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Old 01-20-2020, 06:22 AM
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Is "Home Team/Home Advantage' a phrase used in US sports?


I work for an ad agency, and my boss has, what I think, is a mediocre idea for an iconic US brand we're working on, based around sporting analogies. (It's hard to explain, and I won't mention the brand).

Anyway, it relies on the sporting concept of the 'Home Team' - the idea that by playing at your home stadium you have 'Home Advantage' or 'Home Gain'.

These are phrases used frequently in British sports such as rugby, cricket and soccer to suggest that playing home, you have a better chance, but is this a thing in the US?

Don't want to take this idea forward if our US Clients are going to look at us like we're going mad.
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Old 01-20-2020, 06:25 AM
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Yes. It's definitely a familiar phrase here.

eTA: I hear Home Team Advantage the most. Sometimes Home Stadium Advantage.

Last edited by kitap; 01-20-2020 at 06:27 AM.
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Old 01-20-2020, 06:28 AM
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I'm certainly familiar with the phrase and concept. In my experience though, it's not something that's taken very seriously. Mostly it's mentioned as an excuse to justify a visiting team's loss. "We were playing them on their own field. Back home we would have beaten them easily." sort of thing.
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Old 01-20-2020, 06:30 AM
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I think it is a fairly universal concept, home advantage.
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Old 01-20-2020, 06:48 AM
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That's good to know, thank you.
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Old 01-20-2020, 06:51 AM
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Old 01-20-2020, 06:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpha Twit View Post
I'm certainly familiar with the phrase and concept. In my experience though, it's not something that's taken very seriously. Mostly it's mentioned as an excuse to justify a visiting team's loss. "We were playing them on their own field. Back home we would have beaten them easily." sort of thing.
Home advantage is well established and is taken very seriously in most sports. The extent of home advantage varies from 53% in major league baseball to 58% in major league basketball. Teams will go to a great deal of effort to try to secure home field advantage in playoff series, and it is factored in by Las Vegas oddsmakers.

Last edited by Colibri; 01-20-2020 at 06:57 AM.
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Old 01-20-2020, 06:57 AM
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Sports commentators frequently talk about teams' "home and away" records, so yes, it's a common concept. Although in the US, it's usually phrased "home field advantage".
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Old 01-20-2020, 07:29 AM
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NHL has different rules for player changes. If there is a stoppage, the home team gets to change players after they see who the visiting team sends out. Of course both teams can change players during the action at any time.
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Old 01-20-2020, 07:35 AM
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I'm certainly familiar with the phrase and concept. In my experience though, it's not something that's taken very seriously. Mostly it's mentioned as an excuse to justify a visiting team's loss. "We were playing them on their own field. Back home we would have beaten them easily." sort of thing.
In the NFL it's definitely a thing. The crowd noise can certainly affect the visiting QB's instructions and snap count. Seattle holds the stadium noise record at about 138dB.

According to the team's website, the Seahawks lead the NFL in opponent false start penalties since 2005, and last year no team had a larger difference in opponent false start penalties generated at home (12) versus on the road (5).
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Old 01-20-2020, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by SanVito View Post
I work for an ad agency, and my boss has, what I think, is a mediocre idea for an iconic US brand we're working on, based around sporting analogies. (It's hard to explain, and I won't mention the brand).

Anyway, it relies on the sporting concept of the 'Home Team' - the idea that by playing at your home stadium you have 'Home Advantage' or 'Home Gain'.

These are phrases used frequently in British sports such as rugby, cricket and soccer to suggest that playing home, you have a better chance, but is this a thing in the US?

Don't want to take this idea forward if our US Clients are going to look at us like we're going mad.
It's most commonly phrased "home field advantage". "Home advantage" or "home team advantage" would sound odd to US ears.

Last edited by Tom Scud; 01-20-2020 at 08:20 AM.
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Old 01-20-2020, 08:24 AM
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In baseball, the home team gets to bat last and can win a game without actually finishing the final inning (which isn't even played if they're ahead).
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Old 01-20-2020, 08:24 AM
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It's most commonly phrased "home field advantage". "Home advantage" or "home team advantage" would sound odd to US ears.
I've heard "home team advantage" enough to disagree that it sounds odd. It's used as a more generic term, without having to change the noun when the sport isn't played on a field, e.g. "home court advantage" for basketball.

Last edited by BigT; 01-20-2020 at 08:26 AM.
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Old 01-20-2020, 09:37 AM
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It's most commonly phrased "home field advantage". "Home advantage" or "home team advantage" would sound odd to US ears.
Not for the NBA or NHL, which don't play on fields. (Home-court and home-ice may be used instead.) But "home advantage" is perfectly common in the US.
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Old 01-20-2020, 10:29 AM
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A data point of one, here, but "home advantage" sounds a bit formal (for an ad) to my American ears, as though the concept itself were being discussed. I usually hear it expressed as "home+playing surface (field, court, ice)+advantage".

I suppose, though, it depends on the audience. San Vito, is the ad you're working on going to run in the U.S. or the U.K.? If it were for a British audience, I'd think you'd want the Briticism.
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Old 01-20-2020, 11:32 AM
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Not for the NBA or NHL, which don't play on fields. (Home-court and home-ice may be used instead.) But "home advantage" is perfectly common in the US.
I think, but I'm not sure, that I've never heard "home advantage" in the US. It's always home field advantage, home court advantage, or home ice advantage when I've heard it.
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Old 01-20-2020, 11:45 AM
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I've always heard "home field / ice / court," never just "home advantage."
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Old 01-20-2020, 12:45 PM
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Baseball has the odd situation in the world series , if the AL team is playing at home both teams use the DH but if the NL team is home they don't. Also true for interleague regular season games.

