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  #51  
Old 12-16-2019, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by SykoSkotty View Post
Greatest rock and roll concert I ever saw was KISS on the 1996 reunion tour. I'd never seen KISS in full makeup prior to that, but spent most of my youth staring at magazines with their photos in them, and buying KISS trading cards.
I saw them on the Destroyer Tour in '76, bought my ticket on the day of the show and got 12th row center. Bob Seger opened, a great, great show!
  #52  
Old 12-16-2019, 11:09 AM
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In personal order of preference:

Talking Heads at Red Rocks outside Denver, August 1983, during the Stop Making Sense tour

Fleetwood Mac, University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown (PA), Oct 1975

The Who, Pittsburgh Civic Arena, Dec 1979: I've mentioned elsewhere that this was the night before the infamous Cincinnati show.
  #53  
Old 12-16-2019, 11:27 AM
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I think it was 1991, 4th of July, the city of Dallas decided to do more than just fireworks at the Cotton Bowl/Fair Park. Not sure why. So in addition to fireworks, they added a Cotton Bowl concert by Cheap Trick and Styx.

But in the afternoon before the concert, they opened the fairgrounds and had a second stage with several artists, including Joe Walsh and Bruce Hornsby. And a third stage with local acts that hadn't hit it big, I recall the Dixie Chicks being on that stage.

Free admission, I think I paid $10 for parking, plus whatever concessions cost at the time.
  #54  
Old 12-16-2019, 12:12 PM
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Even Woodstock wasn't at Woodstock.

Boy howdy but isn’t that a t-shirt?? I used to live in Monroe, NY. That’s far southern Orange County. Exit off of the NYS Thruway onto Rf 17 heading up into the Catskills; that’s about the 2nd exit up.

Everyone who drove that far passed that exit. I lived there for 15 years, and damned if I didn’t meet quite a few folks older than me ( I’m 57 ) who said they’d gone up to White Lake for the show. Turned out quite of few of them were telling the truth as well !!

Some interesting stories. Turns out that left to their own devices, and with some serious planning ( not all of which crashed and burned ), 400,000 young people were perfectly capable of caring for one another, lining up for food, enjoying music, doing some non-lethal drugs and leaving and getting themselves home.

My favorite show? I’m a Prog Rock fan, and so here goes:
Hands down, Anderson Rabin & Wakeman, 2016. Beacon Theater, NYC
ABWH ( an iteration of YES ), 1990, NY.
Billy Joel, The Spectrum in Philly, 1982.





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  #55  
Old 12-16-2019, 12:13 PM
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Roger Waters - Dark Side of the Moon
  #56  
Old 12-16-2019, 01:45 PM
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I saw the London side of the Live Aid concert in 1985. What a lineup!
  • Paul McCartney
  • Elton John
  • The Who
  • David Bowie
  • Queen
  • Dire Straits (with Sting wanting his MTV)
  • U2
  • Bryan Ferry (with David Gilmore)
  • Sting
  • Phil Collins
  • Elvis Costello
All on one glorious day!
  #57  
Old 12-16-2019, 02:09 PM
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Caljam II-Ontario Motor Speedway, March 18th '78.
Aerosmith, Foreigner, Heart, Mahogany Rush, Dave Mason, Jean-Michel Jarre, Rubicon, Santana, Bob Welch and Ted Nugent. I was in the U.S.A.F. at March AFB and my good buddy David scored a couple of tickets, so I grabbed a helmet and hopped onto the back of his KZ-650 and joined over 350,000 fans for one hell of a concert.
  #58  
Old 12-16-2019, 02:33 PM
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California Jam, 1974 at Ontario Motor Speedway.
In order of appearance:

Rare Earth
Earth, Wind & Fire
Eagles
Seals and Crofts
Black Oak Arkansas
Black Sabbath
Deep Purple
Emerson, Lake & Palmer

A close runner up was The Who at Angel Stadium in 1976.
  #59  
Old 12-16-2019, 03:57 PM
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[b]jaycat[b], I guess we saw the Stones on the same “Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out” tour. I saw them in October 1969, with Chuck Berry as the opening act. That’s still the greatest rock concert I ever saw, largely because it was the first time I heard “Midnight Rambler.” The “Let It Bleed” album hadn’t been released.

