBeast's Avatar
WildaBeast is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Folsom, CA
Posts: 1,084
Ketchup. No, seriously. While traveling in Africa a few years ago the condiments provided on our tour were from the American Garden brand, and all branded "US Ketchup", "US Mustard", "US Mayonnaise", etc. Apparently the company was founded in New York (and therefore can claim to be American) to sell American style foods overseas, but headquartered in Dubai now. I'd guess the products are actually made locally where they're sold rather than exported from the US, but they definitely seem to be marketed based on the idea that they are American, or at least American-style products.
  #26  
Old 02-11-2020, 12:33 PM
Alpha Twit's Avatar
Alpha Twit is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Somewhere south of normal
Posts: 2,601
Quote:
Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
Ketchup. No, seriously. While traveling in Africa a few years ago the condiments provided on our tour were from the American Garden brand, and all branded "US Ketchup", "US Mustard", "US Mayonnaise", etc. Apparently the company was founded in New York (and therefore can claim to be American) to sell American style foods overseas, but headquartered in Dubai now. I'd guess the products are actually made locally where they're sold rather than exported from the US, but they definitely seem to be marketed based on the idea that they are American, or at least American-style products.
Fair enough but these items seem to be marketed towards Western tourists. Are the locals buying them?
__________________
There's plenty few problems in this life that can't be helped by a good day's work, a good night's sleep and a few swift kicks in the right asses.
  #27  
Old 02-11-2020, 03:49 PM
WildaBeast's Avatar
WildaBeast is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Folsom, CA
Posts: 1,084
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpha Twit View Post
Fair enough but these items seem to be marketed towards Western tourists. Are the locals buying them?
Don't get the wrong idea just because I said it was provided on a tour. Our guides still bought all the food they served us from local shops. It certainly seemed to me to be primarily marked to locals.
  #28  
Old 02-11-2020, 03:52 PM
Alpha Twit's Avatar
Alpha Twit is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Somewhere south of normal
Posts: 2,601
Quote:
Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
Don't get the wrong idea just because I said it was provided on a tour. Our guides still bought all the food they served us from local shops. It certainly seemed to me to be primarily marked to locals.
OK, fair enough. I accept your explanation and express sincere regret for my confusion.
__________________
There's plenty few problems in this life that can't be helped by a good day's work, a good night's sleep and a few swift kicks in the right asses.
  #29  
Old 02-11-2020, 01:06 PM
jerez is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 678
Several kinds of music (blues, jazz, country, rock, bluegrass, etc.), Hollywood-style cinema and maybe some medical treatments.
  #30  
Old 02-11-2020, 01:19 PM
Dorjän is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Euclid, OH
Posts: 2,280
The general consensus in Asia (China especially) is that Wisconsin-grown ginseng is the finest in the world. When we visited my wife's relatives in H.K. a couple of years ago, we brought a few boxes as gifts.
  #31  
Old 02-13-2020, 02:46 AM
kitap is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorjän View Post
The general consensus in Asia (China especially) is that Wisconsin-grown ginseng is the finest in the world. When we visited my wife's relatives in H.K. a couple of years ago, we brought a few boxes as gifts.
I lived in Wausau for four years. It's in Marathon County, which grows something like 90% of U.S. ginseng. They have some sort of US-Chinese ginseng association there, which did not surprise me.
  #32  
Old 02-11-2020, 02:00 PM
Wrenching Spanners is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: London
Posts: 777
Many US brands are quite popular. However, that doesn’t mean the actual products are manufactured in the US. For most normal physical consumer goods, I don’t think there’s any expectation that they will be. For high-end and specialist goods, there are certainly markets for US made goods. There are lots of niche products such as tools or specialist electronics that have a single manufacturer, and often that will be a US manufacturer. There’s also food and beverage items, such as the bourbon mentioned earlier, and tabasco sauce. For intellectual content, I’m not sure how you assess its origin. The OP mentioned pop culture including television and movies. There’s also books, music, Youtube, social media, other internet sites, video games and more. I’m sure that in the UK much more US manufactured “content” is consumed than physical goods. A John Grisham paper-based book may be printed in the UK or in a third country, but I’d still consider it a US product. I’m not sure how you could assess where an e-book was made.
  #33  
Old 02-11-2020, 03:34 PM
Melbourne is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 5,787
I can't think of anything in Aus. Stuff made in America has to come through a painful export process, from companies that aren't really set up to do export, with huge export markups to handle shipping, lead times, and payment problems. When I see 'made in America', I think ug, that's a problem. Even though the problem isn't actually the product.
  #34  
Old 02-11-2020, 03:42 PM
MrDibble's Avatar
MrDibble is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Cape Town, South Africa &
Posts: 27,423
Some tool brands generally have a good rep - DeWalt and Dremel, to name a couple.
  #35  
Old 02-11-2020, 04:03 PM
ZipperJJ's Avatar
ZipperJJ is offline
Just Lovely and Delicious
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 25,733
What do you all think about our breakfast cereals? Fun stuff like Lucky Charms and Fruit Loops, etc.
  #36  
Old 02-11-2020, 04:10 PM
Alpha Twit's Avatar
Alpha Twit is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Somewhere south of normal
Posts: 2,601
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
What do you all think about our breakfast cereals? Fun stuff like Lucky Charms and Fruit Loops, etc.
A few data points: Irish People Try American Cereals and Irish People Try New American Cereals
__________________
There's plenty few problems in this life that can't be helped by a good day's work, a good night's sleep and a few swift kicks in the right asses.
  #37  
Old 02-12-2020, 10:16 AM
ZipperJJ's Avatar
ZipperJJ is offline
Just Lovely and Delicious
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 25,733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpha Twit View Post
Those videos aren't as enlightening as you'd think. They both have several limited-edition and slightly off flavors of staples (Donut Cap'n Crunch, Fruit Loops with Marshmallows, Blueberry Pancake Cap'n Crunch) that Americans don't like either (otherwise they'd be around all the time) and a couple of regular cereals (Peanut Butter Cap'n Crunch and Reese's Peanut Butter Cereal) that Americans like well enough too that they're always on the shelves. The Irish people liked the same ones Americans like.