Of course having 2 sets of rules in 1 pro sport is dumb. Especially now when interleague play is all through the regular season.
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Old 01-20-2020, 01:21 PM
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Most commonly "Home Field Advantage". If the ad isn't about a specific sport, and just Home Advantage in general, then call it Home Field Advantage. I'm with the group of Dopers here who say that "Home Advantage" just doesn't sound right. It would be understood, but it would feel "off".
Home Court Advantage or Home Ice Advantage or whatever else would be great for those specific sports. But if it's a generic concept, use Home Field Advantage.
Growing up, I played organized football for 11 years, and baseball for 8. I never once heard someone say "Home Advantage" as opposed to "Home Field Advantage". And that's saying something, considering the former is shorter. You'd think we would have used the shorter phrasing. In fact, this thread might be the first time I've ever heard it referred to simply as "Home Advantage" without "field, court, ice, etc." in there.
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Old 01-20-2020, 01:40 PM
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This has been very useful. I have woven ‘home field advantage’ into the narrative. Thank you!


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Old 01-20-2020, 01:51 PM
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I think home team advantage is bigger for some college teams than any pro team. For example Duke BB has an old small arena that is always packed with plenty of loud students. It only holds 9k. Of course it helps they pretty much always have a top 10 team.
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Old 01-20-2020, 02:05 PM
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I've always heard "home field" and "home court" advantage, for football/baseball and basketball. I have not commonly heard "home advantage" or "home team advantage". I am a big football fan and probably watch over 30 football games each year on TV, and an occasional baseball/basketball fan; maybe a few games a year.
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Old 01-20-2020, 03:48 PM
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I've always heard "home field" and "home court" advantage, for football/baseball and basketball. I have not commonly heard "home advantage" or "home team advantage". I am a big football fan and probably watch over 30 football games each year on TV, and an occasional baseball/basketball fan; maybe a few games a year.
All of that is true for me as well. Home field/court.
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Old 01-20-2020, 06:12 PM
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Tangentially on this subject, one might remember the recent historic 2019 World Series between the Washington Nationals and the Houston Astros where, being the exception to prove the rule, for the first time in the history of the Series including the analogous basketball and hockey championships, the visiting team won ALL SEVEN games, coming from behind in the final game for a surprise victory to win the game and the Series.

They'll be discussing this in the Baseball History books for some time to come!
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Old 01-20-2020, 06:29 PM
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Another vote for "home _____ advantage," where the blank can be filled with field, court, or ice, as appropriate for the sport.

"Home advantage" or "home team advantage" would be understood in North America, but somehow doesn't sound right.
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Old 01-20-2020, 07:51 PM
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Interstingly, there have been two World SEries where the home team won all sedven games - and the Minnesota Twins won both Series. In 1987 they beat St. Louis 4-3, winning all four games in Minneapolis and losing all three in St. Louis. In 1991 they beat Atlanta 4-3, same pattern.

By random chance, this should happen roughly once every 75 years or so, so the Twins defied the odds, but I guess over the course of 115 World Series it's about what you would expect.
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Old 01-20-2020, 08:18 PM
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In the NFL it's definitely a thing. The crowd noise can certainly affect the visiting QB's instructions and snap count. Seattle holds the stadium noise record at about 138dB.
According to Guinness, that record was broken at Arrowhead Stadium in KC in 2014 during a Monday Night Football game. 142.2 decibels. (I was there.)

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Old 01-20-2020, 09:04 PM
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"Home team" is very common, and so is its counterpart, "visiting team."

"Home team advantage" is a fairly common phrase, but not "home advantage" or "home gain."
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Old 01-20-2020, 09:11 PM
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"Home team advantage" is a fairly common phrase
No, it's not. As others have stated upthread, it's 'home court advantage' or 'home field advantage'.
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Old 01-20-2020, 09:17 PM
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No, it's not. As others have stated upthread, it's 'home court advantage' or 'home field advantage'.
There's more than one post upthread that disagree with you.
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Old 01-20-2020, 09:55 PM
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I think I would normally say home team advantage, but usage may well be regional. Home gain, or any variation on that would not be understood.

Interestingly the Times had an article on the decline of home <whatever> advantage just a few days ago (maybe Saturday) and they mentioned that in football, it dropped significantly after the introduction of replay reviews. That must say something about the refereeing. It dropped, IIRC from 58% to 53%.

It should be noted that baseball has a natural home advantage. A team losing in the bottom of the ninth (or extra) inning knows whether it has to play a one-run strategy or must try for multiples. And in a tie game they need only one run. But the real advantage is that playing fields, unlike any other sport I can think of, are not standardized. And they all have places with funny shapes or that give funny bounces and the home players simply learn more about their home field than any other stadium they play in.
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Old 01-20-2020, 10:12 PM
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Agree that "home field/court advantage" is common here, "home team advantage" is less so but recognizable and not weird, but other variations such as "home advantage" sound odd. The first of those three phrases is so recognizable that my brain would fill in "field" etc. and I'd get the reference if an ad mentioned something like "home office advantage."

Just as a general thing: Americans are a diverse group. I'm from California and fully 75% of my countrymen say things that sound as strange to me as anything to fall from the lips of a Brit. Seriously, Southerners, stop calling every carbonated beverage a "Coke." WTactualF.
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Old 01-20-2020, 10:25 PM
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Like spoons said, 'home team advantage' just doesn't sound right. I really don't think I've heard it very much. Certainly not nearly as much as 'home court advantage' or 'home field advantage'.

Compare these two statements:

a. Arrowhead Stadium gives the Chiefs a tremendous home field advantage.

b. Arrowhead Stadium gives the Chiefs a tremendous home team advantage.

To me, statement 'a' sounds right, and statement 'b' doesn't really make sense.
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