Seeing David Bowie on his “Ziggy Stardust” tour in the spring of ‘73 at War Memorial Auditorium in Nashville is a close second.

Other memorable acts were The Who in 1970 around the time of the release of “Live at Leeds” and again in ‘72 after the release of “Who’s Next.”

And, of course, the Atlanta Pop Festival in 1969, about a month and a half before Woodstock. Blood, Sweat & Tears, Booker T & The M.G.’s, Canned Heat, Chicago Transit Authority, Joe Cocker, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin, Led Zeppelin, Spirit, Johnny Winter, and a bunch of others I don’t remember!
  #60  
Old 12-16-2019, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by SykoSkotty View Post
The Becker benefit sounds like it was beyond amazing, wish I could've seen that, or at least, I wish there was a live CD.
How about a fan shot video of the headliners? Shot from the balcony with the very best of 1996 technology. VHS quality and the sound sucks, but believe me, it was much better live.

https://youtu.be/1soUOPKMYpM
  #61  
Old 12-16-2019, 05:59 PM
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The best concert I ever saw was Sugar and Magnapop in 1994.

They played at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa...
I was at that show! By the end, there was hardly anyone there.

I'm going to go with The Hold Steady/Drive-By Truckers double bill at First Avenue, Minneapolis. 11/2008.

Hmmm...maybe Nirvana at Palmer Auditorium, Davenport, IA. 10/1993.
  #62  
Old 12-16-2019, 06:16 PM
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All but one Boston area, no special order.

Iggy Pop, Harvard Square Theater 1976 shortly before releasing The Idiot. He was more of a rumor than a known quantity at the time, but what a slam-bang show that was. (David Bowie was in the band; didn't matter, it was all about Iggy.)

The Kinks. Saw several times but the one I remember was at Providence Civic Center 1981, their last number was "Twist and Shout", I did and I did.

Flamin' Groovies, Paradise 1978 or 9. They brought their Mod threads and were everything I wanted them to be.

The Cramps, Channel. Lux Interior was one of the few performers who scared me.

The Damned, Channel. Capt. Sensible came out buck naked for the encore. That was weird.

Ramones, the Rat 1977. They didn't use the club's colored lights but brought their own, which was just a bar with four powerful white bulbs glaring at them - perfect for the music.

Barry and the Remains, 1975 at the Jazz Workshop (which wasn't strictly jazz by then) opening for Ian Matthews in front of a dozen people. It was one of their early reunion attempts, and I was astonished that anyone could play that sort of pop and do it brilliantly.

And... any band that invited people up on stage to jump around - Patti Smith, Mo-Dettes, Boomtown Rats ("Do the Rat" - we tried!), etc.
  #63  
Old 12-16-2019, 06:23 PM
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Not the greatest sound (you couldn't even hear them!) but seeing The Beatles in the summer of 1966 was special.
Beatles, summer 65, was definitely the most "special" concert I ever attended. (It was also my first concert at age 14.) And as I've said before, I could hear them well enough to actually enjoy the music.

But as I voted upthread, of all my lifetime events, the greatest" "rock" concert in terms of both quality of the material and the performances was ELP summer '74.
  #64  
Old 12-16-2019, 06:25 PM
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[b]jaycat[b], I guess we saw the Stones on the same “Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out” tour. I saw them in October 1969, with Chuck Berry as the opening act. That’s still the greatest rock concert I ever saw, largely because it was the first time I heard “Midnight Rambler.” The “Let It Bleed” album hadn’t been released.
The funny thing is, the only reason I went was that my high school buddy had bought two tickets, assuming it would be no problem to get a date to see the Stones. He couldn't though, and I bought his $7.50 ticket off him for $5!

Forgot to mention.. I also saw Gram Parsons and the Fallen Angels at Oliver's in Kenmore Square, Boston, in 1973. With Emmylou Harris. Two nights in a row.
  #65  
Old 12-16-2019, 07:08 PM
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Woodstock. 1969. Sly and the Family Stone. Arlo Guthrie. Crosby Stills Nash and Young. Jefferson Airplane. The Who. Sha Na Na. Jimi Hendrix. The most memorable to me, among just a few others.
This. Wish I could remember more.
  #66  
Old 12-16-2019, 07:20 PM
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Epitaph Summer Nationals 1994. A punk rock extravaganza!!!