Not sure if the video was meant to be disingenuous or if they're just mis-informed.

But Irish people sure do have a fascination with peanut butter! I think I've read on the SDMB before that it's not really a thing outside of the US.
  #38  
Old 02-12-2020, 11:02 AM
MrDibble's Avatar
MrDibble is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Cape Town, South Africa &
Posts: 27,423
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
I think I've read on the SDMB before that it's not really a thing outside of the US.
Naw, I think peanut butter is quite common in lots of places. Certainly is here.

What freaks us out is that thing you do, where you mix it with grape jam, though... *shudder*
  #39  
Old 02-12-2020, 02:29 PM
jerez is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 678
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDibble View Post
Naw, I think peanut butter is quite common in lots of places. Certainly is here...
Yeah, and things like ketchup, mayo, etc. There are local brands and many people prefer the more expensive American ones. Often enough, they are better, but I think people don't stop to wonder if they aren't made locally under license.
  #40  
Old 02-11-2020, 04:19 PM
EinsteinsHund's Avatar
EinsteinsHund is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NRW, Germany
Posts: 3,451
If I think of products with a good reputation that are explicitly marketed as American here, other than food or cultural exports, only two come to mind: Harley Davidson, though nobody buys a Harley for the great engineering (which it isn't), but because it's cool and we know it from movies, and Zippo lighters. Now the latter are engineered to perfection, but then it's also no rocket science.
__________________
And if my thought-dreams could be seen
They’d probably put my head in a guillotine

Last edited by EinsteinsHund; 02-11-2020 at 04:22 PM.
  #41  
Old 02-12-2020, 01:23 AM
MrDibble's Avatar
MrDibble is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Cape Town, South Africa &
Posts: 27,423
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
What do you all think about our breakfast cereals? Fun stuff like Lucky Charms and Fruit Loops, etc.
I greatly prefer our local (and much less sweet) cereals like Weet-Bix (an Australian version of Shredded Wheat) or ProNutro. One of my kids, though, is all about the Coco Pops (that's be your Cocoa Krispies). But that's made locally.
  #42  
Old 02-12-2020, 03:35 PM
squidfood is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 496
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
What do you all think about our breakfast cereals? Fun stuff like Lucky Charms and Fruit Loops, etc.
The version of Cheerios sold in the UK is sweetened (a light frosting I think), and tastes terrible if you're used to the standard US very unsweet version. After being burned by this on one UK trip (Cheerios being the go-to travel satisfaction for fussy toddlers), on the next trip we brought boxes from the US. Our UK relatives said "wow, we thought all American cereals were grossly sweet". I suppose anyone who buys Cheerios in the UK expects a sweetened experience from every US cereal or something.
  #43  
Old 02-11-2020, 04:22 PM
MacSpon is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,093
Books. There are many US authors whose writing I treasure.