I was there for 2 of the 3 nights at the Palladium in Hollywood.

We saw GasHuffer, Down by Law, Clawhammer, Joykiller, The Offspring, NOFX and Bad Religion and more.
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  #67  
Old 12-16-2019, 07:29 PM
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Bruce Springsteen 9-3-78. Saginaw Civic Arena.

And look what I found:

https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/bruce...-6bd7ae86.html

Second spot: Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band-One of the two shows that were recorded for the Live Bullet album.
  #68  
Old 12-16-2019, 07:41 PM
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Originally Posted by E-DUB View Post
Bruce Springsteen 9-3-78. Saginaw Civic Arena.

And look what I found:

https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/bruce...-6bd7ae86.html

Second spot: Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band-One of the two shows that were recorded for the Live Bullet album.
That is a great site. You can replay an entire concert. Sometimes they have recordings of songs from the actual show.

Would have loved to have seen Bruce in 1978.
  #69  
Old 12-17-2019, 12:55 AM
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I haven't been to a lot of concerts, but the one that stands out in my mind is Neil Diamond, in the early 1990s. The man wrote about half the great rock songs. And although he wasn't young any more, he worked really really hard to put on a good show.

Last edited by Rocketeer; 12-17-2019 at 12:55 AM.
  #70  
Old 12-17-2019, 03:09 AM
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Perhaps the OP should have said "what really cool concerts have you seen that you'd like to brag about?"

Jesus.
  #71  
Old 12-17-2019, 08:50 AM
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Best concert because of music, sound, etc.? Clearly Pink Floyd at the Muengersdorfer Stadion in Cologne, Germany 1989. Still and up to today the best sound I've ever heard, incredible acoustic pressure waves rolling through the stadium without any hurt to the ears. The start alone with "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" brought us to our knees.


Best concert with regard to feeling, closeness to the artists, etc.? Bob Marley & The Wailers, Waldbuehne, Berlin 1980. Partially perhaps also in hindsight as this was the penultimate concert before Bob's untimely death. We were sitting at the bottom of the amphitheater, just 3 meters away from the stage, watching the band circling giant spliffs and enjoying our own while being absolutely immersed in Reggae. Unforgettable.
  #72  
Old 12-17-2019, 12:47 PM
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1976 Philadelphia's JFK stadium 130,000 plus in the crowd. Among others: Gary Wright, Peter Frampton and Yes. All were at the top of their respective games. Blistering hot day and pretty cold night. People were setting fires to keep warm and catching the tar covered bleachers on fire. All the smoke helped with the Yes laser show (lasers were still a pretty new thing at concerts).
  #73  
Old 12-17-2019, 07:40 PM
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Perhaps the OP should have said "what really cool concerts have you seen that you'd like to brag about?"

Jesus.
Well, of course.

I think the older folk here who were part of an amazing music scene (and an amazing time!) deserve to tell their stories.

Like the t-shirt says (saw this at Summerfest, on a grey-haired hippie):

I might be old
but I saw all the cool bands
  #74  
Old 12-17-2019, 09:28 PM
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Perhaps the OP should have said "what really cool concerts have you seen that you'd like to brag about?"

Jesus.
Yes, that is essentially the thread.

You know, for me it's really, really hard to think of a particular one. I don't like big stadium shows; I mean, I've been to big music festivals, even multi-day ones where I may have spent 48 hours on location drunkenly stumbling from one show to the next, but those big shows never left much of an impression on me.

Pearl Jam in Budapest in 1996 was a memorable one. I wasn't even much of a Pearl Jam fan, but we came up from Croatia to see them perform at a basketball stadium in Budapest. There were only maybe a couple thousand people there. We were easily able to get to the very front of the stage when we wanted to, and Eddie and the crew put on an absolutely energetic and spirited performance. I was impressed, though not enough to actually buy any of their albums, I guess. The opening band were the Fastbacks from Seattle, and two years later when I moved to Budapest, I became good friends with one of their drummers who had moved to Hungary from Seattle, and we ended up playing, recording, and touring together in a local indie rock band. Just a really weird, odd coincidence that I didn't put together until I came across the ticket stub from that show.
  #75  
Old 12-17-2019, 09:37 PM
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Oh, actually I thought of a legit one. I was visiting cousins in Australia in 1993 and happened to be there when Midnight Oil was coming through town. Saw them perform at Hobart City Hall in Tasmania (about a 1300 capacity venue.) They thoroughly rocked the joint.
  #76  
Old 12-18-2019, 02:59 AM
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I quite like Midnight Oil.
  #77  
Old 12-18-2019, 04:18 AM
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I saw the Oils plenty of times at various pubs around Sydney including, of course, the Royal Antler at Narrabeen.

I saw Eric Clapton do a "private" warm up gig at Hemel Hempstead in front of a very small crowd in 1976. It was unusual to be able to walk to the bar, buy a drink and walk back, only yards away from Clapton.

Probably the most memorable concert I have seen was Led Zeppelin at Sydney Showground in Summer 1972. The crowd rushed the stage area to get closer and security could do nothing to stop us. In fact people without tickets climbed the fence to get in. Page told the crowd to stay behind the stage barriers and sit down. So they did. The band played for nearly 3 hours.
  #78  
Old 12-18-2019, 06:29 AM
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Pink Floyd performing The Wall at Earls Court, London in 1981. It was the week of my 17th birthday.

Thirty years later I went with the same friend to the O2 to see Roger Waters do The Wall. We picked the night that David Gilmour turned up to do Comfortably Numb.

But if there's one night I would love to relive it was November 2001 when I went along to a small club in Edinburgh to see this duo that had been causing a stir in the music press. That was my first exposure to the genius of Jack White. I've seen him another twenty times since.

If that is just using this thread to brag about being at cool gigs, so be it.
  #79  
Old 12-18-2019, 02:01 PM
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The greatest musically would have to be The Police during the Synchronicity Tour in 84. I was blown away at how this incredible music was coming from just 3 guys. It was perfect.

The greatest experience would be Yes doing the entire Tales from Topographic Oceans album in 1974. It was a general admission show and we waited all day to get in first. We were right in front of the band, tripping our asses off and, amazingly, I do remember a lot of it.
  #80  
Old 12-18-2019, 08:22 PM
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I saw the London side of the Live Aid concert in 1985. What a lineup!
  • Paul McCartney
  • Elton John
  • The Who
  • David Bowie
  • Queen
  • Dire Straits (with Sting wanting his MTV)
  • U2
  • Bryan Ferry (with David Gilmore)
  • Sting
  • Phil Collins
  • Elvis Costello
All on one glorious day!
Oh my LORD I'm jealous !! That show was just stunning on so many levels. ( Also, killer Member name ) I grew up in the suburbs of Philadelphia. Wish I'd been able to get to JFK to see the US half of that show !

This was hands down the most disturbing concert I've ever attended. I shot it. And about 2/3 of the way through, Patti Smith called me out between songs for blocking people's view and basically ruining their experience. It was awful. ( I was there to do my job, and I was always moving so I really wasn't blocking anyone for more than a second or two. )
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Old 12-18-2019, 09:00 PM
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Kate Bush Before The Dawn, September 2nd, 2014.

And this is after a life of seeing great concerts. Nothing compares to what Kate created that night.
  #82  
Old 12-19-2019, 12:33 PM
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For pure density-of-coolness, the triple bill of Pixies, Primus, Jane's Addiction was hard to beat. All bands were on peak performance form as well.
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  #83  
Old 12-20-2019, 08:20 AM
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I don't know that this is the GREATEST concert I ever saw, but it's one of my favorite memories. To me, concerts are as much about the company, and circumstances, as the music.


May 31st, 1994 was an uncharacteristically hot day for the time of year in Pittsburgh. At the time I was working stock at a big-box discount store called Phar-Mor, and I had an early shift. It was a good day, as I recall: no problems, just steady work that made the day pass quickly. At 3PM, I clocked out and walked out from the fluorescent lighting and air-conditioning into the blazing heat of the day, blinking as I went. No particular plans for the day, but glad to be free of further obligations for the moment.