(The question of where they're printed might be relevant to some people, but nowadays I only buy ebooks, so it's not an issue for me.)
  #44  
Old 02-11-2020, 10:38 PM
Tim@T-Bonham.net is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 15,218
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacSpon View Post
Books. There are many US authors whose writing I treasure.

(The question of where they're printed might be relevant to some people, but nowadays I only buy ebooks, so it's not an issue for me.)
Seems to be true for a lot of creative-type items.
- books, as mentioned.
- movies.
- movies & TV shows.
- software.

But fewer & fewer in the hard goods categories.
  #45  
Old 02-11-2020, 04:55 PM
Dewey Finn is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 29,875
I have a cousin who imports stuff made in China and he claimed that the factories rate goods and based on that, they get sent to different destinations. According to him, the first-rate goods go to the US, second-rate goods go to Europe and third-rate goods stay in China (and may perhaps be sold in places like Africa or India; I can't remember what he said). No idea if this is true, but it might explain why someone would buy something in the US that was produced in China.
  #46  
Old 02-11-2020, 05:12 PM
Alpha Twit's Avatar
Alpha Twit is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Somewhere south of normal
Posts: 2,601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey Finn View Post
I have a cousin who imports stuff made in China and he claimed that the factories rate goods and based on that, they get sent to different destinations. According to him, the first-rate goods go to the US, second-rate goods go to Europe and third-rate goods stay in China (and may perhaps be sold in places like Africa or India; I can't remember what he said). No idea if this is true, but it might explain why someone would buy something in the US that was produced in China.
And this relates to my query about how consumer products manufactured in the U.S.A.are perceived by international consumers....how?
__________________
There's plenty few problems in this life that can't be helped by a good day's work, a good night's sleep and a few swift kicks in the right asses.
  #47  
Old 02-13-2020, 04:11 PM
Brayne Ded is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Europe
Posts: 553
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey Finn View Post
I have a cousin who imports stuff made in China and he claimed that the factories rate goods and based on that, they get sent to different destinations. According to him, the first-rate goods go to the US, second-rate goods go to Europe and third-rate goods stay in China (and may perhaps be sold in places like Africa or India; I can't remember what he said). No idea if this is true, but it might explain why someone would buy something in the US that was produced in China.
Europe has at least two distinct markets: the best, and the bargain. German has both, eastern Europe tends to go for the cheap, but things are changing slowly.
  #48  
Old 02-11-2020, 05:03 PM
zoid's Avatar
zoid is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Chicago Il
Posts: 10,446
My female relatives who do not reside in the USA absolutely go crazy for American cosmetics. They bring extra suitcases to fill for the return trip.
  #49  
Old 02-11-2020, 05:31 PM
Treppenwitz is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: UK
Posts: 1,266
Anything purporting to be an American IPA and Samuel Adams Boston Lager specifically (I mean actually American rather than American Style, obviously).

Some of this (Sam Adams is the example I had in mind) is now Brewed under licence in the UK (god, don't you hate those words?) so I check the fine print on every bottle I pick up, just in case more brands have done the same. I'm not sure you can get proper American Sam Adams in this country any more. As you might imagine, UK-brewed is a pale imitation.

(Did you see what I did there?)

j

Last edited by Treppenwitz; 02-11-2020 at 05:33 PM.
  #50  
Old 02-11-2020, 05:43 PM
Treppenwitz is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: UK
Posts: 1,266
Here's a post for two threads. When I was a kid my dad told me that the Japanese built a city called Usa, so that they could label stuff produced there as Made In USA. As the link indicates, not true (though in this case I suspect my father may have believed it himself.)

j

Last edited by Treppenwitz; 02-11-2020 at 05:44 PM.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:22 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2019 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017