As I crossed the parking lot to my car, I saw someone approaching me in a purposeful manner. I was a little wary, but as he approached, I recognized my best friend from high school, Kev. When we had graduated, he had gone to Boston to attend the Berkelee School of Music. When he quit after a couple years (in the great Berkelee tradition), he continued to live there, and so I only saw him two or three times a year. He hadn't told me he'd be in town, so the day took a sudden, unexpected upturn.

After the startled, excited greetings were out of the way, he asked me what I was doing that night. I said,"I dunno. Take a shower, watch TV I guess." He said, "No. You and I are going to see Pink Floyd tonight!"

Now, I was, and still am, a huge Floyd fan, and I'd never seen them live. My friend and I had a tradition of seeing concerts whenever he was in town - BB King, Bonnie Raitt, The Fabulous Thunderbirds, Dr. John, Roy Buchanan, some of the better local bands, etc - and now Pink Floyd. The day had gone from just another workday to BEST. DAY. EVER. So I went home, showered, grabbed some food out of the fridge to fill the hole, then headed out to meet with Kev.

The tickets were a gift from his fairly well-off stepfather, and came with the stipulation that we had to take his two, mid-teens cousins with us, as they were also in town visiting. Oh well. The "boy", as it turned out, was 15, about 6'5" 250 lbs, somewhat rowdy, dumb as a box of hair, and without redirection seemed capable of making poor life decisions in an instant. The girl was a year older and dangerously attractive, but she seemed better equipped to navigate the world safely than her brother, so that moderated my concerns about looking out for her during our outing. Both, of course, came with the instructions that they return home in the same condition that they left.

In the interest of alleviating any anxiety, I'll disclose at this point that neither of the cousins were much of a problem. Both mostly behaved themselves, though the boy did require some redirection periodically. They don't feature much in the rest of the story, but they were there, and it was their first concert, so good for them, huh?


We parked in a garage downtown. It was a hot, beautiful evening, and the sun hung low as we enjoyed a breezy walk across the bridge to Three Rivers Stadium. As we walked, the vocalists rehearsing, "The Great Gig in the Sky" floated across the water to us, scoring the moment like a soundtrack. The stadium wasn't the best place to see or hear a concert, but it was what we had, and besides, we'd heard that Floyd worked hard to get the best sound from a venue. We got our tickets torn and headed up to the outfield seats. Oh well. Seeing Floyd from the outfield at Three Rivers is still seeing Floyd.

We baked in the uncomfortable, too small and too-close-together stadium seats, fielded concert/band questions from the cousins, and caught up as the sun began to set below the confines of big cement ashtray that was Three Rivers Stadium. There was no opening act. When the show finally started, the visuals were more than I'd ever experienced. Quite a spectacle, with the circular screen behind the band playing snippets of video, the flashing, rotating lights, the lasers, and the iconic, giant inflatable pig flying out over the audience. The 10x binoculars I'd brought helped with seeing the stage itself.

The first part of the show was kind of a sonic wall. It consisted of a lot of the newer material I was unfamiliar with. That, coupled with the relatively poor sound that the stadium allowed made it difficult for me to make out much detail. Damn, I wish Floyd played smaller venues, like Star Lake amphitheater . A little before the scheduled end of the first set, the power went out in the stadium. GAH!

After about 30-45 minutes of sitting around, hoping it was something they could fix in time, and worrying that it wasn't, the power came back, and the second set began. They started in with older, more familiar material that I could better follow. They ripped out a blistering version of, "One of These Days", which, in a darkened, echoey stadium, was far more ominous, eerie, and kick-ass then it is when listening at home. They then launched into most of, "The Dark Side of the Moon", with some cuts from, "Wish You Were Here" and, "The Wall." "The Great Gig in the Sky" fulfilled the promise it made on the trip across the bridge - just unearthly.

After the encore, which was, "Run Like Hell", and "Comfortably Numb", we filed out of the stadium and across the bridge with hundreds or thousands of other concert-goers, all of us still floating on the music high (and of course, for many others, the usual concert enhancements). I don't really recall the rest of the night. We corralled the cousins and got them across the bridge despite their post-concert excitement, everyone got home, and that's the end of that.

It's still one of my favorite memories: Seeing a friend I hadn't seen, nor had expected to see, for months, and suddenly a normal workday turns into the day I saw Pink Floyd. I've had few days in my life turn around that well, that fast.
  #84  
Old 12-23-2019, 07:06 AM
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I think it was the same tour when I saw Pink Floyd (for the one and only time) in Philly. That's actually the first concert that came to mind when I read the OP. The disco ball thing that opened up as it lifted high above the stage during Comfortably Numb was friggin' awesome. As was the entire show.
  #85  
Old 12-23-2019, 01:32 PM
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I think it was the same tour when I saw Pink Floyd (for the one and only time) in Philly. That's actually the first concert that came to mind when I read the OP. The disco ball thing that opened up as it lifted high above the stage during Comfortably Numb was friggin' awesome. As was the entire show.


Cool, that was just 2 days after the concert I saw. Wow, Veteran's Stadium holds 3x the people and you had 3 concerts, we just had the one. What was it like seeing Floyd in a stadium that huge? How was the sound?
  #86  
Old 12-23-2019, 01:50 PM
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...The disco ball thing that opened up as it lifted high above the stage during Comfortably Numb was friggin' awesome...
One of my guilty pleasures is watching reaction/first listen videos on youtube. The other day I watched a bunch of people reacting to the Pulse version of Comfortably Numb and the overwhelming response was one of awe. Some listeners were even brought to tears by the emotion in Dave's solo.
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Old 12-23-2019, 03:04 PM
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One of my guilty pleasures is watching reaction/first listen videos on youtube. The other day I watched a bunch of people reacting to the Pulse version of Comfortably Numb and the overwhelming response was one of awe. Some listeners were even brought to tears by the emotion in Dave's solo.
I've seen some. Do you know any that aren't pretty obvious BS/clickbait made to attract fans who love the material, who want to see others like what they like?

It stretches credibility when 30-year-old Americans claim to hear Bohemian Rhapsody for the first time. . .but actually getting first-listen reactions to material would be cool.
  #88  
Old 12-23-2019, 03:33 PM
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Hmmm (don't want to hijack the thread, but...) I can't speak for the click-bait-y-ness of the videos (I just searched youtube for "reaction Comfortably Numb Pulse") but the reactions I watched seemed pretty genuine for the most part. Of course, like anything else on youtube, there's a lot of chaff sprinkled throughout the video wheat.
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Old 12-23-2019, 03:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Face Intentionally Left Blank View Post
I've seen some. Do you know any that aren't pretty obvious BS/clickbait made to attract fans who love the material, who want to see others like what they like?
There's an Indian couple who do a pretty good reaction channel called Enoma. It's clear that a lot of stuff is genuinely new to them, and they tend to be a bit more eclectic that some of the other channels. In the past few days they've done Phil Collins, Tim Buckley, Staind, Andy Williams and Mazzy Star - so it's not just generic shouty metal like a few of the others.

Last edited by Baron Greenback; 12-23-2019 at 03:53 PM.
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Old 12-23-2019, 05:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blondebear View Post
Hmmm (don't want to hijack the thread, but...) I can't speak for the click-bait-y-ness of the videos (I just searched youtube for "reaction Comfortably Numb Pulse") but the reactions I watched seemed pretty genuine for the most part. Of course, like anything else on youtube, there's a lot of chaff sprinkled throughout the video wheat.
That's fair, thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron Greenback View Post
There's an Indian couple who do a pretty good reaction channel called Enoma. It's clear that a lot of stuff is genuinely new to them, and they tend to be a bit more eclectic that some of the other channels. In the past few days they've done Phil Collins, Tim Buckley, Staind, Andy Williams and Mazzy Star - so it's not just generic shouty metal like a few of the others.
I'll look in to that, thank you. As they are from a different culture listening to Western music, it seems easier for them to have avoided wildly popular songs.
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